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Annual Report 2017 - 2018


Contents

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS & REPORTS YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2018

2017-2018 at a glance

1

Report of the Chair

2

Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW ABN: 98 138 078 092 CFN: 21153 (A company limited by guarantee)

Report of the Commissioner

6

Operations

10

A safe, modern fleet

15

Our people

16

Training & education

18

Our facilities

20

Fundraising & grants

22

Working together

24

IT & communications

26

Investing in our fleet

28

Corporate information

37

Report Design and Layout Nicole Brown

Directors’ qualifications & experience

38

Auditor’s Independence Declaration

41

Photos Brendan Trembath, unless otherwise credited. Thank you to the MRNSW personnel who have supplied photos of our new and refurbished rescue vessels.

Independent Auditor’s Report

42

Responsible Entities’ declaration

46

Declaration by the Principal Officer

47

Statement of profit or loss & comprehensive income

48

Statement of financial position

49

Statement of changes in funds

50

Statement of cash flows

51

Notes to the financial statements

52

Appendix A: Expenditure of NSW Government grant & boating registration & licence levy

67

The Registered Office of the company is: Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW (Trading as Marine Rescue NSW) Building 1, 202 Nicholson Parade Cronulla NSW 2230 Phone: 02 8071 4848 Web: mrnsw.com.au Email: admin@mrnsw.com.au

© Copyright Volunteer Marine Rescue New South Wales. Reproduction in whole or in part prohibited without permission of the publisher.


2,802

841

missions

emergencies

1,961

6,884

other rescues

people rescued

273,405

74,502

radio calls

Log Ons

2017-2018 at a glance 81

14,149

new/refurbished boats over life of MRNSW

App Log Ons

3,082

volunteers

1,505

new volunteer qualifications

2,297 men

785

women

535,320 volunteer duty hours

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

1


Report of the Chair Found ... the crew of Port Hacking 30, with Chair Jim Glissan as On Scene Coordinator (centre), retrieves a rescue mannequin from the water off Stanwell Park during a Search and Rescue Exercise in August 2017.

Chair James Glissan ESM, QC

I

t is my pleasure to present the Marine Rescue NSW Annual Report and Financial Statements for 2017-18, outlining the organisation’s achievements and service over the past year. The dominant focus of our attention and action this year was on leadership. In past years, whether through necessity, intent or externally-imposed requirements, our corporate attention has been directed to areas such as our heavy capital investment in the Fleet Modernisation Program; the development, reform and delivery of our training curriculum and resources; and our technological advances. This year we pivoted strongly to shine a more intense spotlight on bolstering our people. We began with the Marine Rescue NSW Leadership Conference, bringing our senior leadership team together at Port Macquarie on the Mid North Coast. Unit Commmanders, Deputy Unit Commanders, the Board and staff spent a constructive weekend celebrating our achievements, deliberating on issues confronting us at all levels of the organisation and examining how to better support those who step up to the bow of the ship. One of the outcomes of this gathering was a commitment to the development of a targeted leadership training program to assist our unit leaders not only with their operational duties but also the human resources

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and management responsibilities their roles embody. The training team has worked hard to develop a new course specifically designed for our organisation’s needs. This will be rolled out early in the new financial year. Our Unit Commanders and Deputies go above and beyond expectations in these demanding roles and the Board is confident the new program will provide them with a welcome new level of resourcing, skill and knowledge. Congratulations to our newly-elected Unit Commanders and Deputy Unit Commanders for the coming two years and our thanks to all outgoing unit leaders for their service. These elected leaders are ably supported by appointed executive teams who also deserve recognition for shouldering additional responsibilities in training, operations, finance, administration and myriad other duties. Throughout the year, the Board has continued to work collaboratively with our volunteer members and staff to provide considered strategic leadership and oversight of the organisation. Over time, the Board has consistently exhorted our members to seize the opportunity to participate in our internal democratic processes, both as candidates for


Steering the course ... volunteer crew member Pietre Smit at the helm of Middle Harbour 30 during a training exercise on Sydney Harbour.

election to the Board and by exercising their right to decide who represents their interests on this leadership body. This year, a field of 11 candidates nominated for election to the Board in the positions of General Director and Northern Rivers, Mid North Coast, Hunter/Central Coast and Illawarra Regional Directors. This was matched by a record turn-out of voters, with 881 of 2,254 eligible members participating - the highest in any of our eight Board elections to date. Two Directors were returned to office: Pat Fayers as a General Director and John Lynch as the Mid North Coast Regional Director. Bill Wardrobe, a member of Marine Rescue Evans Head, was elected unopposed to replace Bernie Gabriel, who retired after four years as the Northern Rivers Regional Director. Bernie had been a forceful advocate for his region and the welfare of our volunteers and we thank him for his service. Jim Wright, a former Unit Commander of Marine Rescue Lake Macquarie, was elected as the Hunter/Central Coast Regional Director. Marine Rescue Ulladulla member Keven Marshall was elected as the Illawarra Regional Director to fill a one-year casual vacancy created by Bill Carter’s resignation from the Board in May 2017. Congratulations to all five elected Directors. My

personal thanks to the Board for its trust in again returning me as Chair. This is an honour that I do not in any sense take for granted. I am pleased to be able to report that this year the Board approved the transition to online voting in the 2018 elections. In a move that is environmentally and economically responsible, this will enable us to streamline the voting process, reduce our cumbersome paper-based process, cut costs and shrink our green footprint. It is obvious that leadership is not just exercised by those at the highest levels of any organisation. Our 3,082 volunteers are recognised as skilled, experienced mariners and boating safety advocates, at the forefront of the national marine rescue sector and second to none in their commitment to serving the community. Our annual service records again reflect our members’ dedication and effort. This year we responded to 2,802 vessels in trouble on the water, almost a third of which were caught in potentially life-endangering emergencies. Our Radio Operators logged more than 273,400 radio transmissions. This is an impressive record of commitment to the people of our State and I thank all our volunteers, no matter their roles or duties, for their irreplaceable contributions.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

3


2,802 missions. 6,884 people returned safely to shore.

4 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018


Left: Brace ... the crew of Nambucca 20 faces off against choppy seas during a Mid North Coast Search and Rescue Exercise in February.

I again place on the record the organisation’s gratitude for the ongoing financial support of the NSW Government and boating community. In 2017-18, this comprised a direct Government grant of $1.68 million and another $6.27 million raised through the levy on recreational boating registrations and licences. As a not-for-profit, independent emergency service, we rely heavily on this funding and are committed to its responsible investment and expenditure for the benefit of the boating and wider community. Our volunteers also continue to invest serious time and energy into their fundraising activities, on top of their operational, training and other unit responsibilities. Again, I offer our collective thanks to the communities up and down the coastline and around our two inland units who consistently support their local volunteers in these endeavours. This includes the many visitors who flock to the coast during the summer holidays, our Radio Club members and the businesses and sponsors who generously provide goods, services and support. It is always a pleasure to see our members receiving public acknowledgement of their service, skill and experience. This year, plaudits went to Marine Rescue Batemans Bay Operations Officer and Assessor Michael Kelly and Marine Rescue Shellharbour Deputy Unit Commander, Trainer and Assessor Peter May, who were awarded the prestigious Emergency Services Medal in the Queen’s Birthday honours. This medal is presented by our nation to recognise members of the emergency services who have made particularly notable contributions to their agencies and the community.

This year, the Board awarded our organisation’s highest accolade, Life Membership of Marine Rescue NSW, to Marine Rescue Wooli Unit Commander Richard Taffs. I can think of no more deserving recipient of this honour, which the Board unanimously supported in recognition of Mr Taffs’ lengthy service as Unit Commander and contribution to the wider organisation since its very foundation. In any discussion on leadership, it would be remiss not to single out the officer at the forefront of our team. Commissioner Stacey Tannos continues to drive continual improvement throughout our organisation, to seek every opportunity for advancement and to champion innovation across the marine rescue sector. The Board thanks him for his consistent and sound advice and commends him for his determination and energy in leading from the front. The Board also relies on the direct assistance of Deputy Commissioner Dean Storey and each of our staff members, all of whom work with great passion in support of our mission. On behalf of the Board, I again express our appreciation to each of our 3,082 volunteers for their commitment to saving lives on the water. This is a challenging mission, one that we can only achieve together, as a team sharing a common purpose and commitment. It is a mission that demands we leave the comforts of home and shore to head into tough and turbulent conditions. But it is one that brings enormous satisfaction. A life saved, a boater returned safely to home and family. That is our reward.

James L Glissan ESM, QC Chair, Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

5


Report of the Commissioner Remembering those lost ... Commissioner Stacey Tannos (right) at the 2017 Emergency Services Volunteers Memorial Service, alongside State Emergency Service Commissioner Mark Smethurst and Volunteer Rescue Association Commissioner Mark Gibson. Photo: NSW RFS.

Commissioner Stacey Tannos ESM

M

arine Rescue NSW has powered through another 12 months, propelled by the energy of the people who are the organisation’s most valuable asset in our mission to save lives on the water. The reforms to the Australian volunteer marine rescue sector’s operational and training environment in 201617 were consolidated this year, helping to strengthen our performance and meet new national regulatory requirements. As is clear throughout this report, which comprehensively details the range of activities across the organisation, we have channelled resources and attention to building our emergency responsiveness, preparedness and operational muscle, without in any way neglecting our core priorities of safety and risk mitigation. Our people - both volunteers and staff, working in partnership - have driven this achievement and each of them deserves credit for their individual contribution. While the cumulative effort required over a year is taxing, the hardest days are those when tragedy strikes randomly. Royal Life Saving Australia reports that 36 people drowned in NSW over summer, 11 per cent of whom were boating before their deaths. The 1,054 missions launched by our crews from December 1 to February 28 included the response to a number of

6 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

fatal emergencies, including the loss of six people in a seaplane accident, boaters, a fisherman and young people missing in the surf and on the Georges River. Our members responded respectfully and professionally. Over the year, we responded to 2,802 vessels in trouble, including 841 snared in life-endangering emergencies. Our members can be satisfied that through their swift responses and determination, they helped prevent many more fatalilties. Our rescue crews were ably supported by our radio operators’ constant watch, handling more than 273,400 calls and Logging On and Off 74,502 vessels by marine radio, phone and the MarineRescue App. As a not-for-profit volunteer emergency service providing this level of service to the community, MRNSW is heavily dependent on the funding we receive from the State Government and boating community. In 2017-18, this core funding amounted to $7.95 million, comprising a direct Government grant of $1.68 million and $6.27 million raised from the levy on recreational boat licences and registrations. This was supplemented by $3.76 million in income from our volunteers’ committed fundraising efforts and revenue from a range of grants, donations and sponsors. To support our efforts to source additional funding, a


Service recognised ... Deputy Commissioner Dean Storey, Governor of NSW, General David Hurley, and Commissioner Stacey Tannos join Keven Marshall (second from left) and John Murray (second from right) at the presentation of their Emergency Services Medals at NSW Government House. Photo: Rob Tuckwell.

new grants training program was launched early in 2018 and delivered on a regional basis for grants officers and other senior unit personnel. The next five-year Operational Funding Agreement, which sets out the terms of our funding delivery from the State Government, is being finalised and will be signed in the coming financial year. We also are continuing to pursue funding enhancements from the Government, making a strong case based on our solid record of achievement, fiscal responsibility and accountability. The immediate priorities for additional expenditure would be to complete the Fleet Modernisation Program and marine radio network upgrade that have dominated our spending to date and turn our major investment focus to repairing, refurbishing and, where necessary, replacing ageing built infrastructure. The majority of the facilities we occupy are publiclyowned assets. The organisation faces a substantial maintenance and repair bill to upkeep buildings subject to accelerated deterioration due to their age and exposure to harsh coastal environmental conditions. We face a pressing need to enhance units’ working environments, providing safe, secure facilities compatible with modern emergency operations. This would not only boost units’ current service delivery and training but also

help underpin their future sustainability by encouraging greater volunteer recruitment. Under the ongoing Fleet Modernisation Program, four new vessels were delivered this year, at a cost of $629,000, taking the total operational rescue vessel fleet to 84. Over the life of MRNSW, 81 new and refurbished rescue vessels, worth almost $19 million, have been delivered to provide our crews and the boating public with safe, reliable and contemporary rescue resources. We are showcasing our fleet through a social media series following the construction of the new MR Central Coast vessel to be delivered in 2018-19. A world-class rescue service such as this is built on experience and continual development. Our volunteers have again this year committed thousands of hours to meeting the challenges of our custom-designed training curriculum, earning a total of 1,505 new qualifications. I thank each of our volunteers for their commitment, professionalism and community service, whether they serve as radio operators, crew members, trainers, treasurers, fundraisers or in the many other administrative and support roles needed to keep a unit rescue-ready. I particularly acknowledge the additional burden carried by our unit leaders, whom we are providing with extra support through the new leadership

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

7


Above: Harbour passengers ... Commissioner Stacey Tannos and Emergency Services Minister Troy Grant on board Middle Harbour 30 for a training exercise near Sydney Heads.

