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THE ART OF LIFE


T H E A R T O F LI FE Marimekko´s autumn collection reflects inspiring encounters between different cultures, art and design. Interpreting Finnish functionalism and minimalism, the spirit of Slavic art and African aesthetics in Marimekko´s signature style, the collection takes us all the way from east to west and south to north. In the same way, everyday encounters can be intriguing junctures in life’s road and the beginnings of something new. Connecting with your senses, being present in the moment, seeing the beauty around you – together these seemingly little actions can lead to a better life. In this paper, we cover some of these themes with two friends of Marimekko, Suvi Saloniemi and Martin Bergström, who tell us about their dreams, creativity and encounters that shaped their lives. When did you last stop to look around you?

#theartoflife

SOME SIX T Y YE ARS AGO, THE BOLD C O L O U R S A N D U N C O N V E N T I O N A L PAT T E R N S O F T H E N E W LY E S TA B L I S H E D FA S H I O N A N D D E S I G N H O U S E M A R I M E K KO TRANSFORMED THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY I N F I N L A N D . T O D AY, O U R I N V E N T I V E , YE T TIMELESS DIALO G U E B E T W EEN C O LO U R , PAT T E R N A N D S H A P E T R A N S L AT E S I N T O D I S T I N C T I V E D E S I G N S T H AT C E L E B R AT E T H E AR T OF PRINT MAKIN G ALL OVER THE WOR LD.

© Marimekko Corporation Puusepänkatu 4, 00880 Helsinki, Finland Tel. +358 9 75 871 info@marimekko.com w w w.marimekko.com

The availability of products varies from store to store.


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MOMENTS

SUVI SALONIEMI

MARTIN BERGSTRÖM

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A U T U M N 2 0 14

S AT U M A A R A N E N

HOME

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SANNA ANNUKKA

KIDS

FA B R I C P R I N T I N G

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ANNA TEURNELL

50 Y E A R S O F U N I K KO

G R E E TI N G S FR O M M A R I M E K KO


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MOMENTS Existence at its core can be little things and fleeting moments. Just open yourself to the world around you. Feel the sunlight on your face, hear the wind, see beauty in the everyday. Let yourself be carried forward, one step at a time. The wet asphalt beneath your shoes reflects life’s myriad colours. The importance of presence grows – even in unexpected encounters.

# t h e a r tof l i fe Photos: Osma Har vilahti

Y L L E coat M A R I L O G O umbrella


H Y P S dress  O L K A L A U K K U U R B A A N I bag

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R O P O dress

M AT S I tunic

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O I V A / S I I R T O L A P U U TA R H A plates  S U K AT M A K K A R A L L A tumbler & pitcher O I V A teacup K O N K K A R O N K K A cutler y


O I V A / S I I R T O L A P U U TA R H A pitcher P I N N E dress

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M I N A shir t  S T O K K I trousers T O I M I leather bag

Y L L E coat K U N U dress

K O T I L O coat E P P U leather backpack

K U N U dress

L O I S T E coat

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M U H K I S knit  O I V A teacup A R A R AT cushion cover  T I I L I S K I V I cushion cover

K U U S K A J A S K A R I linen fabric

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F R I E N D S O F M A R I M E K KO

SUVI SALONIEMI Photos: Ker ttu Malinen

variety of micro-projects, for example as a DJ, a radio presenter and creative director of an imaginary fashion school based on workshop interventions, the Töölö Fashion Institute.

T E L L U S A B O U T YO U R S E L F I N B R I E F

I am a 35-year-old curator working with exhibitions of design and contemporary art. For the past couple of years, I’ve been Curator at the Design Museum in Helsinki, where I am responsible for building the exhibition programme and curating exhibitions. For me, an inspiring job is one of the most important things in life. In the words of the founder of Marimekko, Armi Ratia, I feel I am a Karelian cosmopolitan as my roots are in Eastern Finland and I constantly travel around the world. I feel at home when I’m abroad; I adjust very well to any situation that comes along.

H O W D O E S C R E AT I V I T Y S H O W I N YO U R E V E R Y D AY L I F E ?

