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MARINA SANTOS PORTFOLIO


TABLE OF CONTENTS 01 // INTERLOCKING 02 // ANIMATION STUDIO 03 // IDEAL CITY 04 // REACH 05 // SCAFFOLD PAVILION 06 // PERFORM 07 // MASTER PLAN 08 // COMMUNITY POP-UP 09 // SCULPTURES CURRICULUM VITAE


SPRING 2017

01 // INTERLOCKING: INTERGENERATIONAL LIVING S p i tz e r S chool of Architecture, C C NY Pro fe sso r Fabian Llonch In Co lla b o ration w ith Gavi Wilcox

Communal spaces include both interior and exterior spaces. The concept of vertical living is introduced in the amenities of the housing model. “Home” and “neighborhood” amenities are placed on the North and East sides of the building respectively. “Home” amenities include rooms typically found in a home and imagines these rooms as large communal spaces for the entire building population. On the other side of the building are “neighborhood” amenities in which neighborhood establishments are taken from the street and placed in the building for both tenants and the neighborhood-at-large to enjoy. Workshops spaces and an after-school center provide space for tenants to volunteer their time and knowledge. The layered activities, through the clusters of individual units and the varied amenities provide opportunities to learn, grow and age as a community. This housing model not only imagines the interlocking of generations, but also of interior and exterior, individual and communal, as wells as private and public spaces.

TOOLS / REVIT, RHINO, ILLUSTRATOR, PHOTOSHOP

The idea of interlocking generations is applied to the building shape and program. “L” shaped volumes are interlocked to create voids which serve as communal outdoor spaces for the inhabitants. Apartment units interlock in order to accommodate various housing options for both the young and old generations.

STUDIO / HOUSING

Retirement homes are spaces of alienation and housing options which allow one to age in place are hard to come by. Interlocking imagines a housing model in which the younger and older generations live side by side, mutually benefiting from each other’s teachings, expertise and simple presence.


HOME

NEIGHBORHOOD

EAT LIVE

RESTAURANT

LIVING ROOM

LEARN LIBRARY

SEE VIEW DECK

COMMUNITY MULTI PURPOSE RM

EAT KITCHEN/DINING

WORK OFFICE

CLEANSE LAUNDRY

LEARN WORKSHOPS

PLAY GYM & REHAB

EAT CAFE

ENTERTAIN THEATRE

SERVE AFTER SCHOOL CTR


PROGRAM

STRUCTURE

CORE DIAGONAL TRUSS HANGER

CORE VIERENDEEL TRUSS HANGER

COMMUNAL OUTDOOR

PRIVATE OUTDOOR

APARTMENT UNIT

CORE & CIRCULA


ATION

COURTYARD STAIRS

12 EAST TO 13 SOUTH

10 SOUTH TO 12 WEST 9 WEST TO 10 SOUTH

7 SOUTH TO 8 EAST

4 WEST TO 6 EAST 4 EAST TO 6 WEST 2 WEST TO 3 SOUTH

PUBLIC AMENITIES

RESIDENT AMENITIES

COURTYARD STAIRS


SENIOR

1 BEDROOM SENIOR

9’

’ 12

9’

9’

N

’ 12

UPPER THIRD FLOOR PLAN

Y

F

S

S

S

Y

Y

UPPER FLOOR UNIT PLAN

S

S

F

N

LOWER FLOOR UNIT PLAN

LOWER THIRD FLOOR PLAN RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL AMENITIES

CIRCULATION GREEN

YOUNG

1 BEDROOM YOUNG


YOUNG

YOUNG

2 BEDROOM FLEX

SENIOR

SENIOR

2 BEDROOM SENIOR

FAMILY

3 BEDROOM FLEX


14TH FLR 252’-0”

RESTAURANT 13TH FLR 234’-0”

12TH FLR 216’-0”

11TH FLR 198’-0”

OBSERVATION DECK 10TH FLR 180’-0”