Right: Air sea resources ... Shoalhaven 30 manoeuvres in large swells during a training exercise with a CHC Group AW139 helicopter that provides aviation emergency response for the Royal Australian Navy at HMAS Albatross. Photo: Danielle Carter.

training program that will be launched next year. Our members would not be able to perfom their duties to assist and protect the people of NSW without the support of their families and employers. They are vital to our service and contribute to our mission. Equally, our 13,372 Radio Club members, whose ongoing support adds up to far more than the sum of their annual financial contributions to belong to their local unit’s supporters’ body. These safety-conscious members are a valuable auxiliary asset on the water, whose assistance can be called upon to help a fellow boater in trouble until a rescue crew can arrive on the scene. I want to officially acknowledge our gratitude to the emergency, rescue and marine services, government agencies and service providers with whom we work closely, particularly Commander of the NSW Police Force Marine Area Command, Detective Superintendent Mark Hutchings and his staff, for their cooperation and confidence. Likewise, to NSW Rural Fire Service Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons and RFS staff and

Stacey Tannos ESM Commissioner

8 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

members for their collaboration and resource sharing. I also thank the Minister for Emergency Services, Troy Grant and his staff for their assistance and support, as well as the State Government Office for Emergency Management and the Minister for Roads, Freight and Maritime Melinda Pavey. Our Board of Directors provides the organisation with keenly focused leadership and guidance. My thanks to the Chair and Directors for their cooperation and commitment to the good governance of our organisation. It is important to thank our 25 staff for their input, most notably Deputy Commissioner Dean Storey for his innovation, efficiency and prodigious output. Neither our regional staff nor those based at the State Headquarters have ever shirked on their contribution, working tirelessly in good spirit to support our volunteer effort. Lastly, thank you again to our 3,082 individual volunteers, on whom we rely for their dedication, courage, expertise and experience. Together, our fine team works as one to save lives on the water.


Commitment to training. 1,505 new qualifications. A skilled volunteer workforce.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

9


Operations Twilight operation ... MR Central Coast members Ted Leeson and Bob Knowles provide support on X-Ray 21 as a Toll Air Ambulance prepares for a medical evacuation from Lobster Beach. Photo: Mitch Giles.

O

ur organisational commitment to continual improvement in our performance across all operational sectors has resulted in greater emergency responsiveness and capability throughout 2017-18. A strategic focus on preparedness, operational risk management and skills development has again delivered positive outcomes for the boating community. In another strong performance, our professional volunteers have this year mounted 2,802 rescue missions. Thirty per cent - 841 - of these were in response to life-threatening emergencies. This workload underlines the need for clarity of purpose and sharp operational reflexes. This year our 44 units have again extended their presence and visibility on the water with increased training activities year-round and an expanded peak summer presence. Our responsiveness to emergencies in isolated and shallow waterways was enhanced with the delivery of smaller, agile new vessels to the Camden Haven and Ulladulla units. Minutes can mean the difference between life and death in an emergency on the water and this year we took additional steps to ensure our crews can be on the scene as quickly as possible. The roll-out of the Telstra SMS desktop messaging system has modernised and streamlined the crew

10 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

activation process, resulting in reduced incident response times. A new bar camera on the Tweed River provided MR Point Danger radio operators clearer vision of conditions and incidents to aid emergency call-outs. In another move to boost emergency preparedness, new assets have been pre-positioned in close proximity to known risk locations such as hazardous coastal bars and high-traffic waterways. A wharf upgrade at Huskisson will improve response times on Jervis Bay and a new Rescue Water Craft pontoon at MR Port Macquarie means operators can reach the problematic Hastings River bar more quickly than ever. We enhanced our service delivery in two of the State’s peak boating regions this year: Sydney’s southern waterways and the Central Coast. The Botany Port Hacking unit has expanded its radio base operations to seven days to serve the large boating population on Botany Bay, home to Australia’s largest container port, Port Hacking and the surrounding scenic waters. On July 17, the Central Coast and Terrigal units amalgamated, creating a strong operation that has provided more efficient use of resources and volunteer effort and even greater coordination of our emergency response. This improved responsiveness is always accompanied


Found when he didn’t Log Off ... fisherman Martin Field is given first aid for hypothermia and abrasions on Racecourse Beach, south of Ulladulla, where he crawled ashore and was located in distress. Photo: Westpac Life Saver Rescue Helicopters

by our continuing focus on operational risk management. New resources have been delivered to support the safety of crew members and the public we serve. The new Operational Risk Management App was launched in February and risk management workshops have been held at regional levels to sharpen attention. Satellite phones are now supplied for each offshore vessel, Special Event and Activity safety plans and risk assessments have been strengthened and information fixed on every helm to ensure crews are aware of key vessel requirements and limitations. As well as the human commitment required, optimal safety of operations also depends on topline resourcing. In addition to providing the leading rescue vessel fleet and communications equipment in Australasia, MRNSW continues to provide high-quality personal protective equipment to members. Fit-for-purpose uniforms are supplied at no cost to volunteers. Our on-water operations could not succeed without the vital support of our communications personnel. MRNSW communications crew are the voices of boating safety. This year, they responded to 273,405 radio calls and Logged On 74,502 vessels, monitoring their voyages and welcoming them home when they Logged Off. And when a boater wasn’t back as expected,

the radio operators were the ones to sound the alarm and launch the appropriate search procedures. Most importantly, they were the voice of reassurance to boaters who were in trouble and needed to know help was on the way - and fast. Their work has been supported by continual improvement to the marine radio network owned, operated and maintained by MRNSW. RediTALK communications equipment was this year installed in five units and the infrastructure that provides the network backbone was improved through major projects on the North and Mid North Coasts. MRNSW has also continued to build its interoperability, both internally through a program of local Search and Rescue Exercises and common vessel and crewing standards, and externally through our shared training and operations with our rescue and emergency services partners, including the NSW Police Force Marine Area Command, Surf Life Saving NSW and the helicopter rescue services. This level of service and capability cannot be achieved without an incredible volunteer commitment - this year totalling more than 535,000 volunteer operational duty hours. Our volunteers are capably supported by our six Regional Operations Managers, who are responsible for operational coordination and resource deployment around the clock.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

11


Operations In formation ... participants in a Rescue Water Craft professional development course assemble for tasking instructions on Lake Macquarie. Photo: Jane Shirriff.

This dedicated effort has resulted in an undeniably positive impact on the safety of the boaters who enjoy NSW waters and the support provided to our partner agencies. Higher levels of public awareness of our work has in turn reinforced volunteer recruitment and our fundraising and boating safety campaigns. Royal Life Saving Australia reports that in 2017-18, 12 per cent of the 87 drowning deaths in NSW were boating/watercraft-related. A spike over summer saw 36 people drown in this State and our crews joined the response to a number of these tragedies, impressing all with their skill, professionalism and empathy in the most challenging of circumstances. While any fatality

is a terrible loss, the success of our work is in the 6,884 boaters our crews returned safely to shore this year. This was supported by our ongoing efforts to raise awareness of the need for boaters to take simple safety precautions: always wearing lifejackets on board, Logging On and Off with MRNSW, installing VHF marine radios for superior coverage and reach, checking conditions and maintaining their boats. MRNSW remains committed to delivering a worldclass search and rescue and marine communications service and working with the boating community and our water safety partners to meet the challenge of our mission to save lives on the water.

2017-2018 MRNSW OPERATIONS Total

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

March April

May

June

No. of radio calls

273,405 23,624 18,465 19,499 22,300 21,134 25,385 33,530 19,367 25,340 24,131 20,077 20,553

No. of Log Ons – local

65,385

5,785

3,686

4,094

4,958

4,566

6,141* 9,504

4,808

6,945

6,116

4,693

4,089*

No. of Log Ons – offshore

9,117

663

432

603

791

846

1,004

1,301

552

720

944

676

585

No. of emergency rescues

841

60

39

49

75

66

92

129

77

74

69

60

51

No. of other assists

1,961

105

82

112

179

146

251

336

169

209

200

90

82

* Most vessels Logged On - December 29 = 600

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* Fewest vessels Logged On - June 19 = 10


2017-2018 MRNSW OPERATIONAL OUTCOMES

THREE-YEAR MRNSW OPERATIONAL TRENDS 2017-18 2016-17 2015-16 Total

Life-endangering (notifiable) emergencies

841

Vessels assisted

2,802

3,257

3,072

9,131

Persons on Board

1,788

Emergencies

841

827

723

2,391

Other vessel assists

1,961

Radio calls

273,405 306,405 296,063 875,873

Persons on Board

5,096

Total Persons on Board rescued

6,884

Radio calls logged

273,405

Vessels Logged On 74,502

74,299

73,383

222,184

App Log Ons

11,714

9,788

35,651

14,149

VESSELS ASSISTED 2017-2018 Up to 6 metres

1,320

6-10m

681

Total vessel Log Ons

74,502

10-15m

361

Vessels Logged On via the MarineRescue App

14,149

15m +

40

Total Persons on Board Logged On vessels

280,278

Other/not specified

400

Along with powered recreational boats (including runabouts, cruisers & tinnies) & various sailing vessels, recorded assists this year included 25 houseboats, 18 trawlers, 97 jet skis, 59 kayaks/ canoes/boards/skis/windsurfers, 5 barges, 3 pontoons & a ferry, whalewatching boat and drone. Eleven on-board dogs & a cat were rescued.

Volunteer duty hours (rostered shifts, excluding call-outs) Search & Rescue Coordination Centres

166,440

Marine Radio Bases

34,800

Marine rescue vessels

334,080

Total volunteer duty hours

535,320

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

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Operational outcomes by region Emergencies

95

Assists

70

Total

165

Persons on Board Local Log Ons

348 12,836

Transit Log Ons Total Log Ons

NORTHERN RIVERS

864 13,700 MID NORTH COAST

Emergencies

220

Assists

685

Total

Emergencies

170

Assists

114

Total

284

Persons on Board

570

Local Log Ons

13,921

Transit Log Ons

1,491

Total Log Ons

905

Persons on Board

2,128

Local Log Ons

9,942

Transit Log Ons

2,246

Total Log Ons

HUNTER/CENTRAL COAST

Emergencies

12,188

97

Assists

873

Total

GREATER SYDNEY Emergencies

154

Assists

162

Total

316

Persons on Board Local Log Ons Transit Log Ons Total Log Ons

15,412

723

970

Persons on Board

2,775

Local Log Ons

5,619

Transit Log Ons

2,896

Total Log Ons

8,515

ILLAWARRA

11,961 471

Emergencies

12,432

Assists Total Persons on Board Local Log Ons MONARO

Transit Log Ons Total Log Ons

105 57 162 340 11,049 557 11,606 Emergencies

841

Assists

1,961

Total

2,802

Persons on Board

6,884

TOTAL

Local Log Ons

65,385

+ 649 (57 Local & 592 Transit) Seahawk Log Ons by Seaway Tower, Southport, for boaters travelling from Queensland waters south to New South Wales.

Transit Log Ons

9,117

14 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

Total Log Ons

74,502


A safe, modern fleet Strong and dependable ... rescue vessels from the MRNSW fleet head offshore from Bermagui during the Monaro Region SAREX in November 2017.