My curating job is very creative, but that doesn’t mean that creativity doesn’t get lost from time to time. Haste smothers creativity. It’s good to have the space to let the best ideas ripen. On the other hand, I don’t like having too much time; a strict timetable makes you trust your intuition and go ahead. In general, trusting your intuition gets you better results and decisions than you do with too much time. So I link creativity very closely to intuition. Sometimes while I’m curating, making choices, it’s hard for me to articulate rationally why some creator is worthy of an exhibition or gets placed as part of an exhibition. Every day I rely more and more on my intuition and I let it lead me in the right direction. Some people also say that fear crushes creativity. I try to avoid fear – my attitude as an experimental adventurer has helped me a lot in this respect.

W H AT PAT H L E D YO U T O T H E P R E S E N T ?

My route has been topsy-turvy. Things in my life haven’t gone in the same order as they should in conventional stories. I’m an experimental adventurer and I’ve learned a lot of things about myself and the world the hard way. I’ve also achieved many of the things I’ve aimed at, and that’s something I’m proud of. My path has always been coloured by art, crafts and aesthetics. My studies began in childhood at art school, continuing through art upper secondary school, and finally in the history-of-art faculty at university. Sometimes I’ve needed space, and I’ve lived in Stockholm and London. I’ve worked for many of Helsinki’s biggest cultural institutions and served simultaneously on a

W H AT I N S P I R E S YO U ?

The greatest inspiration comes from beauty, but there is no beauty without contrasts. I need contrasts in my life.

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mundane and workaday, like getting the rainbowcoloured sapphires given to me by my father over fifteen years ago made into a ring, to the larger and more abstract, such as the desire to do something universally meaningful: to make the world a better place, to work as a volunteer, to leave my mark.

W H AT ’ S YO U R AT T I T U D E T O L I F E ?

Oscar Wilde once said: “We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.” The same kind of attitude to life was also described by Albert Einstein when he said that there are only two ways to live your life: one is as though nothing is a miracle, the other is as though everything is. My personal motto is a quote from the Danish clothing designer Henrik Vibskov, with whom I carried out a major exhibition production at the Design Museum last winter. In an interview, Henrik said: “Wonderful things happen to me all the time, all the time.” There is something magical about these words and they affect me profoundly. I identify with this.

W H AT D O YO U E X P E C T F R O M T H E A U T U M N ?

The autumn’s going to be exciting! In October, I’ll be moving to New York for a while to curate an international exhibition of contemporary design. Life in the museum district of the Upper East Side is sure to be filled with unexpected encounters and more and more inspiring days. It will be wonderful to experience this legendary city and hopefully also to visit Los Angeles, San Francisco and Miami.

W H AT D R E A M S D O YO U H AV E ?

I dream all the time, constantly, a great deal. What’s funny about this is that my dreams have a way of coming true, at least more or less. For example, I’ve dreamed about moving to another country, and in the autumn this will happen. I also dream about a large home and holding dinners there. My dreams vary from the very

Suvi’s favourites in Marimekko’s autumn collection: L O I S T E coat M A G D A L E N A dress V A N J A tights A R P A dress

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F R I E N D S O F M A R I M E K KO

MAR TIN B ERGSTRÖM Photos: Rami Hanafi

T E L L U S A L I T T L E B I T A B O U T YO U R S E L F

W H AT I N S P I R E S YO U I N M A R I M E K KO ?

I am a Stockholm-Helsinki-Berlin-based creative artist who works along and in-between the borders of art, design and fashion. I have applied my imagination to textile prints, set design, interior design and building strawberry dresses. I started as a painter, and my first exhibition was when I was 13. Later I’ve studied design and art in Stock­ holm and Berlin and have a Master in Textile Design from Konstfack in Stockholm.

What I love with Marimekko is that the human touch is always there. It gives warmth, because you immediately see how the designer has worked with their hands. It’s definitely something I have in common with Marimekko. I’m also a huge fan of how Marimekko combines strong graphical elements with organic textures. This sense of everything in combination is essential. When you combine the beautiful with the unexpected, things get more interesting.

W H AT ’ S A D E F I N I N G M O M E N T O R E N C O U N T E R I N YO U R C A R E E R AS AN ARTIST?

W H AT A R E YO U R D R E A M S F O R T H E F U T U R E ?

I want to continue working, because my work and my art are one and the same. I’m always pushing myself to be better.

When I was a child, I was really into opera. Around my 7th birthday I wanted to go and see Madama Butterfly in Stockholm. I remember wearing this black suit and black tie. My parents wanted to go in normal clothes, and I got really mad. I eventually got them to dress up. During the intermission, I met this American man, probably in his 60s, who also wore a black suit. He said to me: “There are a few of us left.” I didn’t understand what he said, but somehow that meeting even then confirmed that I was not alone in what I wanted to do.

