Page 1

Annual Report 2016 - 2017


Contents

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS & REPORTS YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017

2016-2017 at a glance

1

Report of the Chair

2

Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW ABN: 98 138 078 092 CFN: 21153 (A company limited by guarantee)

Report of the Commissioner

6

Operations

10

A safe, modern fleet

14

Our facilities

15

Our people

16

Training & education

18

Working together

20

Fundraising & grants

22

IT & communications

24

Saving lives

26

Investing in our fleet

29

Report Design and Layout Nicole Brown

Corporate information

37

Directors’ qualifications & experience

38

© Copyright Volunteer Marine Rescue New South Wales. Reproduction in whole or in part prohibited without permission of the publisher.

Declaration of independence by Grant Thornton

41

Independent Auditor’s Report

42

Responsible Entities’ declaration

46

Declaration by the Principal Officer

47

Statement of profit or loss & comprehensive income

48

Statement of financial position

49

Statement of changes in funds

50

Statement of cash flows

51

Notes to the financial statements

52

Appendix A: Submission to State Rescue Board Annual Report

67

The Registered Office of the company is: Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW (Trading as Marine Rescue NSW) Building 1, 202 Nicholson Parade Cronulla NSW 2230 Phone: 02 8071 4848 Web: mrnsw.com.au Email: admin@mrnsw.com.au


2016-2017 at a glance Help ... MR Botany Port Hacking member Mark Moretti lets off a flare during a rescue demonstration for Emergency Services Minister Troy Grant and local Members of Parliament in April. Photo: Brendan Trembath.

Operating regions

6

Units

45

Volunteer members

3,096

Men

2,314 (74.7%)

Women

782 (25.3%)

Operational staff

16

New and refurbished vessels (over life of MRNSW)

77, worth more than $18 million

Operational fleet

82

Vessels assisted

3,257

Life-endangering emergencies

827

Other assists

2,430

People assisted

6,503

Vessels Logged On

74,299

Radio calls

306,405

MRNSW radio towers/masts

35

MarineRescue mobile app downloads (since April 2015)

19,926

MarineRescue mobile app Log Ons

11,714

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

1


Report of the Chair Leadership ... Chair Jim Glissan, with Commissioner Stacey Tannos, addresses the 2016 Marine Rescue NSW Annual General Meeting at the State Headquarters at Cronulla. Photos: Brendan Trembath.

Chair James Glissan ESM, QC

I

t is my pleasure to present the Marine Rescue NSW Annual Report and Financial Statements for 2016-17, detailing the organisation’s achievements and service over the past 12 months. Essential reform of our governance arrangements was a focus of activity this year. A series of amendments to the Marine Rescue NSW Constitution was passed overwhelmingly at an Extraordinary General Meeting on August 20, putting in place solid foundations for our future strength and viability. The key change introduced a requirement for Directors to possess skill sets such as professional qualifications or board, managerial, governance or fundraising experience, in addition to their MRNSW membership. The maximum term limit on Directors’ positions was removed to avoid the risk of a leadership vacuum. Other changes could be classed as “machinery of governance” amendments aimed at keeping the Constitution as a high-level document by transferring clauses to the Rules and introducing housekeeping and miscellaneous amendments. The members’ support for these reforms will help ensure the organisation continues to be guided by a strong team of Directors who bring a range of

2 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

knowledge, skills and experience to their responsibilities. Our volunteers, staff and the Board have poured boundless energy and commitment into establishing MRNSW as a professional, respected and skilled rescue service and we have now paved the way for its continued growth and improvement by making sure we attract high-calibre leadership. The annual Board elections in November resulted in the maintenance of the status quo. Monaro Regional Director Glenn Felkin, Illawarra Regional Director Bill Carter and Greater Sydney Regional Director David White all were returned to their positions. I thank the members for their support in re-electing me as a General Director and my fellow Board members for the faith they have shown in again returning me as Chair. Two Directors subsequently have resigned from the Board, with Hunter/Central Coast Regional Director Roger Evans moving interstate and Bill Carter stepping down to successfully stand for election as the Unit Commander of Marine Rescue Shoalhaven. I thank them both for their service and dedication to our organisation. The Prince of Wales this year agreed to maintain his strong links with the volunteer marine rescue sector in NSW by continuing his role as the Patron in Chief of MRNSW. This is welcome recognition of our volunteers.


Keeping watch ... Marine Rescue Cape Byron members Clare Hamilton and Pam Ditton outside our eastern-most unit’s base at the foot of the Byron Bay lighthouse.

The Board has continued its program of meeting every second month at regional locations so that we can speak directly to our members about matters of interest to them in the execution of their duties. We thank the units and their members for their input and hospitality. I am pleased to report that units are, almost without exception, thriving. Members are enthusiastically training to build their skills and knowledge and are committed to the safety of their boating community. This commitment continues to be reflected in our annual service records, with our members this year responding to more than 3,200 vessels in trouble on the water, more than a quarter of which were caught in potentially life-endangering emergencies. Our Radio Operators logged more than 306,000 radio transmissions. This is an impressive record and I thank all our volunteers, no matter their roles or duties, for their contributions. Members have consistently reported to the Board that the upgrading of the fleet has been the most welcome advance over recent years, providing them with safe, reliable and modern operating platforms. The first stage of the Fleet Modernisation Program has been completed, with capital expenditure now directed to upgrading the secondary response fleet.

Ten new and refurbished vessels have been delivered in 2016-17, at a cost of $2.5 million. As a not-for-profit, independent emergency service, MRNSW relies on the ongoing financial support of the NSW Government and the boating community. In 2016-17, this comprised a direct Government grant of $1.6 million and $6 million through the levy on boating registrations and licences. On behalf of the organisation and its members, I again place on the record our appreciation for this vital support. The direct expenditure of this Government and levy funding in our operations, services and volunteer support programs is outlined in Appendix A on Page 67, which is a copy of the 2016-17 MRNSW financial submission to the NSW State Rescue Board Annual Report. This submission, which reports on the expenditure of funds provided on a cash basis, may vary from the final audited reports outlined in this document, which are compiled on an accrual basis. We also rely heavily on our volunteers’ fundraising efforts to help meet our mission. Our units continue to receive most welcome support for their strategic fundraising initiatives from their local communities and businesses, as well as visitors to their areas. The second Marine Rescue NSW Art Union was

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

3


“Our greatest asset is our people. Their characteristic generosity of spirit, skill and courage are essential to our mission.”

4 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017


Left: Bravery in the face of danger ... the recipient of the first Marine Rescue NSW Medal for Valour, Marine Rescue Port Stephens member Laurie Nolan.

launched in December and drawn in May, raising a total of $345,000 for our units. Thank you to our volunteers for devoting time beyond their direct operational and training duties to the Art Union and other unit fundraising activities. The end of the financial year also coincides with our unit elections, with a number of new Unit Commanders and Deputy Unit Commanders elected. These are time-consuming and demanding roles and I thank all our outgoing leaders for their service. Welcome to those who have taken on these new responsibilities. A number of our members have again attracted welldeserved public acknowledgement throughout the year for their service, skill and experience. In particular, congratulations to MR Eden Training Officer John Steele, MR Ulladulla Operations Officer Keven Marshall and Northern Rivers Regional Operations Manager John Murray, who were awarded the Emergency Services Medal in the Queen’s Birthday honours. This medal is presented to recognise members of the emergency services who have made a notable contribution to their agencies and the community. In January, MR Port Stephens member Laurie Nolan earned the distinction of being awarded the first Marine Rescue NSW Medal for Valour. This award recognises Laurie’s great courage in saving the lives of two of his crew mates when their vessel, Port Stephens 40, endured a triple knockdown in dangerous conditions during an operation to rescue a stricken yacht in January 2016.

Congratulations to Laurie and the other 20 unit members who were awarded the Commissioner’s Commendation for Courage and Commissioner’s Citation for their efforts responding to five Maydays in the wild conditions. This year, the Board awarded our organisation’s highest accolade, Life Membership of MRNSW, to MR Central Coast member and our corporate statistician Albert Morris, Ken Fletcher from MR Port Macquarie and MR Botany Port Hacking’s Glenn McMahon. The Board would not be as effective in meeting its commitments without the direct assistance of the Commissioner, Deputy Commissioner and staff members, all of whom I thank for their tireless work to support our membership and fulfil our corporate responsibilities. Commissioner Stacey Tannos is to be applauded for his resolute advocacy for our organisation and volunteers. The depth of knowledge, determination and leadership he brings to our organisation is reflected in his prominence in the national volunteer marine rescue sector and among the NSW emergency management agencies. On behalf of the Board, I again express our gratitude to each of our 3,096 volunteers for their commitment to keeping watch over our waterways and airwaves. Our greatest asset is our people. Their characteristic generosity of spirit, skill and courage are essential to our mission to save lives on the water. Without them, this organisation would not exist. With them, our success is assured.

James L Glissan ESM, QC Chair, Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

5


Report of the Commissioner Courage ... Forster-Tuncurry unit members and shark attack survivors, Colin Rowland and David Quinlivan, meet Commissioner Stacey Tannos at the unit base. Photos: Brendan Trembath.

Commissioner Stacey Tannos ESM

S

ignificant changes to the operational and training environment for Australia’s volunteer marine rescue organisations dominated the sector’s attention and workload in 2016-17. All services are now operating under new national standards for commercial vessels that took effect on July 1, 2016, imposing for the first time uniform requirements for volunteer training and vessel standards on agencies that previously operated under varying state and territory legislation. Marine Rescue NSW training systems have attracted wide interest as a benchmark for meeting the requirements of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority Exemption 24 requirements and we have been happy to share our expertise and the resources in which we have invested so heavily over recent years. The re-registration of the MRNSW Registered Training Organisation in September is testament to our training quality and gives our national colleagues surety about the work we have done to ensure compliance with Exemption 24 without creating an additional burden for our volunteers. Along with our training development, other jurisdictions, both nationally and internationally, have continued to look to our technological advances this year.

6 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

The benefits of the Seahawk vessel tracking system and MarineRescue smartphone app, both for boating safety and volunteer operational support, are clearly attractive to agencies keenly aware of the increasing imperative to move systems and services online. Our early embrace of innovative technology was recognised internationally this year. Our integrated safety network - linking the Seahawk system, the MarineRescue app, Automatic Identification System feed and Radio Member Management System - was acknowledged at the International Marine Rescue Federation’s HERO (Honouring Excellence in Rescue Operations) Awards in November. These advances have all been achieved within our budget and with regard to our operational drivers and essential capital investment in the Fleet Modernisation Program. As a not-for-profit volunteer emergency service, MRNSW is heavily dependent on the funding we receive from the State Government and boating community. In 2016-17, this core funding amounted to $7.6 million, comprising a direct Government grant of $1.6 million and $6 million raised from the levy on recreational boat licences and registrations. This was supplemented by income from our volunteers’ committed fundraising efforts, including


Charting our success ... Regional Operations Managers Glenn Evans, Steve Raymond, Glenn Sullivan and John Murray with Deputy Commissioner Dean Storey (third from left) and MR Point Danger Deputy Unit Commander Nick Wythe (second from right).

the second annual Art Union and a range of grants, donations and sponsors. The 2011-2017 Operational Funding Agreement which set out the terms of our funding delivery from the State Government expired in February. We are contining to operate under these terms while the next five-year agreement is finalised. We also are continuing to seek government support for potential funding enhancements. The Fleet Modernisation Program continued to dominate our capital expenditure in 2016-17. This year, 10 new and refurbished vessels were delivered, at a cost of $2.5 million. In all, since the establishment of MRNSW, 77 rescue vessels worth more than $18 million have joined the fleet, providing our volunteers and the boating public with safe, reliable and contemporary boats. Stage Two of the Modernisation Program, to enhance our secondary response fleet, is ongoing. Our volunteers have continued to demonstrate skill, dedication and heroism in their duties. This year, the first Marine Rescue NSW Medal for Valour was awarded to MR Port Stephens member Laurie Nolan for his bravery in saving the lives of two of his crew mates on board rescue vessel Port Stephens 40 in horrific conditions during a desperate operation to rescue

a disabled yacht being blown north up the coastline. Congratulations to Laurie and the other 20 members of the unit, both vessel crew and communications personnel, who received Commissioner’s Commendations for Courage and Commissioner’s Citations for their service on January 5 and 6, 2016. Each of our volunteers is deserving of praise and acclaim for their commitment and community service. They are selfless in spirit and in action, tireless in their efforts to keep boaters safe and keen to learn. I thank them all for their contribution to the success of our organisation in meeting our mission of saving lives on the water. Our boat crews are called upon to head into hazardous conditions, placing the safety of others ahead of their own, often in confronting circumstances. This year, they performed 3,257 operations, returning more than 6,500 boaters to shore. They are supported by our communications operators, who maintain a watch over the airwaves, this year efficiently responding to more than 306,400 radio transmissions. Our unit teams carry out additional roles as unit leaders, administration and membership officers, treasurers and fundraisers, operations and IT officers,

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

7


Above: Welcome aboard ... Emergency Services Minister Troy Grant joins Marine Rescue Cottage Point member Asher Katz, Commissioner Stacey Tannos and Cottage Point Unit Commander Paul Millar on Sydney Harbour.