F

our new rescue vessels were delivered in 2017-18 as Marine Rescue NSW continued to build its operational capacity on coastal and inland waters. The Fleet Modernisation Program is continuing to deliver increased volunteer safety and operational efficiency through the delivery of safe, contemporary and reliable rescue assets. Since the establishment of MRNSW, 81 new and refurbished vessels, worth almost $19 million, have entered the fleet, including four this year at a cost of $629,000. Two new Ocean Cylinder rescue vessels purpose-built for their operating conditions were delivered to the Alpine Lakes and Norah Head units. The Camden Haven and Ulladulla units purchased Zodiac RHIBS (Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats). With the delivery of new and upgraded primary response vessels completed in Stage One of the Fleet Modernisation Program, this year’s new vessels reflect a focus on providing smaller, more versatile and agile vessels to boost capability in shallow and difficult-toaccess areas on local lakes and estuaries, as well as coastal bars. Work began during 2017-18 on another three vessels, which will be among nine scheduled to be built/delivered in the coming year. We also continued upgrading the existing fleet. A major mid-life refit of 10m Naiad Merimbula 30 was

completed for the peak boating season. The work, at a cost of $126,000, included new outboard motors, solid foam sponsons, livery, battery management system, electronics and communications and navigation equipment. Lemon Tree Passage, Tuggerah Lakes, Nambucca and Alpine Lakes vessels were repowered, at a total cost of $158,200. New electronics, costing $42,587, were installed on Tuggerah Lakes, Ulladulla and Kioloa vessels. MRNSW remains committed to supporting the NSW boat building industry, providing valuable skilled employment in regional centres and ease of access during construction, maintenance and servicing. NEW VESSELS 2017-18 Alpine Lakes 21, 6.8m Ocean Cylinder

$287,000

Norah Head 20, 6.8m Ocean Cylinder

$272,000

Camden Haven 10, 4.2m Zodiac Milpro RHIB

$35,000

Ulladulla 10, 4.2m Zodiac Milpro RHIB

$35,000

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

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Our people Teamwork ... more than 100 leaders of the organisation gather for the 2017 MRNSW Leadership Conference in Port Macquarie.

T

he Marine Rescue NSW Leadership Conference in September 2017 was a showcase of our greatest asset - our people’s talent, knowledge and experience. The biennial conference brought together more than 100 leaders of the organisation, including the Board of Directors, Unit Commanders, Deputy Unit Commanders and staff, at Port Macquarie for a weekend focused on contemporary volunteer leadership and management and the organisation’s operations and achievements. The event was supported with a joint State/ Commonwealth Government 2016-17 Emergency Volunteer Support Scheme grant for more than $40,000. Expert speakers, Useability Principal Penny York and Head of Corps of the Royal Australian Army Medical Corps, Brigadier Georgeina Whelan, provided stimulating perspectives on volunteering and leadership. Guest speaker at the Conference dinner was author, journalist and former Wallaby, Peter FitzSimons. Conference outcomes included a commitment to the development of a leadership training program to provide additional support to Unit Commanders and Deputy Unit Commanders in their challenging roles. MRNSW is not immune from the national volunteer sector’s challenge to recruit and retain members from a workforce of potential volunteers already stretched by

16 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

competing demands on their time and wanting greater flexibility in their volunteering commitments. This year we embarked on an exercise to examine our own volunteer engagement and retention. An exit survey of members who had left within the preceding year after a short period of membership found that 60 per cent of the respondents were still actively employed, searching for work or studying. Almost half reported a mis-match between their availability for duty and training and unit expectations and scheduling. Three-quarters of the respondents would consider re-joining MRNSW in future, with many citing time pressure as the reason for stepping back from volunteer activities. The results of this survey were reported to the Leadership Conference and have since formed the basis of discussions of possible models for greater flexibility in member participation. As a nation, Australia is committed to recognising the service of the volunteers at the heart of our emergency management sector. As an organisation, we equally thank our people for their commitment to our mission. In the Queen’s Birthday Honours, the Emergency Services Medal was awarded to Michael Kelly, from MR Batemans Bay and Peter May, from MR Shellharbour. At the 2017 Annual General Meeting, the Board conferred MRNSW Life Membership on MR Wooli Unit Commander


Courting support ... the Sydney Kings’ Mike Goldman presents MR Hawkesbury’s Greg Groppenbacher, Greg Rottinger, Ken Edwards, Peter Moore and Mark Dryza with their Unsung Hero award.

Richard Taffs. MRNSW Long Service Medals were presented to 264 members, recognising a remarkable 2,105 years of combined service, ranging from five to 40 years individually. Another 41 members were awarded the National Medal, representing another 745 years’ service - 2,850 years in all. In February, National Basketball League team, the Sydney Kings, presented volunteers from MR Hawkesbury with an Unsung Hero award honouring the unit “for making an overwhelming impact on the lives of others in the community”. Both the 2017 and 2018 Rotary Emergency Services Community Awards were held during this financial year, in August 2017 and June 2018. MR Alpine Lakes member Adolf Franco was named the MRNSW 2017 Rotary Emergency Services Officer of the Year in a Volunteer Capacity. The other three MRNSW finalists for 2017 were Wendy Young, from MR Port Macquarie, David Crawford, from MR Terrey Hills and Life Member Albert Morris, from MR Central Coast. MR Wooli member Jackie Taffs took out the title in the 2018 awards, with our other finalists Senior Chaplain Richard Wrightson, from MR Lake Macquarie and MR Port Jackson members Paul Ballard and Paul Robinson. Three members, from MR Evans Head, Port

Kembla and Port Stephens, were awarded Emergency Management Volunteer Scholarships worth almost $20,000 to help them access vocational or higher education qualifications in emergency management. Four volunteers from the Iluka Yamba, Broken Bay, Jervis Bay and Port Kembla units attended the Australian Emergency Management Institute’s Volunteer Leadership Program, which aims to enhance volunteer agency capacity by developing the leadership skills of middle to senior level emergency management volunteers. MRNSW hosted the Emergency Services Volunteers Memorial Service in October. The annual service, this year led by Senior Chaplain Richard Wrightson, pays tribute to all NSW emergency services volunteers and particularly honours the men and women who have paid the ultimate price while volunteering their time to protect their community. These include three members of our former NSW volunteer marine rescue services, Edward Bristow, Dennis Matthews and David Waddell, whose names are inscribed on the Honour Roll on the stone memorial at Mrs Macquarie’s Chair in Sydney. To ensure members are aware of the support available to them should they find their service confronting, a suite of new Critical Incident Support Service resources was delivered to units during the year.

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Training & education The voice of boating safety ... MR Bermagui member Stephen Knight maintains radio communications during the the Monaro Search and Rescue Exercise.

P

rofessional skills development was the focus of intensive training activity throughout the financial year as MRNSW continued to build organisational capability. A calendar of Professional Development sessions provided members with the opportunity to build on their individual skill sets in a range of subject areas. Seventeen one-day or weekend development sessions were organised for Rescue Water Craft Operators, Coxswains, Radio Base personnel and Trainers and Assessors to hone their skills in a collaborative environment. Forty-three volunteers from seven units took part in RWC Operator courses at Trial Bay, Lake Macquarie and Narooma; 30 volunteers from 11 units joined radio courses across all regions, 52 Coxswains from the Greater Sydney and Hunter/Central Coast regions benefited from two joint sessions and 41 Trainers and Assessors from 11 units attended Mid North Coast and Northern Rivers seminars. This program will continue across remaining regions in the coming financial year. Volunteer members gained a total of 1,505 new qualifications in 2017-18, reflecting increasing skill levels and capacity across the organisation. The contribution of our Regional Training Managers and volunteer Trainers and Assessors helped drive this strong performance, which saw members earn 203

18 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

qualifications in rescue vessel operation and 187 for radio communications roles. Enhanced leadership training for unit executives was a key commitment made at the Leadership Conference at Port Macquarie in September. Significant training resources and time have subsequently been invested in the development of an MRNSW-specific program, to be rolled out in the 2018-19 year. A total of $476,000 in 2016-17 Emergency Volunteer Support Scheme (EVSS) grants for initiatives by Headquarters and the Brunswick, Ballina, Trial Bay, Hawkesbury, Port Stephens and Lake Macquarie units helped boost our training resources, participation and facilities this year. The funding included more than $313,000 towards a suite of new organisation-wide training equipment. Each unit was allocated new tools including an adult and infant CPR mannequin, first aid moulage kit and on-water rescue dummy. Regional training resources were bolstered with additional CPR mannequins, oxygen therapy kits, Automated External Defibrillator trainers, moulage kits, rescue dummies, fire simulators and extinguishers, training beacons and smoke machines. Six new educational and recruitment trailers and promotional materials also were funded under the EVSS.


Free show ... passengers on board Sydney ferry Narrabeen watch as Middle Harbour 30 and a Toll Air ambulance helicopter practice aerial winching procedures. Photo: Brian Roberts.

Multi-agency Search and Rescue Exercises (SAREX) remain an integral element of the training curriculum for MRNSW volunteers, helping members develop their operational skills and awareness and build constructive working relationships with partner services. This year, an enhanced focus on real-time activations created realistic emergency response scenarios for rescue vessel crews, communications teams and emergency management personnel. These courses are planned, coordinated and delivered with the assistance of the NSW Police Force Marine Area Command. A total of 167 emergency services personnel from 20 MRNSW units, the NSW Police Force Marine Area Command, Surf Life Saving NSW, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority and the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service took part in large-scale exercises in the Northern Rivers, Monaro, Mid North Coast and Hunter/Central Coast regions. Units continued to stage joint local training activities to share their skills and build inter-operability, this year holding six intra-regional exercises. MRNSW joined the National Volunteer Marine Search and Rescue Committee’s new training sub-committee to foster ongoing collaboration for the volunteer marine rescue sector and keep abreast of changes in training regulations, delivery and asessment.

Public boating education continues to be an important aspect of our role. Although changes to State Government licence requirements have removed the need to complete a Safe Boating course to gain a licence, demand for MRNSW education remains high. In the 2017 calendar year, 17 units conducted 174 Safe Boating and Personal Water Craft (jet ski) licence courses and testing. A total of 688 adults and 128 young adults successfully undertook a boat driver’s licence course and test, with a further 141 adults and 20 young adults passing a PWC course and test. TRAINING QUALIFICATIONS ISSUED IN 2017-18 Provide First Aid

571

Provide Advanced Resuscitation

544

Radio Operator

142

Watch Officer

45

Crew

132

Leading Crew

36

Coxswain

22

Rescue Water Craft Operator

13

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Our facilities Deteriorating landmark ... the MR Port Kembla Search and Rescue Coordination Centre, overlooking the Illawarra coastline, is in need of urgent repairs.

A

fter the sustained focus on upgrading our rescue vessels through the Fleet Modernisation Program, the need for new and refurbished unit facilities is setting the organisation’s next major investment priority. Many of our 44 units are operating in ageing and deteriorating buildings that have been retro-fitted over time with radio communications and administrative equipment but lack adequate space and facilities for search and rescue coordination, training or storage of valuable equipment. This is not optimal for efficient operations, nor for the provision of safe and secure working conditions for our members. Both of these factors, in turn, affect volunteer morale, recruitment and retention. Conversely, the positive impact of purpose-designed unit premises on volunteer participation was evident in the uplift in membership and spirit at MR Ulladulla and Ballina after these two units opened their new highquality bases in recent years. While our facilities are occupied under lease or licence arrangements in most cases from State and local government authorities, the onus of funding the maintenance, repairs and essential upkeep on these public assets is on our organisation.

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A broadscale upgrading of unit facilities to provide units with modern working environments appropriately equipped for emergency response and training continues to depend on securing enhanced funding. Until such time as this is achieved, we are reliant on external funding sources for this work and are grateful to the organisations that have this year assisted us through direct funding, building works and grants. A case in point was Marine Rescue Alpine Lakes’ first facility, a $140,000 base on the shore of Lake Jindabyne, which officially opened in March. The project was jointly-funded with a State Government Community Building Partnership grant, unit fundraising and an MRNSW contribution. Work began this year on the development of a new $1.3 million base for MR Woolgoolga in a former University of New England Marine Science Research Station at nearby Arrawarra Headland. The original building is being gutted, extended and transformed into a fully functional base. The unit’s relocation has been made possible by the generosity of Coffs Harbour City Council injecting some $1.1 million into the project through various grants and capital funding. Funding also has been provided by UNE, the Woolgoolga unit and MRNSW.


Double celebration ... Marine Rescue Alpine Lakes commissions its first unit facility and new rescue vessel, Alpine Lakes 21, in March 2018.

Construction began on a new facility to provide MR Trial Bay with dedicated training and storage space. Its fit-out is being funded by a State Government Community Building Partnership grant - one of 13 grants for unit building projects announced by government and corporate entities this year. MR Camden Haven started a $52,000 renovation to extend and refit its radio room and provide clearer sightlines up and down the Camden Haven Inlet. MR Port Jackson will commission its new base in 2018-19 following a redevelopment of the Birkenhead Point marina complex. MR Newcastle moved inland to temporary facilities at the Warabrook Community Centre. The unit thanked the Newcastle Coal Infrastructure Group for its support in providing accommodation for two years after the unit was forced to vacate its Shepherds Hill base as a result of damage caused by the 2015 East Coast Low storms. A permanent home for the unit is yet to be secured, with Newcastle City Council calling for expressions of interest for future uses of the Shepherds Hill site. Planning is under way for the redevelopment or major upgrading of a number of units, subject to funding. MR Lake Macquarie has detailed plans prepared for the redevelopment of its radio base on Swansea Heads.