9TH FLR 162’-0”

COMMUNITY CENTER

8TH FLR 144’-0”

7TH FLR 126’-0”

6TH FLR 108’-0”

WE WORK 5TH FLR 90’-0”

4TH FLR 72’-0”

WORKSHOP 3RD FLR 54’-0”

2ND FLR 36’-0”

THEATRE 1ST FLR 18’-0”

GROUND FLR 0’-0”

AFTERSCHOOL CENTER SECTION A


LIVING ROOM

LIBRARY

DINING

KITCHEN

LAUNDRY

GYM

REHAB/THERAPY

CAFE SECTION B


FALL 2016

02 // TRIBECA ANIMATION STUDIO BEST COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN PROJECT, 2017 CCNY

The animation studio is located in Lot 8 adjacent to Tribeca neighborhood of New York City. The overall building program is geared towards the viewing of and production of animated films. Programmatically the building function moves from a public street level to an increasing private work and live quarters. Accessible from the street are both a movie theatre and a below grade gallery. The second level is a series of spaces geared toward the making of an animated movie. The third and fourth floors consists of ten apartments and communal spaces for those working in the animation studio below. Underneath the berm, street access from the West Side Highway to the waterfront is facilitated through a tunnel running between the theatre and gallery. Stairs accessible from the West Side Highway lead up to a public courtyard which overlooks the Hudson River. This elevated courtyard sits atop an 18 feet high berm, designed to withstand the anticipated 100 year flood. A gentle hill slopes down to a pedestrian path running parallel to the water’s edge.

TOOLS / REVIT, RHINO, ILLUSTRATOR, PHOTOSHOP

The Tribeca Animation Studio addresses the need for both coastal resiliency and live/work structures in New York City. It combines a protective berm with a structure geared towards the viewing and creating of animated films. Programmatic functions range from full public access to amenities on the ground level to the more private domains of working and living for the creative professionals inhabiting the space. The building massing is determined by views of the city and the water. The animation studio encourages both the viewing of film as well as the viewing of New York City and the Hudson River.

STUDIO / COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN

S p i tz e r School of Architecture, C C N Y Pro fe ssor Martin Stig sg aard In co lla boration w ith Gavi Wilcox


DEBROSSES ST LIVE WORK

THEATRE

SHIFT & ROTATE

WINDOW FOR WATER/CITY VIEWS

ANGLE TO STREET VIEWS

VESTRY ST

LAIGHT ST


PIER 25

N MOORE ST

PIER 26

KAYAK RENTALS

LOT 12

HUBERT ST

LOT 11

LOT 10

LOT 9

LOT 8

LOT 7

LOT 6

LOT 5

WATTS ST

LOT 4

LOT 3

CANAL ST

LOT 2

LOT 1

PIER 34

HOLLAND TUNNEL EXHAUST

LAIGHT

VESTRY

DEBROSSES

VEHICULAR TRAFFIC

PEDESTRIAN SIGHT

WEST SIDE HIGHWAY LOT 8


WESTSIDE HIGHWAY

3

3

100

S-B 101

104 108

S-A 2

204

203

106

105

205 202

107

4

102

206

2

4 207

201

200 103

1

GROUND FLOOR

1

18’ HIGH BERM 108 GALLERY

SECOND FLOOR

100 URBAN PLAZA

104 PRIV ENTRANCE

200 ROOF TERRACE

204 INFORMAL MTG

101 THEATRE LOBBY

105 TUNNEL

201 WORK SPACE

205 RECORDING RM

102 MOVIE THEATRE

106 GALLERY LOBBY

202 DINING

206 BLACK BOX RM

103 PROJECTION RM

107 STORAGE

203 PIN-UP SPACE

207 CONF RM


3

300

302

2

4 304

301

305

306

307

303

1

THIRD FLOOR

TYPICAL UNIT PLAN 300 ROOF TERRACE

304 APT UNIT 2

301 APT UNIT 1

305 APT UNIT 3

302 GYM

306 APT UNIT 4

303 SHARED LIVING

307 APT UNIT 5


GLASS RAILING

ROOF

GLASS MODULE 4’-0” X 12’-0”

