Issuu on Google+

Marin Gross marin@tlu.ee

N V I V O     KOOLITUSMATERJALID   1. 2.

INTRODUCTION  CREATING AND NAVIGATING AROUND YOUR PROJECT 

2.1.1. 2.1.2. 2.1.3. 3.

TO CREATE A PROJECT  NAVIGATING AROUND YOUR PROJECT  SAVING YOUR PROJECT 

SOURCES 

2 2 2 3 3 4

3.1. CREATING FOLDERS  3.1.1. TO ADD A NEW FOLDER  3.2. IMPORTING DOCUMENTS AND IMAGE FILES (INTERNALS)  3.3. TO OPEN A DOCUMENT  3.3.1. EXTERNAL SOURCES  To create and external 

6 6 7 7 10 10

4.

13

NODES AND CODING 

4.1. CREATING A NODE (BEFORE STARTING TO CODE)  4.2. CODING  4.2.1. TO CODE A DOCUMENT BY DRAG AND DROP  4.2.2. CODING USING THE CODE MENU 

13 14 14 15

5.

17

U

CASES AND ATTRIBUTES 

5.1. TO CREATE A CASE  5.2. TO CREATE AN ATTRIBUTE  5.2.1. TO EDIT AN ATTRIBUTE OR ITS VALUES 

18 19 21

6.

23

         

EXPLORING THE DATA 


1. INTRODUCTION  The world is awash with data. But one binary bit is no different from any other. Raw data are  meaningless until we classify them, put them in context, interpret them, and understand their  meaning and significance. It is only after this process that information becomes knowledge. In  doing qualitative research we make observations, record and transcribe interviews and focus  group interaction, we collect questionnaires and take copious fieldnotes. Qualitative research  tends to produce vast amounts of data that then needs to be organized. The major way of  dealing with data collected through the qualitative technique involves reading, thematization  codification, and finally classification.  Why is this important? Remember, you initially began the  research project with the aim of answering a particular question. So it is important to organize  your data in such a way that you are able to answer that question. This workshop has been  designed to assist those researchers who would like to learn about computer assisted  qualitative data analysis software, in this case NVivo 8.  With this in mind, the booklet you have in front of you has been designed as a resource for  those learning NVivo 8 software. It introduces the fundamentals of NVivo 8, including how to  create and navigate around your project, how to import sources into your project, how to create  nodes and code your material, and how to query your data. Having worked through this booklet  you should have acquired an introductory understanding of NVivo 8 and its usefulness in  analyzing data in qualitative research. 

2. CREATING AND NAVIGATING AROUND YOUR PROJECT  In this section you will learn how to:  • • •

Create a project  Navigate around a project  Save a project 

2.1.1. TO CREATE A PROJECT  1. 2. 3. 4.

On the Welcome screen click the New Project button. The New Project dialog is opened.  Enter the name for your project in the Title field.  Enter a description of your project in the Description field (optional).  Click OK. 


By default your project will be saved to your My Documents folder (you can save your project to  another location by clicking the Browse button). 

2.1.2. NAVIGATING AROUND YOUR PROJECT  NVivo provides toolbars for fast access to the most common functions: 

Use the Main toolbar to perform common tasks such as save, print, cut, copy, paste and undo.    Use the Edit toolbar to format text in sources and edit model content:    Use the Coding toolbar to code/uncode selected content:    Use the View toolbar to set display settings for project items:    Use the Links toolbar to work with ‘see also’ links, annotations and memos:  Use the Media toolbar to play, pause, forward and rewind and stop a video or audio file:    Use the Grid toolbar to work with matrices or the project casebook:  Note: The Status Bar – the horizontal area at the bottom of the NVivo window – provides  information about the current state of what is displayed in the window, along with other  contextual information.    Your project structure   

 


Nvivo stores the different parts of your project (interview or focus group transcripts, newspaper  articles, web material etc.) in folders. In Navigation View you have access to a short summary of  the items in that folder (List View) as well as the contents of the highlighted folder item (Detail  View).  There are several options for viewing items shown in the List View.  To change the view, select  the View menu and choose List View. Options available are Detail, Small, Medium or Large  Thumbnails.    By default, when an item is opened in Detail View it is displayed underneath List View. To  change the Detail View to appear to the right, select the View menu and choose Detail  View>Right. 