W H AT I S YO U R B E S T T I P O R P I E C E O F A D V I C E ?

Always mix a lot – I think that’s the best thing you can ever do. Don’t listen to trends so much. In fact, I am reminded of these elderly ladies I saw wearing bold Mari­ mekko prints in Finland. I loved how they were combining prints and patterns just for themselves, no one else. I felt like telling them that there are more than few of us left. Mar tin’s favourites in Marimekko’s autumn collection:

W H AT I N S P I R E S YO U ?

A R A R AT cushion cover  T I I L I S K I V I cushion cover

Mushrooms, modern dance, space and urban activities.

O I V A / S Ä Ä P Ä I V Ä K I R J A mug

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AU T U M N 2014

V I I P U R I ( V Y B O R G) P AT T E R N D ES I G N: M A I JA LO U EK A R I , 2013 The Viipuri pattern got its name from the home town of the designer’s grandmother. The pattern’s essence is traditionally Slavic, but the forms and colours have a contemporar y twist. M A G D A L E N A dress  S A I V U fabric

M U S TA TA M M A ( B L A C K M A R E ) P AT T E R N D ES I G N: MAIJA ISO L A , 1954 Animals were par ticularly dear to Maija Isola all her life. As a little girl, she often imagined that she was running free in the woods together with a big herd of horses. H E S T I shir t  K A V A L L I trousers  S A I V U fabric

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T I I L I S K I V I ( B R I C K ) P AT T E R N D E S I G N : A R M I R AT I A , 1 9 5 2 The Tiiliskivi pattern was designed by Marimekko’s founder Armi Ratia. The pattern reflects her belief in the simple beauty of ever yday life. H Y P S dress  T E L L I S tights  T I I L I S K I V I fabric M I N A shir t  V I S T E R I skir t  S A I V U fabric

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1 0 T I K K U A (1 0 S T I C K S ) P AT T E R N D E S I G N : R E E TA E K , 2 0 1 3 The 10 tikkua pattern is the result of a coincidence. The designer was rummaging through her kitchen cupboards when she accidentally dropped a pile of cocktail sticks on the table. She then decided to scan the sticks in different arrangements. R A M A top  S T O K K E trousers  M A R I M E K K O bracelets A R P A dress  T O T E E M I fabric

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M AT S I tunic  5 0 T H A N N I V E R S A R Y U N I K K O sateen fabric

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DESIGNER

S AT U M A A R A N E N AGE 29  HOME KRUUNUNHAKA DISTRICT IN HELSINKI HOBBIES R U N N I N G I N N AT U R E A N D E X E R C I S I N G

designed a series of jersey styles in a pattern entitled Kolikko (coin) for this year’s autumn collection. In the pattern and clothing designs, I’ve focused on semicircular and circular forms and explored their intricate relationships.

W H O A R E YO U A S A D E S I G N E R ?

I’m an extremely focused designer who likes taking risks. My design work is based on contradictions in colours, patterns, dimensions and cuts. I also love working together with like-minded people. You can bounce ideas around and get incredibly helpful feedback. My design work contains references to nature, modern art and classic couture. I’m also inspired by childhood memories of my family’s summer cottage and the surrounding landscape.

W H AT D O E S C R E AT I V I T Y M E A N T O YO U ?

An engineer-like way to use your visual imagination. H O W W O U L D YO U D E S C R I B E YO U R E V E R Y D AY L I F E ?

W H AT I S YO U R R E L AT I O N S H I P W I T H M A R I M E K KO ?

Fragmented days. I’m always on the move in Helsinki during the week, meeting clients and colleagues. I also travel abroad for fittings and business meetings. I try to reserve a few days each week exclusively for design work, which I do in my studio in downtown Helsinki either in complete silence or with background music.­ A lot depends on my mood.

I’ve worked as a freelance designer for Marimekko for three and a half years now. During the first two years, I was still studying at university. I received my Master’s degree in December 2012. W H AT H AV E YO U D E S I G N E D F O R M A R I M E K KO ’ S A U T U M N 2 014 C O L L E C T I O N ? W H AT I N S P I R E D YO U ?

YO U R FAV O U R I T E P L A C E ?

