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MaRch 2013

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Who's going to gas? MidEast yards divErsify ProPulsion: innovativE solutions to cut fuEl costs

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Contents

MarineLoG

MARCH 2013 Vol . 118, No. 3

the first of three dP2 Platform Supply vessels at Bordelon Marine Shipbuilders’ facility in houma, LA.

6

UPdAtE

Arctic drilling on hold • No fun on this fun ship: Carnival Triumph’s nightmarish journey • linking wind energy to Jersey’s Shore • VT Halter inks deal to build ATB for Bouchard • Shell to pump up lNG availability in U.S. And much more... 

Photo: John R. Snyder



p. 33 Features Software

Get the most out of your software

Modern software enhances the customer service experience, improves business profitability and turns data into built-in intelligence p.14

Ship Repair

Middle East yards bank on offshore business

With the increase in new shipyards and more repair capacity, Gulf yards look to diversify their portfolio with the buoyant offshore sector p.18

Propulsion

Cutting costs and fuel consumption

New innovative solutions and technologies are the key to helping owners and operators meet the increasing maritime technology demands PLUS: Private equity firm acquires Kobelt Manufacturing • Q&A with Traktor Jet specialist NAMJet p.24 www.marinelog.com

LNG

13

INSIdE wAShINGtON

38 39 40 41 42 44

NEwSMAkERS

Navy faces cuts from the sequestration axe

tECh NEwS CONtRACtS BUyER’S GUIdE ML MARkEtPLACE SALvAGE COLUMN

The Costa Concordia: One year later By Tim Beaver

who has gas and who wants it?

Cheap and abundant natural gas is the perfect solution for operators p. 29

Shipyard Spotlight

Rising Star

Bordelon Marine’s new class of DP2 PSVs will be a game changer p. 33

Paints & Coatings

New antifouling technology gives marine organisms the shake

Micanti BV takes a different route on the antifouling front—a foil that shoos away pesky marine organisms without killing them p. 34

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EdItORIAL

Smoothing the transition to lNG

MARCH 2013 MARINE LOG 1

John r. Snyder Publisher & Editor Editorial

jsnyder@sbpub.com

August 2000 Vol 105 No 8

editorial

Smoothing the transition to LNG

T

he use of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) as a marine fuel has really grabbed the imagination of vessel operators. What’s compelling about burning LNG is that it is clearly environmentally friendly—virtually eliminating particulate matter and sulfur dioxides (SOx) and reducing nitrogen oxides (NOx) by at least 85 percent. By equipping ships with dualfuel engines or gas-only engines, operators will be able to sail through Sulfur Emission Control Areas or Emission Control Areas in full compliance. The other choices are to burn ultra low sulfur fuel or operate on Heavy Fuel Oil and use exhaust gas scrubbers. SECAs and ECAs are all about cleaner air. Southern California and around the Port of Los Angeles, for example, has some of the worst air quality in the U.S. Particulate matter and smog have been linked to cancer, asthma, premature death and respiratory ailments. On top Blenkey of the environmental benefits, switching to LNG Nicholas makes good business sense, too. One operator that sees LNG’s Editor value to the bottom line is Washington State Ferries. Speaking at a recent breakfast seminar hosted by DNV in Washington, DC, David Moseley, Assistant Secretary for the Washington State Department of Transportation, Ferries Division, said fuel now represents 29 percent of the ferry system’s operating budget. He figures by switching his fleet to LNG, he will save an average of $6.4 million annually. “I take very seriously the imperative that we need to develop cleaner fuels,” said Moseley, but he clearly sees the economic benefit. Moseley sees LNG, however, as a transitional fuel, until alternatives such as solar, wind, wave, etc., become more fully developed over the next 50 years. As we report in this issue in “Who has gas and who wants it?,” Moseley highlights WSF’s plans for converting six

Issaquah Class ferries to burn LNG during a midlife propulsion refit. What we also report on in this issue is the other part of the LNG equation—namely, the availability of LNG for refueling. As we highlight in our Update section, “Shell to pump up LNG availability in the U.S.,” Shell Oil is doing its part by investing in two small scale reliquefaction units that will be strategically located to supply the U.S. Gulf of Mexico and the Great Lakes region. I would also expect companies such as Clean Energy Fuels—T. Boone Pickens’ company—to expand the availability of LNG. Clean Energy is already the largest provider of LNG to the North American transportation market. They are setting up a string of LNG refueling stations on truck routes and supplying Compressed Natural Gas to sanitation trucks in Seattle. On another front, the mainstream media was all over the sad saga of the Carnival Triumph. As we discuss in “No fun on this fun ship: Carnival Triumph’s nightmarish voyage” in our Update section, the powerless cruise ship left passengers adrift on a steamy, malodorous adventure. The question is whether the mishap will prompt a review in cruise ship design. Would it be worthwhile to look at designing cruise ships with two separate engine rooms to add redundancy? And speaking of cruise ships, American Salvage Association president Tim Beaver marks the one year anniversary of the Costa Concordia incident in this month’s Salvage Column. Titan Salvage and its Italian partner Micoperi SRL are leading the incredibly complex task of salvaging the ship off of the island of Giglio, Italy. The operation—which will cost an estimated $400 million—is called Parbuckling and involves building a series of underwater platforms and using flotation devices to lift the Costa Concordia upright so that it can be towed away. It is truly an amazing feat of engineering and ingenuity.

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March 2013 Vol. 118 No. 3

MarineLoG ISSN 08970491

USPS 576-910

PrESIDENT arthur J. McGinnis, Jr. amcginnis@sbpub.com

INTErNaTIONaL SaLES DIrEcTOr Louise cooper lcooper@sbpub.com

PUBLIShEr & EDITOr-IN-chIEF John r. Snyder jsnyder@sbpub.com

NaTIONaL SaLES DIrEcTOr Jeff Sutley jsutley@sbpub.com

aSSOcIaTE EDITOr Shirley Del Valle sdelvalle@sbpub.com

rEGIONaL SaLES MaNaGEr Vanessa Di Stefano vdistefano@sbpub.com

cONTrIBUTING EDITOr William B. Ebersold wbeber@comcast.net

SaLES rEPrESENTaTIVE -kOrEa & chINa Young-Seoh chinn jesmedia@unitel.co.kr

cONTrIBUTING EDITOr Paul Bartlett pbmc@gotadsl.co.uk

cLaSSIFIED SaLES craig Wilson cwilson@sbpub.com

WEB EDITOr Nicholas Blenkey nblenkey@sbpub.com

cONFErENcE DIrEcTOr Jane Poterala jpoterala@sbpub.com

MarkETING DIrEcTOr Erica hayes ehayes@sbpub.com

cONFErENcE cOOrDINaTOr Michelle M. Zolkos mzolkos@sbpub.com

crEaTIVE DIrEcTOr Wendy Williams wwilliams@sbpub.com

cOLUMNISTS/cONTrIBUTOrS Lars Fischer, Softship Data Processing Markus Niemi, Steerprop Ltd. Tim Beaver, aSa

PrODUcTION DIrEcTOr Mary conyers mconyers@sbpub.com

A SimmonS-BoArdmAn PuBlicAtion EDITOrIaL aND BUSINESS OFFIcES 55 Broad Street, 26th Floor New York, N.Y. 10004 TEL: (212) 620-7200 FaX: (212) 633-1165 website: www.marinelog.com e-mail: marinelog@sbpub.com circulAtion & SuBScriPtionS: call toll free (800) 895-4389, Monday-Friday 9 am—5 pm EST.

nexT MonTH: oFFSHore • SHiPYard SaFeTY • TugS & bargeS Marine Log Magazine (Print ISSN 0897-0491, Digital ISSN 2166-210X), (USPS#576-910), (canada Post cust. #7204654), (Bluechip Int’l, Po Box 25542, London, ON N6c 6B2, agreement # 41094515) is published monthly by Simmons-Boardman Publ. corp, 55 Broad Street, 26th Floor, New York, NY 10004. Printed in the U.S.a. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY and additional mailing offices. Pricing: Qualified individual in the marine industry may request a free subscription. Non-qualified subscriptions printed or digital version: 1 year US $95.00; foreign $207.00; foreign, air mail $307.00. 2 years US $151.00; foreign $263.00; foreign, air mail $463.00. BoTH print & digital versions: 1 year US $142.00; foreign $311.00; foreign, air mail $411.00. 2 years US $228.00; foreign $394.00; foreign, air mail $594.00. Single Copies are $28.00 ea. Subscriptions must be paid for in U.S. funds only. coPYrigHT © Simmons-Boardman Publishing corporation 2013. all rights reserved. contents may not be reproduced without permission. For reprint information contact: ParS International corp., 102 W 38th St., 6th Floor, New York, N.Y. 10018 Phone (212) 221-9595 Fax (212) 221-9195. For SubScriPTionS, & addreSS cHangeS: Please call (800) 895-4389, (402) 3464740, Fax (402) 346-3670, e-mail circulation@sbpub.com or write to: Marine Log Magazine, Simmons-Boardman Publ. corp, PO Box 10, Omaha, NE 68101-0010. PoSTMaSTer: Send address changes to Marine Log Magazine, PO Box 10, Omaha, NE 68101-0010.

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Update

biz NOTES

INlAND • COASTAl OFFSHORE • DEEpSEA

Arctic drilling

ON hOLd

R

oyal Dutch Shell plc will pause its exploration drilling activity in Alaska’s Beaufort and Chukchi Seas for the remainder of the year. The company says the break will help Shell prepare equipment and plans for a resumption of activity at a later stage. “We’ve made progress in Alaska, but this is a long-term program that we are pursuing in a safe and measured way,” says Marvin Odum, Director, Upstream Americas and President, Shell Oil Co. “Our decision to pause in 2013 will give us time to ensure the readiness of all our equipment and people

following the drilling season in 2012.” The decision to halt exploration comes on the heels of the Kulluk’s grounding on Christmas Eve last year and operation issues with the Noble Discoverer. Both vessels have since been towed to yards in Asia for maintenance and repairs, says Shell. In January, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar launched “an expedited, high-level assessment” to “pay special attention to challenges that Shell encountered in connection with certification of its containment vessel, the Arctic Challenger; the deployment of its containment

STX OSV becOmeS Vard

dome; and operational issues associated with its two drilling rigs, the Noble Discoverer and the Kulluk.” The U.S. Coast Guard also announced that it had initiated a comprehensive marine casualty investigation of the Kulluk grounding. Despite the challenges, Shell remains committed to the Arctic exploration program. The company says that Alaska remains an area with high potential for the company over the long term, and that Shell is committed to drill there again in the future. If exploration proves successful, resources there would take years to develop.

Following the sale of STX Europe’s majority stake in the company to Fincantieri Oil & Gas, STX OSV Group has taken on a new moniker: Vard. The name embodies its maritime heritage and long history in shipbuilding, according to the company, and symbolizes its ambition to lead the way in the industry, reflects its size, position and goal to be a preferred partner for technologically advanced solution in the global OSV market. “It conveys a sense of stability and strength, relevance and flexibility,” says Roy Reite, CEO and Executive Director, Vard. “More importantly, it reflects our long-standing Norwegian heritage, as well as our leading position within the offshore and specialized vessels industry globally. From the very start of the project, the objective was to find a name that is short, solid, innovative and maritime in its tone. Vard met all of these criteria.”

Illegal operation lands Pacific International Lines in hot water As A result of the illegAl operation of the M/V Southern Lily 2 in June 2012, Singapore-based container ship company, Pacific International Lines, has been ordered to pay $2.2 million in criminal penalties by a DC Federal Court judge, the Department of Justice reports. The company had previously pleaded guilty to three felony charges—among them: that it made false statements to the U.S. Coast Guard; Violated the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships by concealing illegal waste water operations and discharges in a falsified oil record book; And operating a 6 marINe LOG MARCH 2013

vessel in U.S. waters without a functioning oil water separator. Under the terms of the plea agreement, Pacific International Lines was placed on probation three years, during which time it must operate under the terms of a government-approved Environmental Compliance Plan. The plan includes review by an independent auditor of any of Pacific International Lines ships that trade in the United States. In addition to the $2 million criminal fine, the judge also ordered Pacific International Lines to pay $200,000 to support commu-

nity service projects. The projects will be administered by the National Fish & Wildlife Foundation and the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation. Additionally, Qing Cao, the second engineer of the Southern Lily 2, pleaded guilty to charges of operating the vessel in U.S. waters without a functioning oily water separator. He was was sentenced to 36 months probation and ordered to leave the U.S. immediately. As part of his sentence, during his probation, Cao is not allowed to work on any vessels that make calls at U.S. ports.

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Update No fun on this fun ship: carnival Triumph’s nightmarish voyage When passengers on board the 893 ft Carnival Triumph departed the crippled ship on Valentine’s Day at the Alabama Cruise Terminal, Mobile, AL, some laughed through tears, others kissed the ground and all were thankful to be off the stricken ship. What was supposed to be a fun four-day voyage—the ship departed the Galveston, Texas terminal on February 7 and was scheduled to return February 11— quickly turned into a nightmare for passengers when the ship lost power after an engine fire, rendering it dead in the water north of Merida, Mexico. With 3,143 passengers and 1,086 crew on board, Carnival jumped into action and had another Carnival ship, the 855 ft Carnival Elation, at the scene transferring food and beverage provisions to the vessel. According to Gerry Cahill, President & CEO, Carnival Cruise Lines, the ship was able to maintain emergency generator power, enabling the technical team on board to gradually restore auxiliary power to operate some basic hotel functions. But while guests were safe and, by all accounts, crew did their best to make sure everyone was as comfortable as possible, little to no power on The Resolve Pioneer serves as the primary tow vessel during the Carnival Triumph towing operation board meant there was limited power supply for recharging cell phones, limited hot food service, no air conditioning was emanating from the overflowing human and few operational toilets. waste. The lack of working toilets would go on to be the national media’s focus when TOWING TO POrT The original plan was to tow the ship to interviewing the disembarking passengers. Some passengers went on to say that they Progreso, Mexico, but when strong curslept under makeshift tents on top of the rents kicked in, the ship began to drift north ship’s deck to get away from the smell that prompting Carnival to tow the ship to

8 marINe LOG MARCH 2013

Mobile, AL. Resolve Marine Group, Fort Lauderdale, FL, took part in the salvage operation, deploying its 207-foot Anchor Handling Tug (AHTS) Resolve Pioneer. Resolve Pioneer served as the primary tow vessel and along with other tugs steered the ship into the Mobile port. Resolve’s tug, the Lana Rose, also served as a provisional tug during the operation. It was loaded with water, food and other supplies such as generators that were lifted by helicopter, from the tug to the Triumph’s upper deck. Once in Mobile passengers were given the option of taking a bus to local hotels in Mobile, AL or New Orleans, LA where they could spend the night, or taking the bus back to Galveston. As for the Carnival Triumph, after passengers disembarked, the ship was towed to BAE Ship Repair, Mobile, AL. At press time no contract details were available. The investigation into the fire is being led by the Bahamas Maritime Administration with participation by the U.S. Coast Guard and the National Transportation Safety Board. cOmPeNSaTION In a statement Cahill said, all guests would receive a full refund of the cruise, and transportation expenses. “In addition, they will receive a future cruise credit equal to the amount paid for this voyage, as well as reimbursement of all shipboard purchases during the voyage, with the exception of gift shop and casino charges.” As further compensation, passengers will also receive an additional $500 per person.

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Linking wind energy to Jersey’s shore Atlantic Wind Connection (AWC), Princeton, NJ, has picked Bechtel as its Engineering, Procurement and Construction (EPC) Contractor and Alstom as its HVDC technical advisor for the first phase of its New Jersey Energy Link, an electricity transmission system proposed for off of the New Jersey coast. The New Jersey Energy Link will connect both traditional and alternative energy resources onshore and off with users throughout the state. The subsea cable will run the length of New Jersey 12 to 15 miles offshore and when complete will have the capacity to transmit 3,000 MW of electricity—lowering energy costs and strengthening NJ’s economy. According to the Atlantic Wind Connection, bringing offshore

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energy to the New Jersey coast, will create 74,000 job-years of work, will put $9 billion into the State economy and will bolster state and local tax revenues by $2.2 billion. buILdING The LINk

The New Jersey Energy Link will be built in three phases, with construction expected to begin in 2016, with the first phase in service in 2019. In future phases, the power grid could eventually stretch down to Delaware and Virginia. As EPC contractor for the New Jersey Energy Link, Bechtel will engineer, design, and install onshore transmission lines and substations: two onshore convertor stations and one offshore converter station that will make up the New Jersey Energy Link backbone. Bechtel will also oversee the installation of advanced HVDC converter technology and high voltage DC cables to bring power from the offshore wind turbines to the onshore converter stations. As the HVDC technical advisor, Alstom will provide technical advice concerning the manufacture and delivery of the 320 kV HVDC multi-terminal system components. With their HVDC MaxSine Voltage Source Converters (VSC), they are one of only a few firms in the world versed in technology related to multi-terminal HVDC systems including the project’s plans to provide connections with a series of 1 GW offshore converter “hubs” to onshore converters. This multi-terminal HVDC offshore network will transform the 138 kV or 230 kV alternating current output from offshore wind farm electric service platforms into DC for transmission at 320 kV DC to onshore converters that will be connected to the PJM grid.