Right: Rapid response resource ... rescue vessel Wooli 30 under way off the NSW North Coast. Photo: Robert Watkin.

caterers, stores officers and many other duties crucial to our operations. Special thanks go to our unit Treasurers for their cooperation and work to ensure a successful transition from MYOB to the NetSuite accounting system. Our thanks also to a number of other emergency services, government agencies and service providers with whom we work closely, particularly Commander of the NSW Police Force Marine Area Command, Detective Superintendent Mark Hutchings APM and his staff, for their cooperation and confidence. Likewise to NSW Rural Fire Service Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons AFSM and RFS staff and members for their collaboration and resource sharing. I would also like to place on the record our appreciation for the support of the Minister for Emergency Services, Troy Grant and his predecessor David Elliott and their staff, as well as the State

Stacey Tannos ESM Commissioner

8 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

Government Office for Emergency Management. I also acknowledge Minister for Roads, Freight and Maritime Melinda Pavey and her predecessor Duncan Gay. Thanks also must go to our generous sponsors and donors and our vessel, equipment and service suppliers. The strategic leadership of the Board of Directors this year saw us achieve significant constitutional reform to strengthen the organisation. I thank the Chair and Directors for their support and commitment to our members. It is important to thank our staff for their professionalism, hard work and good humour. The results of their commitment to setting and meeting the highest standards are clear to all. Again, thank you to our 3,096 volunteers, who give their time and effort freely, working tirelessly for the good of their units, our organisation and our community. They are the heroes of 2016-17.


Since the establishment of MRNSW, 77 new and refurbished rescue vessels worth more than $18 million have joined the fleet.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

9


Operations Take the weather with you ... MR Lemon Tree Passage Trainer and Assessor Clem Doyle, kitted out for cold and wet conditions, on board Lemon Tree 30. Photos: Brendan Trembath.

I

t has been a year of strong performance from the professional volunteers of Marine Rescue NSW, who launched 3,257 separate rescue missions to return more than 6,500 people to safety throughout 2016-17. This included 827 operations in response to notifiable life-threatening emergencies - a 14.4 per cent increase over last year. With recreational boating and water-based activities at an all-time high, this reflected growing demand on MRNSW services. Over the year, we dealt with an incredible workload: in addition to these on-water operations, units responded to 306,405 radio calls and Logged On 74,299 vessels, monitoring these through to their destinations. By taking advantage of our free Log On service, unique in NSW, almost 257,000 boaters headed on to the water knowing a responsible agency was watching over them and would start to search if they failed to Log Off as expected. The level of preparatory work and logistical organisation that goes into delivering these results every day of the year cannot be overstated. MRNSW runs on teamwork from a state level through to each of our 45 units and every single team member has been a key contributor to saving hundreds of families, friends, workplaces and communities from

10 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

tragedy over the past 12 months. NSW Maritime reports that there were four recorded boating fatalities in NSW in 2016-17, the lowest number in at least 40 years and nearly 70 per cent below the long-term average. Through our integrated safety service of 24/7 marine radio monitoring, rescue vessel response and boating safety education and advocacy, MRNSW continues to be a leading contributor in driving down this toll. An immense effort is required to provide these services. The organisation’s 3,096 members contributed almost 592,000 volunteer hours to frontline duties in 2016-17; and this stellar level of commitment did not include the hundreds of thousands of volunteer hours invested in training, fundraising, administration and community education. With the largest and most advanced rescue fleet in Australasia and most comprehensive coastal marine VHF network, our professional volunteer units can be proud of their essential role as an emergency service and of the success they demonstrate day after day on our coast and waterways. Another key to our life saving success is our joint agency collaboration, and our emergency service and water safety partnerships have never been stronger. Nowhere is this more evident than with the NSW Police


Under bleak skies ... the crew of Port Kembla 20 takes part in a search operation in March.

Force Marine Area Command (MAC). Continued joint training, streamlined tasking arrangements, rostering of peak-season MRNSW Liaison Officers at MAC and ongoing support from MAC for Policy/Standard Operating Procedure development and operational readiness inspections showcase the strength of this relationship. This year we have also strengthened our interoperability with Surf Life Saving through radio communication protocols and the fit-out of SLS handheld radios in key MRNSW vessels. Enabling the two organisations’ responding teams to effectively communicate tightens the water safety net between the offshore and inshore environments. In the air, a training Memorandum of Understanding with Toll Helicopters has reinforced our operational partnership, with consistent helicopter winch training from our vessels building the skills and experience of both MRNSW members and Toll/NSW Ambulance aeromedical response crews. Safety is always the number one priority and a review and redevelopment this year of Operational Risk Assessment processes will assist in bringing together multiple layers of existing risk management considerations and requirements as part of a timeefficient seamless vessel response.

Our 24/7 response-ready vessel crews on our 82 rescue vessels along the coastline and two inland waterways continue to extend our presence on-water, particularly over the peak holiday periods, resulting in rapid deployment and reduced response times to emergencies. MRNSW provides the Triple Zero of the sea through its public marine radio network. This vital piece of border-toborder infrastructure is monitored 24/7 by highly trained radio operators and watch officers through our Marine Radio Bases and Search and Rescue Coordination Centres. A major investment in VHF infrastructure, combined with a strong public safety and advocacy effort to promote the use of VHF marine radio and the MarineRescue smartphone app, has seen a steady increase in Log Ons over the past three years. MRNSW remains committed to providing a world-class search and rescue and marine communications service and working with the boating community and our water safety partners to improve boating safety and meet the challenge of our mission to save lives on the water.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

11


Operations Companion on the voyage ... a dolphin accompanies the crews of Ulladulla 30 and Jervis Bay 40 along the Illawarra coastline. Photo: Lisa Hardwick.

THREE-YEAR MRNSW OPERATIONAL TRENDS 2016-17

2015-16

2014-15

Total

Vessels assisted

3,257

3,072

3,001

9,330

Emergencies

827

723

775

2,325

Radio calls

306,405

296,063

310,342

912,810

Vessels Logged On

74,299

73,383

70,243

217,925

2016-2017 MRNSW OPERATIONS YTD

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

March April

May

June

No. of radio calls

306,405 24,874 22,951 22,210 25,463 24,928 26,701 32,814 24,097 23,338 30,610 26,148 22,271

No. of Log Ons – local

65,934

4,310

4,418

3,969

5,279

4,649

6,575

10,534 5,812

4,094

6,991

5,607

3,696

No. of Log Ons – offshore

8,365

565

442

393

732

727

915

1,189

589

479

1,000

734

600

No. of emergency rescues

827

29

33

46

96

57

104

90

111

69

72

69

51

No. of assists – tows

1,623

78

73

91

127

141

247

237

134

126

205

82

82

No. of assists – jump starts

128

3

7

4

10

11

20

25

7

10

17

9

5

No. of assists – medical assist 58

1

2

1

6

4

15

6

9

3

3

7

1

No. of assists - transport assist 195

4

7

21

16

9

19

22

31

6

24

17

19

No. of assists - pump outs

19

1

0

1

0

0

4

4

2

3

2

0

2

No. of assists – other

407

27

21

22

41

28

58

58

40

36

33

22

21

12 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017


2016-17 MRNSW OPERATIONAL OUTCOMES Life-endangering (notifiable) emergencies

827

Persons on Board

1,750

Other vessel assists

2,430

Persons on Board

4,753

Total Persons on Board rescued

6,503

Radio calls logged

306,405

Total vessel Log Ons

74,299

Vessels Logged On via MarineRescue mobile app

11,714

Total Persons on Board Logged On vessels

256,911

Volunteer duty hours (rostered shifts, excluding call-outs) Search & Rescue Coordination Centres

194,180

Marine Radio Bases

33,408

Marine rescue vessels

364,356

Total volunteer duty hours

591,944

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

13


A safe, modern fleet Jervis Bay 20 ... the $300,000 Ocean Cylinder is one of 10 new and refurbished vessels delivered in 2016-17, at a cost of $2.5 million.

T

en new and refurbished rescue vessels were delivered in 2016-17 as Marine Rescue NSW continued to invest in its Fleet Modernisation Program. The Fleet Program is delivering rescue vessels purpose-designed and built (or significantly upgraded) for their operating conditions, providing increased volunteer safety and operational efficiency. Stage One of the program, upgrading the first round of primary response vessels, is complete, with the focus now on secondary response vessels. Since the establishment of MRNSW, 77 new and refurbished vessels, worth more than $18 million, have entered the fleet. This includes six new boats, one refurbished vessel and three replacement Rescue Water Craft this year, at a cost of $2.5 million. Another seven vessels were repowered with new Suzuki engines, at a total cost of $315,000, this year. MRNSW is committed to supporting the NSW boat building industry. This not only provides valuable skilled employment in regional centres but also ensures ease of access during construction, maintenance and servicing. Increasing fleet standardisation has seen a concentration on key models: the Naiad and Ocean Cylinder, both produced by Yamba Welding and Engineering; Steber monohulls made by Steber International; and Sailfish

14 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

Catamarans. Sea-Doo Rescue Water Craft (jet skis) remain a flexible rapid response resource, particularly for units operating on hazardous coastal bars.

NEW & REFURBISHED VESSELS 2016-17 Port Macquarie 30, Steber 38

$858,000

Terrigal 30, 9m Sailfish

$350,000

Batemans 20, 7.5m Ocean Cylinder

$300,000

Jervis Bay 20, 7.5m Ocean Cylinder

$300,000

Shoalhaven 20, 7.5m Ocean Cylinder

$300,000

Ulladulla 20, 7.5m Ocean Cylinder

$300,000

Port Macquarie 10, RWC

$15,000

Lake Macquarie 13, RWC

$16,000

Central Coast 11, RWC

$16,000

Merimbula 30 , 10m Naiad refurbishment

$49,000


Our facilities Purpose-built for emergency operations and training ... Marine Rescue Ballina’s new $2.3 million base was officially opened in May 2017. Photo: Brendan Trembath.

F

our units this year opened upgraded facilities that significantly improved the operational environments for MRNSW volunteers. Members of Marine Rescue Ballina moved into their new $2.3 million radio base in October for the start of the summer boating season. The purpose-designed base, replacing the unit’s aged and leaning radio tower, officially opened in May and was lauded as one of the organisation’s finest facilities. The new building provides radio operators with panoramic views of the Richmond River bar and surrounding coastal waters and vastly improved working and training conditions. Funding for the project was provided by MRNSW, the Ballina unit, Ballina Shire Council and the State and Federal governments. The unit has experienced a subsequent upswing in recruitment. Further south, the MR Port Macquarie Search and Rescue Coordination Centre on Town Beach was completely rebuilt on its existing footprint, providing volunteers with improved conditions and sightlines. Port Macquarie Hastings Council, the State Government and the Port Macquarie unit contributed to the $696,000 construction and fit-out cost. MR Crowdy Harrington opened its new $215,000 training centre and boat shed in November, providing

the unit’s members with their first dedicated training facilities and protection for its secondary rescue vessel. Community Building Partnership and Mid Coast Water grants worth a total of $35,000 offset the project cost. The MR Moama base, on the Murray River, was officially opened in June. It was built and fitted out a cost of $76,000 on land and a concrete slab donated by the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service. MRNSW is unable to fund the cost of developing fit-for-purpose facilities such as these without relying on external funding, including grants. Funding the upkeep of existing facilities is just as challenging, with an audit of fixed assets in 2015-16 identifying maintenance and WH&S critical backlogs of $4.54 million and outlining a whole-of-life maintenance program requiring $23.5 million over 10 years. The vast majority of MRNSW premises are State Government assets occupied under lease or licence, transferring responsibility and financial liability for building repairs, maintenance, upkeep and improvements to MRNSW as the tenant. A broadscale upgrading of unit facilities to provide volunteers with modern environments appropriately equipped for emergency response and training continues to depend on securing enhanced funding.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

15


Our people Response-ready .... members of Marine Rescue Hawkesbury on board Cottage Point 30 during a joint unit training exercise.