Summer cottage and sauna. The clothes on the left and the page before as well as their print, Potti (jackpot), are my handiwork. I’ve also

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HOME

K I P P O (C U P ) P AT T E R N D E S I G N : V I L L E S I LV E N N O I N E N , 2 0 1 2 Kippo was inspired by piles of colourful bowls in the designer’s cupboard. K I P P O fabric  O I V A / S Ä Ä P Ä I V Ä K I R J A platter & plate  S U K AT M A K K A R A L L A tumbler T E R V A P Ä Ä S K Y, H I P P A & N E P P A R I cushion covers  K I P P O & N E P P A R I fabrics

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O I V A / S I I R T O L A P U U TA R H A plates & platter

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S I I R T O L A P U U TA R H A (C I T Y G A R D E N ) P AT T E R N DESIGN: MAIJA LO UEK ARI, 20 09 Siir tolapuutarha is Maija Louekari’s brilliant line drawing which tells a tale of a journey from a bustling city centre to an allotment garden overflowing with flowers and vegetables. S I I R T O L A P U U TA R H A tablecloth  S U K AT M A K K A R A L L A tumbler & pitcher O I V A / S I I R T O L A P U U TA R H A pitcher & jug

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J U R M O P AT T E R N D E S I G N : A I N O - M A I J A M E T S O L A , 2 0 11 Jurmo, a remote island and village in the Finnish archipelago, with its rocky shores, birds and heather moors is one of the most beautiful places Aino-Maija Metsola has ever been to. J U R M O duvet cover set TA S A R A I TA pillowcase  U T Ö & P I K K U L O K K I cushion covers  R A R A dress

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U N I K K O ( P O P P Y ) P AT T E R N D ES I G N: MAIJA ISO L A , 1964 Unikko was born in 1964 shor tly after Armi Ratia, Marimekko’s founder, had announced that Marimekko would never print a floral pattern. Maija Isola paid no heed to Armi’s decree and designed an entire collection of floral patterns in protest. One of them was Unikko. 5 0 T H A N N I V E R S A R Y U N I K K O sateen fabric  O I V A / S I I R T O L A P U U TA R H A plates  S U K AT M A K K A R A L L A tumblers  K O N K K A R O N K K A spoon

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T I I L I S K I V I fabric  E L E G I dress

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DESIGNER

SANNA ANNUKK A AGE 3 0  H O M E  B R I G H TO N , U K H O B B I E S  D O W N H I L L M O U N TA I N B I K I N G , B O U L D E R I N G , YO G A

disappear as soon as I look around. Kukkuluuruu is about these creatures coming out to surprise us and finally saying hello! The Toteemi (totem) pattern is a bold explosion of shape and colour. Rather than always creating something representational, it’s sometimes fun to make an abstract design so that the viewer can decide what it is and what it means. I think of Toteemi as a wind chime, moving in the breeze on a veranda and inspiring us to tell our own personal stories.

W H O A R E YO U A S A D E S I G N E R ?

Being a designer is about expressing the things I love – the joy and marvel of our existence and the beauty found on our Earth. Nature, heritage and folklore are key ingredients in my work. I think story telling is hugely important in design and a way of passing wisdom down the generations. W H AT I S YO U R R E L AT I O N S H I P W I T H M A R I M E K KO ?

W H AT D O E S C R E AT I V I T Y M E A N T O YO U ?

I designed my first Marimekko patterns, which were based on my favourite tales from the Finnish national epic Kalevala, in 2008. My second collection came out in 2012 and included the Vanhakaupunki (old town), Kultakero (name of a fell in Lapland) and Raanu (traditional Finnish wall hanging) designs. This autumn collection is now my third for Marimekko and perhaps my bravest to date.

It’s all about exploration and rebelling against the norm – and about telling a story. It’s also about authenticity and humanness and about reaching out to others and togetherness. H O W W O U L D YO U D E S C R I B E YO U R E V E R Y D AY L I F E ?

It’s a constant mission of balancing work and pleasure. Often I’m juggling a few projects at a time so my days are usually quite busy. However, I always try to finish by 6 pm as it’s important to wind down and have the evenings to relax and recharge.

W H AT H AV E YO U D E S I G N E D F O R M A R I M E K KO ’ S A U T U M N 2 014? W H AT I N S P I R E D YO U ?

Kukkuluuruu (peekaboo) celebrates the amazing wildlife of Finnish forests. I am obsessed with bears and great grey owls in particular. What’s hilarious is that even though so much of my work includes Nordic wildlife, rarely do I see any of these creatures when I am out in nature. I often joke that that the animals are always there, behind me, when I am walking in the forests but

YO U R FAV O U R I T E P L A C E ?