This is a priority project for one of the busiest units in the organisation. To cost more than $1 million, it will involve the demolition of the existing base, which is close to outliving its useful lifespan, before a new building is erected on much the same footprint. This will provide an optimised operations centre, dedicated training and meeting facilities, greater security and lift access. Discussions continued with Sydney’s Northern Beaches Council on the redevelopment of the MR Broken Bay base and the MR Terrey Hills unit, which is a key centre for MRNSW radio operations. MR Norah Head is working towards approval for a boat shed to provide protection from the elements for its new rescue vessel. MR Port Kembla is scoping works for the repair and refurbishment of its landmark Hill 60 radio base overlooking the Illawarra coastline. This Search and Rescue Communication Centre operates in a high-traffic boating region popular with recreational boaters sharing the water with vessels operating in one of the State’s busiest ports and commercial shipping lanes. The building’s deteriorating condition has forced the closure of its viewing platform until major structural works can be funded.

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Fundraising & grants Pizza delivery fuels volunteers ... John Harney, from Domino’s, presents the crew of Port Jackson 30, Craig Catlin Ian Harding and Deputy Unit Commander Peter Richards with $5,000 in fuel vouchers.

M

arine Rescue NSW has benefited from a total of $2.91 million in revenue from grants and units’ energetic fundraising activities in 2017-18. The organisation relies on these major sources of finance to supplement its annual income received from the State Government and boating community. In 2017-18, Government, corporate and community organisations allocated more than $680,000 in grants to MRNSW, helping fund a variety of capital works, equipment, training and recruitment activities. In a move to help the organisation successfully target and secure additional grant funding, a new suite of training and tools was developed this year. The MRNSW-specific Guide to Seeking Grants was launched at the 2017 Leadership Conference, followed by the roll-out of the Grants Training Program through a series of regional training sessions for grant officers and other unit personnel. In 2016-2017, the State Government allocated grant funding worth $750,000 over three years to assist with the cost of upgrading the State’s marine radio network backbone, owned and operated by MRNSW. The second $250,000 installment of this funding, directed to specific projects to upgrade critical infrastructure on the NSW North and Mid North Coasts, was received this year. Twenty-one units and Headquarters earned another

22 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

$431,000 in grants, which were invested in new and upgraded facilities, equipment and training. State Government Infrastructure Grants were provided to fund two capital works projects. MR Eden received $75,000 to add a new search and rescue coordination area and improved access to its base. A $33,291 grant to MR Port Macquarie has funded improvements to its boat shed and new first aid equipment. Seven projects, worth a total of almost $94,000, were funded under the State Government Community Building Partnership program. These are to fit out the new MR Trial Bay training facility and MR Evans Head base; upgrade the jetty and piers and also the launch rails at MR Nambucca; repower Tuggerah Lakes 21 and boost security at MR Broken Bay and the State Headquarters. Funding from the State’s Registered Clubs through the ClubGrants program totalled almost $50,000 for 11 units: Moama (replacement vehicle for towing rescue vessels); Botany Port Hacking (vessel berths); Ballina (replacement motors); Port Macquarie (Rescue Water Craft docking); Port Stephens (telecommunications back-up); Bermagui (rescue vessel 500 hour service); Ulladulla (rescue line thrower); Shellharbour (training and operations); Merimbula (vessel re-fit); Lake Macquarie (equipment) and Wooli (base upgrade). MR Port Stephens


Sizzling success ... MR Brunswick member Sylvia Van Rossum, one of the BBQ team ready to greet hungry participants at the finish line of the Mullum to Bruns paddle in May.

and Nambucca also received another $14,000 under the Stronger Communities Program for upgrading works, the NSW Premier’s Rural and Regional Grants Fund provided MR Jervis Bay with $8,000 towards a $50,000 upgrade of Admiralty Wharf and MR Iluka Yamba received a $10,000 Community Development Grant towards a new vessel. Emergency Services Minister Troy Grant provided $5,530 to MR Botany Port Hacking for training gear. The private sector also supported our volunteers’ work this year. The IMB Community Foundation presented MR Port Kembla with $70,000 to install new radio equipment at its Hill 60 Search and Rescue Coordination Centre. The Foundation also handed over $10,000 to MR Botany Port Hacking for volunteer training and recruitment. MR Lemon Tree Passage received $5,000 to improve its facilities under the AGL Corporate Sponsorship program. After considering the value of the significant prizes on offer and the return on investment - in terms of both financial success and demand on volunteer time and effort - it was decided to rest the centrally-coordinated state Art Union fundraising campaign in 2017-18. The funding that would have been committed to this activity has instead been diverted to the development of the new leadership training program. To their immense credit, our units stepped up to raise

$1.65 million in funding this year through a range of activities, including market stalls, barbecues, raffles, bingo and sponsorship. Raffles and bingo again proved winning activities, contributing $486,000 to unit coffers. Our members tapped into the enduring appeal of community markets and put their culinary skills to great use, raising another $276,000 through these activities. These contributions to our total revenue are vital to supporting our operations and volunteer training, funding capital works unable to be met from our core funding and contributing to our fleet upgrading. Our volunteers’ commitment to undertake fundraising in addition to their operational duties, training commitments and other unit responsibilities is to be commended. Thanks are due to all the organisations that have provided financial support this year, whether as grants funders, sponsors or donors. This includes the many businesses and community groups that support our units through generous donations, both financial and in-kind. This support extends to the skippers of vessels assisted by rescue crews who provide a donation by way of thanks and the public who continue to give generously to our many fundraising endeavours. Each of you contributes to our mission to save lives on the water.

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Working together Fine-tuning our joint response ... the crews of NSW Police vessel WP 23 and Shellharbour 30 work together in the Illawarra Regional Search and Rescue Exercise in August.

M

arine Rescue NSW works in close partnership with our emergency service, rescue and marine colleagues to provide the highest standard of service to protect and assist our boating community. Our operations are underpinned by robust policies and procedures and the cohesive emergency management arrangements at local, regional and State levels. MRNSW units contribute to the protection of the community through their membership of their Local Emergency Management and Rescue Committees. Unit representatives and Regional Operations Managers also sit on the Regional Committees. These bodies ultimately report to the State Emergency Management Committee (SEMC) and the State Rescue Board. The Commissioner is a member of the SEMC and also the Chair of the State Rescue Board, which oversights rescue service delivery on both land and water in NSW. MRNSW this year had input to the review and renewal of State Rescue Policies including the NSW Tsunami Plan, Storm Plan and Flood Plan, recognising our role in providing personnel and assets in support of the combat agency for these natural disasters, the State Emergency Service. At an inter-agency level, we renewed our Memoranda of Understanding with NSW Roads and Maritime Services for Sydney Harbour events and with the NSW Rural Fire

24 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

Service for fire operation support and our Critical Incident Support Service. We maintained joint training activities under our MOU with Toll Helicopters. More widely, we continued our representation on the International Marine Rescue Federation, Australian Emergency Management Volunteer Forum and National Volunteer Marine Search and Rescue Committee. The most fundamental service-delivery partnership for MRNSW is with the NSW Police Force Marine Area Command (MAC). The two agencies work cooperatively in emergency operations, coordination and training to ensure the delivery of rescue services is agency-blind. Our crews again supported police in joint operations including searches for two young boys swept off Port Macquarie beaches and a boater missing from Sandon, north of Wooli, and the rapid response to a tragedy on the Moruya bar. MRNSW Regional Operations Managers and senior volunteers were again based in the MAC over the peak summer boating season to enhance tasking efficiency and operational awareness. MAC also continued to participate in our Regional Search and Rescue Exercise training program, along with other agencies, including Westpac Rescue Lifesaver Helicopters, Surf Life Saving and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority.


Someone to watch over you ... Evans Head 30 stands guard at the 2017 Malibu Classic surf competition. For the second year in a row, the Evans Head unit was forced to sound the shark alarm over the event, when a bronze whaler was spotted near surfers. Photo: Ricky Forsyth.

Our operational inter-operability with Surf Life Saving is being enhanced with $37,500 in funding from the State Government’s Shark Observation Grants program for new agency-compatible radios. Our contribution to the health and safety of the public was marked by our ongoing support for the Ambulance Service of NSW through numerous medevac responses, transporting paramedics to emergency scenes and joint training to assist medical helicopter retrieval crews. As part of our boating safety education activities, MRNSW supported 19 of the State Government’s Old4New lifejacket campaign events. Our work has also encompassed wildlife protection. The Port Macquarie, Cottage Point and Hawkesbury units joined whale disentanglement training with the National Parks and Wildlife Service and ORRCA. MR Port Macquarie also took part in an operation to help a tangled and exhausted whale. MR Cottage Point and MR Nambucca worked with WIRES and MR Bermagui with Australian Seabird Rescue. MRNSW units provide on-water, communications, logistical and personnel support for numerous boating and community events. This year, these included the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race, New Year’s Eve and Australia Day festivities, the Yamaha Variety Jet Trek,

Bermagui Seaside Fair, Ulladulla Blessing of the Fleet, Mullum to Bruns Paddle, numerous fishing challenges and the Boating Industry Association’s Sydney International Boat Show and Rosehill Trailer Boat Show. One of Australia’s most respected marine engine suppliers, Suzuki Marine, is the preferred supplier of outboard motors for the MRNSW fleet under the 2013-2018 Power of Choice agreement managed by its Australian distributor, the Haines Group. Raymarine has continued to ensure the quality fit-out of the rescue fleet under the agreement as our supplier of essential on board electronic equipment. Karera Communications supports our communications, particularly the unit radio facilities and repeater sites in the network. Thanks must go to the organisations that advertise in our quarterly journal, Soundings, which showcases our work and their products and services, along with the suppliers for our e-shop, shopmrnsw.com.au We also have valued relationships with our rescue vessel builders; Rescue Water Craft supplier Sea-Doo; charts supplier Navionics; BME, which installs our vessel radios and gives generous discounts to our members; Stewart Toyota; and HP, which discounts computer equipment prices for units, volunteers and Radio Club members.

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IT & communications On the air ... MR Port Stephens radio operators Colin Couper and Sarah Charters monitor some of the 1,050 boats Logged On by the unit over summer. Photo: Tony O’Donnell.

Right: Olivia Ford, Alec Percival, Ray McLeod and Peter Hanks abandon ship during a liferaft exercise on Bermagui 30. Photo: Denise Page.

T

he newest instrument in the Marine Rescue NSW technological toolbox, the Risk Management App, was released in February, strengthening safety, reducing paperwork and streamlining processes for volunteers. The smartphone app automates the risk management assessment completed by MRNSW members before launching a rescue vessel, undertaking training or participating in community events. Each rescue vessel in the fleet has been equipped with an iPad so crews can quickly and easily complete their risk assessment and transmit the details directly to relevant personnel. The app is a key safety aid, helping crews to assess potential risks and factors such as personnel requirements, personal protective equipment and weather conditions. The app and iPads were funded with government grants totalling $84,000. Work is under way on an extensive project to address marine radio blackspots on the North and Mid North Coasts. The State Government has allocated MRNSW grant funding of $750,000 over three years for the project. New VHF radios, aerials and microwave links will be installed to address blackspots caused by geography and distance between radio sites. MRNSW has this year continued to encourage boaters to adopt VHF marine radio for its superior communication

26 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

and safety capabilities. While MRNSW radio bases monitor both VHF and 27MHz marine radio channels along the NSW coastline, a VHF radio provides better range and higher quality communication. As well as communicating with MRNSW units via radio, boaters also have continued to enthusiastically embrace the MarineRescue App, launched in 2015. The upward trend in technology uptake by the boating community is reflected in the app’s increasing use. This year, 14,149 vessels with 34,911 people on board Logged On via the app - up from 11,714 in 2016-17. Since April 2015, the App has been downloaded on 15,669 Apple devices and 13,409 Androids. A comprehensive MRNSW Information Technology review was commissioned for delivery in the coming financial year. This will map out an integrated holistic plan for the future, identifying new technologies and improvements to existing systems to help ensure the organisation’s IT remains fit-for-purpose. A key focus will be to improve the quality and standardisation of information kept by Headquarters and units and streamline processes so that information only needs to be entered once before transferring across systems. Attention also will be paid to storing all operational information in one location.


3,082 members in 44 units. 535,320 duty hours. Professional volunteers.