2.1.3. SAVING YOUR PROJECT  You can save your project at any time by choosing the Save icon on the Main toolbar.    Note: It is also important that you back up your project. A back up is not a back up until the copy  is moved from its primary location on your computer. This is particularly important for projects  stored on notebook computers – if the computer is stolen, so is your project. Therefore, you  need to copy the project at regular intervals to a network drive, USB drive, CD etc. 

3. SOURCES  In this section you will learn how to:  • • • • •                      

Create folders  Import documents and image files  Work with external data  Create memos  Use annotations 


Sources  In NVivo, ‘sources’ is used as the collective term for the research materials that you will  eventually code. These are categorized into three types:  Internals – these are your primary sources and consist of the electronic format materials  you can import into a folder in your NVivo project. They may take the form of interview or  focus group transcripts, field notes, photos or video recordings, email messages, survey  responses, policy documents and so forth. You can import text files in the following  formats:  9 9 9 9

Microsoft Word (.doc)  Adobe Portable Document Format (.pdf)  Rich Text Format (.rtf)  Text (.txt) 

Externals – these are the materials that you can’t import into your NVivo project, such as  reference books, handwritten diaries or letters, paper‐based newspaper articles and web  pages.  Memos – these are created by the researcher to capture the thoughts and insights made  when working through the data. 

In Navigation View click on Sources to view the three categories of research materials (Internals,  Externals, Memos) 


3.1. Creating Folders  NVivo automatically provides three source categories: Internals , Externals, Memos.  Additionally, you can add your own sub‐folders for each of these source categories. For  instance, in the Internals source category you may want to create sub‐folders for the different  data you will be working with, such as focus group/ interview transcripts, photos and email  messages.   

3.1.1. TO ADD A NEW FOLDER  1. In Navigation View, click on Sources, then Internals folder.  2. Right click on Internals and choose New Folder.  3. The New Folder dialog is displayed. 

  4. In the Name field type the name of the sub‐folder (i.e. ‘interviews’).  5. Enter a description of the sub‐folder in the Description field (optional). Click OK.  6. Repeat these steps to add more sub‐folders, such as ‘Focus Groups’, ‘Photos’ and  ‘Project Notes’. 

Note: Folders can be created as needed at any time. Once created, data can be imported  directly into them. 


3.2. Importing documents and image files (Internals)  1. In Navigation View, click on Sources.  2. Click Internals then Interviews if you want this to be the destination sub‐folder.  3. Click in List View (or alternatively click the Project tab on the toolbar and select Import  Internals).  4. Right click and choose Import Internals. The Import Internals dialog is displayed. 

5. In the Import from field, click the Browse button. The Import Sources dialog is displayed.  6. Navigate to the folder where your document is stored and select the file(s) you want to  import. Click Open.  7. The selected file is displayed in the Import from field. Click OK. Your document will be  imported and displayed in the List View.  Note: You can also drag and drop a file from Windows Explorer directly to an Internals sub‐ folder. 

3.3. To open a document  1. Locate the document in List View.  2. Double click on the document name. The document is then displayed in Detail View.  3. To close a document right click on the tab and select close or click the cross at the top  right hand corner of Detail View.   


Note: You can edit a document’s properties (for instance change the name or add to the  description of the file) by right clicking on the document and selecting Document Properties.  Make the required changes and click OK.    Importing pictures  NVivo 8 has the capability to import photographs, diagrams, graphs and so forth into your  project. To do this, simply repeat steps one through seven in section 3.2  Importing documents  and image files (Internals).  Note: Once you have imported your picture it is opened in the same way as any other  document (see section 3.3 To open a document). A picture consists of an image and a log. A log  can be used to record notes (i.e. descriptive text) about the picture. The notes can relate to the  entire image or a selected region. 