CHANNEL GLASS W/ FRIT PATTER

FOURTH FLOOR

SHADOW BOX METAL CLIP ATTACHING TO GLASS

THIRD FLOOR CHANNEL GLASS W/ FRIT PATTERN

CURTAIN WALL ELEVATION

CURTAIN WALL SECTION DETAIL


10

SECTION A

9

8

7

6

5 T2

T1

4

3

2

1

A

TA

TB

TC B

C

TD

TE

D

94' - 0"

94' - 0"

78' - 0"

78' - 0"

66' - 0"

66' - 0"

54' - 0"

54' - 0"

38' - 0"

38' - 0"

19' - 0"

19' - 0"

18' - 0"

18' - 0"

8' - 0"

8' - 0"

1' - 0" 0' - 0"

1' - 0" 0' - 0"

18’ HIGH BERM

SECTION B

18’ HIGH BERM


FALL 2017

03 // IDEAL CITY: RETHINKING ACCESS S p i tz e r School of Architecture, C C N Y Pro fe ssor C arl Fredrick Svenstedt

The zone for pursuing is dedicated to learning and physical activities. Imagined spaces include a space that is both a library and an aquatics center. Where one read in a library, dive into the river, or float in a pool. The zone for moving is dedicated to both social and solitary experiences. Cafes and public spaces are sprinkled throughout this flat meadow. A network of meditation trails run throughout the meadow allowing for self-reflection and solitude. Finally, the zone for living is dedicated to living with others and with nature. The residential zone allows for a multiplicity of living options from apartments to co-living spaces while also offering the experience of interacting with the creek whether by hearing the running water or by standing in it while fishing.

TOOLS / RHINO, ILLUSTRATOR, PHOTOSHOP, AFTER EFFECTS

This city is divided into three zones, a zone for pursuing passions, for moving and for living.

STUDIO / IDEAL CITY

The ideal city should be accessed by everyone--whether young or old, on feet or in a wheelchair.


MEADOW / MOVING

RIVER / PURSUING

CREEK / LIVING


RIVER / PURSUING

MEADOW / MOVING

CREEK / LIVING


RIVER / PURSUING


MEADOW / MOVING


CREEK / LIVING


2016 AIA NYS STUDENT AWARD

SPRING 2016

04 // REACH

WINNER OF THE BROOKLYN COLLEGE ART GALLERY COMPETITION

The gallery is broken into three programmatic rows--public, semi-public and private. The public row blurs the line between interior and exterior through an angled glass wall. The semi-public row contains the main gallery space. Finally, the most private row--the utility row--contains offices and storage. An urban living room--created through the glass wall and grassy area with benches-- encourages the campus to stop and view the art behind the glass wall. The urban living room enables connectivity and interaction between art, artists, students and the community in a fast paced setting where students and faculty are busy with the daily grind of college life. By taking advantage of the site’s location on a main artery of campus and blurring the boundary or interior and exterior, the gallery and the art reaches to the community in an effortless manner. Heading into the gallery, the interior space becomes more intimate. Skylights are placed atop the main gallery to let in diffused natural light. The final row of the gallery serves as the utility core. Offices, restrooms and a mechanical room are located on one side of gallery while the other half of utility row is dedicated to storage with loading access.

TOOLS / RHINO, ILLUSTRATOR, PHOTOSHOP

REACH is a gallery that creates a new connection between Brooklyn College with the arts. The gallery physically reaches out to the campus inviting the university as a whole to experience student work or curated artists--whether by walking pass, sitting in front of or entering the gallery itself. The glass facade breaks the limits of time and space, enabling viewers to see art at anytime of day and without having to physically enter the gallery.