I have more than one! Other than my home being my favourite place on earth, I’ll give two that are extreme opposites: the National Pass in the Blue Mountains in Australia and Pyhä-Luosto National Park in Lapland.

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K U K K U L U U R U U & T O T E E M I fabrics S U K AT M A K K A R A L L A glass pitcher  O I V A / K U K K U L U U R U U bowl

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KIDS

N U P U T dress P I K K U H U H U L I duvet cover  P I E N E T K I V E T cushion cover  R A I T T I blocks & stacking boxes  B O B O O pillowcase

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N E L L I dress  P I T K Ä H I H A shir t

T O P P A N A jacket

H I H I T Y S leggings

A M P P A R I trousers

H E R R A shir t

J Ä N Ö shir t

R O O P E trousers

A M P P A R I trousers

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P I T K Ă„ H I H A shir t

P O M S I shir t

R O O P E trousers

R O O P E trousers

T O P P A jacket

N E I T I tunic

R O O P E trousers

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FABRIC PRINTING Deep in the heart of Marimekko’s textile printing factory in Helsinki lie two printing machines that churn out over a million metres of fabric a year. Maybe it’s Juhannustaika (Midsummer magic) today – perhaps Lumimarja (snowberr y) or Ruusupuu (rosewood) tomorrow. One of the machines is a rotary press and the other is a flatbed printing machine. Rotary printing uses a metallic cylinder to apply colours to the fabric, and it is considerably faster than flatbed printing. Yet the flatbed press has its own advantages: you can print bigger and more complicated patterns with it. When using a flatbed press, the colours are printed onto the fabric through a thin mesh that is fastened to a metallic frame. Both techniques allow 12 different colours to be included in each pattern and every colour has its own screen. About 40 employees work at the factory at different workstations: the colour kitchen, printing machines, steamer, washing machine, finishing and quality inspection. We met up with one of our expert printers, Piia Kuusinen, and talked about her job and the art of textile printing.

starting a new job. Dust tends to accumulate in the rotary cylinders and the dye paste sticks to the flatbed screens easily. To ensure the screens have no flaws, we put each screen through a thorough inspection. If there are some small holes, they are patched. Sometimes we perform a trial print for certain dyes to ensure we get the colour just right. Then the screens are fitted into the printing machine. We also make sure that there’s the right fabric in the printing machine. Thanks to our own printing notes, we know in which order colours are to be introduced and what are the best print settings for each pattern. During the print run, it may seem like the printers are just standing beside the machine. That’s misleading because they’re actually observing the fabric at all times. It´s important that the fabric is fed into the printing press correctly and that the adhesive holding the fabric in place is applied evenly without any dust. We also have to monitor the dye levels and print quality. Even when the fabric exits the dryer at the end of the print line, we’re paying close attention to quality. Throughout the print process, we are trying to spot problems and solve them as soon as possible. The threads and dust that usually come with the fabric are removed by hand. Sometimes we can change printing speed or equipment to ensure a certain quality. Once the print job is finished, the screens are removed from the printing machine and cleaned in a special washing machine. The colour pumps, colour buckets and the other equipment are also washed. Finally, the clean screens are stored, ready for the next print job.

NAME: PIIA KUUSINEN A G E : 37 JOB: PRINTER Y E A R S I N M A R I M E K KO ’ S P R I N T I N G FA C TO R Y: 4 W H AT I S YO U R O R D I N A R Y W O R K I N G D AY L I K E ?

We work mornings or evenings, depending on the week. The morning shift starts as early as 5.30 am. In the evening-shift weeks, we work a bit longer hours from Monday to Thursday. There are three workstations: the rotary printing machine, the flatbed press and the colour kitchen. Here we prepare print dyes and the adhesives that attach the fabric to the printing table. I usually work at the same workstation for one week at a time before switching to the next one. But there are exceptions.

W H AT I S T H E B I G G E S T C H A L L E N G E W H E N P R I N T I N G O N FA B R I C ?

If we’re printing a large batch of the same pattern in a certain colourway, the print run takes several hours. A print job can even last an entire shift, and staying focused can be a challenge. You have to pay attention to the smallest detail at all times.

W H AT A R E T H E D I F F E R E N T S TA G E S I N THE PRINTING PROCESS?

W H AT I S YO U R FAV O U R I T E PAT T E R N ?