FdNY aNd reSOLVe SIGN reSPONder aGreemeNT The New York City Fire Department (FDNY) and Resolve Salvage & Fire, Fort lauderdale, Fl, have signed a consent agreement that would enable the FDNY’s resources to be included in Resolve’s network of first responders. The resources will be available to vessel owners and operators, under the OpA90 Salvage & Marine Firefighting (SMFF) requirements. Under the OpA90 SMFF regulations, municipal and public firefighters can only be listed as responders to a marine event if a consent agreement has been signed saying the responder can be listed in the Vessel Response plan. While the FDNY already has a marine division in place that responds to marine incidents immediately, the agreement simply “formalizes [the] FDNY’s role in the Vessel Response plan, as a fellow marine firefighting responder,” says Joe Farrell, president, Resolve Marine Group, Inc. The current FDNY fireboat fleet includes vessels such as the 140-ft Three Forty Three, its sistership Firefighter II, The Bravest (pictured) and the 27 ft Marine 1.

MARcH 2013 marINe LOG 9

Update hOrIzON reLOcaTeS NOrTheaST OPeraTIONS TermINaL Horizon lines, Inc., is making a fresh start. The company has relocated it Northeast terminal operations from Elizabeth, NJ to The City of Brotherly love, philadelphia, pA. The move will go into effect April 11. Expected to produce “significant advantages for Horizon lines customers in the puerto trade lane,” according to Richard Rodriguez, Vice president and General Manger, puerto Rico Division, Horizon lines, the move will improve cost efficiencies and help Horizon better serve its customers. The first northbound sailing will depart San Juan on April 7, 2013 and is expected to arrive in philidelphia on April 11. Horizon lines also runs two other puerto Rico trade routes—Jacksonville, Fl to San Juan and Houston, TX to San Juan—the service schedules on these routes will not change.

VT halter inks deal to build aTb for bouchard Last month, VT Halter Marine, Inc., Pascagoula, MS, a subsidiary of VT Systems, Inc., inked a new contract to build a 250,000 bbl Articulated Tug Barge (ATB) for Bouchard Transportation Co., Inc., Melville, NY. The contract contains an option for a second ATB that must be exercised within 60 days of the initial contract award. Based on a design by naval architectural firm Guarino & Cox, Inc., the ocean tank barge will have an overall length of 625 feet, making it the longest in the Bouchard fleet. The barge will be ABS and USCG certified for Jones Act service. The barge will have a beam of 91 feet, depth of 47 feet, with a capacity of 250,000

barrels. At 252,000 bbl, only the tank barge B. No. 245 has a larger capacity in the Bouchard fleet. The 10,000 hp twin-screw ocean tug will be classed by ABS as A1 Towing Vessel, Dual Mode ATB, USCG Subchapter M, and will be equipped with an Intercon Coupler System. Construction of the ATB unit will begin next month

at Pascagoula, with delivery scheduled for mid 2015. Last year, VT Halter Marine delivered the 112 ft, 4,000 hp ocean tug Evening Star to Bouchard Transportation Co. Using an Intercon coupling system, the Evening Star was mated to the 55,000 bbl B. No. 250 tank barge, which was built by Bollinger Marine Fabricators, LLC, Amelia, LA.

TechNIP chrISTeNS STaTe-OF-The-arT VeSSeL The latest vessel in the Technip fleet was christened the Deep Orient last month at a naming ceremony at Metalships & Docks (MSD) shipyard, Vigo, Spain. Equipped with a 250-metric tonne main crane, Dp2 stationkeeping capability, two workclass remotely operated vehicles and a large 1,900 m2 deck area, the Deep Orient offers an integration solution to fulfill industry needs, all the while, meeting the latest environmental standards. The vessel will be dedicated to subsea construction and flexible pipelay projects beginning in Norway. The vessel measures 135m x 27m and will have the capacity to accommodate 120 on board.

10 marINe LOG MARCH 2013

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Shell to pump up LNG availability in u.S. One of the big stumbling blocks for the broad adoption of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) as a marine fuel in North America is its availability for bunkering. Shell is trying to change that. It recently announced it would invest in two small-scale liquefaction units. These two units will form the basis of two new LNG transport corridors in the Great Lakes and Gulf Coast regions. This decision follows an investment decision in 2011 on a similar corridor in Alberta, Canada. Shell is also working to use natural gas as a fuel in its own operations. “Natural gas is an abundant and cleaner-burning energy source in North America, and Shell is leveraging its LNG expertise and integrated strength to make LNG a viable fuel option for the commercial market,” says Marvin Odum, President, Shell Oil Company. “We are investing now in the infrastructure that will allow us to bring this innovative and cost-competitive fuel to our customers.” Operators in the U.S. that have already committed to investing in vessels that will burn LNG include Harvey Gulf International Marine, New Orleans, LA, and TOTE, Princeton, NJ. Shell already has charter agreements with HGIM for its dual-fuel PSVs (STX SV310DF) under construction at TY Offshore, Gulfport, MS. Others, such as Washington State Ferries and Staten Island Ferries are exploring converting and building gas-only-powered ferries. In the Gulf Coast Corridor, Shell plans to install a smallscale liquefaction unit (0.25 million tons per annum) at its Shell Geismar Chemicals facility in Geismar, LA. Once operational, this unit will supply LNG along the Mississippi River, the IntraCoastal Waterway and to the offshore Gulf of Mexico and the onshore oil and gas exploration areas of Texas and Louisiana. To service oil and gas and other industrial customers in Texas and Louisiana, Shell is expanding its existing relationship with fuels and lubricants re-seller Martin Energy Services whose publicly traded affiliate, Martin Midstream Partners L.P. will provide terminaling, storage, transportation and distribution of LNG. Shell has a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Edison Chouest Offshore (ECO) to supply LNG fuel to marine vessels that operate in the Gulf of Mexico and to provide what is anticipated to be the first LNG barging and bunkering operation in North America at Port Fourchon, LA. The LNG transport barges will move the fuel from the Geismar production site to Port Fourchon where it will be bunkered into customer vessels. In the Great Lakes Corridor, Shell plans to install a small-scale liquefaction unit (0.25 million tons per annum) at its Shell Sarnia Manufacturing Centre in Sarnia, Ontario, Canada. Once operational, this project will supply LNG fuel to all five Great Lakes, their bordering U.S. states and Canadian provinces and the St. Lawrence Seaway. The Interlake Steamship Company is expected to be the first marine customer in this region, as it begins the conversion of its vessels. Pending final regulatory permitting, these two new liquefaction units are expected to begin operations and production in about three years. Shell is also working to use LNG as a fuel in its own operations or to support its operations. In its onshore production, for example, Shell has begun to transition many of its onshore drilling rigs and hydraulic fracturing spreads to LNG. These conversions can reduce fuel costs and local emissions.

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Leading innovation in passenger ship technology New fuels, new engines and new designs are becoming available for the existing fleet. The difficulty for shipowners, builders, equipment makers and financiers is not only what technology to support but when to invest. Whatever technology or solution you’re exploring for your fleet, we’re here to help you assess it, understand it and make it safe. To find out more visit us on stand 1843 at Cruise Shipping Miami or go to www.lr.org/csm

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MARCH 2013 marINe LOG 11

$645 billion will be spent on oil and gas E&P in 2013 Put your company on the map Marine Log’s April issue features a SPECial adVErtiSinG oPPortUnity, our Offshore Energy Showcase. Learn more at: www.marinelog.com/showcase Bonus distribution at OTC 2013 and Marine Log Tugs & Barges 2013

THE PROVEN FORMULA FOR BRAND SUCCESS | MARiNELOg.COM U.S GUlf CoaSt, WESt CoaSt & MExiCo Jeff Sutley jsutley@sbpub.com 212-620-7233

U.S. EaSt CoaSt, MidWESt & Canada Vanessa di Stefano vdistefano@sbpub.com 212-620-7225

WorldWidE louise Cooper lcooper@sbpub.com +44 1444 416375

ClaSSifiEdS Craig Wilson cwilson@sbpub.com 212-620-7211 *Figure based on 2013 projections

insideWashington

Navy faces cuts from the sequestration axe

W

ith sequestration a reality, the Navy has set plans in motion to make immediate reductions in spending, according to an announcement by Navy Secretary Ray Mabus on March 2. Newly installed Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said that Defense Department civilian employees will “particularly” feel the pain of the sequester. “Last night, because no budget deal had been reached,” said Secretary Mabus, “The Budget Control Act required setting in motion the automatic, government-wide cuts known as sequestration. Given that reality and associated impact of budgetary uncertainty imposed by an indefinite continuing resolution, the Department of the Navy intends to commence some reductions immediately.”

It was clear from the reductions announced by Secretary Mabus that shipyards that build and repair Navy vessels would feel the pinch. The Navy has already deferred maintenance on the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), repairs to the attack submarine USS Miami (SSN 755) and Aegis destroyer USS Porter (DDG 78); delayed the deployment of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64). Sequestration will also mean that the Navy won’t be undertaking some humanitarian missions, cut certain ship deployments, standing down some air wings and curtail its recruitment efforts and slash its advertising. Even the Blue Angels won’t be putting on their air shows.

Among the actions be insufficient after the being taken by the sequestration reducNavy is to cancel or tion is applied. The defer the deployment major programs affectof up to six ships to ed will be the Virginia various areas of operClass SSN Advance ation throughout Procurement, reactor the month of April; power units and the lay up four Combat Navy Secretary Joint High Speed VesLogistics Force units ray mabus sel (JHSV 10).” in PACOM starting Mabus said that the in April; won’t deploy the USS Navy was taking these actions Shoup (DDG 86) as an escort to “preserve support for those for USS Nimitz (CVN 68) in forces stationed overseas and CENTCOM; and return the currently forward-deployed. USS Thach (FFG 43) to home- Reductions in lower-priority port early from deployment to forward operations, and sigSOUTHCOM. nificant reductions in all other The Navy will also be pull- operations, training and maining the plug on some projects. tenance are the results of this Mabus said that the Navy will selection process. We made the begin “negotiating contract choices carefully, while trymodifications to de-obligate ing to preserve our ability to efforts for any investment pro- reverse or quickly restore neggrams for which the remain- ative effects if and when funding unobligated balance will ing is restored.”

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MaRCh 2013 mariNe log 13

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BY LARS FISCHER, MANAGING DIRECTOR, SOFTSHIP DATA PROCESSING ShipBuilding

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GET ThE MOST OUT OF YOUR SOFTWARE

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ontainer shipping has grown exponentially since its inception more than 50 years ago and, as a result, nearly 6,000 ships are currently moving in excess of 17 million containers around the globe. Keeping track of these containers is a tough task for all operators particularly as they might be onboard, in the stack, on a truck, with a customer or sub-leased to another operator. But it’s not just maintaining control of your container stock that’s the problem, increasingly the administrative burden associated with each container movement is threatening to overwhelm operators. A standard container move from a ship to the terminal requires six separate messages to be generated—these are gate out depot, gate in terminal, load

Packaged software delivers more than process automation terminal, discharge terminal, gate out terminal and gate in depot. So, for a new generation Ultra Large Container Vessel (ULCV) with a 15,000 TEU capacity (assuming 5,000 FEU and 5,000 TEU are shipped), around 60,000 pieces of information need to be exchanged, but if the pre-arrival notice, release order, booking confirmation, bill of lading and invoice are considered then a further 60,000 pieces of data need to be relayed for

the export process and another 20,000 (notice of arrival and delivery order) for the import process. That is a staggering 140,000 transactions for one ULCV voyage. Clearly it is an impossibility for any operator to process that amount of data without using some form of automation. Software will auto-generate the various messages, monitor the responses and reconcile and report as required. Not only does this save time and valuable resources, it should also improve accuracy and eliminate errors. But in today’s technology-led environment, an operator should be seeking to get more from its software and IT systems than just process automation. Most modern software is “packaged”

ABS Nautical Systems’ NS5 Enterprise going mobile Mobile devices are ubiquitous in our everyday lives. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the daily number of minutes spent on mobile devices has doubled since 2010 and now largely exceeds the time spent on websites. “The impact that mobile devices and mobilized applications

ABS Nautical Systems is developing apps to integrate with its NS5 Enterprise software, including ones that will assist with audits and inspections

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(apps) have on our day-to-day life continues to grow at an amazing rate,” says Francois Blais, Product Manager, ABS Nautical Systems. “Most of us now remain connected and perform complex business transactions anywhere and at any time, proving that mobility is here to stay and bound to create tangible benefits for the maritime and offshore industries.” ABS Nautical Systems says apps can play a significant role in the area of asset management, asset integrity, process safety and in support of organizational safety culture. To leverage the power of mobile devices, ABS Nautical Systems is designing and developing apps that will fully integrate with its asset management and operational integrity software NS5 Enterprise Solution that will accelerate its customers’ business processes and improve the visibility to their data in the area of Supply Chain, Quality and Compliance and Asset Integrity. APPS FOR ANY DEVICE, OPERATING SYSTEM ABS Nautical Systems says the features in development will include alert

view notifications, mobile calendaring, mobile requisitioning and financial approvals of procurement and crew events. Additionally, in support of overall asset integrity, ABS Nautical Systems’ apps will be designed to assist with audits and inspections allowing for field personnel to document reports and requests in a timelier manner, as well as show compliance with a complete history of maintenance—all from their mobile device. Satisfying current industry needs and looking to expand offerings in the future will give ABS Nautical Systems’ customers options and advantages in an increasingly mobile industry. ABS Nautical Systems’ NS5 Enterprise mobility platform supports portable devices including scanners, tablet PCs and smartphones, and any customer with mobility support within the organization’s infrastructure can take advantage of this upcoming technology. Furthermore, these apps are being developed to support all types of mobile devices and operating systems including Apple, Google Microsoft and others. www.eagle.org

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SOFTWARE ShipBuilding rather than bespoke. This means that operators can take a ready-made and proven application and then tailor it suit their own individual requirements. The advantage of this is that applications run off the latest technology platforms, are regularly updated, rarely go wrong and are significantly cheaper than commissioning an individual system. Added to this, packaged software, having been installed in a numerous, similar environments, has been regularly adapted and enhanced to deliver much more than simple data processing. For example, modern software packages will constantly be asking questions as data is exchanged such as “is this my container?” “where is my container?”, “does the bill of lading and booking information match the rate agreed with my client?” The software will also generate prompts to ensure that terminals, customs authorities and port communication systems receive the required information on time and in the correct format. From a customer perspective, automation enhances their service experience as modern systems can offer complete and up-to-the-minute visibility over actual cargo movements. Good applications will also provide customers with added-value services such as internet bookings,

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other, related processes. tracking and schedule This business informaenquiries as well as cretion is vital for any operaating more transparency tor seeking to understand between the operator, where the profit is made agent and customer. within the business and Software can also which areas need more bring some much needed management focus. An visibility and transparintegrated software system ency to daily operations. will link all elements of Take the common probthe business to consolidate lem of calculating the and analyze data and then profitability of a bookpresent it in a readable foring: A well thought out mat. software application will Modern software is retrieve variable costs Lars Fischer, Managing much more than simply per shipment from a cost Director,Softship Data processing pieces of data. database and apply these Processing Its real benefit comes from as estimated costs to the booking. Information on volumes taken identifying and extracting information from the customer at the time of book- from those processes and then using ing are automatically married with this built-in intelligence to assist managedata to provide analysis and profitabil- ment to enhance their customer service ity assessments for each consignment – and improve their business profitability. while the customer is still on the phone. And, as the voyage progresses and actual ABOUT THE AUTHOR Lars Fischer is Managing Director costs become known, real-time updates of Softship Data Processing Ltd, Singacan be delivered. Such transparency can also be pore, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Softachieved across a range of similar activi- ship AG, the leading provider of software ties such as invoicing, demurrage and solutions to the international liner shipdetention calculations, container repair ping sector. and maintenance, equipment leasing and www.softship.com

MARCH 2013 MARINE LOG 15

Intermodal Age the new

Presented By

MARINELOG +

conference & expo

interModaL is the fastest-growing form of surface freight transportation.

april 2–3, 2013 Hyatt regency BaLtiMore on tHe inner HarBor

Join Marine Log and raiLway age in Baltimore for a special conference exploring the multi-modal approach to moving cargo efficiently—by rail, by ship, by truck. ConferenCe topiCs • • • •

Securing and tracking cargo Improving efficiency through technology Managing the national equipment pool Labor’s critical role

• • • •

Successful public-private partnerships Panama Canal expansion Government policies that need to change Improving infrastructure: federal grants

exhibit and sponsorship opportunities Contact Jane Poterala, Conference Director, at tel. 212-620-7209 or jpoterala@sbpub.com

marinelog.com/events

railwayage.com/conferences

Tuesday, april 2

Wednesday, april 3

Continental breakfast | Sponsorship available | Expo open

Continental breakfast | Sponsorship available | Expo open

◆ Keynote address Ron Batory, President & COO, Conrail

◆ Keynote address

◆ MAP-21 and implementation of a national freight policy Randolph Resor, Policy Advisor, Office of the Undersecretary for Transportation Policy, U.S. DOT

◆ Managing the national equipment pool ◆ Environmental benefits of intermodal transport Debra A. Colbert, Senior VP, Waterways Council, Inc.