STUDIO / GALLERY

S p i tz e r School of Architecture, C C N Y Pro fe ssor B radley Horn


B

8

7

6

4

5

2

A

3

1 PLAN

9

SECTION A

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

MAIN ENTRANCE MAIN GALLERY SECONDARY GALLERY STORAGE & LOADING RESTROOM STAFF RESTROOM OFFICE MECH RM OUTDOOR SEATING


REACH BROOKLYN COLLEGE ART GALLERY

REACH

SITE PLAN

GLASS FACADE

WHITEHEAD HALL TO GALLERY

STRUCTURAL GRID SECTION B


FALL 2015

05 // SCAFFOLD PAVILION PUB L IS H E D I N CI T Y WO R KS S p i tz e r School of Architecture, C C N Y Pro fe ssor Louk ia Tsafoulia

Schematically, the scaffold pavilion can be broken into four main parts: a primary structure, a secondary structure, a skin condition, and a circulation system. The primary structure consists of a rectangular box-shaped frame to which the secondary structure of a tension rod scaffolding system is attached to. The scaffolding system supports the skin which consists of panels while the circulation pathways “punch” through these panels creating void passageways that weave up, down and across the pavilion. Moments of stasis are injected within the circulation program to provide places to sit and stand still---encouraging the user to stop

TOOLS / RHINO, ILLUSTRATOR, PHOTOSHOP

The creation of the scaffold pavilion originated from a series of three consecutive actions— ducking, hopping and kicking---performed on a ubiquitous strip of scaffolding on a New York City sidewalk. Similar to Etienne Jules Marey’s work in chronophotography, a single image capturing the three human actions and the temporal transitions between them was created. A linear vector map was generated to quantify the body (head, feet and limbs) and the environment (scaffold and time) from start to finish of the action set. These lines were then used to generate the form, structure and envelope of a small pavilion.

STUDIO / PAVILION

The origins and design for Scaffold Pavilion manifested from a series of human movements.


CIRCULATION / PLAN

CIRCULATION / ELEVATION


SPRING 2016

S p i tz e r School of Architecture, C C N Y Pro fe ssor Drew C ow drey In Co llaboration w ith Jason N g and Miw ako Aki ya ma

VISUAL STUDIES / SCRIPTING

06 // PERFORM: ANALOG SCRIPTING

TOOLS / RHINO, ILLUSTRATOR, CASTING

Perform consists of a series of rules and instructions, an analog code, which results in an end product. The end product can vary due to the maker’s interpretation of written script.


