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Resolution Booklet 2nd Regional Session of EYP Norway 7th of February 2014


PROCEDURES OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 1. General Rules o The wish to speak during the General Assembly (GA) is indicated by raising the Committee Placard with the abbreviation of the Committee’s name (e.g. the Committee on Foreign Affairs I – AFET I). o The authority of the Board is absolute; the Board consists of the President and one Vice-President.

2. Procedure and time settings o Reading out the topic phrase by the Board o Reading of the Operative Clauses (OCs) by a Delegate of the Proposing Committee (DPC) o Defense Speech - 3 minutes for a DPC to defend the Motion for a Resolution o Attack Speech - 3 minutes for a member of any other committee to attack the Motion for a Resolution o Response to Attack Speech – 1 minute Carried out by DPC from the Assembly floor o Points of information – by raising the Committee Placard and the Point of Information placard. o General debate – the main debate, several rounds with points of debate from all Committees. o Summation Speech - 3 minutes to sum-up the debate, by one or two DPCs, they can pass the microphone once. o Voting procedure – the Board decides how this is done. Often by show of hands.

3. Other o Point of information - Request for a brief explanation of the meaning of specific words and abbreviations. Note that translations are not points of information. o Special placards, only for during the general debate:  Point of Personal Privilege - Request for a delegate to repeat a point that was inaudible.  Point of Order - A delegate feels that the board has not properly followed parliamentary procedure. This placard should be used very carefully and only when absolutely necessary, it is an emergency placard.  Direct Response:  The Direct Response sign is used to contribute to the point made directly beforehand.  Each committee may use the Direct Response sign twice per debate.  Should a committee member raise the Committee Placard and the Direct Response sign, the board recognises them immediately.


Program for General Assembly 11:00 Opening of General Assembly (GA) 11:05 Committee on Foreign Affairs II (AFET II) 11:45 Committee on Constitutional Affairs (AFCO) 12:30 Lunch Break 13:00 Committee on Foreign Affairs I (AFET I) 13:45 Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) 14:30 Closing Ceremony

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2 3 4

Bergen, 7th February, 2014

MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION BY THE COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS II Euromaidan - Ukraine is at the centre of a power struggle between the East and the West. After resigning negotiations with the EU last minute - what started as a roar for closer contact with Europe led to a demand for civil rights. As a response the Government implemented laws violating the very rights Ukrainian citizens are fighting for in an attempt to restrain the riots. By some being criticized for lack of action, how should the EU and the European states react when a state turns on its own citizens?

Submitted by:

Hans Eirik Gabrielsen Opsahl, Narve Nilssen, Eva Elise Tvedt, Lars Kieni (Chairperson, CH), and Peter Pรถlzleithner (Chairperson, AT).

The European Youth Parliament, A. Deeply concerned about the Ukrainian Government's abuse of power against its own citizens by: i)

conducting violence and torture against its citizens,

ii) temporarily implementing anti-demonstration laws, iii) imprisoning individuals due to opposing political views, most notably former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, B. Observing that the Ukraine is torn between economic reliance on Russia, and aspirations of growing ties to Europe, C. Recalling that the Ukrainian Government decided to abandon the planned Association Agreement with the EU, consequently causing the public riots to erupt, D. Bearing in mind the fact that the President of Ukraine, Viktor Yanukovych, was elected on democratic terms, E. Further noting that the President's legitimacy is questionable Error! Bookmark not defined.given the current circumstances, F.

Condemns violations of the human rights in any European States;

G. 1.

Encourages the European Parliament to place neutral observers in the Ukraine to constantly assess the political situation;

2.

Urges Russian and EU diplomats to establish a dialogue between the Ukrainian Government and the protestors;


3.

Endorses President Yanukovych’s offer of call for new elections one year prior to the end of his term, and as soon as political stability is achieved;

4.

Calls upon all political parties to work upon achieving a three-way agreement involving Russia, the EU and the Ukraine.


5 6 7

Bergen, 7th February, 2014

MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION BY THE COMMITTEE ON CONSTITUTIONAL AFFAIRS Celebrating the 200th anniversary of the Norwegian constitution: What measures should be made in order to make the constitution applicable for the 21th century, and how can its survival and relevancy be ensured for the next 200 years?

Submitted by:

Una Queenly Vaagen Frimannslund, Rolf Eirik Leonhard Sørensen, Eira Vilde Martinsen Garrido, Peivend Ghayori, Karl Jakob Kammler (Chairperson, DE), and Eloise Bodin (VicePresident, FR).

The European Youth Parliament, A. Recalling that the constitution is not written in none of the two official Norwegian written languages, Nynorsk or Bokmål, B. Deeply concerned that the language has barely been updated since 1903 thus: i)

making it difficult for citizens to understand,

ii) hindering citizens to be fully aware of their rights, C. Observes that the constitution hardly reflects the development of the society in the past 200 years, D. Keeping in mind that the constitution is not yet recognising that Norway is a multicultural society, E. Reaffirming the importance of human rights and the necessity to strengthen them in the Norwegian constitution, F.

Troubled by the lack of influence the citizens has had, and have on the development of the constitution,

G. Noting with deep regret that the constitution gives a misleading impression of the todays function of the Monarch; H. 1.