Coffee break | Sponsorship available | Expo open

Coffee break | Sponsorship available | Expo open

◆ What are the current trends in intermodal? Lawrence Gross, Senior Consultant, FTR Associates ◆ Panel presentations: Successful public-private partnerships Mark Montgomery, President & CEO, Ports America Chesapeake, LLC

◆ Why we need more federal and state investment in intermodal connections James C. Greller, Transportation Planner, Hudson County Improvement Authority Leif Dormsjo, Acting Deputy Secretary, Maryland Department of Transportation

Luncheon | Sponsorship available | Expo open

Luncheon | Sponsorship available | Expo open

◆ Luncheon address: Jim Hertwig, President & CEO, Florida East Coast Railway

◆ Panel presentations: What’s the impact of the Panama Canal expansion? Richard Powers, Director of Sales & Marketing, Maryland Port Administration Speaker from the U.S. Maritime Administration

◆ What critical role can labor play in the new intermodal age? Frank N. Wilner, Contributing Editor, Railway Age ◆ Panel presentations: How is technology improving intermodal efficiency? Mark Yonge, Chairman, Marine Highways Committee, Ship Operators Cooperative Program (SOCP)

◆ Port of Baltimore Tour

Energy break | Sponsorship available | Expo open ◆ Panel presentations: Securing the supply chain Moderator: Mark A. Carolla, LCDR, U.S. Navy Reserve (Ret.) John Walsh, Director Infrastructure Protection, CSX Stephen L. Caldwell, Director, Homeland Security & Justice Issues, U.S. Government Accountability Office Cocktail reception | Sponsorship available | Expo open

Program subject to change

Sponsorships & exhibits available. Jane Poterala, Conference Director T: (212) 620-7209 | E: jpoterala@sbpub.com

REGISTRATION Please register me for The New Intermodal Age on April 2 & 3, 2013 in Baltimore, MD. Registration fee is $925 per participant. [ ] Check enclosed (Payable in advance to Simmons-Boardman) [ ] Bill my company [ ] Charge my [ ] MasterCard [ ] Visa [ ] Amex

Name __________________________________________________________ Title ____________________________________________________________ Company _______________________________________________________

Card expires ______ / ______ Security code _______________________ Account number ________________________________________________ Signature _______________________________________________________ Cardholder name ________________________________________________ Billing address for card __________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ Email receipt to _________________________________________________

Address ________________________________________________________ City _______________________ State _________ Zip _______________ Telephone _________________________ Fax ________________________ Email ___________________________________________________________ 37-002-1825

Send completed form to: Jane Poterala, Conference Dir., Simmons-Boardman Publishing 55 Broad Street, Flr. 26, New York, NY 10004 T: (212) 620-7209 | F: (212) 633-1165 | conferences@sbpub.com

CONFERENCE FEE: The registration fee for this event includes admission to all conference sessions and social functions, as well as conference documentation containing all available presentations (sent via email post-event). Registration confirmation and invoice will be emailed. CANCELLATION POLICY: Confirmed registrants canceling less than a week prior to the start of the event are subject to a $250 service charge. Registrants who fail to attend are liable for the entire fee unless they notify Simmons-Boardman in writing via email or fax prior to the event. HOTEL: The Hyatt Regency Baltimore on the Inner Harbor is located at 300 Light St., Baltimore, MD, 21202. The Hyatt has set aside a block of rooms at $179.00 single/double for our attendees. These will be held until 30 days prior to the conference. Please contact the hotel directly at (410) 528-1234 for room reservations, group code “MMIS.” Reservations will be confirmed by the hotel. I’d like a complimentary subscription. (Publisher reserves right to limit numbers.) Marine Log Magazine Marine Log Daily News

Railway Age Magazine Rail Group News Daily

BY PAUL BARTLETT, CONTRIBUTING EDITOR ShipBuilding

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MiDDLE EAST YARDS BANK ON OFFShORE BUSiNESS Competitive market pushes Gulf repairers to diversify

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ew shipyards and more repair capacity will inevitably mean tough times ahead for Middle East shipyards. But repair facilities in the Gulf are turning increasingly to the buoyant offshore sector to offset a decline in traditional repair revenues, while diversification into other high-tech floating assets is also a growing contributor to earnings. Two of the region’s leading yards are expecting more offshore work in the months ahead. At a recent press briefing, Drydocks World Dubai (DDW) Chairman Khamis Juma Buamim, for example, said he expects the offshore business will account for 60% of the shipyard’s revenue in five years’ time. Currently, the offshore work accounts for about 33% of the shipyard’s business. ASRY CEO Chris Potter, meanwhile, expects earnings from offshore business to account for more than 50% this year or next of the Bahrain ship repairer’s business as the value of rig-upgrade projects for regional drilling companies continues to rise. Both yards are investing significant resources in beefing up their offshore capability. DDW plans to expand its newbuild area by moving its floating dock to Dubai Maritime City. A new quay adjacent to the area will boost offshore construction and rig upgrade capacity while several lay-by berths will be avail-

able for jack-ups at the end of the quay. Besides its usual mix of commercial repairs, DDW has various other innovative projects in progress. The company recently announced plans to work with Asian cruise consultant Oceanic Group to prepare the iconic QE2 for a voyage to Asia where it will undergo a complete refurbishment, probably in China, to begin a new life as a five-star hotel in the heart of an as-yet unnamed Asian city, possibly Hong Kong, Singapore, Shanghai or Seoul. The liner, delivered in 1969, completed 806 trans-Atlantic crossings between Southampton, UK and New York, NY, during almost 40 years of service for Cunard. The QE2 carried 2.5 million passengers and sailed nearly six million miles before its retirement in Dubai in November 2008. The QE2 has been laid up there, with a skeleton crew, ever since. Now, its seaworthiness and classification checks are being carried out at DDW before the QE2 sails for Asia. Whether or not the majestic liner will make the voyage under its own steam so far remains unclear. TWO MODULAR CAPTURE VESSELS FOR GULF OF MEXICO Other projects underway at DDW include the conversion of two 120,000 dwt Aframax tankers, Eagle Louisiana and Eagle

Dubai Drydocks World is assisting the Oceanic Group in preparing the majestic old liner QE2 for its voyage to Asia, where it will be refurbished for its new life as a five-star hotel

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Ship REpAiR ShipBuilding

Texas, into so-called Modular Capture Vessels for deployment in the Gulf of Mexico. The project, undertaken by Marine Well Containment Co., a not-for-profit company headed by ExxonMobil with nine other oil company shareholders, aims to have the two vessels available within hours to respond to any deepwater emergency in the Gulf of Mexico. The oil company initiative—a direct response to the Macondo disaster—will see the two ABS-classed vessels operating as lightering Aframax units in the Gulf, but capable of mobilization within hours in the event of an incident. The Modular Capture vessel is a new concept on which ABS initially granted “approval in principle.” But senior shipyard executives believe the two AET vessels could be the first of a series, as more robust risk management strategies become an essential component in all deepwater projects. Detail of the conversion and the plant installed on board the tankers is limited so far, but it understood that many millions of dollars have been spent on the ships’ internal arrangements. They will have modules for collecting undersea oil in the event of an emergency, as well as a capability for skimming, containing and storing oil at the surface. Some of the modules will be installed at DDW; others when the vessels arrive in the Gulf later this year. Meanwhile, the delayed floating storage and regasification unit FSRU Toscana is due to leave DDW any time now. Held back through no fault of the shipyard, owner OLT Offshore was www.marinelog.com

The FSRU Toscana was due to leave Dubai Drydocks World, following commissioning tests by OLT Offshore. The Floating Storage Regasification Unit will be operated by Saipem off of the coast of Italy near Livorno

completing commissioning tests in January prior to the vessel’s departure for Italy where it will be operated by Saipem off the coast near Livorno, feeding gas into the Italian grid. At Bahrain’s ASRY, the new 1,500-yard repair quay—a part of the yard’s $188 million expansion program—has opened up a significant new area for offshore repairs. Two new rail-mounted cranes were commissioned last year and the yard has now recently completed four 45-tonne ASD tugs customized to meet its own requirements. It is hoping to attract regional orders for tug construction. Meanwhile, executives have their eye on the floating power plant sector. They are confident that new orders will materialize and have now completed construction of one power barge hull on spec, while work on two more is now underway. GRANDWELD, GOLTENS TAKE UP RESIDENCE IN DUBAI Back in Dubai, the first tenants in Dubai Maritime City (DMC) are finally taking up residence. After long delays, two heavy-hitters are now on site. Grandweld Chief Executive Jamal Abki is clearly excited by the prospect of more space and direct access to the waters of the Gulf, enabling the construcMARCH 2013 MARINE LOG 19

ShipBuilding

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Grandweld’s Jadaf facility is converting four platform supply vessels to dive support vessels that will go to work for Saudi Aramco

The leader in LNG fuel Benefit from our extensive experience, from Feasibility Studies to Port Risk Assessments and Ship Classification in the value chain of LNG fuel.

Contact us: Email: NAMaritime@dnv.com www.dnv.com

20 MARINE LOG MARCH 2013

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Ship REpAiR ShipBuilding tion and repair of larger craft, while Goltens’ President Paul Friedberg says its new facility will enable it to take on significantly more work. Although Grandweld’s Jadaf facility will stay in operation for up to two years, focusing on small aluminum boat building and repair, Jamal says that most new construction and repair will be undertaken at the new 66,000 yd2 facility which cost just over $27 million. It consists of a large workshop and seven covered berths capable of building between seven and 21 vessels simultaneously, depending on size, and will be supplemented later this year with another 24,000 yd2 repair area. This will be adjacent to the two DMC shiplifts—one of 3,000 tons and one of 6,000 tons. Work in progress in January included ongoing construction of six seismic support vessels for Bourbon, as well as a range of other workboats including fast crew boats and security craft in both steel and aluminum. Conversion work underway included four Zamil Offshore vessels originally built as Platform Supply Vessels (PSVs) undergoing conversion to diving support vessels for charter to Saudi Aramco; and a derrick barge, the DLB Nand Gaurav, which is being converted into a pipe-laying barge for Essar Corp. These projects are significant in that they mark Grandweld’s first move into the offshore arena. Meanwhile Goltens is in the process of commissioning its own 26,000 yd2 facility in DMC. The marine engineering specialist, with key sites in Dubai and Singapore but other facilities across the world, serviced more than 10,000 ships last year belonging to several thousand customers. Goltens’ Friedberg

says the firm is focusing on speed and price but notes that the value of an average job is down by around 15% compared with a couple of years ago. He says the company’s engineering expertise can help to prolong the lives of certain key components, saving owners money. He cites 50 crankshafts, for example, which the company has successfully machined and repaired—an alternative to significant capital expenditure or scrapping. Meanwhile, he says, the new facility will ensure that the firm continues to meet its aim of offering an effective option for marine repairs at any time of any day, with the prospect of growing its 10% market share in the specialized marine engineering sector. In a Gulf-wide context, however, the build-up of repair capacity is a concern. Prices have fallen steadily in parallel with shipping’s fortunes and show no sign of a recovery any time soon. Two new shipyards targeting both new construction and repairs are likely to open for business this year—Zamil Group’s new facility in Dammam, Saudi Arabia, and Albwardy/Damen’s yard in Hamriyah. Meanwhile, Nakilat-Keppel Offshore Marine in Qatar plans to commission a new Panamax floating dock this year and has plans for a new VLCC dock by the end of next year. Executives at other existing facilities – including Nico International’s Abu Dhabi yard and Arab Heavy Industries in Ajman—are not expecting a let-up in the fiercely competitive environment any time soon. ML

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MARCH 2013 MARINE LOG 21

May 21-22, 2013 Stamford Marriott Stamford, Conn. An executive level two-day conference & expo focusing on best practices, best technologies for the inland and coastal tug and barge industry

SUPPORTING ORGANIZATIONS Corporate sponsor

Shamosh Equipment Corp.

EXHIBIT AND SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE

For details contact Jane Poterala, Conference Director, Marine Log. Email: jpoterala@sbpub.com Phone: (212) 620-7209

www.marinelog.com/events

PROGRAM

Moderator: John Snyder, Publisher & Editor-in-Chief, Marine Log

May 21, 2013

May 22, 2013

Continental breakfast | Sponsorship available | Expo open

Continental breakfast | Sponsorship available | Expo open

Keynote address

Towing vessel safety

What’s happening in Washington?

Training & safety

What’s the current market for tugs & barges?

Hybrid propulsion Ron Burchett, Commercial Marine Mgr., Corvus Energy Ltd.

Coffee break | Sponsored by DNV | Expo open Panel presentations: Marine finance Moderator: Richard J. Paine Sr., National Finance Mgr., Commercial Marine Group, TCF Equipment Finance Luncheon | Sponsorship available | Expo open Panel presentations: Leveraging LNG technology for the tug and barge market John Hatley, PE, Americas Vice President Ship Power, Wärtsilä North America Inc. Bill Lind, Director of Technology & Business Development, ABS Americas Opportunities for LNG bunkering

Coffee break | Sponsorship available | Expo open Panel presentations: Environmental concerns Moderator: Stephen Gumpel, Regional Vice President, North America, ABS Joseph J. Cox, President & CEO, Chamber of Shipping of America Luncheon | Sponsorship available | Expo open Panel presentations: Shipyard safety Speaker from Signal International Program subject to change

The next wave of ASD tug construction—coastal and inland towing vessels Captain Jeff Slesinger, Delphi Maritime, LLC Energy break | Sponsored by JonRie InterTech, LLC | Expo open Panel presentations: Articulated Tug Barges Cocktail reception | Sponsorship available | Expo open

REGISTRATION

Please register me for the Tugs & Barges conference and expo, taking place May 21-22, 2013 in Stamford, CT. Delegate: $895.00 (US) per person Tug/barge vessel owner/operator: $595.00 (US) per person (Primary business must be tug and barge operations; eligibility must be approved.)

Name ___________________________________________________________ Title ____________________________________________________________ Company _______________________________________________________

Check enclosed (payable to Marine Log) Bill my company Charge my [ ] MasterCard [ ] Visa [ ] Amex

Address ________________________________________________________ City _______________________ State _________ Zip ________________ Telephone __________________________ Fax ________________________

Card expires _______ / ______ Security code _______________________ Account number _________________________________________________ Signature _______________________________________________________ Cardholder name ________________________________________________ Billing address for card ___________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ Email receipt to __________________________________________________

Email ___________________________________________________________ Sign me up for a complimentary digital subscription: Marine Log Magazine Marine Daily - Breaking industry news

37-002-2000

Send completed form to: Jane Poterala, Conference Dir., Simmons-Boardman Publishing 55 Broad Street, Flr. 26, New York, NY 10004 T: (212) 620-7209 | E: conferences@sbpub.com

CONFERENCE FEE: The registration fee for this event includes admission to all conference sessions and social functions, as well as conference documentation containing all available presentations (sent via email post-event). Registration confirmation and invoice will be emailed. CANCELLATION POLICY: Confirmed registrants canceling less than a week prior to the start of the event are subject to a $250 service charge. Registrants who fail to attend are liable for the entire fee unless they notify Marine Log in writing prior to the event. HOTEL: The Stamford Marriott Hotel & Spa is located at 243 Tresser Blvd., Stamford, Connecticut 06901. The Marriott has set aside a block of rooms at $170.00 single/double for our attendees. These will be held until 30 days prior to the conference. Please contact the hotel directly at (203) 357-9555 for room reservations, group code “Marine Log.” Reservations will be confirmed by the hotel.

BY MARKUS NIEMI, STEERPROP LTD. ShipBuilding

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CUTTING COSTS AND T

he maritime world is more technically challenging than ever before. As oil exploration ventures further offshore in deeper waters, for example, offshore service vessels are evolving into more sophisticated, versatile, robust platforms. Additionally, as the natural resources in the Arctic are explored and developed, these vessels will be called upon to operate in increasingly harsher conditions. For cargo vessels there is a need to balance the demand for timely deliveries with rising fuel costs. The opening of new, in some cases faster, transportation routes such as the Northern Sea Route from Europe to Asia also presents both challenges and opportunities. In many cases, the solution—or the way to take advantage of these opportunities—is to utilize new, innovative solutions and technologies to produce faster, more efficient and reliable vessels capa-

ble of operating in demanding conditions. The Steerprop ECO CRP azimuth propulsor was developed as one such solution by the Finland-based Steerprop Ltd. after years of R&D. These propulsors combine innovative technological advancements and state-of-the-art hydrodynamic design with the proven benefits of the rugged dual-end Steerprop Contra-Rotating Propellers configuration. The result is a propulsor that can offer supreme fuel efficiency, outstanding maneuverability and excellent reliability at any speeds—even in excess of 25 knots. The fuel efficiency of the ECO CRP will allow owners and operators to reduce fuel costs, while the propulsor’s reliability will provide for low maintenance costs. The efficiency and reliability of the dual-end Steerprop CRP configuration derives from its rugged, almost simplistic construction. The propulsive load is

divided between two independent sets of propellers, shafts and gear wheels located on opposite ends of the propulsor body. This allows for larger, slower propellers to be used. This not only improves efficiency, but also provides for safety and reliability. As the propellers are separated by the bulk of the propulsor body, they cannot be jammed or blocked by ice or other debris in the water. Combined with ice-classification or other forms of reinforcement, this allows the ECO CRP to be optimized as a high efficiency and high reliability propulsor even for the demanding operating conditions of the Arctic Ocean or shallow rivers. By combining the dual-end CRP configuration with an innovative pressure lubrication system in both upper and lower gear sets, the efficiency is increased even further. This is especially true in larger unit sizes where immersion lubrication of the lower assembly

What’s happening with high-speed workboats? An interview with Traktor Jet specialist NAMJET MARINE LOG: The high cost of fuel has changed the way vessel owners look at their operations. Additionally, owners are focused on total cost of ownership. What type of demands are you seeing from operators looking for NAMJet products? NAMJET: Today’s cost-conscious operators constantly seek the perfect balance between power and economy. NAMJet products strike that balance through mass flow design, which pumps significantly more water at lower rev/min than high-speed jets to

24 MARINE LOG MARCH 2013

provide exceptional thrust and fuel efficiency while minimizing cavitation. Moving higher volumes of water at lower rev/min also increases fuel efficiency while reducing overall horsepower requirements, allowing builders to purchase smaller, more cost-effective engine packages. NAMJet waterjets are designed for a wide variety of commercial, military, and workboat applications, and every product is fully customizable to meet thrust, speed, and durability standards of the world’s most demanding operators.