THE CODE STEP 1 - Orient the 16.5”x21” bounding box in portrait orientation. STEP 2 - Label the corners, clockwise starting from the top left corner, P1-P2-P3-P4. STEP 3 - Divide the left edge (P1 to P4) into 10 equal parts using 9 markers placed 2.125” apart. Label each of these markers, starting from the top, 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9. STEP 4 - Divide the right edge (P3 to P2) into 4 equal parts using 3 markers placed 5.25” apart. Label each of these markers, starting from the bottom, I-II-III. STEP 5 - Divide the top edge (P1 to P2) into 6 equal parts 2.75” using 5 markers placed 2.75” apart. Label each of these markers, starting from the left, A-B-C-D-E. STEP 6 - Divide the bottom edge (P3 to P4) into 4 equal parts using 3 markers placed 4.125” apart. Label each of these markers, starting from the right, a-b-c. STEP 7 - Draw a line connecting: P1 to P3 , P2 to P4 , A to I , B to II , C to III , 1 to a , 2 to b , 3 to c , a to I , b to II , c to III, 9 to E , 8 to D , 7 to C , 6 to B , 5 to A. STEP 8 - In triangular region P1-C-7, offset each panel within this region .125” inward. STEP 9 - In quadrilateral region 7-C-P2-P4, offset each panel within this region .25” inward. STEP 10 - In quadrilateral region P4-P2-II-b, offset each panel within this region .375” inward. STEP 11 - In triangular region b-II-P3, offset each panel within this region .75” inward. STEP 12 - Create an ellipse within each of the offseted boundaries. STEP 13 - Repeat Steps 1-7. STEP 14 - In triangular region P1-C-7, offset each panel within this region .25” inward. STEP 15 - In quadrilateral region 7-C-P2-P4, offset each panel within region .5” inward. STEP 16 - In quadrilateral region P4-P2-II-b, offset each panel within this region .75” inward. STEP 17 - In triangular region b-II-P3, offset each panel within this region .25” inward. STEP 18 - Create an ellipse within each of the offseted boundaries. STEP 19 - Place Surface 1 1” directly above Surface 2. STEP 20 - Using P1 as reference, move Surface 1 .5” north and .5” west. STEP 21 - Loft corresponding ellipses from Surface 1 to Surface 2. STEP 22 - Create a 16”x20.5” (portrait orientation) bounding box and place its top right corner on Surface 1 reference point P2. Trim any loose edges that extend the pass the bounding box. STEP 23 - Close the edges. STEP 24 - Slice the 3D model into horizontal layers each 1/8” apart. STEP 25 - Using 1/8” thick chipboard, laser cut the layers (total of 9)--making sure to cut the ellipses for all layers and to etch the grid only on the top most layer. STEP 26 - Stack and glue the layers of chipboard accordingly.


SUMMER 2017

07 // COMMUNITY POP UP

Summer Studio 2017 collaborated with Groundswell, a local non profit organization focused on using art as a tool for social change, to celebrate the organization’s 500th mural. Ge n sle r’s internship prog ram includes Sum m er S tu d i o in w hich the internship class work s to ge th er on a sum m er long project. The i n te r n ship class w as broken into four g roups of si x, wi th each g roup desig ning a different pop up i n sta llation to com m em orate the opening of the o rga n i zation’s 500th m ural. Th i s i n tern g roup celebrated Groundwells’ history b y d o cu menting 100 of org anization’s past m urals. Th e group desig ned a label featuring a m ural a lo n g with its title, artists, year and location in New Yo rk C ity. Labels were placed on paint cans to symbolize the orig ins of these painting s. On o p e n i n g day, seeds, plants and soil were provided fo r th e artists and com m unity m em bers to plant i n si d e the desig ned paint cans to further em body a n d sym bolize the org anization’s ethos of planting se e d s of chang e throug h art.

TOOLS / ILLUSTRATOR, PROTOTYPING

Ge n sle r S u mme r Studio 2017 New Yo rk , N ew York In Co llaboration w ith Stephanie C heung , Ve ro n i ca B edoya, B illy B laha, Al Fajardo, Luke Pa lma d esso

INTERNSHIP / ARCHITECTURE

FE AT U R E D I N A R CH I T E CT U R A L D I G E S T


PASSING WISDOM, PLANTING SEEDS Lead Artist: Jazmine Hayes, Danielle McDonald Participants: Lydia-Rose Aigbedion, Gloryann Anderson, Molly Baum, Sammi Chan, Chasity Colon, Jade Fang, RaNasia Gale, Ayobami “Yaya” Kinard, Joyglenn Lionel, Jeannie Lee, Karina Linares, Star-Imara McBain, Tiffany Moore, Violet Ponce, Jessica Tepehua Martinez, Leslie Valette, Farangiz Yusupova Theme: Women’s Development

Groundswell NYC

Crown Heights, 2016

COMPASS OF DREAMS Lead Artist:: Chris Soria Assistant Artist: Micaela Anaya Participants: Rawan Abdelrahman, Tia Barnes, Yasmina Belkacemi, Sharee Campbell, Brandon Casimir, Moesha Chambers, Saul De Leon, Ebonie Dunkley, Tommie Durdin, Josefina Jackman, Stefany Lema, Eileen Ma, Brandon Summers, Nathaniel Page, Temitope Oniyinde, Shania Reid, Jaimie Walker, Jason Wu Theme: Youth Development