Investing in our fleet T

he Fleet Modernisation Program has resulted in 81 new and refurbished vessels joining our fleet since MRNSW was established on July 1, 2009, including four new boats in 2017-18. All have been funded, at a cost of almost $19 million, with the support of the NSW Government and boating community and our units’ dedicated fundraising and generous sponsors. Alpine Lakes 21 (Les Threlfo), above, was delivered in November 2017.

Point Danger 20 (PD 20)

Point Danger 30 (PD 30)

Brunswick 30 (BR 30)

Ballina 30 (BA 30)


Evans Head 30 (EH 30)

Iluka Yamba 30 (IY 30)

Wooli 30 (WI 30)

Woolgoolga 30 (WO 30)

Coffs 30 (CO 30)

Nambucca 20 (NH 20) - replacement

Nambucca 11 (NH 11) - replacement

Trial Bay 30 (TB 30)

Trial Bay 11 (TB 11) - replacement

Trial Bay 12 (TB 12)


Port Macquarie 30 (PM 30)

Port Macquarie 20 (PM 20)

Port Macquarie 10 (PM 10) - replacement

Camden Haven 30 (CH 30)

Camden Haven 10 (CH 10)

Crowdy 20 (CB 20)

Crowdy 30 (CB 30)


Norah Head 20 (NR 20)

Forster 30 (FO 30)

Port Stephens 31 (PS 31)

Port Stephens 30 (PS 30)

Lemon Tree Passage 30 (LT 30)

Newcastle 30 (NC 30)

Lake Macquarie 30 (LM 30)


Lake Macquarie 13 (LM 13) - replacement

Tuggerah Lakes 20 & Tuggerah Lakes 21 (TL 20 & TL 21)

Central Coast 20 (CC 20)

Central Coast 21 (CC 21)

Central Coast 11 (CC 11)

Broken Bay 20 (BB 20)

Hawkesbury 22 (HW 22)

Hawkesbury 21 (HW 21)

Cottage Point 30 (CP 30)

Cottage Point 31 (CP 31) - formerly TG 30


Middle Harbour 30 (MH 30)

Middle Harbour 20 (MH 20) - formerly NH 20

Port Jackson 30 (PJ 30)

Port Jackson 20 (PJ 20)

Botany 30 (BY 30)

Port Hacking 30 (PH 30)

Port Kembla 30 (PK 30)

Port Kembla 20 (PK 20)

Shellharbour 30 (SH 30)

Shoalhaven 30 & Shoalhaven 20 (SA 30 & SA 20)


Jervis Bay 20 (JB 20) - replacement

Shoalhaven 10 (SA 10)

Jervis Bay 40 (JB 40)

Jervis Bay 20 (JB 20) - replaced

Sussex Inlet 30 (SI 30)

Ulladulla 30 & Ulladulla 20 (UL 30 & UL 20)

Ulladulla 10 (UL 10)


Merimbula 30 (MB 30)

Kioloa 20 (KL 20)

Batemans 30 (BM 30)

Batemans 20 (BM 20) - replaced

Batemans 20 (BM 20) - replacement

Batemans 21 (BM 21)

Tuross 13 (TU 13)


Narooma 30 (NA 30)

Narooma 11 (NA 11)

Narooma 12 (NA 12)

Bermagui 30 (BG 30)

Alpine Lakes 20 (AL 20)

Alpine Lakes 21 (AL 21) - replaced

Moama 20 (MO 20)

X Ray 21 (X 21)

X Ray 22 (X 22)

X Ray 10 (X 10)


Corporate information Another record summer workload ... Helen Manifold, Mel Little and Alison Glover on duty at MR Terrey Hills. Photo: Pamela Sayers.

DIRECTORS Marine Rescue NSW Directors during all or part of 2017-18: James Glissan ESM, QC (Board Chair and General Director); Patricia Fayers ESM (General Director); Mark McKenzie (General Director); Bernard Gabriel ESM (Northern Rivers Regional Director); William Wardrobe (Northern Rivers Regional Director); John Lynch ESM (Mid North Coast Regional Director); James Wright (Hunter/Central Coast Regional Director); David White ESM (Greater Sydney Regional Director); Keven Marshall ESM (Illawarra Regional Director); and Glenn Felkin (Monaro Regional Director). COMPANY SECRETARY Alan Skelley REGISTERED CHARITY STREET ADDRESS & PRINCIPAL PLACE OF BUSINESS MRNSW State Headquarters, Building 1, 202 Nicholson Parade, Cronulla NSW 2230 BANK Westpac AUDITOR Grant Thornton Audit Pty Ltd

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Directors’ qualifications & experience Name and status

Directors’ qualifications and experience

Mr James Glissan ESM, QC Appointed as Original Director 3 July 2009 – 11 December 2010

• Member of Marine Rescue Botany Port Hacking, after joining the Australian Volunteer Coast Guard Association (AVCGA) Botany Bay in 2008.

Elected General Director 11 December 2010, 3 year term 23 November 2013, 3 year term 26 November 2016, 3 year term

• Barrister since 1971, QC since 1985. Extensive practice in Company and Commercial law. Public Defender NSW 1981-1984. Associate Judge, District Court of NSW, 1989-1991. • Served on numerous Boards, including the Firearms Safety Awareness Council NSW.

Mrs Patricia Fayers ESM Elected General Director 29 November 2014, 3 year term 25 November 2017, 3 year term

• Member of Marine Rescue Central Coast. The first woman elected to the MRNSW Board. Served more than 19 years in volunteer marine rescue since joining the Central Coast division of the Royal Volunteer Coastal Patrol (RVCP) in 1998. • Appointed Divisional Commander from 2006 to 2010 and elected as Unit Commander from 2012 to 2014. • A Skipper One, has participated in many rescue operations and was integral to the delivery of new vessels to the Central Coast unit. Served in positions including Watch Officer, Assistant Quartermaster, radio invigilator and boat licence tester in MRNSW.

38 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018


Name and status

Directors’ qualifications and experience

Mr Mark McKenzie

• Former member of Botany Port Hacking unit, after joining the AVCGA in 2004. Qualified Coxswain. Unit Commander 2008-2013.

Elected General Director 28 November 2015, 3 year term Resigned November 25, 2017

• Qualifications include a Master of Business Administration, Cert. IV Training and Assessment and Cert. IV Occupational Health and Safety. • Extensive experience as a Group Operations Manager for a major public transport operator and a professional career also spanning power generation and distribution, telecommunications and construction. • Resigned as a member of MRNSW on November 25, 2017.

Mr Bernard Gabriel ESM Elected Regional Director (Northern Rivers) 23 November 2013, 2 year term 28 November 2015, 2 year term Retired 25 November 2017

• Member of Marine Rescue Point Danger. Active member since 1965 and inception of Volunteer Rescue Association (VRA). Former Unit Commander. • Life Member, Marine Rescue NSW. • Qualifications and experience include Chief of Operations and Chief Skipper VRA and delegate for VMR Queensland and NSW. • Professional background as owner-operator of marina and boat building business. Area manager for NSW of large Queensland marine accessories distribution company.

Mr William Wardrobe

• Joined Marine Rescue Evans Head in 2014.

Elected Regional Director (Northern Rivers) 25 November 2017, 2 year term

• Serves as Unit Membership Officer and has previously acted as Unit Commander and Deputy Unit Commander. • A qualified Radio Operator who performs regular radio duty, is completing his Watch Officer training and has been actively involved in unit fundraising activities. • More than 40 years’ management experience with Wesfarmers, after starting his career with Coles in Orange. • From 1978 until his retirement in 2008, was the National Buyer for Kmart Australia Ltd in the menswear, sporting goods, camera and optical, electrical, major appliances and garden departments.

Mr John Lynch ESM Elected Regional Director (Mid North Coast) 3 December 2011, 2 year term 23 November 2013, 2 year term 28 November 2015, 2 year term 25 November 2017, 2 year term

• Member of Marine Rescue Forster-Tuncurry, after becoming an active volunteer in the RVCP in 1995. • Life Member, Marine Rescue NSW. • Qualified offshore skipper, Watchkeeper and Cert. IV Training and Assessment. • Positions held include Administration Officer, Secretary, Treasurer and Unit Commander, along with Senior Regional Officer North Coast, Member State Rescue Board Accreditation Team, Delegate Mid North Coast Marine Advisory Committee and Delegate Great Lakes Emergency Management Committee for 15 years. • Former member of the Royal Australian Navy and Company Secretary of a regional Australian bank and its subsidiaries.

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Name and status

Directors’ qualifications and experience

Mr James Wright

• Member of Marine Rescue Lake Macquarie.

Elected Regional Director (Hunter/Central Coast) 25 November 2017, 2 year term

• Joined the RVCP on Lake Macquarie in 2008, which merged with the AVCGA Swansea in 2010, following the formation of MRNSW. Unit Commander 2014-2016. • Radio Operator and Coxswain, undertakes regular duties and participates in crew training. • Former investigator with the Office of Fair Trading and at the time of his retirement was in charge of the Licensee Investigations Team. • A Justice of the Peace.

Mr David White ESM

• Former member of Marine Rescue Cottage Point.

Elected Regional Director (Greater Sydney) 29 November 2014, 2 year term 26 November 2016, 2 year term

• Joined the AVCGA in 2004 at the completion of his service career as a Commander in the Royal Australian Navy.

Resigned April 11, 2018

• A vessel Master and active Coxswain, developed and delivered cross-unit training within the Sydney Region, as well as supporting organisation-wide training initiatives and joining a working group to develop the new MRNSW Constitution.

• Served as the unit’s Training Officer and Training Systems Officer for two years and Unit Commander for five years.

• Resigned as a member of MRNSW on April 11, 2018.

Mr Keven Marshall ESM

• Joined the RVCP at Ulladulla - now MR Ulladulla - in 1998.

Elected Regional Director (Illawarra) 25 November 2017, 1 year term

• Has held a number of positions including Deputy Unit Commander, Training Officer, Assessor and Operations Officer. Undertakes regular Radio Operator shifts, assists with fundraising and has been instrumental in the maintenance of the unit’s rescue vessels. • Former skipper of an Australian Customs vessel, holds a Master 5 marine qualification and is a mentor for his fellow volunteers. • Awarded the Emergency Services Medal in June 2017 and is a Justice of the Peace. • Elected for a one-year term to fill a casual vacancy.

Mr Glenn Felkin Elected Regional Director (Monaro) 28 November 2015, 1 year term 26 November 2016, 2 year term

• Member of Marine Rescue Batemans Bay, after joining the RVCP in 2009. • A Marine Master, has held positions including Acting Deputy Unit Commander, Training Officer, Watch Officer, Crew Leader, maintenance controller and member of vessel replacement teams. • Crew trainer and assessor for MR Moama upon its establishment and also an introductory trainer for the roll-out of the new Seahawk vessel tracking system for units from Kioloa to Eden. • Professional background in the aviation and motor industries, including more than 20 years with Qantas. • Originally elected for a one-year term to fill a casual vacancy before his subsequent re-election in 2016.

40 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018


Level 17, 383 Kent Street Sydney NSW 2000 Correspondence to: Locked Bag Q800 QVB Post Office Sydney NSW 1230 T +61 2 8297 2400 F +61 2 9299 4445 E info.nsw@au.gt.com W www.grantthornton.com.au

Auditor’s Independence Declaration To the Responsible Entities of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW In accordance with the requirements of section 60-40 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, as lead auditor for the audit of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW for the year ended 30 June 2018, I declare that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, there have been no contraventions of any applicable code of professional conduct in relation to the audit.

Grant Thornton Audit Pty Ltd Chartered Accountants

James Winter Partner – Audit & Assurance Sydney, 20 October 2018

Grant Thornton Audit Pty Ltd ACN 130 913 594 a subsidiary or related entity of Grant Thornton Australia Ltd ABN 41 127 556 389 ‘Grant Thornton’ refers to the brand under which the Grant Thornton member firms provide assurance, tax and advisory services to their clients and/or refers to one or more member firms, as the context requires. Grant Thornton Australia Ltd is a member firm of Grant Thornton International Ltd (GTIL). GTIL and the member firms are not a worldwide partnership. GTIL and each member firm is a separate legal entity. Services are delivered by the member firms. GTIL does not provide services to clients. GTIL and its member firms are not agents of, and do not obligate one another and are not liable for one another’s acts or omissions. In the Australian context only, the use of the term ‘Grant Thornton’ may refer to Grant Thornton Australia Limited ABN 41 127 556 389 and its Australian subsidiaries and related entities. GTIL is not an Australian related entity to Grant Thornton Australia Limited.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation.

www.grantthornton.com.au


Level 17, 383 Kent Street Sydney NSW 2000 Correspondence to: Locked Bag Q800 QVB Post Office Sydney NSW 1230 T +61 2 8297 2400 F +61 2 9299 445 E info.nsw@au.gt.com W www.grantthornton.com.au

Independent Auditor’s Report To the Members of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW Report on the audit of the financial report

Opinion We have audited the financial report of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW (the “Registered Entity”) which comprises the statement of financial position as at 30 June 2018, and the statement of profit or loss and comprehensive income, statement of changes in funds and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, and notes to the financial statements, including a summary of significant accounting policies and the Responsible Entities’ declaration. In our opinion, the financial report of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, including: a)

giving a true and fair view of the Registered Entity’s financial position as at 30 June 2018 and of its financial performance for the year then ended; and

b)

complying with Australian Accounting Standards and Division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Regulation 2013.