    To add content to a picture log 


Open the picture to display it in Detail View.  Add text to the picture log by clicking in a row in the Content column and entering the required  text.    Importing audio and video files  In Navigation View click sources.  Click Internals or a sub‐folder. (In this case we use the ‘Audio‐files’ sub‐folder).  Click in List View.  Right click and choose Import Internals. The Import Internals dialog is displayed.   

    In the Import from field, click the Browse button. The Import Sources dialog is displayed.  Navigate to the folder where your audio and video files are stored and select the file(s) you want  to import. Click Open.  The selected item is displayed in the Import from field.  Click OK. Your audio and/or video file(s) will import and will be displayed in the List View.     To open an audio or video file in List View  Locate the audio or video file in List View.  Double click on the name. The audio or video file is displayed in Detail View.    A video or audio file consists of a media file and space for a transcript. You can add  custom columns to a transcript. For example you can add a column that shows the  name of each speaker.    To play the audio or video file, place the cursor in Detail View and right click. Select Play. (Or  simply use the media toolbar).     


3.3.1. EXTERNAL SOURCES  Qualitative research often draws on a diverse range of material, some of which cannot be  imported into NVivo. Nevertheless, you may still want this material to be included in your  project. For instance, web pages, scanned hand written documents or newspaper articles. These  are the types of data you may want to search and use in the scope of a query.  TO CREATE AN EXTERNAL  1. 2. 3. 4.

In Navigation View, click the Sources button.  Click the Externals folder.  Right click in List View and choose New External. The New External dialog is displayed.  Enter a name in the Name field. If required enter a description of the source in the  Description field. 


1. Then click the External tab to define the required option.  2. From the Type drop down list select an option that is suitable for the required source.  3.   Option   OTHER        FILE LINK 

  WEB LINK 

Descriptiondddddddddddddddddddddddddd…. THE ITEM IS NOT STORED ON YOUR COMPUTER. FOR  INSTANCE IT MAY BE A BOOK OR A HANDWRITTEN DIARY 

THE ITEM IS STORED ON YOUR COMPUTER AS AN  EXECUTABLE FILE, FOR EXAMPLE AN EXCEL SPREADSHEET OR  A SCANNED NEWSPAPER ARTICLE. IF YOU CHOOSE THIS  OPTION YOU CAN CREATE A LINK TO THE FILE  THE ITEM IS A WEB PAGE. YOU CAN CREATE A LIVE LINK TO A  WEB PAGE BY PROVIDING THE WEB ADDRESS IN THE URL  PATH FIELD. 

  To open an external file 1. Locate the file in List View 2. Right click on the file and select Open External File

Memos and annotations  Some of the most important research material comes from your own thought processes as  you work with your data. When in the field, these ideas and comments are often recorded  in notebooks. You may also collect observation notes about the person you are  interviewing. It is useful to keep this sort of material together with your data. NVivo allows  you to do this through the memos function. Memos are sources and can be searched and  coded. 

      To create a memo 

1. In Navigation View, click the Sources button.  2. Click the Memos folder.  3. Right click in List View and choose either New Memo or Import Memos. If you choose  New Memo, the New Memo dialog is displayed.  4. Enter a name in the Name field.  5. If required, enter a description of the memo in the Description field. 


6. Click OK. The new memo is opened in Detail View ready for you to enter your text.  7. If you chose Import Memos, click the browse button and select the document you wish  to import. Click OK  Creating an annotation in a text document  1. In Navigation View, click Sources and open an internal document.  2. Select the required text to which you would like to add your annotation.  3. From the Links menu, select Annotation>New Annotation. 