Groundswell NYC

BedStuy, 2016

ARCHITECTURE OF LOVE Lead Artist: Danielle McDonald Assistant Artist: Ashton Agbomenou Participants: Kamal Abdelrahman, Amanda Barrow, Brandon Bendter, Toni Bernard, Kay Boyes, Christian Caraballo, Jovan Delavandel, Kandice Drysdale, Irianna Frink, Donae Goodrich, Julieta Hoffbauer-Sanchez, Nicholas “Nico” Isaac, Susan Jean-Baptiste, Chevalle Johnson, Tadre Jones, Tasha McCalla, Joelennys “Jay Jay” Negron, Temitope Oniyinde, Destiny Ortiz, Anai Sanchez Sarah Shahata, and Andley Tyson Theme: Loving Families

Groundswell NYC

Brownsville, 2017


OUR AMERICAN NARRATIVE CONTINUES Lead Artist: Danielle McDonald

Assistant Artist(s): Adan Palermo Participants: Noor Ain, Ranin Ali, Shakeema Cox, Walter Euceda, Sheray Goday, Isaiah Haigler, Nathaniel James, Glendon Jones, Stefan Leeke, Mei Jia Lin, Tiffany Moore, Oluwatobi (Tobi) Oniyinde, Angel Pena, Violet Ponce, Yafeu Raiford, Lizette Reyes, Eden Russo, Isaiah Sandy, Shechem Scott, Fnu Shohag, Sundiatta Small, Andley Tyson, Gabrielle Zahuatitla Theme: Immigration

Groundswell NYC

Eillis Island, 2015

REBOUND AND REBUILD RED HOOK Lead Artist: Esteban Del Valle Participants: DonChristian Jones Participants: Deloitte Volunteers Theme: Community

Groundswell NYC

Redhook, 2013

SOME WALLS ARE INVISIBLE Lead Artist: Nicole Schulman, Chris Soria Participants: Ahmathya Edwards, Shauna Fitzgerald, Angel Garcia, Brian Jean-Louis, Ivan Jacobson, Jasper Kerbs, Christopher Konecky, Maikel Noyer-Deviez, Isodoro Ramos, Keyla Rijo, Ashley Sullivan, Fernando Tejada, Ye Yan Theme: Justice & Equality

Groundswell NYC

Red Hook, 2010


The Witherspoon Jackson Neighborhood


SUMMER 2014 Background Historically, the precinct north of Nassau Street along Witherspoon Street developed in response to the needs of what was then called the College of New Jersey, now Princeton University. The College occupied Nassau Hall in 1750 and by 1800 there were almost one hundred dwellings, a church and three taverns in the borough. Immigrants found employment by setting up stone cutting yards in and around the quarry located along Witherspoon Street. Through the early part of the twentieth century, the neighborhood lourished keeping pace with the growth of the College. Municipal zoning recognized the precinct as a working class neighborhood that promoted home ownership and increased density from the other residential zones in the borough. African American families developed homesteads and called the neighborhood their own beginning in the mid 1800s and throughout the 20th century. As a community, they built homes, schools, churches, businesses, meeting halls and a YMCA. The once growing neighborhood began to stall in the late 1980s with the gradual and steady shift in home ownership from resident owned property to speculators seeking returns on the steady increasing land values around the university. This critical change in ownership translated into rooming houses and absentee landlords. Retail merchants began a slow retreat from Witherspoon Street at about the same time leaving storefronts empty and landlords bereft of income. An inlux of new transient residents from Mexico and Central America adopted the neighborhood with the hope of inding employment in the increasingly prosperous university town.