T

he first Marine Rescue NSW Medal for Valour was awarded this year, recognising the outstanding courage of Marine Rescue Port Stephens member Laurie Nolan in saving the lives of two of his crew mates during a rescue operation in fatal conditions in January 2016. The Medal for Valour is the organisation’s highest award for bravery in the line of duty. Mr Nolan was one of 21 rescue crew members and communications operators to receive awards for their courage, skill and service in a series of emergency operations in wild conditions whipped up by an East Coast Low on January 6 and 7. The Commissioner’s Commendation for Courage was awarded to crew members Skipper David Jack, Ken Johnson, Eryl Thomas, Peter Merlino, Suzanne Freeman, Nigel Waters, Michael Duggan, Noel Corcoran, Skipper Ron Lighton, Michael Smith, Richard Pizzuto, Tom Miller, Ian Drummond and Paul Sullivan. Six of these received the First Clasp, recognising this as their second Commendation for Courage. The Commissioner’s Citation was presented to Watch Officers Stephen Alta, John Vassallo, Michael Grover, Colin Cahill and Radio Operators Ian Peacock and Peter Baldwin. Marine Rescue Terrey Hills broke its own records

16 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

in its busiest summer yet, handling more than 9,300 communications and responding to at least 15 Mayday and Pan Pan calls from December 1 to February 1. The unit was awarded a Commissioner’s Citation for its work to provide a marine radio safety net for boaters on Sydney waters and further along the coastline through its communications support for regional units via the Radio over Internet Protocol system. MR Terrey Hills also was named as the Sydney Kings basketball team’s Unsung Hero in October. In the 2017 Queen’s Birthday Honours, the Emergency Services Medal was awarded to Keven Marshall, from MR Ulladulla, John Steele, from MR Eden and Northern Rivers Regional Operations Manager John Murray. Life Member Dr Peter Taylor, from MR Shoalhaven, was named the 2016 MRNSW Officer of the Year in a Volunteer Capacity in the Rotary Emergency Services Community Awards. Our other finalists in the awards were Ken Fletcher (MR Port Macquarie), Czes Lawicki (MR Terrigal) and Victor Lawrence (MR Broken Bay). At the 2016 Annual General Meeting, the Board conferred Life Membership on MR Central Coast member Albert Morris, MR Port Macquarie member Ken Fletcher and MR Botany Port Hacking member Glenn McMahon. A total of 334 members received Long Service awards


Waving the flag ... Marine Rescue NSW volunteers, staff, family and friends ready to step out in the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Parade in March. Photo: Brendan Trembath.

and 62 were awarded the National Medal this year. ‘Reach Out’ was the theme of the inaugural MRNSW entry in the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Parade in March. Twenty-eight volunteers from the Crowdy Harrington, Central Coast, Cottage Point, Terrey Hills, Middle Harbour, Botany Port Hacking and Port Kembla units, staff and family and friends received a rousing welcome in the 39th annual parade. Our entry sent a clear message of respect for diversity and inclusiveness. The Reach Out theme highlighted the organisation’s core role in rescuing those reaching out for help and also reflected that MRNSW reaches out to our community for members, fundraising and support. Six volunteers from the Point Danger and Newcastle units took part in the Australian Emergency Management Institute’s Volunteer Leadership Program in Newcastle and on the Gold Coast in September and November. This program aims to enhance volunteer agency capacity through developing the leadership skills of middle to senior level emergency management volunteers. MRNSW vessel expertise is being tapped at a national level with the organisation’s representation on the Australian Standards Committee for small boats up to

35 metres. Fleet Manager Jody Hollow was appointed to the Standards Committee CS-114, which contributes to the development and approval of Australian vessel build standards and regulations for recreational vessels. Standards Australia chose Mr Hollow to represent Australia as a delegate on the International Standards Committee for small and inflatable pleasure craft at its 2016 meeting in London. Former Monaro Regional Controller Bob Herbert was appointed the new MRNSW Honorary State Protocol Officer. MRNSW personnel attended the Emergency Services Volunteers Memorial Service in October. The annual service is held to pay tribute to all NSW emergency services volunteers and particularly to remember the men and women who have paid the ultimate price while volunteering their time to protect their community. These sadly include three members of our former NSW volunteer marine rescue services, Edward Bristow, Dennis Matthews and David Waddell, whose names are inscribed on the Honour Roll on the stone Emergency Services Volunteers Memorial at Mrs Macquarie’s Chair in Sydney.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

17


Training & education Skills development ... Rescue Water Craft operators from the neighbouring Central Coast and Lake Macquarie units building rescue capability.

A

s a recognised innovator in the national volunteer marine rescue sector, Marine Rescue NSW has led the way on the implementation of new national training, fleet and operational standards throughout 2016-17. Our training systems have attracted wide interest as a benchmark for meeting the requirements of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) Exemption 24 requirements (previously known as Scheme R), which took effect on July 1, 2016. The MRNSW training curriculum was developed to meet our operational requirements and ensure members have the skills and knowledge required to perform their roles safely and effectively Designed to align with standards set by the Australian Skills Quality Authority (ASQA), the curriculum has now been refined to also comply with the Exemption 24 requirements. The new regulations were successfully introduced across our organisation without imposing an additional burden on volunteers. All volunteer marine rescue jurisdictions have been provided with our training resources to assist them to meet the requirements. Commissioner Stacey Tannos and Assistant Director Training and Education Chris Butler continue to work closely with the National Volunteer Marine Search and Rescue Committee and

18 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

AMSA on the ongoing national transition to Exemption 24, under which all the services now operate. This success was mirrored in another major training achievement in 2016-17: securing the renewal of the registration of the MRNSW Registered Training Organisation. ASQA approved the renewal for a further seven years in September 2016. The MRNSW Training Advisory Group was established this year, with Jeffrey Crompton (MR Port Jackson), Tony Drover (MR Jervis Bay), Ray McLeod (MR Bermagui) and Richard Taffs (MR Wooli) appointed to provide formalised volunteer input to our training programs. We continued to build organisational capability, with a total of 1,495 qualifications issued to members, reflecting increasing skill levels and capacity. Our training resources, participation and facilities will be boosted with funding from a number of Emergency Volunteer Support Scheme (EVSS) grants. Emergency Services Minister Troy Grant announced joint NSW-Commonwealth EVSS funding worth a total of $476,000 for recruitment and training initiatives by Headquarters and the Brunswick, Ballina, Trial Bay, Hawkesbury, Port Stephens and Lake Macquarie units in April. Multi-agency Search and Rescue Exercises (SAREX)


Ocean rendezvous ... rescue crews on board Wooli 30 and Woolgoolga 30 meet off North Solitary Island for cross-regional emergency response training. Photo: Robert Watkin.

are an integral element of the training curriculum for MRNSW volunteers, helping members develop their operational skills and awareness and build constructive working relationships with other relevant services. Realtime day and night activations put rescue vessel crews, communications teams and emergency management personnel to the test. These courses are planned, coordinated and delivered with the assistance of the NSW Police Force Marine Area Command. A number of regional SAREX activities were staged this year. Six units took part in the Hunter/Central Coast Regional SAREX at Newcastle in September. Five units joined the Monaro Region exercise at Narooma in November, followed by another five in the Illawarra SAREX at Ulladulla in May. A local SAREX was held on Lake Jindabyne in March and a cross-border multi-agency exercise on the Murray River at Moama in May. Units along the coast also staged joint local training activities to share their skills and build their experience. Four crews joined Exercise Sydney CBD 2016 in August, maintaining an exclusion zone on Sydney Harbour and searching for debris and “casualties” from a simulated plane crash at Barangaroo. Public boating education continues to be an important aspect of our role. Our members are recognised as

skilled mariners, attracting boaters keen to learn from their expertise. Although changes to State Government licence requirements have removed the need to complete a Safe Boating course to gain a licence, demand for MRNSW education remains high. In the 2016 calendar year, 23 units conducted 231 Safe Boating and Personal Water Craft (jet ski) licence courses and testing. A total of 845 adults and 160 young adults successfully undertook a boat driver’s licence course and test, with a further 170 adults and 42 young adults passing a PWC course and test. TRAINING QUALIFICATIONS ISSUED IN 2016-17 Provide First Aid

517

Provide Advanced Resuscitation

545

Radio Operator

167

Watch Officer

11

Crew

163

Leading Crew

43

Coxswain

33

Rescue Water Craft Operator

16

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

19


Working together Dropping in ... a NSW Ambulance aeromedical crew member lands on the deck of Middle Harbour 30 as part of an intensive training program established under a new Memorandum of Understanding with Toll Helicopters. Photo: Brian Roberts.

T

he inter-agency cooperation that is the hallmark of the emergency services sector was again highlighted throughout 2016-17. A new Memorandum of Understanding was established between Marine Rescue NSW and Toll Helicopters, which provides the NSW Ambulance helicopter service for the southern half of NSW and the ACT. MRNSW crews from Sydney and neigbouring regions have been taking part in an intensive joint training program with Toll and NSW Ambulance aeromedical crews under this new partnership, which is aimed at ensuring patients receive rapid treatment in medical emergencies on the water. Other rescue helicopter services along the coastline have also maintained training arrangements with units including Ballina and Port Stephens. Commissioner Tannos continues as Chair of the State Rescue Board and a member of the State Emergency Management Committee and the organisation is represented on bodies including the International Marine Rescue Federation, Australian Emergency Management Volunteer Forum and National Volunteer Marine Search and Rescue Committee. The NSW Police Force Marine Area Command

20 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

(MAC) and MRNSW operate cooperatively to ensure the provision of an effective and robust level of marine protection for the boating community. MRNSW crews have again supported the police in a number of joint operations including searches for two men reported missing on a fishing trip in the Jervis Bay area; a sailor from an empty yacht off Sydney’s Northern Beaches who was later located on shore; and drowning victims. MRNSW Regional Operations Managers and senior volunteers were again based in the MAC over the peak summer boating season to enhance tasking efficiency and operational awareness during the busiest period on the water. MAC continued to participate in our Regional Search and Rescue Exercise training program. As part of our boating safety education activities, MRNSW strongly supported two key State Government campaigns, with 22 units joining 29 Old4New lifejacket campaign events over the summer season and 13 units assisting the NSW Roads and Maritime Services program for the disposal of expired flares. MRNSW units again provided on-water, communications and logistical support for events including the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race, New Year’s Eve and Australia Day festivities, Evans Head Fishing Classic, Marine X-treme at Coffs Harbour, Ulladulla


Scouring the coastline ... Marine Rescue Jervis Bay and Sussex Inlet and NSW Police Force Marine Area Command crews take part in a coordinated search for two missing fishermen in the Jervis Bay region. Photo: Lisa Hardwick.

Blessing of the Fleet and Mullum to Bruns Paddle. We also joined the annual BIA Sydney International Boat Show and other promotional events. Fourteen volunteers from seven units joined the response to bushfires in catastrophic heatwave conditions in early February, answering calls to the Bush Fire Information Line at the NSW Rural Fire Service (RFS) Headquarters. MR Port Stephens members provided communications assistance at the RFS Lower Hunter Fire Control Centre during bushfire operations in November. The RFS supports the MRNSW Critical Incident Support Service and we thank its personnel for their collaboration. Thanks must go to our volunteers’ families and employers, without whose support they would not be able to perform their duties to assist, support and protect the people of NSW. They are also part of our emergency services community and contribute to our mission to save lives on the water. Suzuki Marine has been the preferred supplier of outboard motors for the MRNSW fleet since 2013, with our current Power of Choice agreement extending to 2018. MRNSW is pleased to continue its relationship with one of Australia’s most respected suppliers of marine engines and its Australian distributor, the Haines

Group. The high-quality fit-out of the rescue fleet is assured under our agreement with Raymarine as the supplier of essential on board electronic equipment. Karera Communications continues to support our communications, particularly the unit radio facilities and repeater sites that form the backbone of the network. We are continuing to reach the boating community through a series of ‘infomercials’ on Reel Action TV. Michael Guest’s program gives MRNSW brand exposure before a potential audience of five million viewers over 20 episodes on Network Ten’s One HD channel. Thanks must go to the organisations that advertise in our quarterly journal, Soundings, which showcases our work and their products and services, along with the suppliers for our e-shop, shopmrnsw.com.au We also have established valued relationships with businesses that support our work, including: • Sea-Doo, supplier of Rescue Water Craft (jet skis) • Navionics, which supplies its charts for our training simulators, vessels and website • Stewart Toyota, Headquarters vehicle supplier • BME, which has provided discounts for members, and • HP, which provides discounts on computer equipment for our organisation, units, volunteers and Radio Club members.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

21


Fundraising & grants Ready to drive away ... Commissioner Stacey Tannos congratulates the winner of first prize in the Marine Rescue NSW Art Union, David Thornton. Photo: Matt Sims.