Every day I have different favourites. Right now it’s Teija Puranen’s Vuohenputki (ground elder). But Marimekko fabrics are like sweets. One day I have a craving for salty liquorice and the next for marmalade.

First, the screens are washed and held up against a light to spot defects. Screens are always washed after a print job, but it’s important that we rinse them again before

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FA C T O R Y T O U R S

Would you like to see what Piia and her co-workers do with your own eyes? Just join one of our regular factory tours in Herttoniemi, Helsinki. After the tour you can enjoy coffee or lunch at our Maritori cafeteria, with food and snacks prepared by Juuri restaurant. For information about upcoming tours, visit village.marimekko.com. Becoming a member of Marimekko Village is easy – you can sign up online or in one of our stores.

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ANNA TEURNELL N E W C R E AT I V E D I R EC TO R O F M A R I M E K KO

“I love, love, love Marimekko! A colourful dress with flat sandals. A table set with a Marimekko cloth and matching napkins – my favourite. Ever since I admired my mother in her Keidaspatterned Marimekko dress a long time ago, the irresistible mix of clean, Nordic minimalism and vibrant playfulness has been present in my life. As a little girl, I would print colourful patterns with potatoes, make shoes from wood planks and fabric, and craft my own bijoux with stiff metal thread. I felt that making things with my hands was important. Today I feel more or less the same about design: design to me is about fulfilling dreams and creating things that can

empower and enlighten our lives. Just like at Marimekko, a brand with a heart. I am extremely happy to work for Marimekko and I look forward to taking the brand forward. We have a unique, timeless heritage to draw on, and I want to dig in the Marimekko archives and discover hidden gems. I also want to do new, surprising things. Together with my amazing team, we will make Marimekko even stronger and more inspiring!”

The first Marimekko collections featuring Anna Teurnell’s involvement will be launched in autumn 2015.

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50 YE AR S OF UNIKKO This year, Marimekko´s most iconic print turns 50, and we have been celebrating around the world. See what has happened via our event shots and join in by sharing your own Unikko moment with #Unikko50.

W W W. M A R I M E K KO.C O M / U N I K KO

H E L S I N K I - S E O U L- H E L S I N K I

Since October 2012, an Unikko-patterned aeroplane has been flying between Helsinki and Finnair’s destinations in Asia as a symbol of design collaboration between Marimekko and Finnair. In celebration of the 50th anniversary of Unikko, the iconic print was also featured in the passenger cabin on a special flight from Helsinki to Seoul and back.

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SY D N E Y

Marimekko’s store in Sydney threw a colourful birthday party for Unikko.

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BEIJING

Unikko added colour to the piazza in front of the Taikoo Li Sanlitun South mall in Beijing.

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H O N G KO N G

The Unikko 50th Anniversary Lounge on the go invited people to hop in and enjoy a relaxing moment surrounded by vibrant colours.


STOCKHOLM

An Unikko pop-up store delighted people in the Kungsträdgården park in Stockholm.

HELSINKI

In the heart of Helsinki, we celebrated Unikko´s 50th anniversary with a public summer fashion show held outdoors in the Esplanade Park.

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W A S H I N GT O N D C

The 50 Years of Unikko exhibition at the Embassy of Finland showcased the beloved pattern in many different forms.

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G R E E T I N G S FR O M E V E RYO N E AT M A R I M E K KO!

F O L LO W U S : facebook.com/marimekkoglobal instagram.com/marimekkoglobal instagram.com/marimekkousa instagram.com/marimekkoaustralia twitter.com/marimekkoglobal twitter.com/marimekkousa pinterest.com/marimekkoglobal youtube.com/marimekkovideo weibo.com/marimekkoofficial

J O I N M A R I M E K KO V I L L A G E ! Events, benefits, surprises. Join our customer programme Marimekko Village in a Marimekko store or online at marikyla.marimekko.com. Be among the first to hear the latest news from Marimekko!

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© MARIMEKKO OYJ SUOMI- FINL AND MAIJA ISOL A / K .I. 196 4 –2014: “UNIKKO 50 TH ANNIVERSARY”

100% CO

© MARIMEKKO OYJ SUOMI- FINL AND MAIJA ISOL A / K .I. 196 4 –2014: “UNIKKO 50 TH ANNIVERSARY”

100% CO

080500, 002

W W W.MARIMEKKO.COM

Marimekko paper autumn 2014  
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