Basis for opinion We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Our responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report section of our report. We are independent of the Registered Entity in accordance with the ethical requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (the Code) that are relevant to our audit of the financial report in Australia. We have also fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in accordance with the Code. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion.

Grant Thornton Audit Pty Ltd ACN 130 913 594 a subsidiary or related entity of Grant Thornton Australia Ltd ABN 41 127 556 389 ‘Grant Thornton’ refers to the brand under which the Grant Thornton member firms provide assurance, tax and advisory services to their clients and/or refers to one or more member firms, as the context requires. Grant Thornton Australia Ltd is a member firm of Grant Thornton International Ltd (GTIL). GTIL and the member firms are not a worldwide partnership. GTIL and each member firm is a separate legal entity. Services are delivered by the member firms. GTIL does not provide services to clients. GTIL and its member firms are not agents of, and do not obligate one another and are not liable for one another’s acts or omissions. In the Australian context only, the use of the term ‘Grant Thornton’ may refer to Grant Thornton Australia Limited ABN 41 127 556 389 and its Australian subsidiaries and related entities. GTIL is not an Australian related entity to Grant Thornton Australia Limited.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation.

www.grantthornton.com.au


Responsibilities of the Responsible Entities for the financial report The Responsible Entities of the Registered Entity are responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the financial report in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards, the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Act 2012, and the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991, and for such internal control as the Responsible Entities determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. In preparing the financial report, the Responsible Entities are responsible for assessing the Registered Entity’s ability to continue as a going concern, disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the Responsible Entities either intend to liquidate the Registered Entity or to cease operations, or have no realistic alternative but to do so. The Responsible Entities are responsible for overseeing the Registered Entity’s financial reporting process. Auditor’s responsibilities for the audit of the financial report Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report as a whole is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes our opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of this financial report. As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards, we exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. We also: 

Identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control.

Obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Registered Entity’s internal control.

Evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the Responsible Entities.

Conclude on the appropriateness of the Responsible Entities’ use of the going concern basis of accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Registered Entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If we conclude that a material uncertainty exists, we are required to draw attention in our auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial report or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify our opinion. Our conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of our auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the Registered Entity to cease to continue as a going concern.

Evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial report, including the disclosures, and whether the financial report represents the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation.

We communicate with those charged with governance regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that we identify during our audit.


Report in accordance with the Charitable Fundraising Act NSW 1991 Opinion We have audited the accompanying financial report of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW (the “Entity”) for year ended 30 June 2018. In our opinion, in all material respects: a)

the financial statements show a true and fair view of the financial result of fundraising appeals by the Entity for the year to which they relate;

b)

the financial statements and associated records have been properly kept by the Entity during that year in accordance with the Charitable Fundraising Act NSW 1991 and Regulation 2015;

c)

money received as a result of fundraising appeals conducted during that year by the Entity has been properly accounted for and applied in accordance with this Act and the Regulation; and

d)

there are reasonable grounds to believe the Entity will be able to meet its debts as and when they fall due.

Emphasis of Matter We draw attention to Note 2c(iii) to the financial report which describes the revenue recognition policy of the Entity regarding revenue from donations and fundraising, including the limitations that exist in relation to the recording of cash receipts from donations and fundraising. Revenue from this source represents a significant proportion of the Entity’s revenue. Our opinion is unmodified in respect of this matter. Responsibilities The Responsible Entities of the Entity are responsible for the preparation and presentation of the Financial Report in accordance with the requirements of the Charitable Fundraising Act NSW 1991 and Regulation 2015. Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report as a whole is free from material misstatements, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes our opinion, based on our audit conducted in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards.

Grant Thornton Audit Pty Ltd Chartered Accountants

James Winter Partner – Audit & Assurance Sydney, 20 October 2018


81 new & refurbished vessels. Almost $19 million invested. A world-class rescue fleet.

MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

45


Responsible Entities’ declaration Reporting on our progress and performance ... Company Secretary Alan Skelley, Chair Jim Glissan and Commissioner Stacey Tannos at the 2017 Annual General Meeting.

Previous page ... Senior Tradesperson Dylan Campbell at work on new vessel Central Coast 30, under construction at the Yamba Welding & Engineering factory. The boat will be delivered in 2018-19.

I

n the opinion of the Responsible Entities of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW: a. The financial statements of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW are in accordance with the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, including: i. Giving a true and fair view of its financial position as at 30 June 2018 and of its performance for the financial year ended on that date; and ii. Complying with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Comission Regulation 2013. b. There are reasonable grounds to believe that Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable. Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Responsible Entities:

James L Glissan ESM, QC Director Sydney, 20 October 2018

46 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

John Lynch ESM Director


Declaration by the Principal Officer New to the fleet ... Shoalhaven Cr Joanna Gash, MR Ulladulla Unit Commander Dave Hall, Illawarra Director Keven Marshall, Commissioner Stacey Tannos, Royleen Pymble, Gilmore MP Ann Sudmalis, South Coast MP Shelley Hancock and Shoalhaven Mayor Cr Amanda Findley at the commissioning of Ulladulla 20 (Rex Pymble) in October 2017. Photo: Lisa Hardwick.

D

eclaration by the Principal Officer in accordance with the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 on behalf of responsible entitites in respect of fundraising appeals:

I, Stacey Tannos, Commissioner and Chief Executive Officer of Marine Rescue NSW, declare that: 1. the attached financial statements give a true and fair view of all income and expenditure of the Company with respect to fundraising appeals; 2. the attached statement of financial position gives a true and fair view of the state of affairs with respect to fundraising appeals; 3. the provisions of the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 (NSW), the regulations under the Act and the conditions attached to the authority have been complied with; and 4. the internal controls exercised by the Company are appropriate and effective in accounting for all income received.

Stacey Tannos ESM Commissioner Chief Executive Officer Sydney, 20 October 2018

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47


Statement of profit or loss & comprehensive income FOR THE FINANCIAL YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2018 2018 $

2017 $

NSW recreational boat licence & registration levy

6,266,892

6,150,000

NSW Government core grant

1,683,108

1,648,490

850,523

888,272

1,256,820

270,780

Interest

103,691

101,670

Proceeds from insurance claims

123,081

-

87,189

-

1,467,734

1,602,752

603,861

492,963

12,442,899

11,154,927

Staff costs

3,011,445

3,021,366

Depreciation

3,268,571

2,752,271

357,385

270,339

2,223,528

2,207,750

Marketing

121,521

137,873

Membership

478,370

560,508

IT expenditure

282,956

255,774

Expenditure on insurance claims

-

33,443

Loss on sale of assets

-

204,025

Games of chance

193,266

322,561

Fundraising

158,210

175,467

Training expenditure

132,266

116,431

1,977,899

1,868,020

12,205,417

11,925,828

237,482

(770,901)

-

-

237,482

(770,901)

Note Revenue and other income

Donations Other grant income

Profit on sale of assets Other income Activities income Total revenue and other income

4

Expenditure

Grant expenditure Maintenance & development of assets

Administration Total expenditure Net surplus/(deficit)

4

Other comprehensive income Other comprehensive income for the year Total comprehensive surplus/(deficit) for the year

Notes to the financial statements are included on pages 52 - 65.

48 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018


Statement of financial position AS AT 30 JUNE 2018

Note

2018 $

2017 $

Cash and cash equivalents

12(a)

8,228,806

7,800,583

Trade and other receivables

5

922,431

1,347,430

Inventories

6

447,562

467,455

9,598,799

9,615,468

18,795,417

19,625,564

Total non-current assets

18,795,417

19,625,564

Total assets

28,394,216

29,241,032

1,719,133

1,757,344

951,367

1,157,227

2,670,500

2,914,571

852,720

1,692,947

852,720

1,692,947

3,523,220

4,607,518

24,870,996

24,633,514

-

9,849,267

Accumulated funds

24,870,996

14,784,247

Total funds

24,870,996

24,633,514

Current assets

Total current assets Non-current assets Property, plant and equipment

7

Current liabilities Trade and other payables Borrowings from non-related entity

8 9(a)

Total current liabilities Non-current liabilities Borrowings from non-related entity Total non-current liabilities Total liabilities Net assets

9(b)

Funds Transferred assets reserve

Notes to the financial statements are included on pages 52 - 65.

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49


Statement of changes in funds AS AT 30 JUNE 2018 Transferred Assets Reserve $

Accumulated funds $

Total funds

9,849,267

15,555,148

25,404,415

-

(770,901)

(770,901)

-

(770,901)

(770,901)

Balance at 30 June 2017

9,849,267

14,784,247

24,633,514

Balance at 1 July 2017

9,849,267

14,784,247

24,633,514

Net surplus for the year

-

237,482

237,482

Total comprehensive surplus for the year

-

237,482

237,482

(9,849,267)

9,849,267

-

-

24,870,996

24,870,996

Balance at 1 July 2016

$

Total comprehensive income for the year Net deficit for the year Total comprehensive deficit for the year

Total comprehensive income for the year

Fair value of transferred assets reserve transferred to accumulated funds Balance at 30 June 2018

Notes to the financial statements are included on pages 52 - 65.

50 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018


Statement of cash flows FOR THE FINANCIAL YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2018 2018 $

2017 $

Cash received from levies, grants, donations & other income

12,826,572

10,732,660

Cash paid to suppliers & employees

(8,993,667)

(8,395,379)

3,832,905

2,337,281

Proceeds from property, plant & equipment

248,762

231,079

Interest received

103,691

101,670

Payments for purchases of property, plant & equipment

(2,599,997)

(2,758,174)

Net cash used in investing activities

(2,247,544)

(2,425,425)

Payment of interest on leases (Westpac)

(111,051)

(133,328)

Repayment of capital on leases (Westpac)

(902,087)

(807,269)

Repayment of borrowings

(144,000)

(144,000)

-

956,054

(1,157,138)

(128,543)

428,223

(216,687)

7,800,583

8,017,270

8,228,806

7,800,583

Note Cash flows from operating activities

Net cash provided by operating activities

12(b)

Cash flows from investing activities

Cash flows from financing activities

Proceeds of borrowings Net cash (used in)/provided from financing activities Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the financial year Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year

12(a)

Notes to the financial statements are included on pages 52 - 65.

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51


Notes to the financial statements Working together ... MR Narooma Unit Commander Paul Houseman and crew aboard Narooma 30 during a Montague Island navigation exercise. Photo: Megan Fraser.

1. CORPORATE INFORMATION The financial statements of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW, operating as Marine Rescue NSW (MRNSW), for the year ended 30 June 2018 were authorised for issue in accordance with a resolution of the Directors on 20 October 2018. MRNSW is a company limited by guarantee, incorporated and domiciled in Australia. 2. SUMMARY OF ACCOUNTING POLICIES a. Basis of Preparation General Purpose Financial Statements These General Purpose Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 and the Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements. The company is a ‘Not for profit’ entity registered with the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission and registered under the Charitable Fundraisng Act 1991. Historical cost convention and currency The financial statements have been prepared on the basis of historical cost, except for the revaluation of certain noncurrent assets and financial instruments. Cost is based on the fair values of the consideration given in exchange for assets. All amounts are presented in Australian dollars, unless otherwise noted. b. Significant accounting judgments, estimates and assumptions The preparation of financial statements requires the Directors to make judgments, estimates and assumptions that affect the application of policies and reported amounts of assets, liabilities, income and expenses. The estimates and associated assumptions are based on historical experience and other various factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis of making the judgments. Actual results may differ from these estimates. The estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to accounting estimates are recognised in the period in which the estimate is revised if the revision affects only that period or in the period of the revision and future periods if the revision affects both current and future periods.