M

arine Rescue NSW continues to rely on grants and fundraising as the major sources of finance to supplement the organisation’s annual income received from the State Government and boating community. The second annual Marine Rescue NSW Art Union was launched on December 1 and drawn on May 30. With prizes worth $229,600, including a 4WD and boat, travel voucher, premium Wallabies ticket packages and six regional prizes of jet skis and trailers, the Art Union raised a total of $345,000 for our units. MRNSW benefited from grants from a range of government, corporate and community organisations for a variety of projects throughout the year. MRNSW owns, operates and maintains the State’s marine radio network. In recognition of this responsibility, the State Government has allocated grant funding worth $750,000 over three years, starting in 2016-17, to assist with the financial burden of upgrading critical infrastructure to eliminate communication blackspots and provide system redundancy. Work to install new marine radio infrastructure at four strategic locations on the northern NSW coastline will begin early in 2017-18. Development is nearing completion on a new smartphone app to automate the risk management

22 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

assessment completed by MRNSW members before launching a rescue vessel, undertaking training or participating in community events. This project is being funded through a State Emergency Management Program grant for $29,880. In April, Emergency Services Minister Troy Grant announced 13 grants worth a total of $476,000 under the joint NSW-Commonwealth Emergency Volunteer Support Scheme to recruit and train more volunteers for our vital work to save lives on the water. The grants will be used to puchase equipment including new training and recruitment trailers, rescue and CPR mannequins, fire simulation machines and 82 iPads facilitating the use of the new risk management app on board the rescue fleet. This funding also will assist with the cost of the biennial MRNSW Leadership Conference to be held in September 2017; fit out new training centres; provide more volunteer training and support recruitment activities. Eight of the grants, totalling $66,000, were awarded to the Brunswick, Ballina, Trial Bay, Hawkesbury, Port Stephens and Lake Macquarie units. Seven units received a total of $61,200 under the State Government’s Community Building Partnerships


Get set ... Abigail Choat readies her duck for the Jervis Bay unit’s annual Duck Derby, a fun family day and fundraiser. Photo: Jeff Choat.

grants program, including $15,000 to the Ulladulla unit for an AirBerth for its new rescue vessel, Ulladulla 20 and $14,300 for the fit-out of the radio room when MR Woolgoolga relocates to new premises at Arrawarra. The State’s Registered Clubs continued to support our volunteers through the Club Grants program, including funding of almost $87,500 to eight units for 13 projects this year. The units to benefit are Botany Port Hacking (vessel berths); Kioloa (work station upgrade); Lake Macquarie (open day); Port Macquarie (jet ski berth), Port Stephens (dock facilities, engine upgrade and telecommunications); Shellharbour (training, operational expenses and tender); Merimbula (battery systems upgrade); and Woolgoolga (office furniture for new base). The Point Danger, Ballina, Port Macquarie, Camden Haven, Forster-Tuncurry, Lake Macquarie, Terrey Hills, Middle Harbour, Shellharbour, Shoalhaven, Batemans Bay and Merimbula units also received another 12 grants, valued at $68,500, from the Australia Post Our Neighbourhood Community Grants, City of Gold Coast Community Grants Program, Harcourts Foundation, Honda Foundation, Port Macquarie Hastings General Community Grants Program, Mid Coast and Northern Beaches Councils’ Stronger Communities Grants

Programs, the Good Guys Doing Good, Mumbulla Foundation and the Minister for Emergency Services. Thank you to all the organisations and bodies which have allocated grants funding to the organisation this year and also to our sponsors and donors, including the many local businesses and community groups that support our units’ operations through generous donations, both financial and in-kind. This support extends to the skippers of vessels assisted by rescue crews who provide a donation by way of thanks and members of the community, who continue to give generously to our many fundraising endeavours, whether it is our Art Union, sausage sizzles, local unit raffles or one of the regular community markets run by our units. Each of you contributes to our mission to save lives on the water.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

23


IT & communications Workers in the mist ... with no vehicle access, equipment was flown from a base camp to the top of Mt Imlay to complete a major communications upgrade for boaters on the Far South Coast. Photo: Andrew Cribb.

Right: Moama 20 joins a search operation on the Murray River. Photo: Glenn Carr.

M

arine Rescue NSW received international acknowledgement this year for its use of innovative technology to help keep boaters safe on the water. The online integrated system, linking the Seahawk vessel tracking system, the MarineRescue smartphone app, Automatic Identification System feed and Radio Member Management System, was recognised in the inaugural International Marine Rescue Federation’s HERO (Honouring Excellence in Rescue Operations) Awards. The system was named the runner-up in the Innovation and Technology in Maritime Search and Rescue category in November. A major project to upgrade communications infrastructure on the NSW Far South Coast produced immediate improvements in boating safety in the remote region. The joint communications site on Mt Imlay in the Mt Imlay National Park, about 20km south-west of Eden, was upgraded in late December to overcome large radio blackspots on the southern coastline. At 886m, the site is an ideal communications platform for optimal VHF radio coverage. Less than a fortnight later, the expanded capability enabled MRNSW to intercept a call for help from a yacht that had run aground off the southen tip of Flinders Island in Bass Strait.

24 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

The State Government has allocated MRNSW grant funding of $750,000 over three years to continue this work with a project to address existing marine radio blackspots on the NSW North and Mid North coasts. New VHF radios, aerials and microwave links will be installed to address blackspots caused by geography and distance between radio sites. Preventative Maintenance Inspections have continued along our backbone communications sites, in line with the Network Maintenance Agreement with Karera. This public safety infrastructure facilitates units’ marine radio operations, enabling them to handle 306,405 radio transmissions to Log On boaters, disseminate vital safety information and advice and help coordinate search and rescue operations. As well as communicating with MRNSW units via radio, boaters also have enthusiastically embraced the MarineRescue app, launched in 2015. This year, 11,714 vessels with 28,098 people on board Logged On via the app. Since April 2015, the app has been downloaded by 19,926 boaters on 11,085 Apple devices and 8,841 Androids.


Our volunteers responded to 3,257 vessels in trouble on the water in 2016-17, returning more than 6,500 people to safety.


Saving lives Tight formation ... Jervis Bay 40 and Sussex Inlet 30 travel a rocky stretch of coastline in the multi-agency search for two missing fishermen in January. Photo: Lisa Hardwick on board Ulladulla 30.

A

n extensive multi-agency land, air and sea search was launched off Jervis Bay for two fishermen missing, presumed drowned, in late January. The two men, aged 45 and 55, were last seen on January 21 when they left home on a fishing expedition to Booderee National Park, on the southern side of the bay. They were reported missing when they failed to return to Sydney. Fishing equipment was found at Black Rock in the National Park, where they were believed to have been fishing. A white motor vehicle owned by one of the men was located in a carpark nearby at Steamers Beach. The Australian Federal Police, which expressed ‘grave concerns’ for the men’s welfare, coordinated the multiagency land search, with NSW Police controlling the marine and aerial searches. The operation involved crews from MR Jervis Bay, Ulladulla, Sussex Inlet, Kioloa, Batemans Bay and Tuross, NSW and Federal Police, the State Emergency Service, Westpac Life Saver Rescue Helicopter and National Park personnel. The crew of Jervis Bay 40 was swiftly deployed to join the coordinated search effort on the afternoon of Friday, January 27, searching offshore from Steamers Beach

26 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

before returning the following day with Ulladulla 30 and Sussex Inlet 30 to join the expanded air, ground and sea operation. The seach continued over the weekend, with MRNSW crews searching the rugged shoreline of Wreck Bay and Bherwerre Beach to Sussex Inlet. The search area was then widened, with MRNSW crews scouring areas off the coastline from the Tuross River north to Jervis Bay, the islands off Kioloa and the entrance to and shoreline inside Jervis Bay. The operation ended without locating the missing men. In a spate of drownings over summer, 29 people lost their lives in NSW in the six weeks from December 1 to January 15 - almost twice the average for the same period over the past 14 years. The two fishermen then took the toll to 31. None of these victims were boating when they died, although one man was found deceased on board his boat at Batemans Bay.


Professionalism, skill and determination ... MR Broken Bay’s ‘Triple J’ team, John Weaver, John Sutton and Joe Ellams, received a Unit Commander’s Citation for saving a sailor washed overboard.

A

yachtsman washed overboard in rough conditions off Macmasters Beach was swiftly rescued by a threemember crew from MR Broken Bay, who have been awarded a Unit Commander’s Citation in recognition of their life-saving operation. Unit Commander Vic Lawrence said the crew had demonstrated professionalism, skill and determination in finding the sailor in difficult conditions and returning him to safety. The Unit Commander’s Citation states that the successful outcome of the rescue is a point of pride for the crew and the Broken Bay unit. Broken Bay 20 was on patrol near the entrance to Careel Bay in Pittwater about 12.30pm on Sunday, October 23, when the crew, John Sutton, John Weaver and Joe Ellams, heard a VHF radio call to MR Terrey Hills reporting a man overboard from a yacht. With the call quickly escalating to a Mayday, the crew proceeded at full safe speed on the 6.5m rigid hull inflatable boat to the broadcast position, about 1.5nm due east of Macmasters Beach, where it was thought the sailor had fallen overboard. It was later discovered he had been washed off the yacht in the rough sea conditions, with a 4-5 metre swell and 20 knot winds gusting to 30 knots.

With the assistance of MR Terrey Hills, Greater Sydney Regional Controller Chris Gillett and the Police Marine Area Command, numerous rescue resources were dispatched to search for the boater, including two rescue helicopters. BB 20 arrived in the vicinity about 12.55pm and immediately turned due east in order to cover the area in the yacht’s wake. The sailor was quickly sighted and safely recovered by the three rescue crew by 1pm. Unit Commander Lawrence said the sailor was fortunate to have been swiftly located as he had been wearing dark clothes, without a lifejacket. “This helped explain why neither of two helicopters in the search area had been able to spot him,” he said. “The sailor was bruised and cold but otherwise unharmed. He was immediately wrapped in a space blanket for warmth. “Due to the strong south-east swell and to avoid injury to the sailor, BB 20 was forced to make a lengthy return passage, turning into Pittwater once abeam the Barrenjoey lighthouse.Once they had returned to Pittwater, the sailor was transferred to a NSW Police vessel and BB 20 returned to the Broken Bay base at Bayview.”

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

27


Saving lives Safely back to shore... MR Batemans Bay Unit Commander Mick Syrek and MR Bermagui crew Richard Stanton, Doug Hodges, Ray McLeod and Caron Parfitt with the crew of the rescued vessel. Photo: Glenn Sullivan.