Points of Entry How one enters this precinct should recognize all routes that lead to it. The intersection of Witherspoon Street and Valley Road has become a main point of entry from the western and northern suburbs. Trafic from Route 206 and Cherry Valley Road, often bumper to bumper, makes its way through abrupt turns and signal-controlled congestion where vehicles converge from 5 directions. Maintenance vehicles and the public works detritus inhabit this gateway into the center of Princeton alongside the township’s civic headquarters including the police station, ire house and community swimming pool. Within the neighborhood, Witherspoon Street is the only N-S through street and is therefore a preferred alternative to Rt. 206. The increase in the number of people walking and biking along the 8/10 of a mile Witherspoon Street axis is indicative of the need for new zoning that responds to the needs for safety and maintenance of the civic domain of the street. Broken, narrow pavement, unsightly telephone poles laced together by tangled wires overhead and the absence of street lighting present a sharp contrast with the corresponding southern extension of Witherspoon Street

4

08 // MASTERPLAN S tu d i o H illier Pr i n ce ton, New Jersey In Co llaboration w ith B arbara Hillier, Marina S a n to s, Selena Anjur- Dietrich, David Schrag g er, Be n j a min Pollak

The Witherspoon Jackson Neighborhood Master Plan is a study of the neighborhood in which Studio Hillier is located. The Master Plan includes research on the past and current state of the neighborhood as well as proposals to help solve urban challenges-such as lack of affordable housing, outdated zoning laws and decreasing number of local business-facing the town. The following pages are excerpts from the master plan.

INTERNSHIP / URBAN PLANNING

Our study looks at the Witherspoon Jackson neighborhood as the core of a vibrant residential district, and Witherspoon Street as the axis that not only connects people and places but as a destination for a unique range of services and specialty retail. The neighborhood exists within the larger urban context of central Princeton and extends to the university campus and Palmer Square, north to the Princeton Shopping Center and west to the municipal / recreation complex. The Witherspoon Street axis connects the northwestern communities of Princeton with the central business district. Second to Nassau Street, Witherspoon Street functions as the dominant avenue for commerce and entertainment.

TOOLS / ILLUSTRATOR, PHOTOSHOP. IN DESIGN

Introduction

Boundaries


Home ownership

Henry Ave.

Witherspoon St.

Birch Ave.

John St.

Leigh Ave.

Franklin Ave.

Cla

y St

.

Lytle St.

MacLean St.

Witherspoon St.

Witherspoon Jackson Neighborhood

Slightly less than half (45.4%) of Princeton properties are owner-occupied, a slight decrease from 46.8% in 2000. However, the same pressures affecting gentriication in black communities everywhere are causing long-time Witherspoon Jackson property owners to “succumb to higher and higher offers on their homes� (Peterson, 2001). This increase in property value and inlux of academics and business people reduces the number of remaining historic buildings, local businesses, and thus the character of the Witherspoon Jackson neighborhood.

John St.

Transformat i o n s

Temporal change has eroded the solidarity and equilibrium of the neighborhood.

Quarry St.

RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES

Green St.

Owner Occupied Non-Owner Occupied Data From 2007 0

70

140

280

Paul Robeson St.

19


Mixed Use Projects

YM/WCA

According to the American Planning Association, mixed use developments allow for greater housing variety and density, reduce distances between housing, workplaces and retail businesses, encourage more compact development, strengthen neighborhood character, and promote pedestrian and bicycle friendly environments. This type of development will beneit Princeton. It integrates residential, ofice, and commercial spaces thereby enabling people to live, work and play in one amenity-rich town.