52 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018


Significant accounting estimates and assumptions The key estimates and assumptions that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of certain assets and liabilities within the next annual reporting period are: Make good provisions Provisions for future costs to return certain leased premises to their original condition are based on the company’s experience with previous premises and estimates of likely restoration costs determined by management. These estimates may vary from the actual costs incurred as a result of conditions existing at the date the premises are vacated. Management has estimated that the lease make good provisions will be negligible. Provisions for employee benefits Provisions for employee benefits payable after 12 months from the reporting date are based on future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures and periods of service, as discussed in Note 2(m). The amount of these provisions would change should any of these factors change in the next 12 months. Useful lives of depreciable assets Management reviews its estimate of the useful lives of depreciable assets at each reporting date, based on the expected utility of the assets. Uncertainties in these estimates relate to technical obsolescence that may change the utility of certain software and IT equipment. Inventories Management estimates the net realisable values of inventories, taking into account the most reliable evidence available at each reporting date. The future realisation of these inventories may be affected by future technology or where they no longer meet the requirements of the company through changes in design or equipment redunancy. No provision for impairment has been recognised at the date of this financial report. Long Service Leave The liability for Long Service Leave is recognised and measured at the present value of the estimated cash flows to be made in respect of all employees at the reporting date. In determining the present value of the liability, estimates of attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation have been taken into account. c. Revenue recognition Revenue is recognised when the company is legally entitled to the income and the amount can be quantified with reasonable accuracy. Revenues are recognised net of the amounts of Goods and Services Tax (GST) payable to the Australian Taxation Office. Income from a contribution is recognised when the company obtains control of the contribution or right to receive the contribution, it is probable the economic benefits comprising the contribution will flow to the entity and the amount can be measured reliably. (i) Government funding Under an agreement with the Office of Emergency Management (formerly the NSW Ministry for Police and Emergency Services), the company’s services are supported by funding received from the NSW Government in the form of a core Government grant and through NSW Roads and Maritime Services as a portion of recreational boating registrations and licences. Grants received on the condition that specified services are delivered, or conditions are fulfilled, are considered reciprocal. Such grants are initially recognised as a liability and revenue is recognised as services are performed or conditions fulfilled. Revenue from non-reciprocal grants is recognised when the company obtains control of the funds. (ii) Interest revenue Interest revenue is accrued on a time basis, by reference to the principal outstanding and at the effective interest rate applicable, which is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset to that asset’s net carrying amount. (iii) Donations and fundraising Donations collected, including cash, in kind donations, donations of vessels and equipment and goods for resale, are recognised as revenue when the company gains control, economic benefits are probable and the amount of the donation can be measured reliably. Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW, in common with most organisations dependent upon such contributions, is unable to establish control over voluntary donations prior to their initial entry in the accounting records.

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53


(iv) Other grants Grants received for a specific project not yet completed are only recognised as income when the project occurs or the terms and conditions are met as these amounts are repayable if not fully utilised on the specific project. Grants received for general operational funding and which are not repayable are brought to account as income when received. Revenue from sales of goods comprises revenue earned (net of returns, discounts and allowances) from the sale of goods purchased for resale and gifts donated for resale. Sales revenue is recognised when the control of goods passes to the customer. (v) Asset sales The gain or loss on disposal of all non-current assets and available-for-sale financial investments is determined as the difference between the carrying amount of the asset at the time of the disposal and the net proceeds on disposal. Compensation from third parties for items of property, plant and equipment that were impaired, lost or given up shall be included in profit or loss when the compensation becomes receivable. The impaired or lost assets shall be written off. The cost of items of property, plant and equipment restored, purchased or constructed as replacements is capitalised as capital assets. (vi) Investment income Investment income comprises interest. Interest income is recognised as it accrues, using the effective interest method. d. Expenditure All expenditure is accounted for on an accruals basis and has been classified under headings that aggregate all costs related to the category. Where costs cannot be directly attributed to a particular category they have been allocated to activities on a basis consistent with use of the resources. Fundraising costs are those incurred in seeking voluntary contributions by donation and do not include costs of disseminating information relating to the activities carried on by the company. Management and administration costs are those incurred in connection with the administration of the company and compliance with constitutional and statutory requirements. Other costs comprise investment management fees, information and education costs. e. Income Tax The company is exempted from paying income tax due to it being a charitable institution in terms of Section 50–5 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997, as amended. f. Cash and cash equivalents Cash comprises cash on hand and demand deposits. Cash equivalents are short-term, highly liquid investments that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value or term deposits longer than three months in duration that may be broken without prejudice and are subject to an insignificant risk of change in value at call. g. Goods and Services Tax Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of Goods and Services Tax (GST), except: (i) where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the taxation authority, it is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset or as part of an item of expense; or (ii) for receivables and payables which are recognised inclusive of GST. The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is included as part of receivables or payables. Cash flows are included in the cash flow statement on a gross basis. The GST component of the cash flows arising from investing and financing activities which is recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is classified as operating cash flows. h. Financial Assets Loans and receivables Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market are classified as loans and receivables. These are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment. Interest is recognised by applying the effective interest rate. Impairment of financial assets Financial assets, other than those at fair value through profit or loss, are assessed for indicators of impairment at each

54 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018


Building skill sets ... volunteers assemble for the first joint Mid North Coast and Hunter/Central Coast Regional Rescue Water Craft training camp, staged at Trial Bay in November. Photo: Chris Butler.

balance sheet date. Financial assets are impaired where there is objective evidence that as a result of one or more events that occurred after the initial recognition of the financial asset the estimated future cash flows of the investment have been impacted. For financial assets carried at amortised cost, the amount of the impairment is the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows, discounted at the original effective interest rate. The carrying amount of the financial assets including uncollectible trade receivables is reduced by the impairment loss through the use of an allowance account. Subsequent recoveries of amounts previously written off are credited against the allowance account. Changes in the carrying amount of the allowance account are recognised in profit or loss. With the exception of available-for-sale equity instruments, if, in a subsequent period, the amount of the impairment loss decreases and the decrease can be related objectively to an event occurring after the impairment was recognised, the previously recognised impairment loss is reversed through profit or loss to the extent the carrying amount of the investment at the date the impairment is reversed does not exceed what the amortised cost would have been had the impairment not been recognised. i. Impairment of long-lived assets At the end of each reporting period the company assesses whether there is any indication that individual assets are impaired. Where impairment indicators exist, a recoverable amount is determined and impairment losses are recognised in profit or loss where the asset’s carrying value exceeds its recoverable amount. The recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less costs to sell and value in use. For the purpose of assessing value in use, the estimated future cash flows are discounted to their present value using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the asset. Where it is not possible to estimate recoverable amount for an individual asset, recoverable amount is determined for the cash-generating unit to which the asset belongs.

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j. Inventories Inventories comprise goods for distribution and goods for resale at no or nominal consideration as part of the company’s charitable activities. Inventories may be purchased or received by way of donation. Inventories are carried at the lower of cost or net realisable value. The cost is the purchase price of the items. The inventory is made up of supplies purchased for members and units, consisting of uniform items, items for the vessels, promotional and educational materials. Goods for resale No value is prescribed to goods for resale that have been donated to the company where the fair value cannot be reliably determined. The cost of bringing each item to its present location and condition is determined on a first-in, first-out basis. Net realisable value is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business, less estimated costs necessary to make the sale. k. Property, plant and equipment Property, plant and equipment is carried at cost or deemed cost less accumulated depreciation. Depreciation Depreciation is calculated on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life, or in the case of leasehold improvements and certain leased plant and equipment, the shorter lease term, as follows: (i) Communications equipment – over 3 years (ii) Furniture and fittings – over 4 years (iii) IT and office equipment – over 3 years (iv) Motor vehicles – over 5 years (v) Rescue vessels – over 5-10 years The assets’ residual values and useful lives are reviewed and adjusted, if appropriate, at the end of each reporting period. Gains and losses on disposals are calculated as the difference between the net disposal proceeds and the asset’s carrying amount and are included in profit or loss in the year that the item is derecognised. l. Trade and other payables Trade payables are recognised initially at their fair value, which is the amount expected to be paid, and subsequently at amortised cost. These amounts represent liabilities for services provided to the company prior to the end of financial year which are unpaid. The amounts are unsecured and are usually paid within 60 days of recognition. m. Employee benefits Employee benefits comprise wages and salaries, annual, non-accumulating sick and long service leave and contributions to superannuation plans. Liabilities for wages and salaries expected to be settled within 12 months of balance date are recognised in other payables in respect of employees’ services up to the reporting date. Liabilities for annual leave in respect of employees’ services up to the reporting date which are expected to be settled within 12 months after the end of the period in which the employees render the related services are recognised in the provision for annual leave. Both liabilities are measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are settled. Liabilities for nonaccumulating sick leave are recognised when the leave is taken and are measured at the rates paid or payable. The company pays contributions to certain defined contribution superannuation plans. Contributions are recognised in the income statement when they are due. The company has no obligation to pay further contributions to these plans if the plans do not hold sufficient assets to pay all employee benefits relating to employee service in current and prior periods. Other long-term employee benefits The company’s liabilities for annual leave and long service leave are included in other long-term benefits as they are not expected to be settled wholly within twelve (12) months after the end of the period in which the employees render the related service. They are measured at the present value of the expected future payments to be made to employees. The expected future payments incorporate anticipated future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures and periods of service and are discounted at rates determined by reference to market yields at the end of the reporting period on high quality corporate bonds that have maturity dates that approximate the timing of the estimated future cash outflows. Any re-measurements arising from experience adjustments and changes in assumptions are recognised in profit or loss in the periods in which the changes occur. The company presents employee benefit obligations as current liabilities in the statement of financial position if the

56 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018


company does not have an unconditional right to defer settlement for at least twelve (12) months after the reporting period, irrespective of when the actual settlement is expected to take place. Post-employment benefits plans The company provides post-employment benefits though defined contribution plans. n. Economic dependence The company is dependent upon the ongoing receipt of Federal and State Government grants and community and corporate donations to ensure the ongoing continuance of its programs. At the date of this report, management has no reason to believe this financial support will not continue. o. Finance and operating leases i. Finance leases The economic ownership of a leased asset is transferred to the lessee if the lessee bears substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership of the leased asset. Where the company is a lessee in this type of arrangement, the related asset is recognised at the inception of the lease at the fair value of the leased asset or, if lower, the present value of the lease payments plus incidental payments. A corresponding amount is recognised as a finance lease liability. See Note 2 (k) for the depreciation methods and useful lives for assets held under finance lease. The corresponding finance lease liability is reduced by lease payments net of finance charges. The interest element of lease payments represents a constant proportion of the outstanding capital balance and is charged to profit or loss, as finance costs over the period of the lease. The Westpac leasing facility is secured against certain vessels within the fleet. ii. Operating leases All other leases are treated as operating leases. Where the company is a lessee, payments on operating lease agreements are recognised as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term. Associated costs, such as maintenance and insurance, are expensed as incurred. 3. INFORMATION TO BE FURNISHED UNDER THE NSW CHARITABLE FUNDRAISING ACT 1991

2018 $

2017 $

Donations

850,523

777,806

Market stalls, barbecues and functions

483,760

335,226

Bingo, raffles, art union

485,917

625,791

Other fundraising

285,484

192,815

2,105,684

1,931,638

-

-

Market stalls, barbecues and functions

164,595

99,302

Bingo, raffles, art union

193,266

322,561

59,444

76,165

417,305

498,028

1,688,379

1,433,610

(a) Details of Aggregate Gross Income & Total Expenditure of Fundraising Appeals Gross proceeds from Fundraising Appeals

Direct costs of Fundraising Appeals Donations

Other fundraising

Net Surplus from Fundraising Appeals

The surplus of fundraising is applied in the charitable purposes of Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW, including the acquistion of vessels and other equipment. Fundraising Apeals include all individual fundraising activities at units and at Headquarters, across the entity.

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841 emergencies. 1,961 other rescues. Saving lives on the water.


Left: When this distressed 13.5m yacht called for help in the middle of the night, the crew of Wooli 30 towed it 20nm south to Coffs Harbour where Coffs 30 guided it on to a berth at the marina. Photo: Kath Farrar.