V

olunteers from three MRNSW units worked seamlessly on an operation to rescue two men and a woman on board a yacht in imminent danger of smashing on to rocks in rough conditions near Bingi Bingi on January 24. Travelling north, the 52 foot vessel had lost its steering about 15 nautical miles from Moruya, with a large southerly swell and strong south-easterly winds making seas extremely hazardous. A major rescue operation was mounted after MR Batemans Bay Watch Officer Don Brewster received a call for help from the yacht’s skipper at 6.33pm, with Batemans 30 immediately dispatched. Monaro Regional Operations Manager Glenn Sullivan tasked Bermagui 30, with a crew of Alec Percival, Denise Page and Ray McLeod, to travel 48nm north as back-up. BM 30, punching into a 2-3m swell and heavy seas, could manage no more than 10 knots under way, while BG 30, with a following sea and swell from the southeast, reached 15-20 knots. MR Bermagui Watch Officer Peter Ford maintained radio and AIS contact with BG 30, while at the MR Narooma radio base, Watch Officers Clive Cavey and Judy Barry-Cotter also maintained essential contact. Helped by flares from the yacht, the BM 30 crew, Keith

28 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

Wrench, Peter Varkulevicius, Michael Dolan and Paul Hallam, located the vessel about 10pm. Given BM 30’s arduous trip through rough conditions to reach the yacht, BG 30 was tasked to tow the yacht to Batemans Bay. BM 30 returned to the marina, arriving after 1am before standing by with a fresh crew of Michael Syrek, David Murn, Peter Withington and Matthew Mason. Quickly taking the yacht under tow, BG 30 set out for Batemans Bay. This was a particularly difficult operation in the challenging sea conditions. With its rudder jammed to starboard, the yacht continually yawed hard over from BG 30’s starboard to port quarter. After more than three hours, BG 30 and the yacht made the safety of Batemans Bay, where BM 30 took over the tow. With the yacht yawing too widely to be safely towed over the Clyde River bar and too dangerous to raft up as it was taking on water, it was manoeuvred on to a visitor’s mooring in the lee of Snapper Island. The three sailors elected to stay on board to watch over the bilge pump. BM 30 then led BG 30 into the marina, with both rescue boats Logging Off at 2.45am.


Investing in our fleet T

he Fleet Modernisation Program has resulted in 77 new and refurbished vessels joining our fleet since MRNSW was established on July 1, 2009, including 10 new and refurbished boats in 2016-17. All have been funded, at a cost of more than $18 million, with the support of the NSW Government and boating community and units’ dedicated fundraising and sponsors. Port Macquarie 30 (Westport Spirit), above, was delivered in July 2016.

Point Danger 20 (PD 20)

Point Danger 30 (PD 30)

Brunswick 30 (BR 30)

Ballina 30 (BA 30)


Evans 30 (EH 30)

Iluka Yamba 30 (IY 30)

Wooli 30 (WI 30)

Woolgoolga 30 (WO 30)

Coffs 30 (CO 30)

Nambucca 20 (NH 20) - replacement

Nambucca 11 (NH 11) - replacement

Trial Bay 11 & Trial Bay 12 (TB 11 & TB 12) - 1 replacement

Trial Bay 30 (TB 30)

Port Macquarie 20 (PM 20)


Port Macquarie 10 (PM 10)

Camden Haven 30 (CH 30)

Crowdy 20 (CB 20)

Crowdy 30 (CB 30)

Forster 30 (FO 30)

Port Stephens 31 (PS 31)

Port Stephens 30 (PS 30)

Lemon Tree Passage 30 (LT 30)

Newcastle 30 (NC 30)

Lake Macquarie 30 (LM 30)


Ulladulla 20 (UL 20) - with Ulladulla 30 (left)

Lake Macquarie 13 (LM 13) - replacement

Tuggerah Lakes 21 (TL 21)

Tuggerah Lakes 20 (TL 20)

Terrigal 30 (TG 30)

Central Coast 22 (CC 22)

Central Coast 21 (CC 21)


Central Coast 11 (CC 11)

Broken Bay 20 (BB 20)

Hawkesbury 21 (HW 21)

Hawkesbury 22 (HW 22)

Cottage Point 30 (CP 30)

Middle Harbour 30 (MH 30)

Middle Harbour 20 (MH 20) - formerly NH 20

Port Jackson 30 (PJ 30)

Port Jackson 20 (PJ 20)

Botany 30 (BY 30)


Port Hacking 30 (PH 30)

Port Kembla 30 (PK30)

Port Kembla 20 (PK 20)

Shellharbour 30 (SH 30)

Shoalhaven 10 (SA 10)

Jervis Bay 40 (JB 40)

Jervis Bay 20 (JB 20)

Jervis Bay 20 (JB 20) - replacement

Sussex Inlet 30 (SI 30)

Kioloa 20 (KL 20)


Batemans 30 (BM 30)

Batemans 20 (BM 20)

Batemans 20 (BM 20) - replacement

Batemans 21 (BM 21)

Tuross 13 (TU 13)

Narooma 30 (NA 30)

Narooma 11 (NA 11)

Narooma 12 (NA 12)

Bermagui 30 (BG 30)

Merimbula 30 (MA 30)


Shoalhaven 30 (SA 30) and Shoalhaven 20 (SA 20)

Alpine Lakes 20 (AL 20)

Alpine Lakes 21 (AL 21)

Moama 20 (MO 20)

X Ray 21 (X 21)

X Ray 22 (X 22)

X Ray 10 (X 10)


Corporate information Providing a safety net for boaters in Sydney and further along the coastline ... Radio Operator Pamela Sayers on duty at Marine Rescue Terrey Hills. Photo: Brendan Trembath.

DIRECTORS Marine Rescue NSW Directors during all or part of 2016-17: James Glissan ESM, QC (Board Chair and General Director); Patricia Fayers ESM (General Director); Mark McKenzie (General Director); Bernard Gabriel ESM (Northern Rivers Regional Director); John Lynch ESM (Mid North Coast Regional Director); Roger Evans (Hunter/Central Coast Regional Director); David White ESM (Greater Sydney Regional Director); William Carter ESM (Illawarra Regional Director); and Glenn Felkin (Monaro Regional Director). COMPANY SECRETARY Alan Skelley REGISTERED CHARITY STREET ADDRESS & PRINCIPAL PLACE OF BUSINESS MRNSW State Headquarters, Building 1, 202 Nicholson Parade, Cronulla NSW 2230 BANK Westpac AUDITOR Grant Thornton Audit Pty Ltd

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

37


Directors’ qualifications & experience Name and status

Directors’ qualifications and experience

Mr James Glissan ESM, QC Appointed as Original Director 3 July 2009 – 11 December 2010

• Member of Marine Rescue Botany Port Hacking, after joining the Australian Volunteer Coast Guard Association (AVCGA) Botany Bay in 2008.

Elected General Director 11 December 2010, 3 year term 23 November 2013, 3 year term 26 November 2016, 3 year term

• Barrister since 1971, QC since 1985. Extensive practice in Company and Commercial law. Public Defender NSW 1981-1984. Associate Judge, District Court of NSW, 1989-1991. • Served on numerous Boards, including the Firearms Safety Awareness Council NSW.

Mrs Patricia Fayers ESM Elected General Director 29 November 2014, 3 year term

• Member of Marine Rescue Central Coast. The first woman elected to the MRNSW Board. Served more than 19 years in volunteer marine rescue since joining the Central Coast division of the Royal Volunteer Coastal Patrol (RVCP) in 1998. • Appointed Divisional Commander from 2006 to 2010 and elected as Unit Commander from 2012 to 2014. • A Skipper One, has participated in many rescue operations and was integral to the delivery of new vessels to the Central Coast unit. Served in positions including Watch Officer, Assistant Quartermaster, radio invigilator and boat licence tester in MRNSW.

38 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017


Name and status

Directors’ qualifications and experience

Mr Mark McKenzie

• Member of Marine Rescue Botany Port Hacking, after first joining the AVCGA in 2004.

Elected General Director 28 November 2015, 3 year term

• Qualified as Coxswain in 2007. Unit Commander from 2008 to 2013. • Qualifications include a Master of Business Administration, Cert. IV Training and Assessment and Cert. IV Occupational Health and Safety. • Extensive experience as a Group Operations Manager for a major public transport operator and a professional career also spanning power generation and distribution, telecommunications and construction.

Mr Bernard Gabriel ESM Elected Regional Director (Northern Rivers) 23 November 2013, 2 year term 28 November 2015, 2 year term

• Member of Marine Rescue Point Danger. Active member since 1965 and inception of Volunteer Rescue Association (VRA). Former Unit Commander. • Life Member, Marine Rescue NSW. • Qualifications and experience include Chief of Operations and Chief Skipper VRA and delegate for VMR Queensland and NSW. • Professional background as owner-operator of marina and boat building business. Area manager for NSW of large Queensland marine accessories distribution company.

Mr John Lynch ESM Elected Regional Director (Mid North Coast) 3 December 2011, 2 year term 23 November 2013, 2 year term 28 November 2015, 2 year term

• Member of Marine Rescue Forster-Tuncurry, after becoming an active volunteer in the RVCP in 1995. • Life Member, Marine Rescue NSW. • Qualified offshore skipper, Watchkeeper and Certificate IV TAA. • Positions held include Administration Officer, Secretary, Treasurer and Unit Commander, along with Senior Regional Officer North Coast, Member State Rescue Board Accreditation Team, Delegate Mid North Coast Marine Advisory Committee and Delegate Great Lakes Emergency Management Committee for 15 years. • Former member of the Royal Australian Navy and Company Secretary of the regional Australian Bank and its subsidiaries.

Mr Roger Evans Elected Regional Director (Hunter/Central Coast) 28 November 2015, 2 year term Resigned 13 January 2017

• Joined the AVCGA in 2007 and was a member of Marine Rescue Lake Macquarie until his resignation from the company. • Served as Deputy Unit Commander for three years until his election to the Board and holds SAR and Crew ratings. • Diploma in Mechanical Engineering. • Professional background includes 30 years with BHP, working in Western Australia, Victoria and NSW. Operations Manager in Geelong and Engineering Manager for the Wire Products Group before retirement in 2000.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

39


Name and status

Directors’ qualifications and experience

Mr David White ESM

• Member of Marine Rescue Cottage Point.

Elected Regional Director (Greater Sydney) 29 November 2014, 2 year term 26 November 2016, 2 year term

• Joined the AVCGA in 2004 at the completion of his service career as a Commander in the Royal Australian Navy. • Served as the unit’s Training Officer and Training Systems Officer for two years and Unit Commander for five years. • A vessel Master and active Coxswain, has developed and delivered cross-unit training within the Sydney Region, as well as supporting organisation-wide training initiatives and joining a working group to develop the new MRNSW Constitution.

Mr William Carter ESM Appointed Original Director 3 July 2009 – 11 December 2010 Elected Regional Director (Illawarra) 11 December 2010, 2 year term 29 November 2014, 2 year term 26 November 2016, 2 year term Resigned 30 May 2017

Mr Glenn Felkin Elected Regional Director (Monaro) 28 November 2015, 1 year term 26 November 2016, 2 year term

• Member of Marine Rescue Shoalhaven and Life Member of Marine Rescue NSW. •An original director of MRNSW, held numerous positions in the State’s volunteer marine rescue sector, including the NSW VRA Marine Committee Chair, Volunteer Marine Rescue Council Chair, VRA Vice President, State Rescue Board member, Shoalhaven Marine Rescue Association President and Marine Rescue Shoalhaven Unit Commander. •Skipper, NSW commercial coxswain and licensed automotive engineer.

• Member of Marine Rescue Batemans Bay, after joining the RVCP in 2009. • A Marine Master, has held positions including Acting Deputy Unit Commander, Training Officer, Watch Officer, Crew Leader, maintenance controller and member of vessel replacement teams. • Crew trainer and assessor for MR Moama upon its establishment and also an introductory trainer for the roll-out of the new Seahawk vessel tracking system for units from Kioloa to Eden. • Professional background in the aviation and motor industries, including more than 20 years with Qantas. • Elected for a one-year term to fill a casual vacancy before his subsequent 2016 re-election.

40 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017


Level 17, 383 Kent Street Sydney NSW 2000 Correspondence to: Locked Bag Q800 QVB Post Office Sydney NSW 1230 T +61 2 8297 2400 F +61 2 9299 4445 E info.nsw@au.gt.com W www.grantthornton.com.au

Auditor’s Independence Declaration To the Responsible Entities of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW In accordance with the requirements of section 60-40 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, as lead auditor for the audit of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW for the year ended 30 June 2017, I declare that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, there have been no contraventions of any applicable code of professional conduct in relation to the audit.