Today the building of the YM/WCA only occupies the corner of the plot of land it owns. Redeveloping the property will preserve the services and mission of the YM/WCA while still ensuring it has plenty of indoor and outdoor spaces. By purchasing and developing on the organization’s extra land retail space, parking, and housing units will occupy the previously unused site. The YM/WCA redevelopment will beneit the organization because of the reduced expenses and grounds maintenance of a smaller property. In addition, the income from selling the extra land can be used to maintain and supplement other useful programs. The plan for the purchased land envisions a 4 storey building with residential lats and retail space on the ground loor. The mixed use development will add low to moderate income housing in a location dominated by multi-million apartments across the street. Retail and ofice spaces in the proposed housing development will further increase walkability and street life along Paul Robeson Place. The increase in pedestrian trafic in the area will bring and entice more patrons into the YM/WCA facilities. Furthermore low to moderate income housing units will provide much needed housing in Princeton.

Valley Road and Witherspoon Street

A mixed use development at the old Valley Road School will generate new residential and commercial life at the northern end of Witherspoon Street. This plan repurposes parts of the old Valley Road School and preserves the current open spaces on the property. Repurposing parts of the school preserves history and the connections it has with the neighborhood and its people. Redevelopment will create condominiums as well as retail and ofice spaces. The proposed footbridge connects the northwestern parts of Princeton to the amenities on Witherspoon Street and the development. 40

41


SPRING 2014

09 // S CU L P T U R E S Cornell University Professor David Snyder

PORTRAIT /mesh wire, steel cables, wax paper, stringed lights Portrait was made by outlining the vertical contours of my face with metal cables. Next Page, left to right: CATAPULT /steel, wood, rubber band “Catapult” is a working multi-arm catapult. A trigger mechanism enables the catapult to throw projectiles in rapid succession.

ART / SCULPTURE

The following sculptures explore different materials and methods of construction. Materials such as metal, wood, textiles and paper were used. Construction techniques such as weaving, carpentry and welding were employed.

CONTRAST / paper, plastic “Contrast” explores the varying properties of paper and plastic.

OCULUS / wood, burlap, wax paper Inspired by binocular towers prominent in tourist sites, “Oculus” is a telescope for locations of personal meaning and interest. STALACTITE / wood, books, watercolor “Stalactite” is an exploration on gravity illusions.

and

TOOLS / WELDING, WOOD WORKING

BROKEN / glass, glue “Broken” explores a view on ugliness.


M A R I N A B E AT R I Z GA L A N G S A N TO S marina.bgsantos@gmail.com // marinasantos.net

EDU CAT I O N / / The City College of New York The Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture Master of Architecture Candidate - Expected 2018 GPA: 3.9 Cornell University College of Architecture, Art and Planning B.S. in Urban and Regional Studies GPA: 3.3 Dean’s List - Fall 2013 to Spring 2015

New York, NY August 2015 - Present

Ithaca, NY August 2011 - May 2015

EX P ERI ENC E / / City College of New York // Core Architecture Teaching Assistant Gensler // Architectural Intern Murdock Solon Architects // Architectural Intern Finkelstein Research Group // GIS Research Intern

New York, NY January 2018 - June 2018 New York, NY May 2017 - August 2017 New York, NY June 2016 - August 2016 Ithaca, NY December 2013 - May 2015

Durland Alternative Library // Program Assistant

Ithaca, NY August 2013 - May 2015

Studio Hillier // Urban Planning Intern

Princeton, NJ May 2014 - August 2014

H O NO RS and P U B LI CAT I O NS / / Architectural Digest // These Designs Have Made the World a Much Better Place

New York, NY December 2017

2016 AIA New York State (AIANYS) Student Award

Albany, NY December 2016

Brooklyn College Art Gallery Competition // First Place

New York, NY May 2016

S K I LLS / / Programs Languages

Revit // Rhinoceros // AutoCAD // Adobe-InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, After Effects // ArcGIS //Microsoft Office Suite // Model Making Fluent English // Fluent Filipino (Tagalog) // Proficient French


2014-2017 marina.bgsantos@gmail.com

Marina Santos // Portfolio // 2018  

Works from graduate, undergraduate and professional experiences.

Marina Santos // Portfolio // 2018  

Works from graduate, undergraduate and professional experiences.

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