ML: How has NAMjet’s investment in a 3D printer changed your business? NAMJET: 3D printing has immeasurably changed our production and testing methodology. The cost savings afforded us by not having to tool and machine prototype parts can’t be overstated, nor can the flexibility inherent in the 3D printing process. Tasking a skilled machinist with making adjustments, however small, to prototype parts takes that individucontinued on p. 27

www.marinelog.com

pROpULSiON ShipBuilding

FUEL CONSUMPTION Steerprop’s newly developed ECO CRP azimuth propulsors offer a viable option

The ECO CRP is designed to bring the efficiency and envionmental friendliness of the contra-rotating propulsor to larger, more powerful vessels

requires both lower propulsive efficiency and a large amount of oil. The environmental friendliness of the ECO CRP is further enhanced by the incorporation of a new type of propulsor shaft seal that uses pressurized air to ensure that the propulsor remains truly emissions-free. This new technology was developed in part for the demanding, but ecologically fragile conditions of the Arctic Sea. The ECO CRP was designed by Steerprop Ltd. to bring the efficiency and environmental friendliness of the CRP configuration to even larger, faster and more powerful vessels. The power and efficiency of the ECO CRP enables new kinds of innovative vessels such as faster, larger and more efficient multi-purpose Offshore Working Vessels, Arctic tankers capable of operating in both icy and open water conditions without compromising their fuel efficiency or large cargo www.marinelog.com

vessels and cruise vessels that require maneuverability even at high speeds and reliability as a matter of safety to be designed and built. While the ECO CRP is relatively new to the market, Steerprop Ltd. has already been contracted to deliver units to several different projects worldwide in the last year. These range from multipurpose vessels in Russia to RoPax passenger ferries operating year-round in Canadian waterways to multi-purpose vessels from India. For example, Steerprop Ltd. delivered two 7,000 kW SP 120 ECO CRP propulsors for the dual fuel ferry being built for Société des traversiers du Québec (STQ) by Italian shipbuilder Fincantieri. At 130 m long and with a capacity of 800 passengers and 180 autos, the ferry will be larger and faster than its predecessor. Despite its larger size, however, the vessel will be more efficient and envi-

ronmentally friendly through the use of innovative technical solutions to improve total efficiency. A part of this efficiency will be due to the propulsion system used. To ensure their safe operation year round, the propulsors will be ice-classed in the demanding Finnish-Swedish 1 A Super ice-class. Utilizing high efficiency Steerprop Dual-End Contra Rotating Propellers (CRP), these propulsors are projected to offer a significant increase in efficiency and thus cut down on both emissions and fuel consumption. The maritime world is more challenging and competitive than ever before. But these challenges also present new opportunities. To fully take advantage of these opportunities, propulsion specialists such as Steerprop are designing and producing innovative technologies that take both fuel efficiency, emissionsreduction and reliability to the next generation. ML MARCH 2013 MARINE LOG 25

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TA N K E R S

Private equity firm acquires Kobelt Manufacturing Private equity investment firm Bow River Capital Partners, Denver, CO, has acquired propulsion control specialist Kobelt Manufacturing, Surrey, BC, Canada. For more than 50 years, Kobelt Manufacturing has built high-quality marine

controls, push-pull and hydraulic steering systems and industrial disk brakes, sold through a global network of distributors into the marine, natural resources and manufacturing industries. Kobelt is a premier manufacturer of quality marine engine controls, electron-

UNCOMPROMISED

ic, pneumatic and hydraulic steering, shaft brakes, deck machinery controls and industrial disc brakes used around the globe in all sizes of pleasure craft, work boats, public service vessels, oil rigs, wind turbines, aerospace and mining industries since 1962. Bow River Capital Partners has a diverse portfolio of holdings, ranging from interests in private oil and gas exploration companies to home pediatric care services. The acquisition of Kobelt Manufacturing marks the retirement of 83-yearold Jack Kobelt, a well-known figure in the propulsion market, who founded the company in his basement in 1962, devel-

CONTROL

HT600

Low Submergence Requirement Small Hull Penetrations Auxiliary Propulsion/ “Take Home” Capability Effective Thrust in Currents JT1000

Waterjet Bow/Stern Thrusters Up to 2,200HP

26 MARINE LOG MARCH 2013

Proudly Made in the USA!

Kobelt Manufacturing made a name for itself developing unique propulsion control products. One of its latest is the Krronos electronic control head (above), which is gaining traction in the industry

oping unique, hand-engineered components for the marine industry. Over the next five decades, Kobelt Manufacturing was awarded dozens of patents, and grew to become a worldwide name with its products sold in over 100 countries. David Bockhold was tapped as Kobelt’s new CEO. Bockhold is a Vancouver resident whose 20 years’ manufacturing experience includes serving as CEO of Advanced Marine Technologies. “Jack leaves very big shoes to fill, and his continued advice and guidance will be important as we move forward to build an even bigger and better Kobelt,” says Bockhold. “The Kobelt name has long been known for superb quality and durability and we will maintain those strengths, while looking to advance Kobelt’s reputation for product innovation, partner support and customer service.” www.marinelog.com

pROpULSiON ShipBuilding continued from p. 24 al out of the production cycle, a loss production teams can ill-afford. With the 3D printer, our design team is able to make the necessary changes in a digital environment, then have those changes realized in real-time without sacrificing production time. ML: Tell us about some recent notable applications of a NAMJet TRAKTOR. NAMJET: Washington ship builder Everest Marine recently chose NAMJet to provide propulsion solutions for its newest oyster harvest vessel, Kumo Express. Twin 300-hp John Deere engines paired with NAMJet TJ-457HT waterjets push the 50-foot, 22-ton vessel to an impressive 17-knot top speed under full load, allowing Kumo Express’ crew to deliver the freshest possible catch to their customers. NAMJet’s reputation for superior CIMAC_Shanghai_170_120

26.07.12

maneuverability also played a significant role in Kumo Express’ design, as remaining on station plays a critical role during harvest. Also, Norwegian shipbuilder Westplast AS chose NAMJet to provide propulsion solutions for its newest seismic survey vessel, the WP950. Twin 295 hp Yanmar diesels mated with NAMJet TJ-381s propel the 31-foot, 15,653pound craft to top speeds of 28 knots while providing 6,393 pounds of bollard pull. Westplast replaced its incumbent propulsion supplier with NAMJet waterjets not only for their impressive speed and bollard pull, but also for their exceptional stability, high forward thrust, and superior reverse thrust.

ready to deliver the next generation of advanced marine propulsion with 360-degree thrusters and a jet series designed for engines up to 1,200 hp. ML: Have there been significant changes at NAMJet since its acquisition by Birdon Australia?

ML: What products are currently under development at NAMJet?

NAMJET: Birdon’s acquisition of NAMJet has afforded us unprecedented growth opportunities. Our team has expanded—Jim Ducker is General Manager, and industry veteran Phil Organ is our new Director of Distributor Sales & Development. We’ve also overhauled our website and consumer communications pieces, and we anticipate further growth as we continue to enhance our product offerings, trade show presence, and media outreach.

NAMJET: NAMJet currently offers propulsion packages for engines in the 150–850-hp range, and stands

To learn more about NAMJet visit www.namjet.com

08:42

Seite 1

Where the engine community meets 27th CIMAC World Congress on Combustion Engine Technology for

Ship Propulsion Power Generation Rail Traction May 13 – 16, 2013 Shanghai Exhibition Center Shanghai, China for further information visit:

www.cimac.com

Information exchange at the highest level www.marinelog.com

MARCH 2013 MARINE LOG 27

American Salvage Association

ine in neLoG Marin

national maritime salvage conference & eXPo

WEATHERING THE STORM

September 9–12, 2013 Key bridge Marriott hotel arlington, va

network, Discuss & learn at the Marine Salvage event of the Year!

An intensive three-dAy event tailored for shipowners, regulators, insurers and salvage professionals on the ins-and-outs of salvage, wreck removal, firefighting and environmental response.

SPonSorShiPS & eXhibitS available contact Jane Poterala at (212) 620-7200 x7209 jpoterala@sbpub.com

don’t miss a unique interactive tabletop training exercise on the third day of the conference and ask about the availability of CLe credits.

Get Conference Updates: www.marinelog.com/events conferences@sbpub.com

BY JOHN R. SNYDER, PUBLISHER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

LNG ShipBuilding

WhO hAS GAS AND WhO WANTS iT? Cheap, abundant natural gas perfect solution for operators, both economically and environmentally

F

ood trucks are ubiquitous in New York City, serving up everything from grilled cheese to Korean barbeque. So what would get two billionaires excited about a food truck that serves pizza? Well, it just so happens that food truck is 100% powered by Compressed Natural Gas. The CNG-powered food truck Neapolitan Express is a partnership between Neapolitan Pizza and Clean Energy Fuels— the largest provider of natural gas to the North American transportation market. Clean Energy was founded by billionaire T. Boone Pickens. Pickens who was on hand along with fellow billionaire and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg to unveil the new truck at a press conference last month in New York. “This is the lowest carbon-emission food truck ever built,” says Bloomberg. “It will produce three-quarters less greenhouse gases than trucks that run on diesel or gasoline and reduce fuel costs by 60%.” That’s a powerful equation for any business and one that is resonating in the marine market as well. The abundance and price of natural gas in combination with rising marine diesel oil prices and stricter environmental regulations has ignited an age of innovation in shipping. GROWING NUMBER OF LNG-FUELLED VESSELS Not including inland waterway vessels and LNG carriers, there are currently 37 LNG-fuelled vessels currently in operation, according to Kenneth Vareide, U.S. Director of Operations, DNV. Speaking at a breakfast seminar on “Future developments in maritime shipping” last month in Washington, DC, Vareide says that increasing environmental regulation is driving LNG technology development. DNV expects there to be at least 63 LNG-fuelled vessels in operation by 2015 and, says Vareide, as many as one in ten newbuilds will be built with gas engines over the next eight years, according to DNV’s study Shipping Outlook 2020. “That [projection] doesn’t include any conversion of existing vessels to burn LNG,” points out Vareide. The choices for operators are clear, says Vareide. “To meet ECA requirements, you will have to either install exhaust gas scrubbers if you operate on heavy fuel oil, burn low sulfur distillate fuel or burn LNG,” he says. By 2016, 30 to 40 percent of all newbuilds will have exhaust gas recirculation or SCR technology. www.marinelog.com

Besides supplying gas or dual fuel engines, Wärtsilä has been supplying the LNGPac system, which includes the bunkering station, LNG tank and tank room compartment, process skid, glycol-water heating unit, and the control and monitoring system

INNOVATION STARTS IN NORWAY DNV’s involvement with LNG-fuelled vessels—not including LNG carriers—dates back two decades to the DNV classed RO/ RO ferry Glutra. Using natural gas as fuel for ferries had long been a desire of Norwegian maritime authorities. What was driving the innovation was the abundance of domestic natural gas production, the environmental benefits of burning natural gas, and the idea to develop Norwegian gas technology. That led in 1995 to a test project to design and build a gas-fuelled ferry. As a result of a Norwegian parliamentary decision and funding through the Norwegian Ministry of Transportation, the LNG-powered Glutra was built and delivered in January 2000 for what was then Norway’s largest ferry operator, MRF (now part of Norway’s Fjord1 Group). Still in operation today, the 94.8m, 300-passenger/96-vehicle capacity Glutra has served as a prototype for future generations of gas-fuelled vessels. As a result of that early pioneering work with the Glutra, there will be 22 LNG-fuelled ferries in operation in Norway by 2014, according to Norway’s Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry Kristin Maurstad. She attributes some of the success to the Norwegian governMARCH 2013 MARINE LOG 29

LNG ShipBuilding

I C E

C L A S S

TA N K E R S

CURRENT ORDERBOOK FOR LNG-FUELLED VESSELS (Excludes LNG carriers and inland waterways vessels)

Rendering showing the LNG storage tanks on the top deck of Washington State Ferries’ Issaquah Class ferries. Passengers do not have access to the top deck

ment’s “open door policy” that promotes cooperation between the public and private sectors. In addition, nitrogen oxide (NOx) abatement projects such as LNG-fuelled ships can receive support of up to 80% of their cost through grants from Norway’s NOx Fund. The fund grew out of an agreement between Norway’s Ministry of the Environment and 15 private organizations, who agreed to reduce their NOx emissions in exchange for a tax exemption from Norway’s NOx tax that was enacted in January 1, 2007. Instead, these companies contribute to the NOx Fund. Grants from the NOx fund have been used to build LNGfuelled vessels. For example, Norwegian operator Buksér og Berging is building two gas-fuelled tugs with support from the NOx Fund. Based on the expected reduction in NOx emissions (as compared to diesel) the fund will provide up to NOK350 ($60.85) per kilo NOx reduced. For the two tugs this means NOK8.7 million ($1.51 million) and NOK9.1 million ($1.58 million). When delivered in September 2013, the two tugs will operate for Statoil for 10 years. BUNKERING AND TRAINING One of the biggest challenges for the industry is LNG bunkering infrastructure, safety and crew training. A company with extensive experience is Norway’s Fjord1, which currently operates 12 LNG-fuelled ferries, including the Glutra. Fjord1 is Norway’s largest ferry operator, carrying 30.6 million passengers and about 10 million cars, according to the latest figures. For bunkering, tanker trucks fill LNG tanks near the terminal. The LNG is then fed via a pipeline from the tanks to a bunker station at the dock, where the ferries are refueled. Oscar Bergheim, Production Manager, Fjord1, speaking at the breakfast seminar, says the company is “trying to refine it’s refueling procedure to mitigate the release of methane into the atmosphere during refueling.” The new procedure is expected to be approved by spring. Bergheim emphasized that the crew was an essential part of the safety system for the ferries. Crews are trained in emergency shutdown procedures. Since 2007, the company has accumulated 175,000 operat30 MARINE LOG MARCH 2013

Delivery 2012 Type of vessel Platform Supply Vessel DNV Car/passenger ferry Car/passenger ferry Harbor vessel

Torghatten Nord Torghatten Nord Incheon Port Auth.