GRANT THORNTON AUDIT PTY LTD Chartered Accountants

James Winter Partner – Audit & Assurance Sydney, 21 October 2017

Grant Thornton Audit Pty Ltd ACN 130 913 594 a subsidiary or related entity of Grant Thornton Australia Ltd ABN 41 127 556 389 ‘Grant Thornton’ refers to the brand under which the Grant Thornton member firms provide assurance, tax and advisory services to their clients and/or refers to one or more member firms, as the context requires. Grant Thornton Australia Ltd is a member firm of Grant Thornton International Ltd (GTIL). GTIL and the member firms are not a worldwide partnership. GTIL and each member firm is a separate legal entity. Services are delivered by the member firms. GTIL does not provide services to clients. GTIL and its member firms are not agents of, and do not obligate one another and are not liable for one another’s acts or omissions. In the Australian context only, the use of the term ‘Grant Thornton’ may refer to Grant Thornton Australia Limited ABN 41 127 556 389 and its Australian subsidiaries and related entities. GTIL is not an Australian related entity to Grant Thornton Australia Limited.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation


Level 17, 383 Kent Street Sydney NSW 2000 Correspondence to: Locked Bag Q800 QVB Post Office Sydney NSW 1230 T +61 2 8297 2400 F +61 2 9299 4445 E info.nsw@au.gt.com W www.grantthornton.com.au

Independent Auditor’s Report To the Members of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW Report on the Audit of the Financial Report Opinion We have audited the accompanying financial report of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW (the “Entity”) which comprises the statement of financial position as at 30 June 2017, the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income, statement of changes in funds and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, and notes to the financial statements, including a summary of significant accounting policies and the Responsible Entities’ declaration. In our opinion the financial report of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 (“ACNC Act“), including: a)

giving a true and fair view of the Entity’s financial position as at 30 June 2017 and of its financial performance for the year then ended; and

b)

complying with Australian Accounting Standards and Division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Regulation 2013.

Basis for Auditor’s Opinion We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Our responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report section of our report. We are independent of the Entity in accordance with the ethical requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (the Code) that are relevant to our audit of the financial report in Australia. We have also fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in accordance with the Code. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion. Grant Thornton Audit Pty Ltd ACN 130 913 594 a subsidiary or related entity of Grant Thornton Australia Ltd ABN 41 127 556 389 ‘Grant Thornton’ refers to the brand under which the Grant Thornton member firms provide assurance, tax and advisory services to their clients and/or refers to one or more member firms, as the context requires. Grant Thornton Australia Ltd is a member firm of Grant Thornton International Ltd (GTIL). GTIL and the member firms are not a worldwide partnership. GTIL and each member firm is a separate legal entity. Services are delivered by the member firms. GTIL does not provide services to clients. GTIL and its member firms are not agents of, and do not obligate one another and are not liable for one another’s acts or omissions. In the Australian context only, the use of the term ‘Grant Thornton’ may refer to Grant Thornton Australia Limited ABN 41 127 556 389 and its Australian subsidiaries and related entities. GTIL is not an Australian related entity to Grant Thornton Australia Limited.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation.


Responsibilities of the Responsible Entities for the Financial Report The Responsible Entities of the Entity are responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the financial report in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards, the ACNC Act and the Charitable Fundraising Act NSW 1991 and Regulation 2015, and for such internal control as the Responsible Entities determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that is from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. In preparing the financial report, the Responsible Entities are responsible for assessing the Entity’s ability to continue as a going concern, disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the Responsible Entities either intend to liquidate the Entity or to cease operations, or have no realistic alternative but to do so. Those charged with governance are responsible for overseeing the Entity’s financial reporting process. Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report as a whole is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes our opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of this financial report. As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards, we exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. We also: •

Identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control.

Obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Entity’s internal control.

Evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the Responsible Entities.


Conclude on the appropriateness of the Responsible Entities’ use of the going concern basis of accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Registered Entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If we conclude that a material uncertainty exists, we are required to draw attention in our auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial report or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify our opinion. Our conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of our audit report. However, future events or conditions may cause the Entity to cease to continue as a going concern.

Evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial report, including the disclosures, and whether the financial report represents the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation.

Obtain sufficient appropriate evidence regarding the financial information of the entities or business activities within the Entity to express an opinion on the financial report. We are responsible for the direction, supervision, and performance of the Entity’s audit. We remain solely responsible for our audit opinion.

We communicate with those charged with governance regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that we identify during our audit. Report in accordance with the Charitable Fundraising Act NSW 1991 Opinion We have audited the accompanying financial report of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW (the “Entity”) for year ended 30 June 2017. In our opinion, in all material respects: a)

the financial statements show a true and fair view of the financial result of fundraising appeals for the year to which they relate;

b)

the financial statements and associated records have been properly kept during that year in accordance with the Charitable Fundraising Act NSW 1991 and Regulation 2015;

c)

money received as a result of fundraising appeals conducted during that year has been properly accounted for and applied in accordance with this Act and the Regulation; and

d)

there are reasonable grounds to believe the Entity will be able to meet its debts as and when they fall due.


Emphasis of Matter We draw attention to Note 2c(iii) to the financial report which describes the revenue recognition policy of the Entity regarding revenue from donations and fundraising, including the limitations that exist in relation to the recording of cash receipts from donations and fundraising. Revenue from this source represents a significant proportion of the Entity’s revenue. Our opinion is unmodified in respect of this matter. Responsibilities The Responsible Entities of the Entity are responsible for the preparation and presentation of the Financial Report in accordance with the requirements of the Charitable Fundraising Act NSW 1991 and Regulation 2015. Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report as a whole is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes our opinion, based on our audit conducted in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards.

GRANT THORNTON AUDIT PTY LTD Chartered Accountants

James Winter Partner - Audit & Assurance Sydney, 21 October 2017


Responsible Entities’ declaration Financial controllers ... Treasurers and colleagues from 32 units assemble with Headquarters finance staff at Cronulla in November for a training course on the new NetSuite accounting system. Photo: Florian Glajcar.

I

n the opinion of the Responsible Entities of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW: a. The financial statements of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW are in accordance with the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, including: i. Giving a true and fair view of its financial position as at 30 June 2017 and of its performance for the financial year ended on that date; and ii. Complying with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Comission Regulation 2013. b. There are reasonable grounds to believe that Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable. Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Responsible Entities:

James L Glissan ESM, QC Director Sydney, 21 October 2017

46 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

David White ESM Director


Declaration by the Principal Officer Regional winners ... Jean Thompson, Garry Grant and Peter Walton, who each won a Sea-Doo Spark jet ski in the Marine Rescue NSW Art Union, collect their prizes from Commissioner Stacey Tannos.

D

eclaration by the Principal Officer in accordance with the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 on behalf of responsible entitites in respect of fundraising appeals:

I, Stacey Tannos, Commissioner and Chief Executive Officer of Marine Rescue NSW, declare that: 1. the attached financial statements give a true and fair view of all income and expenditure of the Company with respect to fundraising appeals; 2. the attached statement of financial position gives a true and fair view of the state of affairs with respect to fundraising appeals; 3. the provisions of the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 (NSW), the regulations under the Act and the conditions attached to the authority have been complied with; and 4. the internal controls exercised by the Company are appropriate and effective in accounting for all income received.

Stacey Tannos ESM Commissioner Chief Executive Officer Sydney, 21 October 2017

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

47


Statement of profit or loss & comprehensive income FOR THE FINANCIAL YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 2017 $

2016 $

NSW recreational boat licence & registration levy

6,150,000

5,994,396

NSW Government core grant

1,648,490

1,627,335

Donations

888,272

1,137,627

Other grant income

270,780

666,882

Interest

101,670

145,864

1,602,752

1,621,118

Proceeds from insurance claims

-

3,365

Profit on sale of assets

-

86,805

492,963

554,193

11,154,927

11,837,585

Staff costs

3,021,366

2,544,835

Depreciation

2,752,271

2,628,237

270,339

143,577

2,207,750

2,307,576

Marketing

137,873

185,883

Membership

560,508

545,568

IT expenditure

255,774

440,987

33,443

-

Loss on sale of assets

204,025

-

Games of chance

322,561

434,642

Fundraising

175,467

106,211

Training expenses

116,431

129,710

1,868,020

1,864,152

11,925,828

11,331,378

(770,901)

506,207

-

-

(770,901)

506,207

Note Revenue and other income

Other income

Activities income Total revenue and other income

4

Expenditure

Grant expenditure Maintenance & development of assets

Expenditure on insurance claims

Administration Total expenses Net (deficit)/surplus

4

Other comprehensive income

Other comprehensive income for the year Total comprehensive (loss)/income for the year

Notes to the financial statements are included on pages 52 - 65.

48 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017


Statement of financial position AS AT 30 JUNE 2017

Note

2017 $

2016 $

Cash and cash equivalents

12(a)

7,800,583

8,017,270

Trade and other receivables

5

1,347,430

1,157,044

Inventories

6

467,455

478,854

9,615,468

9,653,168

19,625,564

19,619,661

Total non-current assets

19,625,564

19,619,661

Total assets

29,241,032

29,272,829

8

1,757,344

1,023,025

9(a)

1,157,227

837,914

2,914,571

1,860,939

1,692,947

2,007,475

Total non-current liabilities

1,692,947

2,007,475

Total liabilities

4,607,518

3,868,414

24,633,514

25,404,415

9,849,267

9,849,267

Accumulated funds

14,784,247

15,555,148

Total funds

24,633,514

25,404,415

Current assets

Total current assets Non-current assets Property, plant and equipment

7

Current liabilities Trade and other payables Borrowings from non-related entity Total current liabilities Non-current liabilities Borrowings from non-related entity

Net assets

9(b)

Funds Transferred assets reserve

Notes to the financial statements are included on pages 52 - 65.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

49


Statement of changes in funds AS AT 30 JUNE 2017 Transferred Assets Reserve $

Accumulated funds $

Total funds

9,849,267

15,048,941

24,898,208

506,207

506,207

-

506,207

506,207

Balance at 30 June 2016

9,849,267

15,555,148

25,404,415

Balance at 1 July 2016

9,849,267

15,555,148

25,404,415

-

(770,901)

(770,901)

(770,901)

(770,901)

14,784,247

24,633,514

Balance at 1 July 2015

$

Total comprehensive income for the year Net surplus for the year Total comprehensive income for the year

Total comprehensive income for the year Net deficit for the year Other comprehensive income for the year Total comprehensive loss for the year Balance at 30 June 2017

9,849,267

Notes to the financial statements are included on pages 52 - 65.

50 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017


Statement of cash flows FOR THE FINANCIAL YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 2017 $

2016 $

Cash received from levies, grants, donations & other income

10,732,660

11,166,731

Cash paid to suppliers & employees

(8,395,379)

(8,477,732)

-

245,769

2,337,281

2,934,768

Proceeds from property, plant & equipment

231,079

367,327

Interest received

101,670

145,864

Payments for purchases of property, plant & equipment

(2,758,174)

(4,230,232)

Net cash used in investing activities

(2,425,425)

(3,717,041)

Payment of interest on leases (Westpac)

(133,328)

(121,375)

Repayment of capital on leases (Westpac)

(951,269)

(562,258)

-

(350,000)

956,054

1,207,940

Net cash (used in)/provided from financing activities

(128,543)

174,307

Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

(216,687)

(607,966)

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the financial year

8,017,270

8,625,236

7,800,583

8,071,270

Note Cash flows from operating activities

Amount (paid)/received from insurance claims Net cash provided by operating activities

12(b)

Cash flows from investing activities

Cash flows from financing activities

Repayment of borrowings Proceeds of borrowing

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year

12(a)

Notes to the financial statements are included on pages 52 - 65.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

51


Notes to the financial statements Rapid response training ... MR Port Macquarie’s Ben Leonard and Luke Allman, from MR Trial Bay, take part in a Mid North Coast Region Rescue Water Craft training course in October. Photo: Helen Federoff.