1

Calls upon the Norwegian Parliament to accept the modernization proposal of the Norwegian constitution by the Constitutional Language Commission 1 (CLC), both for ‘Bokmål’ and ‘Nynorsk’;

The Norwegians Parliament’s presidency established the Constitutional Language Commission on the 21th of May 2012 with the mandate to ”compose new, linguistically updated versions of the Norwegian Constitution in contemporary Bokmål and Nynorsk.” The report was submitted on the 17th of September 2012.


2.

Authorises the CLC to make necessary adjustments to the language of the constitution every 10 years;

3.

Encourages the Norwegian Parliament to include an article in the constitution stating that Norway is a multicultural country;

4.

Calls upon Norwegian politicians to set constitutional questions on the political agenda prior to elections and thus enhance the possibility for citizens to influence it's development;

5.

Urges the Norwegian Parliament to explicitly incorporate certain human rights into the constitution;

6.

Further recommends that the constitution should state that the Monarch only has a symbolic value, removing the paragraphs that give the monarch power.

5.


8 9 10 Bergen, 7th February, 2014

MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION BY THE COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS I While Syria’s Bashar al-Assad agreed to disclose and destroy their chemical weapons stockpiles, the conflict rages on killing scores of civilians and soldiers alike. What foreign policy should Norway and Europe employ in order to safeguard the lives of innocent civilians on the ground in Syria?

Submitted by:

Kristine Heimli, Martin Nilssen Blytt, Sofie Othilia Ngo, Petter Wilhelmsen, Kristin Verpe (Chairperson, NO), and Martin Ellingsen (President, NO).

The European Youth Parliament, A. Deeply disturbed by the Syrian Government’s use of violence causing great suffering to the Syrian population, B. Concerned by the lack of political agreement in Syria: i)

between the Government and the Opposition,

ii) within the Opposition itself, C. Alarmed by the fact that the need of humanitarian supplies have not been met, D. Deeply conscious of the continuing violation by both the government, and oppositions forces, of international law and human rights, E. Aware of the difficulties to reach a political agreement on Syria within the United Nations Security Council;

1.

2.

Calls upon the protection of the Syrian civilians by: a)

condemning the violence used against them,

b)

demanding an immediate ceasefire;

Endorses the existing restrictive measures implemented by the EU against Syria;


3.

Congratulates the UN on the Geneva II 2 conference;

4.

Further encourages all involved parties to keep working towards a comprehensive agreement for a political settlement in Syria;

5.

Calls for European states to ensure full humanitarian assistance and supplies by: a)

increasing the economic support,

b)

putting pressure on the Syrian government to ensure there distribution to all parts of the country;

6.

Demands that those responsible of war crimes are to be held legally accountable;

7.

Calls upon the Norwegian government to encourage the UN to agree on a common approach in order to solve the conflict.

2

UN-backed peace conference on Syria, bringing together representatives from both the government and the opposition


11 12 13 Bergen, 7th February, 2014

MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION BY THE COMMITTEE ON ENVIRONMENT, PUBLIC HEALTH AND FOOD SAFETY Climate Change - Often heralded as the most important policy issue of our times, progress on an international framework has stalled. Should the current Norwegian Government continue the broad international approach at the risk of getting no comprehensive deal at all, or should a bilateral or regionally-based approach be used, with the risk of making those states less competitive?

Submitted by:

Ida Liset Anderssen, Gard Aasmund Skulstad Johanson, Ingvild Nord Waage, Nora Mork Østbø, Mari Vetti Frostad (Chairperson, NO), and Christopher Nölte (Chairperson, DE)

The European Youth Parliament, A. Recognising that countries have different economic interests and approaches to climate change, making productive agreements harder to establish, B. Fully aware of the fact that CO 2 emissions are a problem that will exponentially increase global warming, C. Emphasising that restricting the usage of natural resources in countries, such as Norway, could limit their economic competitiveness, D. Keeping in mind that environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil energy sources are less efficient and more expensive, E. Noting with deep concern that agreements between countries that include strict regulations on polluting industries such as coal and oil will lead to a loss of workplaces, F.

Approving the EU as an symbolic authority and a leading actor in the struggle against climate change,

G. Expresses satisfaction with existing climate frameworks, such as the 20-20-20-targets1;


I. 1.

Urges the EU to bear the responsibility to monitor its Member States that are not keeping their part of the CO 2 emission reduction;

2.

Calls upon bilateral agreements between countries who cooperate economically and have similar fiscal policies;

3.

Requests that the EU enforces economic sanctions over MemberSstates who do not reach their designated targets, at the same time rewarding 3 the states that reach the goals;

4.

Calls for additional economical punishment for the violation of international binding climate agreements, such as ‘The 2015 International Agreement’ and the ‘Kyoto Protocol’;

5.

Encourages the agreements subsidising environmentally friendly energy sources in countries which base their economy on polluting industry, in order to establish a beneficial alternative to fossil fuels;

6.

Believing that sustainable economic cooperation could be made by redirecting money gathered through fees collected on surplus CO 2 emissions, and using them towards subsidising environmentally friendly power sources;

7.

Calls for the UN to obtain a stronger position as a climate authority by establishing a controlling department within the UN to ensure binding climate agreements are being followed.

6. 7.

8.

3

The targets have been set in 2007 by the EU. There are three key objectives to reach until 2020:, a 20% reduction in EU greenhouse gas emissions from 1990 levels, raising the share of EU energy consumption produced from renewable resources to 20%, a 20% improvement in the EU's energy efficiency.

Resolution Booklet Bergen  

The resolutions of the 2nd Regional Session of EYP Norway, Bergen 2014

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