4. SURPLUS FROM REVENUE, OTHER INCOME AND EXPENSES

2018 $

2017 $

Activities income

603,861

492,963

Donations

850,523

888,272

Fundraising & sponsorship income

561,672

639,516

Games of chance

485,917

625,791

NSW recreational boat licence & registration levy

6,266,892

6,150,000

NSW Government core grant

1,683,108

1,648,490

Grants

1,256,820

270,780

Sales

302,032

268,621

Interest

103,691

101,670

Net proceeds from insurance claims

123,081

-

87,189

-

118,113

68,824

12,442,899

11,154,927

Activities

142,948

117,304

Administration

980,343

967,692

Staff costs

3,011,445

3,021,366

Maintenance of assets

2,223,528

2,207,750

Net insurance proceeds received

-

33,443

Loss on disposal of assets

-

204,025

Cost of sales

322,345

421,021

Depreciation

3,268,571

2,752,271

Training expenditure

132,266

116,431

Grant expenditure

357,385

270,339

Fundraising & games of chance

351,476

498,028

Interest expense (on finance loans)

111,051

133,328

IT expenditure

282,956

255,774

Insurances

318,031

267,560

Marketing

121,521

137,873

13,077

22,183

568,474

499,440

12,205,417

11,925,828

Revenue

Profit on disposal of assets Other

Expenditure

Membership Utilities

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5. TRADE AND OTHER RECEIVABLES

2018 $

2017 $

Trade receivables

710,913

825,826

Other receivables

199,756

500,713

11,762

20,891

922,431

1,347,430

347,414

397,769

Stock on hand - ratings & ranks

13,570

18,352

Stock on hand - Unit items/equipment

86,578

51,334

447,562

467,455

507,509

48,492

Goods & Services Tax recoverable

6. INVENTORIES Stock on hand - uniforms

7. PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT Assets under construction - general

Buildings/leasehold improvements At Cost

4,780,110

4,343,971

Less: Accumulated depreciation

(548,050)

(382,495)

4,232,060

3,961,476

2,619,346

2,358,297

(1,796,144)

(1,352,523)

823,202

1,005,774

499,702

482,438

(445,254)

(406,574)

54,448

75,864

1,280,652

1,173,795

(1,107,800)

(993,507)

172,852

180,288

At Cost

1,073,159

932,447

Less: Accumulated depreciation

(653,760)

(494,595)

419,399

437,852

Communications equipment At Cost Less: Accumulated depreciation

Furniture, fixtures & fittings At Cost Less: Accumulated depreciation

IT, office, plant & equipment At Cost Less: Accumulated depreciation

Motor vehicles

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2018 $

2017 $

20,777,541

20,574,156

540,461

393,006

(9,675,702)

(7,965,487)

11,642,300

13,001,675

At Cost

1,605,279

1,400,695

Less: Accumulated depreciation

(661,632)

(486,552)

943,647

914,143

18,795,417

19,625,564

Rescue vessels At Cost Under construction Less: Accumulated depreciation

Rescue vessel equipment

Total property, plant and equipment

Reconciliations Reconciliations of the carrying amounts of each class of property, plant and equipment at the beginning and end of the current and previous financial year are set out below: Assets under construction 507,509

48,492

3,961,476

3,402,068

435,426

703,329

Depreciation

(164,842)

(143,921)

Carrying amount at the end of the financial year

4,232,060

3,961,476

1,005,774

926,323

261,267

472,733

(443,839)

(393,282)

823,202

1,005,774

Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year

75,864

106,911

Additions at cost

17,321

11,167

(524)

-

(38,213)

(42,214)

54,448

75,864

Additions at cost

Buildings/leasehold improvements Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year Additions at cost

Communications equipment Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year Additions at cost Depreciation Carrying amount at the end of the financial year

Furniture, fixtures & fittings

Disposals Depreciation Carrying amount at the end of the financial year

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2018 $

2017 $

Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year

180,288

179,261

Additions at cost

105,686

101,524

(113,122)

(100,497)

172,852

180,288

Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year

437,852

316,704

Additions at cost

157,834

283,244

Disposals

(16,623)

(83,878)

(159,664)

(78,218)

419,399

437,852

13,001,675

13,608,888

Transfers to rescue vessel equipment

(23,636)

-

Additions at cost

839,154

1,192,876

Assets under construction

147,456

393,006

(143,638)

(367,307)

Depreciation

(2,178,711)

(1,825,788)

Carrying amount at the end of the financial year

11,642,300

13,001,675

914,143

946,224

23,636

-

180,947

131,910

(4,899)

4,360

(170,180)

(168,351)

943,647

914,143

18,795,417

19,625,564

IT, office, plant & equipment

Depreciation Carrying amount at the end of the financial year

Motor vehicles

Depreciation Carrying amount at the end of the financial year

Rescue vessels Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year

Disposals

Rescue vessel equipment Carrying amount at the beginning of the financial year Transfers from rescue vessels Additions at cost Disposals Depreciation Carrying amount at the end of the financial year Total Property, Plant and Equipment

The written down value of assets under finance lease was $2,940,404. The depreciation of leased assets was $457,515. 8. TRADE AND OTHER PAYABLES Trade payables Employee liabilities

62 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

1,119,872

1,184,679

599,261

572,665

1,719,133

1,757,344


Safe at day’s end ...the crew of Crowdy 30 returns a 42 foot yacht to safety in Crowdy Harbour. Photo: Keryn Woodman-Day.

9. BORROWINGS 2018 $

2017 $

Government loan

140,000

144,000

Bank loan (Westpac Leasing Facility) - secured

811,367

1,013,227

951,367

1,157,227

-

154,400

852,720

1,538,547

852,720

1,692,947

a) Current

b) Non-current Government loan Bank loan (Westpac Leasing Facility) - secured

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10. MEMBERS’ LIABILITIES AND NUMBERS The liability of the Members is limited. Every Regular and Provisional Member of the company undertakes to contribute to the assets of the Company, in the event of the same being wound up while s/he is a Member, or within one year after s/he ceases to be a Member, for payment of the debts and the liabilities of the company (contracted before s/he ceases to be a Member) and of the costs, charges and expenses of winding up and for the adjustment of the rights of the contributors among themselves, such amount as may be required not exceeding two dollars ($2.00). The numbers of Members were: Regular Members 2,463 Provisional 576 Other 43 Total 3,082 11. KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL COMPENSATION No emoluments were received or due and receivable by the Directors of the company. Those with authority for planning, directing and controlling the company’s activities, directly or indirectly (other than Directors) are the Commissioner, Deputy Commissioner, Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Services Director and IT and Business Development Director.

2018 $ The compensation paid to the key management personnel is:

2017 $

1,075,534

993,771

2018 $

2017 $

8,228,806

7,800,583

237,482

(770,901)

Interest income received & receivable

(103,691)

(101,670)

Depreciation charged

3,268,571

2,752,271

Gain on sale of property, plant & equipment

(87,189)

(231,079)

Interest on finance leases

111,051

133,328

Movement in receivables

424,999

(190,386)

Movement in inventories

19,893

11,399

Movement in provisions

26,596

228,353

Movement in payables

(64,807)

505,966

3,832,905

2,337,281

12. CASH FLOW INFORMATION (a) Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents For the purposes of the statement of cash flows, cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand and in banks and investments in money market instruments, net of outstanding bank overdrafts. Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year as shown in the statement of cash flows is reconciled to the related items in the statement of financial position as follows: Cash and cash equivalents (b) Reconciliation of surplus for the year to net cash flows from operating activities Net (deficit)/surplus for the year

Changes in net assets and liabilities

Net cash from operating activities

64 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018


13. LEASES (Operating leases as leases) The organisation’s future minimum operating lease payments are as follows: Minimum lease payments due

Within 1 year $

1 to 5 years $

After 5 years $

Total $

144,543

202,095

16,474

363,112

30 June 2018

Lease expenses during the period amount to $132,415, representing the minimum lease payments.

14. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS There have been no significant subsequent events. 15. EXPENDITURE OF CORE NSW GOVERNMENT GRANT & BOAT LICENCE & REGISTRATION LEVY Marine Rescue NSW has in recent years reported on its investment of the annual funding received from the State Government via a direct Government grant and the levy on recreational boat licences and registrations in its submission to the NSW State Rescue Board Annual Report. This submission has excluded funding from other sources such as fundraising and other grants and expenditure that relates to unit operations. This reporting format is no longer required by the State Rescue Board but for optimal transparency and accountability, this expenditure is specifically outlined in this report at Appendix A (page 67). The report on the acquittal of funding provided in Appendix A is prepared on a cash basis, which may vary from the final audited reports, which are prepared on an accrual basis. 16. REGISTERED OFFICE AND PRINCIPAL PLACES OF BUSINESS The Registered Office of the company is: Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW (Trading as Marine Rescue NSW) Building 1, 202 Nicholson Parade Cronulla NSW 2230 Phone: 02 8071 4848 Web: marinerescuensw.com.au Email: admin@marinerescuensw.com.au The Principal Places of Business are located at the following Marine Rescue NSW bases (from north to south): 1

Point Danger

16

Port Stephens

31

Shellharbour

2

Brunswick

17

Lemon Tree Passage

32

Shoalhaven

3

Cape Byron

18

Newcastle

33

Jervis Bay

4

Ballina

19

Lake Macquarie

34

Sussex Inlet

5

Evans Head

20

Norah Head

35

Ulladulla

6

Iluka Yamba

21

Tuggerah Lakes

36

Kioloa

7

Wooli

22

Central Coast

37

Batemans Bay

8

Woolgoolga

23

Hawkesbury

38

Tuross

9

Coffs Harbour

24

Cottage Point

39

Narooma

10

Nambucca

25

Broken Bay

40

Bermagui

11

Trial Bay

26

Terrey Hills

41

Merimbula

12

Port Macquarie

27

Middle Harbour

42

Eden

13

Camden Haven

28

Port Jackson

43

Alpine Lakes

14

Crowdy Harrington

29

Botany Port Hacking

44

Moama

15

Forster-Tuncurry

30

Port Kembla

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305 volunteers honoured. 2,850 years’ service to our community.

66 MARINE RESCUE NSW | ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018


Left: MR Forster-Tuncurry Unit Commander Fran Breen waves to crowds during the Queen’s Baton Relay in the lead-up to the April Gold Coast Commonwealth Games. Photo: gc2018.com

APPENDIX A: Expenditure of NSW Government grant & boating registration & licence levy

$

$

8,450,759

Total funding made available: Represented by: NSW recreational boat registration & licence levy

6,767,651*

NSW Government grant

1,683,108

Amount expended by Marine Rescue NSW Indirect Unit Funding

56,867

Direct Unit funding

821,675

Funding Advance repayment

156,000

Administration

634,880

Staff cost Activities expenses

2,788,357 63,474

Buildings

142,387

Uniforms and stores costs

180,276

Training

80,313

IT

225,588

Insurance

316,943

Marketing

82,487

Membership

1,964

Motor vehicles

259,432

Radio facilities

263,674

Rescue vessel R&M

66,921

Trailers

8,375

Utilities

423,791

Fundraising costs Subtotal New vessels

1,500 6,574,904 843,657

Other vessel expenditure

-

Other capital expenditure

861,085

Total capital expenditure

1,704,742

Unit contributions, leasing facility & other funds Total Expenditure

171,113 8,450,759

* Thirteen monthly NSW recreational boat registration and licence levy payments were received in 2017-18.

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APPENDIX A: Expenditure of NSW Government grant & boating registration & licence levy

$

New vessels (note)

6.8m Ocean Cylinder RHIB*, Alpine Lakes unit (part)

237,803

6.8m Ocean Cylinder RHIB, Norah Head unit

272,236

10m Naiad, Central Coast unit (part)

161,782

6.8m Ocean Cylinder, Forster-Tuncurry unit (part)

49,119

4.8m Naiad RHIB, Tuross unit (part)

22,400

4.2m Zodiac Milpro RHIB, Camden Haven unit

35,161

4.2m Zodiac Milpro RHIB, Ulladulla unit

35,481

5.5m Ocean Cylinder, Iluka Yamba unit (part)

29,675

Subtotal

843,657

Other capital expenditure Buildings/leasehold improvements Furniture and fittings IT equipment

144,891 846 42,192

Communication equipment

502,238

Rescue vessel equipment

66,062

Motor vehicles & trailers

104,856

Subtotal

861,085

Total

1,704,742

Note: Funding allocations against new vessels represent the amount paid during the financial year and may not reflect the total cost of the vessel. * RHIB Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat

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Marine Rescue NSW Operational Regions and Unit locations


MARINE RESCUE NSW Volunteers saving lives on the water Volunteer Marine Rescue New South Wales ABN 98 138 078 092 PO Box 579, Cronulla NSW 2230 Phone: 02 8071 4848 | Fax: 02 9969 5214 Web: marinerescuensw.com.au Email: admin@marinerescuensw.com.au

Profile for Marine Rescue NSW

MRNSW Financial Report 2018  

MRNSW Financial Report 2018

MRNSW Financial Report 2018  

MRNSW Financial Report 2018