1. CORPORATE INFORMATION The financial statements of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW, operating as Marine Rescue NSW (MRNSW), for the year ended 30 June 2017 were authorised for issue in accordance with a resolution of the Directors on 21 October 2017. MRNSW is a company limited by guarantee, incorporated and domiciled in Australia. 2. SUMMARY OF ACCOUNTING POLICIES a. Basis of Preparation General Purpose Financial Statements These General Purpose Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements, other authoritative pronouncements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board and Urgent Issues Group interpretations. The company is a ‘Not for profit’ entity and registered with the Australian Charities and Not-forprofits Commission. Historical cost convention and currency The financial statements have been prepared on the basis of historical cost, except for the revaluation of certain noncurrent assets and financial instruments. Cost is based on the fair values of the consideration given in exchange for assets. All amounts are presented in Australian dollars, unless otherwise noted. b. Significant accounting judgments, estimates and assumptions The preparation of financial statements requires the Directors to make judgments, estimates and assumptions that affect the application of policies and reported amounts of assets, liabilities, income and expenses. The estimates and associated assumptions are based on historical experience and other various factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis of making the judgments. Actual results may differ from these estimates. The estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to accounting estimates are recognised in the period in which the estimate is revised if the revision affects only that period or in the

52 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017


period of the revision and future periods if the revision affects both current and future periods. Significant accounting estimates and assumptions The key estimates and assumptions that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of certain assets and liabilities within the next annual reporting period are: Make good provisions Provisions for future costs to return certain leased premises to their original condition are based on the company’s experience with previous premises and estimates of likely restoration costs determined by management. These estimates may vary from the actual costs incurred as a result of conditions existing at the date the premises are vacated. Management has estimated that the lease make good provisions will be negligible. Provisions for employee benefits Provisions for employee benefits payable after 12 months from the reporting date are based on future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures and periods of service, as discussed in Note 2(m). The amount of these provisions would change should any of these factors change in the next 12 months. Useful lives of depreciable assets Management reviews its estimate of the useful lives of depreciable assets at each reporting date, based on the expected utility of the assets. Uncertainties in these estimates relate to technical obsolescence that may change the utility of certain software and IT equipment. Inventories Management estimates the net realisable values of inventories, taking into account the most reliable evidence available at each reporting date. The future realisation of these inventories may be affected by future technology or where they no longer meet the requirements of the company through changes in design or equipment redunancy. No provision for impairment has been recognised at the date of this financial report. Long Service Leave The liability for Long Service Leave is recognised and measured at the present value of the estimated cash flows to be made in respect of all employees at the reporting date. In determining the present value of the liability, estimates of attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation have been taken into account. c. Revenue recognition Revenue is recognised when the company is legally entitled to the income and the amount can be quantified with reasonable accuracy. Revenues are recognised net of the amounts of Goods and Services Tax (GST) payable to the Australian Taxation Office. Income from a contribution is recognised when the company obtains control of the contribution or right to receive the contribution, it is probable the economic benefits comprising the contribution will flow to the entity and the amount can be measured reliably. (i) Government funding Under an agreement with the Office of Emergency Management (formerly the NSW Ministry for Police and Emergency Services), the company’s services are supported by funding received from the NSW Government in the form of a core Government grant and through NSW Roads and Maritime Services as a portion of recreational boating registrations and licences. Grants received on the condition that specified services are delivered, or conditions are fulfilled, are considered reciprocal. Such grants are initially recognised as a liability and revenue is recognised as services are performed or conditions fulfilled. Revenue from non-reciprocal grants is recognised when the company obtains control of the funds. (ii) Interest revenue Interest revenue is accrued on a time basis, by reference to the principal outstanding and at the effective interest rate applicable, which is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset to that asset’s net carrying amount. (iii) Donations and fundraising Donations collected, including cash, in kind donations, donations of vessels and equipment and goods for resale, are recognised as revenue when the company gains control, economic benefits are probable and the amount of the donation can be measured reliably. Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW, in common with most organisations dependent upon such contributions, is unable to establish control over voluntary donations prior to their initial entry in the accounting records.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

53


(iv) Other grants Grants received for a specific project not yet completed are only recognised as income when the project occurs or the terms and conditions are met as these amounts are repayable if not fully utilised on the specific project. Grants received for general operational funding and which are not repayable are brought to account as income when received. Revenue from sales of goods comprises revenue earned (net of returns, discounts and allowances) from the sale of goods purchased for resale and gifts donated for resale. Sales revenue is recognised when the control of goods passes to the customer. (v) Asset sales The gain or loss on disposal of all non-current assets and available-for-sale financial investments is determined as the difference between the carrying amount of the asset at the time of the disposal and the net proceeds on disposal. Compensation from third parties for items of property, plant and equipment that were impaired, lost or given up shall be included in profit or loss when the compensation becomes receivable. The impaired or lost assets shall be written off. The cost of items of property, plant and equipment restored, purchased or constructed as replacements is capitalised as capital assets. (vi) Investment income Investment income comprises interest. Interest income is recognised as it accrues, using the effective interest method. d. Expenditure All expenditure is accounted for on an accruals basis and has been classified under headings that aggregate all costs related to the category. Where costs cannot be directly attributed to a particular category they have been allocated to activities on a basis consistent with use of the resources. Fundraising costs are those incurred in seeking voluntary contributions by donation and do not include costs of disseminating information relating to the activities carried on by the company. Management and administration costs are those incurred in connection with the administration of the company and compliance with constitutional and statutory requirements. Other costs comprise investment management fees, information and education costs. e. Income Tax The company is exempted from paying income tax due to it being a charitable institution in terms of Section 50–5 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997, as amended. f. Cash and cash equivalents Cash comprises cash on hand and demand deposits. Cash equivalents are short-term, highly liquid investments that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value or term deposits longer than three months in duration that may be broken without prejudice and are subject to an insignificant risk of change in value at call. g. Goods and Services Tax Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of Goods and Services Tax (GST), except: (i) where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the taxation authority, it is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset or as part of an item of expense; or (ii) for receivables and payables which are recognised inclusive of GST. The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is included as part of receivables or payables. Cash flows are included in the cash flow statement on a gross basis. The GST component of the cash flows arising from investing and financing activities which is recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is classified as operating cash flows. h. Financial Assets Loans and receivables Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market are classified as loans and receivables. These are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment. Interest is recognised by applying the effective interest rate. Impairment of financial assets Financial assets, other than those at fair value through profit or loss, are assessed for indicators of impairment at each

54 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017


Slam dunk ... Sydney Kings great Steve Carfino and Beetlejuice present MR Terrey Hills Deputy Unit Commander Matt King with the basketball team’s Unsung Hero recognition award at half-time during a game against the Brisbane Bullets the day before Halloween in 2016.

balance sheet date. Financial assets are impaired where there is objective evidence that as a result of one or more events that occurred after the initial recognition of the financial asset the estimated future cash flows of the investment have been impacted. For financial assets carried at amortised cost, the amount of the impairment is the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows, discounted at the original effective interest rate. The carrying amount of the financial assets including uncollectible trade receivables is reduced by the impairment loss through the use of an allowance account. Subsequent recoveries of amounts previously written off are credited against the allowance account. Changes in the carrying amount of the allowance account are recognised in profit or loss. With the exception of available-for-sale equity instruments, if, in a subsequent period, the amount of the impairment loss decreases and the decrease can be related objectively to an event occurring after the impairment was recognised, the previously recognised impairment loss is reversed through profit or loss to the extent the carrying amount of the investment at the date the impairment is reversed does not exceed what the amortised cost would have been had the impairment not been recognised. i. Impairment of long-lived assets At the end of each reporting period the company assesses whether there is any indication that individual assets are impaired. Where impairment indicators exist, a recoverable amount is determined and impairment losses are recognised in profit or loss where the asset’s carrying value exceeds its recoverable amount. The recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less costs to sell and value in use. For the purpose of assessing value in use, the estimated future cash flows are discounted to their present value using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the asset. Where it is not possible to estimate recoverable amount for an individual asset, recoverable amount is determined for the cash-generating unit to which the asset belongs.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

55


j. Inventories Inventories comprise goods for distribution and goods for resale at no or nominal consideration as part of the company’s charitable activities. Inventories may be purchased or received by way of donation. Inventories are carried at the lower of cost or net realisable value. The cost is the purchase price of the items. The inventory is made up of supplies purchased for members and units, consisting of uniform items, items for the vessels, promotional and educational materials. Goods for resale No value is prescribed to goods for resale that have been donated to the company where the fair value cannot be reliably determined. The cost of bringing each item to its present location and condition is determined on a first-in, first-out basis. Net realisable value is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business, less estimated costs necessary to make the sale. k. Property, plant and equipment Property, plant and equipment is carried at cost or deemed cost less accumulated depreciation. Depreciation Depreciation is calculated on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life, or in the case of leasehold improvements and certain leased plant and equipment, the shorter lease term, as follows: (i) Communications equipment – over 4 years (ii) Furniture and fittings – over 4 years (iii) IT and office equipment – over 3 years (iv) Motor vehicles – over 5 years (v) Rescue vessels – over 10 years The assets’ residual values and useful lives are reviewed and adjusted, if appropriate, at the end of each reporting period. Gains and losses on disposals are calculated as the difference between the net disposal proceeds and the asset’s carrying amount and are included in profit or loss in the year that the item is derecognised. l. Trade and other payables Trade payables are recognised initially at their fair value, which is the amount expected to be paid, and subsequently at amortised cost. These amounts represent liabilities for services provided to the company prior to the end of financial year which are unpaid. The amounts are unsecured and are usually paid within 60 days of recognition. m. Employee benefits Employee benefits comprise wages and salaries, annual, non-accumulating sick and long service leave and contributions to superannuation plans. Liabilities for wages and salaries expected to be settled within 12 months of balance date are recognised in other payables in respect of employees’ services up to the reporting date. Liabilities for annual leave in respect of employees’ services up to the reporting date which are expected to be settled within 12 months after the end of the period in which the employees render the related services are recognised in the provision for annual leave. Both liabilities are measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are settled. Liabilities for nonaccumulating sick leave are recognised when the leave is taken and are measured at the rates paid or payable. The company pays contributions to certain defined contribution superannuation plans. Contributions are recognised in the income statement when they are due. The company has no obligation to pay further contributions to these plans if the plans do not hold sufficient assets to pay all employee benefits relating to employee service in current and prior periods. Other long-term employee benefits The company’s liabilities for annual leave and long service leave are included in other long-term benefits as they are not expected to be settled wholly within twelve (12) months after the end of the period in which the employees render the related service. They are measured at the present value of the expected future payments to be made to employees. The expected future payments incorporate anticipated future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures and periods of service and are discounted at rates determined by reference to market yields at the end of the reporting period on high quality corporate bonds that have maturity dates that approximate the timing of the estimated future cash outflows. Any re-measurements arising from experience adjustments and changes in assumptions are recognised in profit or loss in the periods in which the changes occur. The company presents employee benefit obligations as current liabilities in the statement of financial position if the

56 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017


company does not have an unconditional right to defer settlement for at least twelve (12) months after the reporting period, irrespective of when the actual settlement is expected to take place. Post-employment benefits plans The company provides post-employment benefits though defined contribution plans. n. Economic dependence The company is dependent upon the ongoing receipt of Federal and State Government grants and community and corporate donations to ensure the ongoing continuance of its programs. At the date of this report, management has no reason to believe this financial support will not continue. o. Finance and operating leases i. Finance leases The economic ownership of a leased asset is transferred to the lessee if the lessee bears substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership of the leased asset. Where the company is a lessee in this type of arrangement, the related asset is recognised at the inception of the lease at the fair value of the leased asset or, if lower, the present value of the lease payments plus incidental payments. A corresponding amount is recognised as a finance lease liability. See Note 2 (k) for the depreciation methods and useful lives for assets held under finance lease. The corresponding finance lease liability is reduced by lease payments net of finance charges. The interest element of lease payments represents a constant proportion of the outstanding capital balance and is charged to profit or loss, as finance costs over the period of the lease. The Westpac leasing facility is secured against certain vessels within the fleet. ii. Operating leases All other leases are treated as operating leases. Where the company is a lessee, payments on operating lease agreements are recognised as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term. Associated costs, such as maintenance and insurance, are expensed as incurred. 3. INFORMATION TO BE FURNISHED UNDER THE NSW CHARITABLE FUNDRAISING ACT 1991

(a) Details of Aggregate Gross Income & Total Expenditure of Fundraising Appeals Gross proceeds from Fundraising Appeals

Direct costs of Fundraising Appeals

Net Surplus from Fundraising Appeals

2017 $

2016 $

1,931,638

1,723,233

498,028

540,853

1,433,610

1,182,380

The surplus of fundraising is applied in the charitable purposes of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW, including the acquistion of vessels and other equipment.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

57


Our 3,096 Marine Rescue NSW members contributed almost 592,000 volunteer hours to frontline duties.


Left: Jervis Bay 40 powers to the rescue off the Illawarra coastline.