DNV DNV

Delivery 2013 Type of vessel High-speed RoPax Ro-Ro Ro-Ro RoPax RoPax General cargo Car/passenger ferry Car/passenger ferry Ro-Ro Ro-Ro RoPax Tug Platform Supply Vessel Platform Supply Vessel Patrol vessel Car/passenger ferry Tug Tug

Owner Buquebus Sea-Cargo Sea-Cargo Fjordline Fjordline Eidsvaag Norled Norled Nordlines Nordlines Viking Line Bukser & Berging Harvey Gulf Intl. Harvey Gulf Intl. Finnish Border Gd. STQ CNOOC CNOOC

Class DNV DNV DNV DNV DNV DNV DNV DNV DNV DNV LR DNV ABS ABS GL LR CCS CCS

Delivery 2014 Type of vessel Car/passenger ferry Car/passenger ferry Tug Platform Supply Vessel Platform Supply Vessel Gas carrier Gas carrier Platform Supply Vessel Platform Supply Vessel

Owner STQ STQ Bukser & Berging Harvey Gulf Intl. Harvey Gulf Intl. SABIC SABIC Remøy Shipping Siem Offshore

Class LR LR DNV ABS ABS BV BV DNV DNV

Delivery 2015 Type of vessel Platform Supply Vessel Containership Containership

Owner Harvey Gulf Intl. TOTE TOTE

Class ABS ABS ABS

Owner REM

Class

Notes: Harvey Gulf International Marine holds options for up to five more dual fuel PSVs; TOTE holds options for three more containerships Source: DNV

www.marinelog.com

ShipBuilding ing hours on five large LNG fuelled ferries. Over that time span, there have only been a couple of what Bergheim called “blackouts,” due to more human factors, rather than technical problems. There has also been detection of six pipe leakages from the gas plant that were attributed to welding procedures. Fjord1, says Bergheim, is looking to take its ferry operations to the next level with the development of a ferry design that will incorporate LNG, wind and solar power. WASHINGTON STATE EYES CONVERSIONS In the U.S. ferry market, it appears that the first LNGfuelled vessels won’t be newbuilds, but refits. At the seminar, David H. Moseley, Assistant Secretary, Washington Department of Transportation, Ferries Division, outlined the state’s plans to convert six Issaquah Class ferries to burn LNG. The largest ferry system in the U.S., Washington State Ferries burns about 17 million gallons of ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (ULSF) annually. “Fuel costs represent about 29 percent of the system’s operating budget,” says Moseley. There is no regulatory demand that the system switch to LNG by 2015. We are already in compliance because we burn ultra low sulfur diesel.” So the driver for the state is not environmental, it’s economic. That’s why it is planning to spend $84.5 million to convert the six Issaquah Class ferries to burn LNG. While Moseley says he takes “very seriously the imperative that we need to burn cleaner fuels,” he points out that the switch to LNG will translate to a projected annual savings of $6.4 million. Right now, WSF is working with DNV on its LNG safety and security assessment plans. The next steps in the conversion timeline will be to obtain U.S. Coast Guard approval for the detail design, then complete final design, obtain funding for the construction and train its crew. If all goes well, the first conversion could start in 2014. Moseley says that right now, there is no regasification available at the terminal, so LNG would have to be trucked in from British Columbia, Canada. That could change, however, he says because of Totem Ocean Trailer Express, Inc.’s (TOTE) commitment to converting its two Orca Class Roll-on/Roll-Off ships, which operate from Seattle to Alaska, to burn LNG. TOTE burns about 54 million gallons of fuel annually. “We’ll be riding on their back,” he adds. TOTE TAPS NASSCO FOR CONVERSION DESIGN And speaking of TOTE, the Princeton, NJ-headquartered operator recently inked a design contract with NASSCO, San Diego, CA, for the conversion of its two ORCA Class trailerships to burn LNG. “This is the first conversion like this in the world,” says Parker Larson, NASSCO Program Manager. “It’s also the largest conversion of this type vessel to dual fuel.” Back in 2011, the Norwegian product tanker Bit Viking was converted from heavy fuel to LNG. That was the first marine installation in the world to involve converting Wärtsilä 46 engines to Wärtsilä 50DF engines, and the first 50DF marine installation with mechanical propulsion. Larson says some of the work for the ORCA Class trailership conversions will be done in drydock. TOTE, however, is planning on doing a lot of the conversion of the engines and installation of systems while the ships are in service. One of the challenges for TOTE’s North Star and the Midnight Sun will be www.marinelog.com

MARCH 2013 MARINE LOG 31

LNG where to mount the LNG tanks. In the case of the Bit Viking—a product tanker—two 500 m3 LNG storage tanks are mounted on the deck to facilitate bunkering operations. Larson says one location currently being considered for the TOTE vessels is in between the ship stacks. While the engineering for the conversion is being performed at NASSCO, TOTE will ultimately control where the

conversion work is performed. “Still,” says Larson, “we want to have that strategic knowledge in house at NASSCO.” He points out the engineering for the conversions will be performed in parallel with the design and construction of TOTE’s LNG-fuelled boxships. The new boxships will be designed by DSEC, a subsidiary of Korea’s Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME). The design will be based on

proven containership-design standards and will include DSME’s patented LNG fuel-gas system and a MAN ME-GI dual fuel slow-speed engine. NASSCO’s ground-breaking TOTE contracts have caught the attention of a global audience. “We’ve already been approached by owners—and not just in the Jones Act trade,” says Larson. The inquiries, he says, have been for all types of vessels. “Shipowners are reading about it and learning.” NASSCO is also looking at the possibility of building LNG bunker vessels based on a Daewoo design. “What makes these prospects so exciting is that the U.S. is taking a leading role. This is an exciting time. And this is not going to be a one-off project. You’re going to have multiple owners and shipyards in the U.S. working on these type of projects.” HARVEY ENERGY Of course, the first U.S. operator to leap into the LNG pool was New Orleans-based Harvey Gulf International Marine (HGIM). It has already committed to building five ABS-classed DP2 dual fuel Platform Supply Vessels designed as SV310DF vessels STX Marine Inc. at TY Offshore, Gulfport, MS, and has options to build up to five more. HGIM expects to add the first of 302 ft PSVs, the Harvey Energy, this coming November. And the LNG bunkering infrastructure is coming. As we went to press, Shell unveiled plans to install a smallscale liquefaction unit in Louisiana that once operational will supply LNG for the Gulf of Mexico. You can read more about it in this month’s Update section. REGULATORS PLAYING CATCH UP The surge in using LNG as marine fuel has regulators playing catch up. “Quite frankly the regulations aren’t there yet,” says Jeff Lantz, Director Commercial Regulations and Standards, U.S. Coast Guard. Speaking at the DNV breakfast seminar, Lantz adds, “However, the Coast Guard has addressed the gaps in existing regulations by issuing policy documents that provide a path for operators to comply with future regulations.” Lantz emphasizes that the policy documents are just that—a path. He says the Coast Guard is willing to listen and work with alternatives from operators and designers. ML

32 MARINE LOG MARCH 2013

www.marinelog.com

BY JOHN R. SNYDER, PUBLISHER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

ShipYARDSPOTLIGHT ShipBuilding

John R. Snyder

RiSiNG STAR

New class of DP2 PSVs are game-changer for Bordelon Marine

T

hings will be very different for Bordelon Marine Shipbuilders on April Fool’s Day. That will be the day when the first of its three Stingray Class DP2 Platform Supply Vessels is completed and delivered to its sister company, Bordelon Marine. The towering vessel—the superstructure rises five stories above the deck— has an elegant, robust bow design, with a spacious 182 ft x 44 ft deck, giving the vessel an appearance of being much larger than its 255 ft overall length. The three 3,285-dwt Platform Supply Vessels (PSVs) are quite an undertaking for the relatively new Houma, LA, shipbuilder, but a challenge that its President and Owner, Wes Bordelon, relishes. “I enjoy building things. It just gets in your blood,” says Bordelon. He spent his youth working on boats—his father Terry co-founded Bordelon Marine in 1979—before leaving to pursue his other passion—music. A graduate of Berklee College of Music in Boston, Bordelon played drums professionally with bands in New York, Chicago and Boston and performed studio session work in New York. For eight years, he worked as an Artist Development Representative for record labels such as Capitol, EMI, Interscope, Universal and Virgin. While he loved the music profession, he realized he missed his Louisiana marwww.marinelog.com

itime roots. Now as President of both a vessel operating company and a shipyard, Bordelon enjoys the creative and strategic challenges of the marine marketplace. So why would a relatively small vessel owner want to undertake setting up its own shipyard? Maintaining your own shipyard, points out Bordelon, allows you to refine your vessel design, control production costs and schedule, and moderate your fleet expansion and replacement. The Houma shipyard is a stone’s throw away from LAShip, one of Edison Chouest Offshore’s shipbuilding group. ECO is renowned for building sophisticated tonnage for its own fleet—something that Bordelon would like to emulate, albeit on a much smaller scale. Bordelon Marine, Inc., Lockport, LA, currently has a fleet of 11 vessels, the largest being its DP1 170 ft mini-supply vessels. The new DP2 Stingray Class PSVs will be a game-changer for Bordelon Marine. The 3,071 gross ton PSVs will have an overall length of 255 ft, beam of 52 ft, depth of 18 ft and maximum draft of 15 ft. Each vessel will be supplied by two electronically controlled Tier 3-compliant 2,200 hp Cummins QSK-60 main engines. The generators will include two 975 kW Cummins QSK-38 units and

one 525 kW Cummins QSK-19 unit. The emergency generator will be a 170 kW Cummins 6CTA8. Each PSV will have two Schottel 125 Z-drives and two 950hp Schottel STT2 fixed-pitch bow thrusters driven by electric motors with a VFD system. Marine Technologies, a company owned by Edison Chouest, is supplying the state-of-the-art DP2 Bridge Integration and Full Navigation Suite, Radar/ ECDIS/Doppler, and VSAT. All American Paint & Supply, Inc., is providing Carboline paint systems for the vessel’s interior and exterior. C. Fly Marine supplied a turnkey design package, from preliminary design to production for the PSVs. The vessels are being classed by ABS as ABS(E) +A1 +AMS, DPS-2, ACCU, FiFi 1, SOLAS, USCG Subchapter L and Subchapter I, so they will be able to operate both in the U.S. and internationally. In light of some of the massive newbuild programs being undertaken by other larger operators, Bordelon says he does have concerns about an oversupply of tonnage in 2015. His company plans to incrementally replace older tonnage in his fleet. Following delivery of the first Stingray in April, the second in the class will join the Bordelon Marine fleet in January 2014, followed by the third in the third quarter of 2014. ML MARCH 2013 MARINE LOG 33

paintS & CoatingS ShipBuilding

I C E

C L A S S

TA N K E R S

New aNtifouliNg techNology giveS marine organiSmS the Shake

M

icanti BV is looking to change the way a vessel’s hull is coated. While marine antifoulings have traditionally taken the form of paints, Holland-based Micanti BV has developed a non-toxic fouling defense foil wrap called Thorn-D. Created five years ago by Micanti founder Dr. ir. Rick Breur, Thorn-D is an easy-to-apply, self-adhesive foil that can be applied on all hull surfaces and last for up to five years. Placed on top of a tie coat, the foil creates an environmentally friendly barrier against organisms. The textured barrier takes the form of short fibers that are prickly, vibrate and sway making the surface unattractive for organisms to attach themselves to—the goal isn’t to kill the organisms, but rather repel them. Highlighting its product’s benefits, Micanti points to two vessels that have used Thorn-D—the tug Willem-B Sr belonging to Dutch company BMS Towing and a small vessel, the Duffy, based in Florida. For the Willem-B Sr, BMS Towing decided to go with Thorn-D to keep its maintenance cost low. Prior to Thorn-D use, BMS’ vessel’s antifouling coat would need to be reapplied every few months. As for the Duffy, no downtime was needed to clean the foil and no organisms were found to be attached to the vessel’s hull after an 18- month period. Micanti also says that the Thorn-D film did not suffer any damage, even at speeds up to 30 knots. Additionally, the textured surface poses no negative impact on the vessel’s drag, says Micanti. Rather, tests show that vessels using Thorn-D have decreased wake and delayed bow wave separation. Recently, Micanti applied Thorn-D to the crew vessel Lady Rasha, owned by Dubai’s GGM. The decision to go with Micanti came after GGM noted its vessels, at the time coated with a conventional antifouling, were losing speed during operations. “During two years of operation with a conventional antifouling we lost 5 knots of speed,” says Foad Al Ali, Owner, GGM. “Since speed is crucial for our operations, we have chosen Thorn-D as an antifouling system since it has proven to be effective while moored and while sailing.” PORTS TAKE NOTICE With a life span of five years, the film has attracted the attention of the Port of Amsterdam. Concerned with the sustainability of its vessels, the port has chosen Damen Shipyards, Gorinchem, Netherlands, to help conduct a pilot test on two of its vessels. Damen will coat one of the vessels with the Thorn-D film, while the other will operate using a conventional coatings system. The pilot test, according to Willem Spoelstra, Port of Amsterdam’s Nautical Division, will run for a year and will have both vessels operating

Thorn-D is applied to the hull of the tug Willem-B Sr. The antifouling film keeps marine organisms from attaching to the hull with its prickly, vibrating, swaying fibers

34 MARINE LOG MARCH 2013

www.marinelog.com

ShipBuilding

Global Experience – Local Presence Our advanced coatings provide protection for Oil & Gas Industry projects worldwide

Micanti BV’s easy-t0-apply, self-adhesive foil Thorn-D is applied to the hull of the Lady Rasha

within the same area. Another port taking notice is the Port of Los Angeles. Eric Pieters, Commercial Director and Co-Owner, Micanti BV, names the port among a growing list of clients that will apply Thorn-D to their vessels over the next few months. “We’ll be applying our film to a fleet of approximately 15 work and crew vessels in the months ahead,” says Pieters. “They include boats run by towing companies in the Netherlands, the Middle East and a tug owned by the Port of Los Angeles.” Interest from the Port of Los Angeles should come as no surprise. The port has a number of green initiatives and environmental programs in place with the goal of developing sustainable operations that benefit the environment, the quality of life for those in the region and the economy. EXPANDING ECOFLEET Recent developments on the traditional antifouling front include the expansion of Sigma Coatings’ ECOFLEET range. Sigma Coatings, a PPG Protective and Marine Coatings brand, recently launched SIGMA ECOFLEET 690, a highquality, self-polishing antifouling for vessels operating in extreme, aggressive fouling conditions. Designed for use while in drydock during maintenance and repair, SIGMA ECOFLEET 690 is suitable for a variety of low-activity and low-speed vessels operating in coastal areas. Using PPG’s patented binder technology—which ensures that polishing properties of the antifouling are kept within narrow limits—the SIGMA ECOFLEET 690 system results in performance levels and fouling control that will remain consistent for a period of up to 60 months. Additionally, the binder technology results in film formation with ultra-high volume solids content of 70%—reducing VOC emissions. “Aggressive hull fouling is a problem for shipowners operating in coastal and short-sea trades where vessels can be inactive more than 50% of the time,” says Sijmen Visser, Global Marketing Manager M&R, PPG Protective and Marine Coatings. Similar to all PPG antifoulings, SIGMA ECOFLEET 690 is fully compliant with the IMO AFS Convention.

74 Jotun companies represented in more than 80 countries. 40 production facilities globally. Uniform standard of global service.

jotun.com

MANAGING YOUR COATINGS AT SEA “We believe the simpler and clearer something is, the better it will work,” says Visser. To that end PPG launched SIGwww.marinelog.com

53320 2011 Oil & Gas half page 269mm x 85mm v3.indd 1

17/02/2011 14:14

MARCH 2013 MARINE LOG 35

I C E

paintS & CoAtings ShipBuilding

Contracts

Newsmakers

C L A S S

TA N K E R S

MACARE PLUS, an online

then be printed and used as

While every care has shipboard been taken to present the most accurate is farof from perfect. Welater welcome your maintenance sys-information, our survey gathering system a point reference on. Shipyard Contracts Reliable and long-lasting: input. Please e-mail any changes to: marinelog@sbpub.com. Some contract values and contract completion dates are estimated. Information tem that helps vessel operaVisser believes the SIGThe InTernaTIonal Chamber ofbased ShIppIng on data as of about April 1, 2012. (*) Asterisk indicates first in series delivered. A “C” after a vessel type indicates a major conversion, Jotun’s SeaQuantum tors monitor its paints and MACARE PLUS system (ICS) has elected masamichi morooka overhaul or refit. Additional commercial and government contracts are listed on our website, www.marinelog.com.