4. An annotation is added in the Annotations tab in Detail View. Enter the annotation text. 


5. Click outside the Annotation pane to finish. The annotation text now appears,  highlighted in blue. 

4. NODES AND CODING  In this section you will learn how to:  • •

Create Nodes  Code selected project sources 

  Introducing the concept of nodes  Nodes are where you store data about ideas or themes that emerge as you work in your  project.  Think of the manual method of coding you may have used in the past; lots of  photocopying, selecting text relevant to specific themes or categories by highlighting or  physically cutting the paper. This text may then have been filed in categorized folders in a  filing cabinet. In NVivo, when you wish��to have data segments that form a particular  theme gathered together, the references to them are stored in what is called a node. Any  amount of data can be stored in a node, and the same piece of text can be stored in  more than one node.  Some researchers will find that they know certain themes they want to explore in their  project and create nodes for these before analyzing the data. On the other hand, some  researchers may create nodes as they discover themes in their data. The two primary  types of nodes are:    Free Nodes – These are ‘stand alone’ nodes. Free node are useful when you begin  coding as you may not be sure as to whether they fit into a hierarchical structure.  However, as you code further you may discover similarities or relationships between  nodes and move them into a more logical area to represent this relationship i.e Tree  Nodes    Tree nodes ‐ Are organized into a hierarchical structure of categories and subcategories  (represent as the branches of a tree).

4.1. Creating a Node (before starting to code)  1. In Navigation View click the Nodes folder  2. Click the folder for the type of node you want (i.e. Tree Nodes)  3. In List View right click and choose New Tree Node. The New Tree Node dialog is  displayed. 


4. Enter a name in the Name field  5. If required, enter a description of the node in the Description field. This is useful for  reminding you of the theme this node represents.  6. Click OK. Repeat the process to create further nodes 

4.2. Coding  Coding is the process by which you gather and transfer text on a specific theme at a node that  represents that theme. You can code the content of any imported source in your NVivo project.  To see all the coded text in a particular node, simply open that node. The actual process of  coding can be done in two ways:  • •

Using drag and drop to an existing node  Using the Code menu 

4.2.1. TO CODE A DOCUMENT BY DRAG AND DROP  4. In Navigation View, click the Sources button and open an internal  document  5. Select the Nodes folder so that they appear as a list  6. Select the text you would like to code 


7. Drag the text to the required node and drop. The text is coded at the selected node 

4.2.2. CODING USING THE CODE MENU  Using the code menu is another way to code text. However, the advantage in using the code  menu is that you are able to create new codes as you work on the data.  1. Open a source and select the text that you want to code from the document  2. Right click and choose Code Selection > Existing Nodes. Note: If you would like to create  a new node whilst coding choose New Node.  3. The Select Project Items dialog is displayed 

 


4. Select the folder containing the required nodes (i.e. Free Nodes, Tree Nodes etc.) Note:  Do not tick the box beside the folder as this will automatically select all items in that  folder.  5. Click the checkbox for the required node(s).  6. Click OK    Creating Tree Node relationships  Tree nodes are codes that are organized in a hierarchical structure. For example if you are  coding interviews about trust between doctors and patients you may want to have a node called  ‘Trust’ under which rests two nodes called ‘High Trust’ and ‘Low Trust’. 

    To create a Tree Node  1. In Navigation View, click the Nodes button.  2. Select Tree Nodes.  3. Select  an  existing  Tree  Node  or  create  a  new  Tree  Node  (see  section  4.1  Creating  a  Node).  4. Left click on the selected Tree Node, then right click and choose New Tree Node.  5. The New Tree Node dialog is opened.   

  6. Enter a name in the Name field 


7. If required, enter a description of the node in the Description field. This is useful for  reminding you of the theme this node represents.  8. Click OK. Repeat the process to create further nodes   

  Example from demonstration project 

5. CASES AND ATTRIBUTES  In this section you will learn how to:  • •

Create cases  Create attributes and assign values 

Cases  A case in NVivo is another sort of node. However, in this instance it doesn’t represent a  theme, but gathers together all the information about a person, institution or  organization. You can also import into the case all the data content that belongs to that  entity. If, for instance, you have information about a person or field‐site (demographic  information about age, gender, marital status etc) this information is stored with the case.  These are known as attributes.