4. SURPLUS FROM REVENUE, OTHER INCOME AND EXPENSES

2017 $

2016 $

Activities income

492,963

554,193

Donations

888,272

1,137,627

Fundraising & sponsorship income

639,516

493,810

Games of chance

625,791

799,303

NSW recreational boat licence & registration levy

6,150,000

5,994,396

NSW Government core grant

1,648,490

1,627,335

Grants

270,780

666,882

Sales

268,621

241,564

Proceeds from insurance claims

-

3,365

Profit on sale of assets

-

86,805

101,670

145,864

68,824

86,441

11,154,927

11,837,585

Activities

117,304

173,505

Administration

967,692

1,050,972

Staff cost

3,021,366

2,544,835

Maintenance of assets

2,207,750

2,307,576

33,443

-

Loss on disposal of assets

204,025

-

Cost of sales

421,021

356,583

Depreciation

2,752,271

2,628,237

Training

116,431

129,710

Grant expenditure

270,339

143,577

Fundraising & games of choice

498,028

540,853

-

12,223

Interest expense (on finance loans)

133,328

121,375

IT expenses

255,774

440,987

Insurances

267,560

212,474

Marketing

137,873

185,883

22,183

15,480

499,440

467,108

11,925,828

11,331,378

Revenue

Interest Other

Expenses

Net insurance proceeds received

Interest expense (unwinding discount on RMS loan)

Membership Utilities

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

59


5. TRADE AND OTHER RECEIVABLES

2017 $

2016 $

Trade receivables

825,826

236,625

Other receivables

500,713

505,172

20,891

415,247

1,347,430

1,157,044

397,769

378,852

Stock on hand - ratings & ranks

18,352

35,915

Stock on hand - Unit items/equipment

51,334

64,087

467,455

478,854

48,492

133,282

At Cost

4,343,971

3,640,642

Less: Accumulated depreciation

(382,495)

(238,574)

3,961,476

3,402,068

2,358,297

1,885,564

(1,352,523)

(959,241)

1,005,774

926,323

482,438

471,270

(406,574)

(364,359)

75,864

106,911

At Cost

1,173,795

1,072,271

Less: Accumulated depreciation

(993,507)

(893,010)

180,288

179,261

932,447

735,191

(494,595)

(418,487)

437,852

316,704

Goods & Services Tax recoverable

6. INVENTORIES Stock on hand - uniforms

7. PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT Assets under construction - general

Buildings/leasehold improvements

Communications equipment At Cost Less: Accumulated depreciation

Furniture, fixtures & fittings At Cost Less: Accumulated depreciation

IT, office, plant & equipment

Motor vehicles At Cost Less: Accumulated depreciation

60 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017


2017 $

2016 $

20,574,156

18,244,204

393,006

1,504,382

(7,965,487)

(6,139,698)

13,001,675

13,608,888

At Cost

1,400,695

1,289,485

Less: Accumulated depreciation

(486,552)

(343,261)

914,143

946,224

19,625,564

19,619,661

Rescue vessels At Cost Under construction Less: Accumulated depreciation

Rescue vessel equipment

Total property, plant and equipment

Reconciliations Reconciliations of the carrying amounts of each class of property, plant and equipment at the beginning and end of the current and previous financial year are set out below: Assets under construction 48,492

133,282

3,402,068

3,141,693

703,329

369.093

Depreciation

(143,921)

(108.718)

Carrying amount at the end of the financial year

3,961,476

3,402,068

Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year

926,323

685,176

Additions at cost

472,733

533,980

-

(1,778)

Depreciation

(393,282)

(291,055)

Carrying amount at the end of the financial year

1,005,774

926,323

106,911

118,510

11,167

53,457

-

(2,507)

(42,214)

(62,549)

75,864

106,911

Additions at cost

Buildings/leasehold improvements Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year Additions at cost

Communications equipment

Disposals

Furniture, fixtures & fittings Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year Additions at cost Disposals Depreciation Carrying amount at the end of the financial year

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

61


2017 $

2016 $

Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year

179,261

222,636

Additions at cost

101,524

90,975

-

(1,077)

(100,497)

(133,273)

180,288

179,261

Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year

316,704

386,628

Additions at cost

283,244

57,898

Disposals

(83,878)

(4,471)

Depreciation

(78,218)

(123,351)

Carrying amount at the end of the financial year

437,852

316,704

13,608,888

12,786,905

1,192,876

1,478,001

393,006

1,504,382

(367,307)

(374,427)

Depreciation

(1,825,788)

(1,785,973)

Carrying amount at the end of the financial year

13,001,675

13,608,888

Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year

946,224

956,639

Additions at cost

131,910

112,904

4,360

-

(168,351)

(123,319)

914,143

946,224

19,625,564

19,619,661

IT, office, plant & equipment

Disposals Depreciation Carrying amount at the end of the financial year

Motor vehicles

Rescue vessels Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year Additions at cost Assets under construction Disposals

Rescue vessel equipment

Disposals Depreciation Carrying amount at the end of the financial year Total Property, Plant and Equipment

The written down value of assets under finance lease was $3,373,567.93. The depreciation of leased assets was $1,116,149.62.

8. TRADE AND OTHER PAYABLES Trade payables Employee liabilities

62 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

1,184,679

678,713

572,665

344,312

1,757,344

1,023,025


Heavy going ... crews from the Lemon Tree Passage, Port Stephens and Newcastle units return to shore after the Hunter/Central Coast SAREX in September 2016.

9. BORROWINGS a) Current Government loan Bank loan (Westpac Leasing Facility)

2017 $

2016 $

144,000

144,000

1,013,227

693,914

1,157,227

837,914

154,400

298,400

1,538,547

1,708,727

-

348

1,692,947

2,007,475

b) Non-current Government loan Bank loan (Westpac Leasing Facility) Other

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

63


10. MEMBERS’ LIABILITIES AND NUMBERS The liability of the Members is limited. Every Regular and Provisional Member of the company undertakes to contribute to the assets of the Company, in the event of the same being wound up while s/he is a Member, or within one year after s/he ceases to be a Member, for payment of the debts and the liabilities of the company (contracted before s/he ceases to be a Member) and of the costs, charges and expenses of winding up and for the adjustment of the rights of the contributors among themselves, such amount as may be required not exceeding two dollars ($2.00). The numbers of Members were: Regular Members 2,480 Provisional 553 Other 63 Total 3,096 11. KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL COMPENSATION No emoluments were received or due and receivable by the Directors of the company. Those with authority for planning, directing and controlling the company’s activities, directly or indirectly (other than Directors) are the Commissioner, Deputy Commissioner, Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Services Director and IT and Business Development Director.

2017 $

2016 $

The compensation paid to the key management personnel is:

993,771

901,288

12. CASH FLOW INFORMATION

2017 $

2016 $

7,800,583

8,017,270

Net (deficit)/surplus for the year

(770,901)

506,207

Interest income received & receivable

(101,670)

24,490

Depreciation charged

2,752,271

2,628,237

Gain on sale of property, plant & equipment

(231,079)

(86,805)

-

12,223

133,328

-

Movement in receivables

(190,386)

(192,416)

Movement in inventories

11,399

21,206

Movement in provisions

228,353

87,342

Movement in payables

505,966

(65,716)

2,337,281

2,934,768

(a) Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents For the purposes of the statement of cash flows, cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand and in banks and investments in money market instruments, net of outstanding bank overdrafts. Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year as shown in the statement of cash flows is reconciled to the related items in the statement of financial position as follows: Cash and cash equivalents (b) Reconciliation of surplus for the year to net cash flows from operating activities

Present value adjustment for borrowings Interest on finance leases Changes in net assets and liabilities

Net cash from operating activities

64 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017


13. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS There have been no signifcant subsequent events.

14. STATE RESCUE BOARD FINANCIAL SUBMISSION Marine Rescue NSW reports on its investment of the annual funding received from the State Government via a direct Government grant and the levy on recreational boat licences and registrations in its submission to the NSW State Rescue Board Annual Report. This submission excludes funding from other sources such as fundraising and other grants and expenditure that relates to unit operations. A copy of the 2016-17 MRNSW State Rescue Board financial submission, reconciling this expenditure, is at Appendix A (page 67). This submission, which reports on the acquittal of funding provided to MRNSW on a cash basis, may vary from the final audited reports, which are on an accrual basis.

15. REGISTERED OFFICE AND PRINCIPAL PLACES OF BUSINESS The Registered Office of the company is: Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW (Trading as Marine Rescue NSW) Building 1, 202 Nicholson Parade Cronulla NSW 2230 Phone: 02 8071 4848 Web: www.marinerescuensw.com.au Email: admin@marinerescuensw.com.au The Principal Places of Business are located at the following Marine Rescue NSW bases (from north to south): 1

Point Danger

16

Port Stephens

31

Port Kembla

2

Brunswick

17

Lemon Tree Passage

32

Shellharbour

3

Cape Byron

18

Newcastle

33

Shoalhaven

4

Ballina

19

Lake Macquarie

34

Jervis Bay

5

Evans Head

20

Norah Head

35

Sussex Inlet

6

Iluka Yamba

21

Tuggerah Lakes

36

Ulladulla

7

Wooli

22

Central Coast

37

Kioloa

8

Woolgoolga

23

Terrigal

38

Batemans Bay

9

Coffs Harbour

24

Hawkesbury

39

Tuross

10

Nambucca

25

Cottage Point

40

Narooma

11

Trial Bay

26

Broken Bay

41

Bermagui

12

Port Macquarie

27

Terrey Hills

42

Merimbula

13

Camden Haven

28

Middle Harbour

43

Eden

14

Crowdy Harrington

29

Port Jackson

44

Alpine Lakes

15

Forster-Tuncurry

30

Botany Port Hacking

45

Moama

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

65


Our crews supported on-water festivities, yacht races, fishing competitions and other events.

66 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017


Left: Colour and movement ... Port Jackson 20 keeps a watch on the festive spectator fleet on Sydney Harbour for the Australia Day 2017 celebrations. Photo: Brendan Trembath.

APPENDIX A: MRNSW submission NSW State Rescue Board Annual Report 2016-17

$

$

7,255,157

Total funding made available: Represented by: NSW recreational boat registration & licence levy

5,606,667

NSW Government grant

1,648,490

Amount expended by Marine Rescue NSW Indirect Unit Funding

77,939

Direct Unit funding

795,325

Funding Advance repayment

144,000

Administration

607,897

Staff cost Activities expenses

2,698,407 23,320

Buildings

152,541

Uniforms and stores costs

294,099

Training

59,152

IT

195,790

Insurance

261,621

Marketing

100,245

Membership

6,219

Motor vehicles

268,565

Radio facilities

195,035

Rescue vessel R&M

90,401

Trailers

4,596

Utilities

368,728

Art Union & fundraising costs

225,225

Subtotal New vessels

6,569,105 884,119

Other vessel expenditure

52,358

Other capital expenditure

809,995

Total capital expenditure

1,746,472

Unit contributions, leasing facility & other funds Total Expenditure

(1,060,420) 7,225,157

Note: This data represents the acquittal of funding provided on a cash basis to Marine Rescue NSW from the NSW Government through a direct grant and the proceeds of the levy on NSW recreational boat registrations and licences.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017

67


APPENDIX A: MRNSW submission NSW State Rescue Board Annual Report 2016-17 continued

$

New vessels (note)

11.5m Steber 38, Port Stephens Unit (part) 6.8m Ocean Cylinder RHIB, Alpine Lakes Unit (part) *

197,164 49,119

7.5m Ocean Cylinder RHIB, Shoalhaven Unit

297,690

7.5m Ocean Cylinder RHIB Ulladulla (part)

297,690

Sea-Doo Rescue Water Craft, Port Macquarie Unit

15,227

Sea-Doo Rescue Water Craft, Lake Macquarie Unit

13,615

Sea-Doo Rescue Water Craft, Central Coast Unit

13,615

Subtotal Other vessel capital expenditure

884,119 52,358

Other capital expenditure Buildings/leasehold improvements Furniture and fittings IT equipment

416,736 3.977 11,050

Communication equipment

219,306

Rescue vessel equipment

49,876

Motor vehicles & trailers

109,050

Subtotal

809,995

Total

1,746,472

Note: Funding allocations against new vessels represent the amount paid during the financial year and may not reflect the total cost of the vessel. * RHIB Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat

68 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2016-2017


Marine Rescue NSW Operational Regions and Unit locations


MARINE RESCUE NSW Volunteers saving lives on the water Volunteer Marine Rescue New South Wales ABN 98 138 078 092 PO Box 579, Cronulla NSW 2230 Phone: 02 8071 4848 | Fax: 02 9969 5214 Web: www.marinerescuensw.com.au Email: admin@marinerescuensw.com.au

MRNSW Financial Report 2017  

MRNSW Financial Report 2017