coatings while at sea—PPG means that PPG’s “customas its new Chairman. Morooka succeeds Applied more who than stepped 6,000 vessels says it’s the first paints and ers can benefit from streamSpyros m. to polemis down worldwide, seaQuantum has been coatings supplier to provide lined product from the post after six years in office. SHIPyARD Shipyard Location LOCATION QTy PARTICULARS OwNER/OPERATOR EST. $ MILdelivery EST. and DEL. Type TyPE Particulars Owner Value $ Mil Est. Del. touted by its maker, Jotun,Qty as the “ultisuch a system. Est. Recently, service,” with orders “conmate fuel saver.” inAL2000, PPGcasino hit a milestone installtrolled more35.0 effectively Alabama Shipyard Mobile, 38,000 ft2 casino Hollywood Park Casino 7/00and RECENT CONTRACTS John Walker was launched named head ofthe gl1 riverboat Crystal Taylor Kevin Kirby masamichi morooka Allen Denton’s Marine, Sitka, AK Investipassenger Allen Marine Tours 2.0 2000 Gladding-Hearn Somerset, MA 1 1 pilot boat catamaran 52 ft x 1678 ftft Delta Launch Services 4Q2012 coating is Inc. a silyl acrylate polymer that ing the 1,000th SIGMAplaced while at sea.” Visser noble Marine Casualty IngramPuget barge KVIChaK ICS AllenMarine Marine, Inc. Sitka, AK passenger NYWaterway 2.0 2000 Kvichak Seattle, WA 1 1 work boat catamaran system. 31 ft 8 in78ftftx 11 ft 4 in Sound Energyadds, “The paint SUM2012 hydrolyzes when exposed to seawater. CAREPLUS inventory gation practice for the Americas region. AMFELS Brownsville, TX 1 deepwater construction vessel 4000-ton deckload CalDive International 100.0 1Q/01 Kvichak Marine Seattle, WA 1 work boat 37 ft 11 in Puget Sound Energy SUM2012 Atlantic Marine, Jacksonville, FL pro-2 cruise ships 226 passenger Delta Queen Coastal Voyages 60.0locker become 6/01 the longevity and of reliability of its 2011, the and the$138 paint HeFab will lead a Inc. team marine US Seattle, WA engineers, ferry Launched 144in cars Washington Ferries BayShipyard Shipbuilding Sturgeon Bay, WI 1 1 car cutterhead dredge 250 ft Lake MichiganState Contractors 2000 2015 Global pipoli tection is a result of anaval linear polishing SIGMACARE PLUS andManthe master mariners and architects Debra a. Colbert has beenm3sysnamedSijmen SeniorVisser, appointed the Bay Shipbuilding Sturgeon Bay, WI 1 trailing suction hopper dredge 5,000 Greatgennaro Lakes Dredge & better Dock wasorganized, 51.6 3Q/2001 Marketing Manager and a low leached layer, says Jotun.1 MP tem allows vessel crewfor also work more2001 safely Bender Shipbuilding Mobile, AL extent deepwater vessel of 340owners ft Inc. 30.0 marine in rate determining the cause and Vice President the Waterways Council Torch aging Director Imtech SinDELIVERIES Bender Shipbuilding Mobile,collisions, AL effect,1 offshore tugoperators 150 ft Candies, Inc. 5.0 can 8/00 M&R, PPG Protective thanks todamage, its self-smoothing and well as served because watch of And machinery fires, Inc. (WCI). Colbert as previously as Otto gapore. Pipoli has anthey extensive track Bender Shipbuilding Mobile, WA AL offshore tug 150ft,ft 26 knots OttoTechnologies Candies, Inc. 5.0 10/00 APR12 All American Marine Bellingham, 1 1 survey vessel 134 ft x 37 C&C and Marine Coatings seaQuantum decreases hull roughness crew members to organize training videos on coatings groundings, salvage operations and Director of Communications and Media record, having worked a number of years Blount Shipyard Warren, RI 1 harbor tug 55 ft stock 2000 DonJon Shipbuilding Erie, PA 1 ocean tug SEAJON LLC APR12 Blount Shipyardincidents. Warren, RI oyster dredge 90 ft serves Tallmadge Brothers 7/00 APR12 and increases fuel savings. its coatings management. By as Pres-SEAJON other marine Relations at WCI. Sheton also with generalapplication.” electric (ge). DonJon Shipbuilding Erie, PA 1 1 ocean barge 34,000 LLC Blount Shipyard Warren, RI 1 sightseeing dinner boat 64 ft 10 in Chicago from the Lake, Ltd. 4/01 Kvichakthe Marine WA 1 patrol boat ftsystem 11 in x 14 ft 7 in Seattle Police Dept. APR12 success ofSeattle, itsAmelia, seaQuantum “giving crew44aCommunications. newident ofbarge Colbert Bollinger Marine Fabricators LA 1 oceangoing 400 ft that McDonough Marine ServiceThe system includes 2/01 brand propelled Jotun to launch a tai-1 cement is clear, to understand,” saysLoneKvichak build specs andIndustries, drydocking reports to Bollinger Shipyards Lockport, LA Interbarge [and] easy 295 ft Star Industries 2000WA, The tanker owners’ association, marine Seattle, Bollingerreports Shipyards Lockport, LA hp Company product delivery 8.0 and service. 3/01 lor-made solution forits high-speed and Visser, the overall quality of onboard facilitate tanko, that council has11 towboat lance Camarena has8,000 joined cruise com- Riverway has appointed Kevin Kirby as its new PENDING CONTRACTS Bollinger Shipyards Lockport, LA utility vessel 166 ft Gilco Supply Boats, Inc. 8.0 10/00NOTES high voyage factorPanama vessels maintenance isamerica improved. Currently, appointed Katharina Stanzel the panies Kirby with him Bollinger Shipyards Lockport, LA toyear, utility vessel holland Gilcoproposal Supply Boats,manager. Inc. the onboard 8.0maintenance 5/01options Eastern Shipbuilding City,last FL 8 1 PSV 300 ft 166 ft line and Sea-Hornbeck Offshore $360.0 brings Bollinger Shipyards Director LAon the utility vessel 145fttraining ft66in, in Lytal22 Marine Operators 9/00 the Plus s.Lockport, Based The system’s unique inventory conchart comes available in 12 TBD 1 1 car ferry 115 ftfleet x 47 23 cars Wahkiakum County del. end 2014 post ofseaQuantum Managing of Intertanko. bourn as director, and peryears of experience in8.0 thelanguages— aluminum Bollinger Shipyards Lockport, LA utility vessel 145 ft 6 in Plaisance MarineHighway 8.0 1/01 Ship TBD 1 1 car ferry 500 PAX, 60 vehicles Alaska Marine Alaska advanced technology, seaQuantum trol product ordering system perwith a 13th language, Mandarin, to be Stanzel, who currently acts as WA Deputy formance boatbuilding industry. Brusco Tug &silyl Barge Longview, 1 Z-Drive tugandmanagement. 3,600His hp responsibiliDiversified Marine, Portland, OR 5.0 4Q/00 & Drydock Plus s Shipyard requires fewer numbers ofLA coats, mits ordering of110stock while atand sea.undisclosed added later this year. 5.0 Conrad Morgan boat ft 1Q/00 Managing Director, will step City, in to her1 liftties willthe include overseeing the deck Conrad Shipyard Morgan City, LA 1 lift boat 111 ftlist of PPG prod-Global Marine 5.0 6/00general ensuring properties. It features a complete For those withServices limited internet new role on better July 1. technical engine fleet training team. braemar Technical appointed contractor Conrad Shipyard Morgan City, LA 1 liquid mud barge 130 ft undisclosed 5.0 1Q/00 benefits include reduced ucts and a product mapton with detailed access sea, PPG’s of TBDAdditional 20 vehicle/149 PAX WA DOT graeme Temple to the latest role Regional Conrad Shipyards Morgan City, LA 1 1 car dryferry dock 10,000 Conrad Industriesat 3.0 ofrelease 4Q/00MAY13 TBD 49 140 PAX Townsend MAR/APR12 DakotainCreek Industries Anacortes, WA 1in1 ferry Prevention/Response Tug65 ft, 10,192 hp products Z-drives Port Crowley Marine Services 8.0 7/00 time drydock, higherbarge productivity information onft,was where those SIGMACARE offers offline funcNashville-based Ingram Company evan efstathiou named Executive Director for its PLUS Far East region. Temple Derecktor Shipyards Mamaroneck, NY 1 2 Roll-On/Roll-Off pilot boats 56 ft aluminum NY/NJ Hawaii Sandy Hook Pilots Association 2.0 VT Halter Marine Pascagoula, MS 692 ft, 26,600 dwtin real time. option newbuilds, lower application cost, areSupply available worldwide tionality, enabling $137.0 the of the12/00 system has promoted Crystal Taylor to Senior Director of SpecTec america. He previ-Pasha will beTransport responsible foruse strengthening Eastern Shipbuilding Group PanamaMS City, FL less Offshore Vessel 204 ft Naviera Tamaulipas 6/00options VT Halter Marine Pascagoula, 24 1 PSVs 97.2m, DP2 Hornbeck Offshore $1,080.07.0 inspection time and its approved up1 tank Additionally the system when not connected to the ML FirstWave/Newpark Shipbuilding Houston, TX forwill bargeworked in 30,000 bblenables Marine Services 3.0 internet. 6/00 Vice President and Controller. Taylor ously Veson nautical asusers the Blessey the company’s surveyor network in this Goldman Halter Escatawpa, MS 2 auto/pax ferries tailored maintenance 300 passengers/40 autos Carolina DOT 10.8 7/00 toFriede 90 months. to create chartsNorthregion. succeed the retiring al oldham. Director of Client Services. Friede Goldman Halter Pearlington, MS 2 casino barges Harrah’s Entertainment 2Q/00 fordeckspecific vessels. charts canIngram Industries Friede Goldman Halter Gulfport, MS 30 inland barges 200These ft 9.0 4Q/00

Commercial

Friede Goldman Halter Friede Goldman Halter Friede Goldman Halter Friede Goldman Halter Friede Goldman Offshore Friede Goldman Offshore Friede Goldman Offshore Friede Goldman Offshore Gladding-Hearn Shipbuilding Gladding-Hearn Shipbuilding Gunderson, Inc. Gunderson, Inc. Houma Fabricators Kody Marine, Inc. Kvichak Marine Industries Kvichak Marine Industries Kvichak Marine Industries Kvichak Marine Industries Kvichak Marine Industries Kvichak Marine Industries Leevac Shipyards Leevac Shipyards LeTourneau LeTourneau Litton Avondale Industries Litton Ingalls Shipbuilding Litton Ingalls Shipbuilding MARCO Seattle Marine Builders Mark Steel Corporation NASSCO Nichols Brothers Boat Builders Nichols Brothers Boat Builders Nichols Brothers Boat Builders Nichols Marine Ways North American Shipbuilding North American Shipbuilding North Florida Shipyards Orange Shipbuilding Orange Shipbuilding Co., Inc. Patti Shipyard Quality Shipyards SEMCO Swiftships, Inc.

Gulfport, MS 1 Pascagoula, MS 1 Pearlington, MS 1 Lockport, LA 1 Orange, TX 1 Pascagoula, MS 2 Pascagoula, MS 1 Pascagoula, MS 2 Somerset, MA 1 Somerset, MA 3 Portland, OR 3 Portland, OR 1 Houma, LA 1 Harvey, LA 3 Seattle, WA 1 Seattle, WA 1 Seattle, WA 1 Seattle, WA 1 Seattle, WA 1 Seattle, WA 1 Jennings, LA 2 Jennings, LA 1 Vicksburg, MS 1 Vicksburg, MS 1 New Orleans, LA 3 Pascagoula, MS 2 Pascagoula, MS 3 Seattle, WA 2 Utica, IN 1 Salt Lake City, UT 1 San Diego, CA 2 Whidbey Island, WA 1 Whidbey Island, WA 1 Whidbey Island, WA 1 Portland, OR 1 Larose and Houma, LA1 Larose and Houma, LA1 Jacksonville, FL 1 Orange, TX 1 Orange, TX 1 Pensacola, FL 2 Houma, LA 1 Lafitte, LA 3 Morgan City, LA 2

oceangoing tank barge pure car truck carrier self-unloading bulker tugboat hull semi-submersible semi-submersibles semisubmersible (C) semisubmersibles (C) fast ferry pilot boats railcar/deck cargo barges split hull hopper barge offshore tug switchboats catamaran oil spill response vessel passenger shuttle patrol boat pilot boat whalewatch catamaran deepwater supply vessel riverboat casino jackup rig Super Gorilla XL Alaskan tankers cruise ships multipurpose jackup vessels pilot boats dinner cruise boat car passenger ferry RO/RO ships dinner boat high-speed ferry high-speed ferry hydraulic pipeline dredge AHTS Offshore Supply Vessel oil tanker deck barge deck barge offshore towing vessels towboat Multi-Purpose Vessels crewboat

46 MARINE LOG MAY 2012

Express Marine Pasha Hawaii Transport Lines Great Lakes Marine Leasing Thoma-Sea Boat Builders ENSCO International Petrodrill Construction Inc. Noble Drillling/FGII Ocean Rig ASA (Norway) Boston Harbor Cruises Charleston, Boston Pilots Alaska Railbelt Marine, LLC J.E. McAmis, Inc. Harvey Gulf International LC Power Maui Classic Voyages Clean Sound Co-op Atlantis Submarines Nassau County Police Columbia Bar Pilots Eco Adventures Hornbeck Offshore Services Hollywood Shreveport Rowan Offshore Rowan Offshore ARCO Marine American Classic Voyages Searex, Inc. San Francisco Bar Pilots Winston Knauss 148 pax/26 auto Utah DOT 839 ft TOTE 800 passenger Argosy Cruises 400 passenger Golden Gate Bridge, Hwy. 379 passenger Catalina Express Lines Manson Construction 7,200 hpEdison Chouest Offshore 190 ftChouest Offshore Ser vices3.5 171 ft Marine Tankers Services, Ltd. 200 ft undisclosed 120 ft undisclosed 150 ft Harvey Gulf International 8000 hp Marquette Transportation 156 ft x 103 ft Transocean Sedco Forex 170 ft aluminum hull Candies Fleet

10.0 70.0 30.0 4.0 100.0 186.8 N/A 313.0 5.0 6.0 15.0 3.0 7.5 2.0 0.8

8/00 sp/02 4/00 4Q/00 8/00 12/01 N/A 12/00 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 1Q/01 7/00 2000 3Q/00 12/00 8/00 3Q/00 6/01 10/00 6/00 3Q/03 4/01 1/04 2000 1Q/01 2000 9/00 3Q/02 6/00 6/01 sp/01 N/A 5/00

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TOTAL, COMMERCIAL 134 SHIPS, BOATS, VESSELS www.marinelog.com 36 MARINE LOG MARCH 2013

370 ft, liquid sugar 579 ft 740 ft 150 ft 7500 ft water depth 5000 ft water depth Ilion Bingo 9000-12 143 ft 75 ft 420 ft 1,700 yd3 capacity 125 ft 1,500 hp 54 ft aluminum 38 ft 54 ft aluminum 38 ft aluminum 73 ft aluminum 65 ft aluminum 260 ft-280 ft 280 ft, 30,000 sq ft casino 400 ft depth 550 ft water depth 125,000 dwt 1,900 passenger 180 ft water depth 104 ft

Visit Jobs.marinelog.com 0.8 0.5 2.6 0.9 36.0 36.0 211.7 190.0 496.0 880.0 21.9 8.0 5.0 3.0 300.0 8.0 8.5 8.5 10.2 8.0 5/00 10.0 2.0 1.0 22.0 8.0 15.0 12.0

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2000 2Q/00 1Q/00 2000 8/00 2000 3Q/00

$3,485.8 MILLION JUNE 2012 YEARBOOK marIne log 57 www.marinelog.com www.marinelog.com

Newsmakers Captain RobeRt Johnston, foRmeR Senior Vice President and Head of overseas shipholding Group, inc., (osG) U.S. Flag Strategic Business Unit, will replace morten arntzen as President and CEO of OSG. Arntzen resigned as President, CEO and company director. mcallister towing, New York, NY, has promoted buckley mcallister to President of McAllister Towing. He replaces his father, Captain brian a. mcallister, who was President of the company since 1984. Captain Brian A. McAllister will remain on as Chairman. huntington ingalls industries (hii) has named Chad n. boudreaux to the newly created position of Chief Compliance Officer. In his new role, Boudreaux will provide centralized oversight, leadership and coordination of HII’s compliance with applicable laws, regulations, and its policies and procedures designed to prevent misconduct. Marine jet drive manufacturer Arkansas-based namJet has named phil organ the company’s Director, Sales and Development. A retired U.S. Coast Guard Naval Engineering Officer and shipboard Chief Engineer, Organ has over 20 years of experience with marine propulsion and electronic controls companies. sally Jewell has been chosen—in what some, like the national ocean industries association President Randall Luthi have deemed a surprise—the

Chad n. boudreaux hii

francis tang ihC meRweDe

next secretary of the interior by president barack obama. Jewell has been CEO of Recreational Equipment Inc. Prior to that she spent 19 years in the commercial banking industry.

Tarnowski was honored for his stanchion stabilizer—the stabilizer prevents stanchions from rolling off flight decks and prevents them from dropping through holes on aircraft carriers.

titan salvage, Pompano Beach, FL, named michael G. Johnson its new Vice President of Business Strategy and Process. Johnson will be responsible for assisting with the administration and running of Titan, and focusing on strategic issues to further business growth.

Klüber Lubrication has appointed Ralf Kraemer the CEO of Klüber Lubrication north america. Kraemer assumes the roles from Dieter a. becker, who will return to Klüber’s global headquarters in Munich.

ihC asia pacific, regional headquarters of Singapore-based ihC merwede, has appointed francis tang, Product Director for the Product Market Combination team. The team is responsible for global sales and marketing of service and support vessels. Tang will lead the development of two new offshore support vessels, the IHC Packhorse and IHC Packhorse-maxi. Casey tarnowski, who works for huntington ingalls’ amseC LLC subsidiary, has won the annual Safety Suggestion Award contest hosted by the Virginia ship Repair association (VsRa).

Sulzer sworn in as member of Advisory Board Dr. arthur h. sulzer, Captain USN (Ret.), and President of arthur h. sulzer associates, inc., has been sworn in by Transportation Secretary Ray Lahood as a member of the advisory board of the saint Lawrence seaway Development Corporation. Sulzer was nominated by president barack obama in July 2012 to a five- year position on the Saint Lawrence Seaway Advisory Board. Arthur H. Sulzer Associates, Inc., is a family business that charters barges and performs surveying and

38 maRine LoG MARCH 2013

tony smith sCb

marine consulting in the Port of Philadelphia. From 1974 to 2005 Captain Sulzer served in the United States Navy.

Crowley maritime recently named farhad Rajabi Vice President of its management team. Rajabi will work out of the group’s Houston office. In his new role, he will leverage his 30 years of experience in project management and other marine solutions fields to establish objectives, plans, policies and procedures for the project management department. shipowners Claims bureau inc., managers of the american p&i Club, have recruited Colin snell to SCB’s underwriting department. Snell will support the club’s European and North American business. Additionally, tony smith comes on board as Vice President and Principal Surveyor. The american equity Underwriters, inc. (aeU), Mobile, AL, has named Jason Lake, Loss Control Manager. Lake is a graduate of the U.s. merchant marine academy, Kings Point, NY, and has sailed with maersk and ocean shipholding. bill Queen has been named President of travelers ocean marine, inc., Hartford, CT. Prior to his appointment, Queen served as Chief Operating Officer for Travelers’ first party Group. The Group includes the Ocean Marine, Inland Marine, Boiler & Machinery and National Property businesses. He’s worked within the Travelers’ Group for 26 years.