5.1. To create a case  1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Simply do so in the same way that you would create a node (as covered previously).  In Navigation View click Nodes  Click the Cases folder  Right click in List View and choose New Case  The New Case dialog is displayed 

1. Enter a name in the Name field (i.e. Orhan Pamuk)  2. If required, enter a description of the case in the Description field  3. Click OK    The case is now ready to have text coded to it. For example, Orhan’s interview(s), all that he said  at the focus group, as well as his attributes (i.e. gender, age and so on) can also be added. Here  we have a complete profile of the entity in one place.    To code an existing source to an existing case 


1. In List View select the required source (e.g. Orhan)  2. Right click and choose Code Sources>Existing Nodes  3. The Select Project Item dialog is displayed. Selected the Cases folder to display all cases  and click the check box next to Orhan’s Case   

    4. Click OK    Attributes  Now that your data records about specific people or groups are stored in cases, it is now  possible to add demographic information (e.g. gender, age etc). Attributes are used to  store this data. The attributes folder is located under the Classifications Folder.   

5.2. To create an attribute  1. 2. 3. 4.  

In Navigation View, click on Classifications  Select the Attributes folder  In List View, right click and choose New Attribute  The New Attribute dialog is opened 


1. Enter a name for your attribute in the Name field e.g. gender, age, region etc. (If required  enter a description of the attribute in the Description field  2. Select the format of the attribute’s values from the Type list. Choose string if the  attribute has values that are words rather than numbers or dates – for example Gender  3. Click the Values tab to define the values that will be assigned to the attribute, for  instance Gender=male, female  4. Click the Add button  5. Enter the name of the value in the Value cell, e.g. female  6. Repeat the process to add more values as needed     

 


7. Click the default checkbox to specify that new cases will be allocated this value as a  default. Note: the Unassigned and Not Applicable tabs are system defined values and  cannot be removed  8. Click OK when finishing adding attribute values   

5.2.1. TO EDIT AN ATTRIBUTE OR ITS VALUES  Attributes and attribute values can be renamed, reordered or removed.  1. Locate the attribute in the Attributes folder under Classifications  2. Right click on the attribute you wish to edit and select Attribute Properties  To assign attribute values to cases  1. Now that attribute values have been created, they can be assigned to the appropriate  cases.  2. In Navigation View, click on Nodes  3. Click the Cases folder  4. In List View, select the required case. Right click and choose Case Properties 

 

1. The Case Properties dialog appears. Click the Attribute Values tab  2. From the drop down menu next to each attribute, choose the relevant value for that  particular case 


1. Click OK  Note: All cases must be assigned a value for each attribute. If an attribute is not relevant to a  case, you can assign it one of the system defined values: Unassigned or Not Applicable.  The casebook  The casebook is a table containing your cases (or case names) and the attribute values  that have been assigned to them. You can add new attribute values to the appropriate  case via the casebook, rather than via Case Properties as previously covered.   

To open the casebook  1. From the Tools menu choose Casebook>Open Casebook. The casebook will now appear  in Detail View showing the cases, attributes and values assigned 

 


Note: You can assign the attribute value for each case by selecting the cell, clicking the drop  down arrow and selecting the appropriate value. 

6. EXPLORING THE DATA  Once you have coded data at your nodes, created cases and assigned attributes, you have  organized your data in such away as it becomes manageable and accessible. When writing your  research you can explore the data which has been thematically categorized in the free or tree  nodes. There are other ways, however, to do searches of the data.    Text Search  1. In Navigation View click on the Queries button  2. Click on the Projects tab and select New Query>Text Search.  3. The Text Search Query dialog is opened   

      4. Type in the key word you wish to search for (in this case ‘food’). Click Run  5. The text search query results will appear in Detail View     


6. To open the sources that contain the desired key word highlight the source, right click  and select Open Document  7. The document will open and the key word will be highlighted every time it appears in  the text.       


http://www.maringross.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/materjal-_-EN