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Technews

Technews

Quantum leap for turbochargers Abb Turbocharging, baden, switzerland, says it’s “taken a quantum leap in the technological development of turbochargers” with its new, optimized A200-L generation of single-stage turbocharger for low-speed two-stroke engines. when compared to previous models, the A200-L has up to 30% additional volume flow— an increase never before seen in the turbocharging industry—and has a higher pressure ratio. The A200-L technology is “going to change what it means to be, and stay, competitive in the turbocharging industry,” says Axel Kettmann, senior vice President, Abb Turbocharging. beyond the increased volume flow, the A200-L has a compact frame, offering customers a cost-effective turbocharger that is lower in weight and takes up less space. This, according to Abb, leads to lower service costs, lower first cost and a lower total cost of ownership.

“The A200-L series is much more efficient and so much more cost-efficient than what we have seen before,” says Kettman, who goes on to offer up a prediction, “Companies who choose not to develop their products in a similar direction will lose business, because in this market, customers are focusing on what will save money, particularly in the long-term.”

Filtering out excessive maintenance costs For vessel operators looking to cut maintenance costs, reduce emissions and improve its engine’s performance, the switch to reusable filter technology could be the answer. shifting from disposable filters to reusable ones is becoming a common trend in the marine industry due to the former’s need to be replaced and disposed of frequently, and its added cost—both on the inventory and environmental front. Filter Technology Group (FTG), Cerritos, CA, manufactures custom lubrication filters and quality filter and fittings that offer cleanable, reusable filters that are made to last as long as the engine it’s filtering—and in some cases beyond. Developed and initially produced by the Parker

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Hannifan’s racor Filtration Division, the filter is a cleanable stainless steel wire cloth filter. Available in configurations that spin directly onto existing mounting heads, or in remote-mount models, the filters help engine performance and further an engine’s life. when developing the technology, explains David Cline, oil Filtration Product manager, Parker Hannifan’s racor Filtration Division, “the idea was to reduce the continual cost of filter replacement, waste disposal, and inventory.” He adds, “The cleanable, reusable filters reduce the waste stream by 100%.” Additionally, the technology helps fleets become self reliant and self sufficient.

www.ftginc.com

www.abb.com

Guardian for a Russian newbuild Hyde marine, Inc., will deliver its Hyde Guardian ballast water Treatment system (bwTs) HG600 unit to russia’s baltic shipyard for installation on the largest icebreaker in the FsUe rosmorport Fleet—a vessel known as the 22600 project. Hyde was previously awarded a contract for installation on the retrofit of a russian arctic container vessel, the ms Norilskiy Nickel and the system was installed on two novoship-owned LPG tankers currently under construction at Korea’s Hyundai mipo Dockyard Co. Comprised of automatic backwashing depth filtration and powerful Uv disinfection, the chemical-free bwTs will enable rosmorport to meet ballast water Convention requirements. Compact in size, the Hyde Guardian system features low power consumption, low-pressure drop, and a fully automatic operation.

www.hydemarine.com

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 mArCH2012 2013 marine log 39 november november 2011 marinelog 57 marine log 57

Contracts Shipyard Contracts

Commercial

SHIPyARD Shipyard Location LOCATION Qty

While every care has been taken to present the most accurate information, our survey gathering system is far from perfect. We welcome your input. Please e-mail any changes to: marinelog@sbpub.com. Some contract values and contract completion dates are estimated. Information based on data as of about February 1, 2013. (*) Asterisk indicates first in series delivered. A “C” after a vessel type indicates a major conversion, overhaul or refit. Additional commercial and government contracts are listed on our website, www.marinelog.com.

QTy PARTICULARS Type TyPE Particulars Owner Est. Value $ Mil

OwNER/OPERATOR Est. Del.

EST. $ MIL

Alabama Shipyard Mobile, AL 1 riverboat casino 38,000 ft2 casino Hollywood Park Casino 35.0 RECENT CONTRACTS Allen Shipyards Marine, Inc. Sitka, passenger catamaran lengthen 78to ft 250 ft Allen Marine 2.0 Bollinger Amelia, LA AK 5 1 OSVs Harvey Gulf Tours Intl. Marine AllenMarine Marine, Inc. Sitka, passenger 78 ftft NYWaterwayAlaska Pilots 2.0 Kvichak Seattle, WAAK 1 1 pilot boat catamaran 50 ft x 15.5 Southwest AMFELS Brownsville, TX 1 1 pilot deepwater vessel deckload CalDive International 100.0 Kvichak Marine Seattle, WA boat construction 64 ft x 194000-ton ft Savannah Pilots Atlantic Marine, Inc. Jacksonville, FL 2 cruise ships 226 passenger Delta Queen Coastal Voyages 60.0 US Fab Portland, OR Bay, WI 1 1 deck barge dredge 250 ft x 70 Harley MarineContractors Bay Shipbuilding Sturgeon cutterhead 250ftft Lake Michigan VT Halter Marine Pascagoula, MS 1 ATB 625 ft x 91 ft, 250,000 bbl Bouchard Transportation Bay Shipbuilding Sturgeon Bay, WI 1 trailing suction hopper dredge 5,000 m3 Great Lakes Dredge & Dock 51.6 Bender Shipbuilding Mobile, AL 1 MP deepwater vessel 340 ft Torch Inc. 30.0 DELIVERIES Bender Shipbuilding Mobile, AL 1 offshore tug 150 ft Otto Candies, Inc. 5.0 Bender Shipbuilding Mobile, AL 1 offshore tug 150 ft Otto Candies, Inc. 5.0 Moose Boats Petaluma, CA 1 fire rescue 37 ft x 13 ft 6 in West Pierce Fire & Rescue Blount Shipyard Warren, harborboat tug stock Moose Boats Petaluma, CARI 1 1 police 37 ft x 1355ftft6 in SF Police Department Blount Shipyard Warren, RI 1 oyster dredge 90 ft Tallmadge Brothers Blount Shipyard Warren, RI 1 sightseeing dinner boat 64 ft 10 in Chicago from the Lake, Ltd. Bollinger Marine Fabricators Amelia, LA 1 oceangoing barge 400 ft McDonough Marine Service PENDING CONTRACTS Bollinger Shipyards Lockport, LA 1 cement barge 295 ft Lone Star Industries 3 BAE Systems Southeast Mobile, AL 2 dump scows 7,700 ft Great Lakes Dredge Bollinger Shipyards Lockport, LA 1 towboat 8,000 hp Riverway Company 8.0 GD-NASSCO San Diego, CA LA 3 1 containerships 764 ft x 106 TOTE Bollinger Shipyards Lockport, utility vessel 166 ft ft Gilco Supply Boats, Inc. 8.0 Lockport, LA utility vessel 166 ft Gilco Supply Boats, 8.0 TBD Bollinger Shipyards 6 1 car ferries 1,200 PAX (Convert to LNG) Washington StateInc. Ferries Lockport, LA 1 OPCs utility vessel ft 6 inCutters LytalCoast Marine Operators 8.0 TBD Bollinger Shipyards Offshore145 Patrol U.S. Guard Lockport, LA utility vessel Plaisance Marine 8.0 TBD Bollinger Shipyards 10 1 OSVs stretch 145 ft 6 in GulfMark Offshore Longview, WA Z-Drive tug ferry Diversified Marine, Portland, OR $27.0 5.0 TBD Brusco Tug & Barge 1 1 double-end 70-car 3,600 hp VDOT Conrad Shipyard Morgan City, LA 1 lift boat 110 ft undisclosed 5.0 TY Offshore New Orleans, LA LA 2 1 PSVs dual fuel, 302 Harvey Gulf Intl. Marine Conrad Shipyard Morgan City, lift boat 111 ft ft x 64 ft Global Marine 5.0 VT Halter Marine Pascagoula, MS 1 Roll-On/Roll-Off 692 ft, 26,600 dwt Pasha Hawaii Transport $137.0 Conrad Shipyard Morgan City, LA 1 liquid mud barge 130 ft undisclosed 5.0 VT Halter Marine Pascagoula, 97.2m, DP2 Hornbeck Offshore $1,080.03.0 Conrad Shipyards MorganMS City, LA 24 1 PSVs dry dock 10,000 ton Conrad Industries VT Halter Marine MSWA 1 1 ATB bblZ-drives Bouchard Transportation Dakota Creek Industries Pascagoula, Anacortes, Prevention/Response Tug625 ft x 91 140ft,ft,250,000 10,192 hp Crowley Marine Services 8.0 Derecktor Shipyards Mamaroneck, NY 1 2 subsea pilot boats 56 ft aluminum NY/NJ Sandy Hook 2.0 Candies Shipbuilders Houma, LA vessel 108m x 22m, MT6022 Otto Candies LLC Pilots Association Panama City, FL 1 1 research Offshore vessel Supply Vessel 65ft, hybrid 204 ft Naviera Tamaulipas 7.0 TBD Eastern Shipbuilding Group Maritime Aquarium FirstWave/Newpark Shipbuilding Houston, TX 1 tank barge 30,000 bbl Blessey Marine Services 3.0 Friede Goldman Halter Escatawpa, MS 2 auto/pax ferries 300 passengers/40 autos North Carolina DOT 10.8 Friede Goldman Halter Pearlington, MS 2 casino barges Harrah’s Entertainment Friede Goldman Halter Gulfport, MS 30 inland deck barges 200 ft Ingram Industries 9.0 Friede Goldman Halter Gulfport, MS 1 oceangoing tank barge 370 ft, liquid sugar Express Marine 10.0 Friede Goldman Halter Pascagoula, MS 1 pure car truck carrier 579 ft Pasha Hawaii Transport Lines 70.0 Friede Goldman Halter Pearlington, MS 1 self-unloading bulker 740 ft Great Lakes Marine Leasing 30.0 Friede Goldman Halter Lockport, LA 1 tugboat hull 150 ft Thoma-Sea Boat Builders 4.0 Friede Goldman Offshore Orange, TX 1 semi-submersible 7500 ft water depth ENSCO International 100.0 Friede Goldman Offshore Pascagoula, MS 2 semi-submersibles 5000 ft water depth Petrodrill Construction Inc. 186.8 Friede Goldman Offshore Pascagoula, MS 1 semisubmersible (C) Ilion Noble Drillling/FGII N/A Friede Goldman Offshore Pascagoula, MS 2 semisubmersibles (C) Bingo 9000-12 Ocean Rig ASA (Norway) 313.0 Gladding-Hearn Shipbuilding Somerset, MA 1 fast ferry 143 ft Boston Harbor Cruises 5.0 Gladding-Hearn Shipbuilding Somerset, MA 3 pilot boats 75 ft Charleston, Boston Pilots 6.0 Gunderson, Inc. Portland, OR 3 railcar/deck cargo barges 420 ft Alaska Railbelt Marine, LLC 15.0 Gunderson, Inc. Portland, OR 1 split hull hopper barge 1,700 yd3 capacity J.E. McAmis, Inc. 3.0 Houma Fabricators Houma, LA 1 offshore tug 125 ft Harvey Gulf International 7.5 Kody Marine, Inc. Harvey, LA 3 switchboats 1,500 hp LC Power 2.0 Kvichak Marine Industries Seattle, WA 1 catamaran 54 ft aluminum Maui Classic Voyages 0.8 Kvichak Marine Industries Seattle, WA 1 oil spill response vessel 38 ft Clean Sound Co-op Kvichak Marine Industries Seattle, WA 1 passenger shuttle 54 ft aluminum Atlantis Submarines 0.8 Kvichak Marine Industries Seattle, WA 1 patrol boat 38 ft aluminum Nassau County Police 0.5 Kvichak Marine Industries Seattle, WA 1 pilot boat 73 ft aluminum Columbia Bar Pilots 2.6 Kvichak Marine Industries Seattle, WA 1 whalewatch catamaran 65 ft aluminum Eco Adventures 0.9 Leevac Shipyards Jennings, LA 2 deepwater supply vessel 260 ft-280 ft Hornbeck Offshore Services 36.0 Leevac Shipyards Jennings, LA 1 riverboat casino 280 ft, 30,000 sq ft casino Hollywood Shreveport 36.0 LeTourneau Vicksburg, MS 1 jackup rig 400 ft depth Rowan Offshore 211.7 LeTourneau Vicksburg, MS 1 Super Gorilla XL 550 ft water depth Rowan Offshore 190.0 Litton Avondale Industries New Orleans, LA 3 Alaskan tankers 125,000 dwt ARCO Marine 496.0 Litton Ingalls Shipbuilding Pascagoula, MS 2 cruise ships 1,900 passenger American Classic Voyages 880.0 Litton Ingalls Shipbuilding Pascagoula, MS 3 multipurpose jackup vessels 180 ft water depth Searex, Inc. 21.9 MARCO Seattle Seattle, WA 2 pilot boats 104 ft San Francisco Bar Pilots 8.0 Marine Builders Utica, IN 1 dinner cruise boat Winston Knauss 5.0 Mark Steel Corporation Salt Lake City, UT 1 car passenger ferry 148 pax/26 auto Utah DOT 3.0 NASSCO San Diego, CA 2 RO/RO ships 839 ft TOTE 300.0 Nichols Brothers Boat Builders Whidbey Island, WA 1 dinner boat 800 passenger Argosy Cruises 8.0 Nichols Brothers Boat Builders Whidbey Island, WA 1 high-speed ferry 400 passenger Golden Gate Bridge, Hwy. 8.5 Nichols Brothers Boat Builders Whidbey Island, WA 1 high-speed ferry 379 passenger Catalina Express Lines 8.5 Nichols Marine Ways Portland, OR 1 hydraulic pipeline dredge Manson Construction 10.2 North American Shipbuilding Larose and Houma, LA1 AHTS 7,200 hpEdison Chouest Offshore 8.0 North American Shipbuilding Larose and Houma, LA1 Offshore Supply Vessel 190 ftChouest Offshore Ser vices3.5 5/00 North Florida Shipyards Jacksonville, FL 1 oil tanker 171 ft Marine Tankers Services, Ltd. 10.0 Orange Shipbuilding Orange, TX 1 deck barge 200 ft undisclosed 2.0 Orange Shipbuilding Co., Inc. Orange, TX 1 deck barge 120 ft undisclosed 1.0 Patti Shipyard Pensacola, FL 2 offshore towing vessels 150 ft Harvey Gulf International 22.0 Quality Shipyards Houma, LA 1 towboat 8000 hp Marquette Transportation 8.0 SEMCO Lafitte, LA 3 Multi-Purpose Vessels 156 ft x 103 ft Transocean Sedco Forex 15.0 Swiftships, Inc. Morgan City, LA 2 crewboat 170 ft aluminum hull Candies Fleet 12.0

TOTAL, COMMERCIAL 134 SHIPS, BOATS, VESSELS 40 MARINE LOG MARCH 2013

TOTAL CONTRACT VALUE

EST. DEL. 7/00 2000 2000 JUN13 1Q/01 SEP13 6/01 2000 2013 mid-2105 3Q/2001 2001 8/00 10/00 FEB13 2000 FEB13 7/00 4/01 2/01 2000NOTES 3/01Option Opts ex. 2013 10/00 5/01 issued RFP 9/00 RFP/Phase I 1/01 RFP 4Q/00 RFP 1Q/00 Options 6/00 1Q/00Option Options 4Q/00 7/00Option 12/00Option 6/00 Shipyard 6/00 to be selected 7/00 2Q/00 4Q/00 8/00 sp/02 4/00 4Q/00 8/00 12/01 N/A 12/00 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 1Q/01 7/00 2000 3Q/00 12/00 8/00 3Q/00 6/01 10/00 6/00 3Q/03 4/01 1/04 2000 1Q/01 2000 9/00 3Q/02 6/00 6/01 sp/01 N/A 5/00 2000 2Q/00 1Q/00 2000 8/00 2000 3Q/00

$3,485.8 MILLION www.marinelog.com

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While every care has been taken to present the most accurate information, our survey gathering system is far from perfect. We welcome your Shipyard Contracts input. Please e-mail any changes to: marinelog@sbpub.com. Some contract values and contract completion dates are estimated. Information REGULATION A GLANCE based on data as of about May 1, 2012. (*) Asterisk indicates first in series delivered. A “C” after a vessel type indicates a major conversion, NAMJet 4 ABS Nautical Systems & IMPLEMENTATION 5AT

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Vessel’s Compliance Date

National Maritime Salvage 2013

28

New Vessels All On or after Dec. 1, 2013 On delivery SHIPyARD Shipyard Location LOCATION QTy TyPE Particulars Owner PARTICULARS OwNER/OPERATOR EST. $ MIL EST. DEL. Qty1,500 m Type Est. Value $ Mil Est. Del. 3 Existing Vessels Before20 Dec. 1, 2013 First Scheduled Drydocking after Jan. 1, 201626 Omnithruster Det Norske Veritas Less than Alabama Shipyard Mobile, AL 1 riverboat casino 38,000 ft2 casino Hollywood Park Casino 35.0 7/00 RECENT CONTRACTS Allen Marine, Inc. Sitka, AKMS m31 1 assault passenger 78 ft Allen Marine Tours 2000 JUN18 1,500 – 5,000 Before 2 Dec. 1,72013 FirstU.S. Scheduled Drydocking after Jan.2.01, 2014 C2 Huntington Ingalls Pascagoula, shipcatamaran LHA Navy $2,381.4 Scania USA, Inc. Elliott Bay Design Group AllenMarine Marine, Inc. Sitka,RIAK passenger NYWaterway 2.0 2000 2013 Senesco Kingston, 1 1 ASD tug catamaran 5,150 hp78 ft McAllister Towing AMFELS Brownsville, TX 1 1 dry deepwater vessel 4000-ton deckload CalDive International 100.0 1Q/01 2013 Senesco Marine Kingston, RI dock construction 420 ft, 7,300 lt cap Dry Dock Greater than 5,000 m23 cruise FirstCaddell Scheduled Drydocking Atlantic Marine, Inc. Jacksonville, FL shipsBefore Dec. 1, 2013 226 passenger Delta Queen Coastal Voyages after Jan. 60.01, 2016 6/01 Vigor/US Fab Seattle, WA Bay, WI 1 1 auto ferry dredge 37 362 ft 3 in x ft 83 ft 2 in RubberWashington Ferries Company 10 FLNG Bay Shipbuilding Sturgeon cutterhead 250Schuyler Lake MichiganState Contractors 2000 FEB14 Bay Shipbuilding Sturgeon Bay, WI 1 trailing suction hopper dredge 5,000 m3 Great Lakes Dredge & Dock 51.6 3Q/2001 Bender Shipbuilding Mobile, AL 1 MP deepwater vessel 340 ft Torch Inc. 30.0 2001 Marine Otto Candies, Inc. 40 Gas Turbine 7 DELIVERIES Bender Shipbuilding Mobile, AL 1 offshore tug 150Senesco ft 5.0 8/00 Bender Shipbuilding Mobile, offshore tug 150ftft OttoCoast Candies, Inc. 5.0 Bollinger Shipyards LA AL 1 1 FRC 145aftType x 25 Guard $47 five MAY12 in are similar to theLockport, ones adopted by Guard has issued Approval certif- U.S. (SAB Study) listed only BWM10/00 techBlount Shipyard Warren, RI 1 harbor tug 55 ft stock 2000 GD-NASSCO San Diego, CA 1 T-AKE 13 689 ft x 106 ft U.S. Navy $412 APR12 the Convention through 2016; the new icate, AMS certification will no longer be nologies that met the IMO D-2 discharge Smith Berger 39 Great American Insurance Co. 21 Blount Shipyard Warren, RI 1 oyster dredge 90 ft Tallmadge Brothers 7/00 US Fab Portland, OR 1 covered barge 180 ft x 52 ft Georgia Pacific Consumer MAY12 Blount Shipyard Warren, RI 1 sightseeing dinner boat 64 ft 10 in Chicago from the Lake, Ltd. 4/01 construction implementation is almost possible for vessels for which the Coast standard that is now adopted in the Bollinger Marine Fabricators Amelia, LA 1 oceangoing barge 400 ft McDonough Marine Service 2/01 two apart, at 1 Guard Type Approved system is deemed Coast Guard Regulations: 1. De-oxygenBollinger Shipyards with the Convention Lockport, LA cement barge 295 ft Star Industries 2000 Steerprop Ltd. Lone 31 JLGyears Industries 3 PENDING CONTRACTS Bollinger Lockport, LA towboat 8,000 hp 8.0 + chlorine 3/01NOTES January 1,Shipyards 2012 and the Coast Guard at 1 suitable. Title 46 CFR Part 162.060 Riverway ationCompany + cavitation; 2. Filtration TBD Bollinger Shipyards 6 1 car ferry 1,200 PAX (Convert to LNG) Washington StateInc. Ferries RFP by July 11 Lockport, LA utility vessel 166 ft Gilco Supply Boats, 8.0 10/00 December 1, 2013. sets out the requirements for submittals Pasha dioxide; 3. Filtration$137.0 + UV; Bollinger Shipyards Lockport, LA utility vessel 166The ft dwt Gilco Supply Inc. 8.0 4. Filtration 5/01option VTJMS Halter Marine Pascagoula, MS 1 1 Roll-On/Roll-Off Hawaii Transport New Intermodal AgeBoats, Conference 16-17 8 692 ft, 26,600 For BWM equipment installed from Type Approval + Marine UV Offshore +Operators Ti O2; and 5.$1,080.0 Filtration + electro Bollinger Shipyards Lockport, LA prior utility vessel 145 ft 6 inby a foreign Hornbeck Lytal 8.0 9/00options VT Halter Marine Pascagoula, MS 24 1 PSVs 97.2m,testing DP2 Bollinger Shipyards Lockport, LAimple- 1 administration. utility vessel 145 ft 6 in Plaisance Marine 8.0 1/01 to the Coast Guard Regulations chlorination. BruscoPaints, Tug & Barge Longview, WA 1 Z-Drive tug 3,600 hp & Barges 2013 Diversified Marine, Portland, OR 5.0 4Q/00 Tugs 22,23 Jotun Inc. 35 mentation date, the Coast Guard may Once the Convention and RegulaConrad Shipyard Morgan City, LA 1 lift boat 110 ft undisclosed 5.0 1Q/00 Shipyard Morgan lift boat 111 ft Marine 5.0 6/00 issueConrad a five-year certificate forCity, theLA use 1 SELECTION AND INSTALLATION OF BWM SYSTEMS Global tions build dates requirements are taken Conrad Shipyard Morgan City, LA 1 liquid mud barge 130 ft undisclosed 5.0 1Q/00 W&O 15 Senner, Inc.Management C4 owner’s ofKarl anConrad Alternative System The vessel attention must Conrad intoIndustries account, and a Coast 3.0 Guard system Shipyards Morgan City, LA 1 dry dock 10,000 ton 4Q/00 (AMS) to Creek foreign Type-Approved equip- 1 now turn to the of BWM sys- Crowley approval appears assured, Dakota Industries Anacortes, WA Prevention/Response Tug selection 140 ft, 10,192 hp Z-drives Marine Services 8.0 an owner’s 7/00 Derecktor Shipyards Mamaroneck, NY pilot boats 56 ftthe aluminum Sandy Hook Pilots among Associationthese 2.0 alternatives 12/00 ment that demonstrates equivalent per- 2 tems and the timing of installation. NY/NJ selection from Wortelboer 9 KVH Industries, Inc. C3 Eastern Shipbuilding Group Panama City, FL 1 Offshore Supply Vessel 204 ft Naviera Tamaulipas 7.0 6/00 formance to thatShipbuilding with CoastHouston, Guard Science Advisory30,000 Board will Marine depend upon the circumstances FirstWave/Newpark TX Type- 1 The tank barge bbl Study that Blessey Services 3.0 6/00 of Friede Goldman Halter Escatawpa, auto/pax ferries 300 passengers/40 DOT operation and10.8 7/00 Approved equipment. Once the MS Coast 2 was submitted in July autos 2011 North theCarolina vessel’s the configuraWQIS 13 Lloyd's Register 11 to the EPA Friede Goldman Halter Pearlington, MS 2 casino barges Harrah’s Entertainment 2Q/00 Friede Goldman Halter Gulfport, MS 30 inland deck barges 200 ft Ingram Industries 9.0 4Q/00 Friede Goldman Halter Gulfport, MS 1 oceangoing tank barge 370 ft, liquid sugar Express Marine 10.0 8/00 Friede Goldman Halter Pascagoula, MS 1 pure car truck carrier 579 ft Pasha Hawaii Transport Lines 70.0 sp/02 Friede Goldman Halter Pearlington, MS 1 self-unloading bulker 740 ft Great Lakes Marine Leasing 30.0 4/00 Friede Goldman Halter Lockport, LA 1 tugboat hull 150 ft Thoma-Sea Boat Builders 4.0 4Q/00 Friede Goldman Offshore Orange, TX 1 semi-submersible 7500 ft water depth ENSCO International 100.0 8/00 Friede Goldman Offshore Pascagoula, MS 2 semi-submersibles 5000 ft water depth Petrodrill Construction Inc. 186.8 12/01 Friede Goldman Offshore Pascagoula, MS 1 semisubmersible (C) Ilion Noble Drillling/FGII N/A N/A Friede Goldman Offshore Pascagoula, MS 2 semisubmersibles (C) Bingo 9000-12 Ocean Rig ASA (Norway) 313.0 12/00 Gladding-Hearn Shipbuilding Somerset, MA 1 fast ferry 143 ft Boston Harbor Cruises 5.0 2000 Gladding-Hearn Shipbuilding Somerset, MA 3 pilot boats 75 ft Charleston, Boston Pilots 6.0 2000 Gunderson, Inc. Portland, OR 3 railcar/deck cargo barges 420 ft Alaska Railbelt Marine, LLC 15.0 2000 Gunderson, Inc. Portland, OR 1 split hull hopper barge 1,700 yd3 capacity J.E. McAmis, Inc. 3.0 2000 Houma Fabricators Houma, LA 1 offshore tug 125 ft Harvey Gulf International 7.5 2000 Kody Marine, Inc. Harvey, LA 3 switchboats 1,500 hp LC Power 2.0 1Q/01 Kvichak Marine Industries Seattle, WA 1 catamaran 54 ft aluminum Maui Classic Voyages 0.8 7/00 Kvichak Marine Industries Seattle, WA 1 oil spill response vessel 38 ft Clean Sound Co-op 2000 Kvichak Marine Industries Seattle, WA 1 passenger shuttle 54 ft aluminum Atlantis Submarines 0.8 3Q/00 Kvichak Marine Industries Seattle, WA 1 patrol boat 38 ft aluminum Nassau County Police 0.5 12/00 Kvichak Marine Industries Seattle, WA 1 pilot boat 73 ft aluminum Columbia Bar Pilots 2.6 8/00 Kvichak Marine Industries Seattle, WA 1 whalewatch catamaran 65 ft aluminum Eco Adventures 0.9 3Q/00 Leevac Shipyards Jennings, LA 2 deepwater supply vessel 260 ft-280 ft Hornbeck Offshore Services 36.0 6/01 Leevac the Shipyards Jennings, LA 1it’s riverboat casino 36.0 10/00 Find right people, whether shore-side or 280 ft, 30,000 sq ft casino Hollywood Shreveport LeTourneau Vicksburg, MS 1 jackup rig 400 ft depth Rowan Offshore 211.7 6/00 LeTourneau Vicksburg, MS 1 Super Gorilla XL 550 ft water depth Rowan Offshore 190.0 3Q/03 shipboard professionals by leveraging jobs.marinelog.com. Litton Avondale Industries New Orleans, LA 3 Alaskan tankers 125,000 dwt ARCO Marine 496.0 4/01 Litton Ingalls Shipbuilding Pascagoula, MS 2 cruise ships 1,900 passenger American Classic Voyages 880.0 1/04 Litton Ingalls Shipbuilding Pascagoula, MS 3 multipurpose jackup vessels 180 ft water depth Searex, Inc. 21.9 2000 MARCO Seattle Seattle, WA 2 pilot boats 104 ft San Francisco Bar Pilots 8.0 1Q/01 Marine Builders Utica, IN 1 dinner cruise boat Winston Knauss 5.0 2000 Mark Steel Corporation Salt Lake City, UT 1 car passenger ferry 148 pax/26 auto Utah DOT 3.0 9/00 NASSCO San Diego, CA 2 RO/RO ships 839 ft TOTE 300.0 3Q/02 Nichols Brothers Boat Builders Whidbey Island, WA 1 dinner boat 800 passenger Argosy Cruises 8.0 6/00 Nichols Brothers Boat Builders Whidbey Island, WA 1 high-speed ferry 400 passenger Golden Gate Bridge, Hwy. 8.5 6/01 Nichols Brothers Boat Builders Whidbey Island, WA 1 high-speed ferry 379 passenger Catalina Express Lines 8.5 sp/01 Nichols Marine Ways Portland, OR 1 hydraulic pipeline dredge Manson Construction 10.2 N/A North American Shipbuilding Larose and Houma, LA1 AHTS 7,200 hpEdison Chouest Offshore 8.0 5/00 North American Shipbuilding Larose and Houma, LA1 Offshore Supply Vessel 190 ftChouest Offshore Ser vices3.5 5/00 North Florida Shipyards Jacksonville, FL 1 oil tanker 171 ft Marine Tankers Services, Ltd. 10.0 2000 Orange Shipbuilding Orange, TX 1 deck barge 200 ft undisclosed 2.0 2Q/00 Orange Shipbuilding Co., Inc. Orange, TX 1 deck barge 120 ft undisclosed 1.0 1Q/00 Patti Shipyard Pensacola, FL 2 offshore towing vessels 150 ft Harvey Gulf International 22.0 2000 Quality Shipyards Houma, LA 1 towboat 8000 hp Marquette Transportation 8.0 8/00 SEMCO Lafitte, LA 3 Multi-Purpose Vessels 156 ft x 103 ft Transocean Sedco Forex 15.0 2000 Swiftships, Inc. Morgan City, LA 2 crewboat 170 ft aluminum hull Candies Fleet 12.0 3Q/00

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TOTAL, COMMERCIAL 134 SHIPS, BOATS, VESSELS 60www.marinelog.com MARINE LOG JUNE 2012 YEARBOOK 26 MARINE LOG MAY 2012

TOTAL CONTRACT VALUE

$3,485.8 MILLION

MARCH 2013 MARINE LOG 41 www.marinelog.com www.marinelog.com

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March 2013 MARINE LOG 43

MARINE SALVAGE

December 2005 Vol. 110 No.12

March 2013 Vol. 118 No. 3

opinion

BY TIM BEAvER, PRESIdENT, AMERICAN SALvAGE ASSOCIATION

The Costa ConCordia: one year laTer The Costa Concordia, one of the largest cruise ships ever built, went aground just over a year ago. The unprecedented and tragic event sparked an interest in marine salvage worldwide. Not only was the cause of the sinking a source of wonderment and disbelief, but the sheer enormity of the salvage undertaking was enough to cause doubts among many as to its feasibility. The vessel was carrying over 4,000 souls, of which 32 ultimately perished. While the rescue and recovery efforts were proceeding, the owners began to face the reality of salving the huge passenger ship, a vessel nearly 300 meters long and with a gross tonnage of 114,500. As president of the American Salvage Association, representing the leading salvors located in North America, I was called upon to respond to the many calls and inquiries directed to our offices located in Washington, DC. It was time for many including academics, armchair inventors, the general public, vendors, journalists and others to take a crash course in marine salvage, and they were full of questions and eager to get a grasp of what could and could not be done; what might and might not happen. Had a vessel of this size ever been refloated before? Would the vessel slip down the rocky face of the shoreline? How would it be righted? How would it be cut up? How would the pollution be contained? Is there anyone in the world capable of performing such a monumental task? Who would pay, and how much?

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From the perspective of those who inquired, these were legitimate concerns. One and all wanted to learn all about stability and trim, buoyancy and ballast, par bucking and heavy lift; in five minutes, in 50 words or less. Nevertheless, they were assured from the perspective of the ASA that although the project was unprecedented in size and scope, funding would be provided, the work would move forward, and the salvage would be completed successfully. Much has been accomplished since those first hectic days. Contracts have been let, survey and engineering completed, operational plans developed and implemented, and money spent (it has been reported that salvage costs could be in excess of $500 million). With an international team of more than 20 organizations including ASA members, the salvage operation is being led by ASA member, Titan Salvage, and its Italian partner, Micoperi. One hundred engineers from 13 different firms, more than 80 divers working around-the-clock shifts, and a total crew of over 450 diversely skilled people from all over the world are housed on-site and working towards the refloating of the Costa Concordia. While salvage efforts were originally projected to take about a year, further precautions to protect the integrity of the damaged vessel, heavy weather, increasing complexities related to the precarious positioning of the vessel on the sheer rock ledge, and vigilant efforts to provide

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safety for the work crew as well as the extreme care being taken to safeguard the environment have extended the work period. The pristine waters surrounding Giglio, Italy are part of a protected marine sanctuary for dolphins, porpoises and whales, and are a primary concern to the salvage crew. In fact, before beginning work, a detailed survey of the ecosystems around the ship was conducted so that any changes could be identified. As I write this, more than 24,000 tons of steel fabrication is well under way. Two of the six massive platforms on which the 65,000 ton ship will rest have been installed on the rugged seabed. Divers have installed about one third of the nearly 14,000 cubic meters of grout bags that serve to support the fragile hull. So as I predicted, the process has moved forward with the full support of underwriters. According to reports, the refloating of the Costa Concordia is predicted to occur by the fall of 2013. So, the ultimate salvage lesson is yet to be given. We trust that the hard work, ingenuity and skill of the international salvage industry will be given due credit for another job well done. For now, the American Salvage Association would like to send our best wishes to the men and women involved in this historic effort. Be safe and good luck, one and all. ML

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Mar 2013 Marine Log Magazine