Issuu on Google+

2010 Annual Report 2011-2012 Calendar


Letter from the Chair My involvement with Marie Stopes for the past two years, from a personal perspective, has been a privilege. I was elected to Chair of the Board in 2010 - a role I find very rewarding. I am constantly reminded of the dire need for our work and all the women we must help to give them more choice and a better quality of life. The longevity and credibility of Marie Stopes - its people focussed and supportive values, are commendable. The healthcare services, information and education can reach and save so many lives. Innovation, such as social franchising and paramedicalisation is at the heart of how Marie Stopes services are delivered and is the reason they have such an impact across the areas they work. To have great impact, Marie Stopes must have great governance. I am dedicated to ensuring the organisation remains robust across all critical areas. We want to see an organisation that is able to realise its vision with full compliance. The past year has seen some changes. Elle Cox, Dr Bolormaa Dashdavaa and Dr Alison McIntosh retired from the board and I thank them for their passion and commitment. We then welcomed Dr Yasmin Ahmed, Rachel Molloy and Virgilio Pernito. Their wealth and variety of experience will be invaluable guidance and counsel for us in the years to come.

At a strategic level, 2010 was significant for Marie Stopes. It closed the chapter on our 2006 – 2010 global strategy to be The Biggest, The Best, The Most Sustainable – a strategy which provided nearly seven million people worldwide with sexual and reproductive healthcare services every year. Our new 2011 – 2015 strategy, The Power of Ten, launched at the end of 2010, will see us aim even higher. For example, one goal is to achieve a 10-point increase in the number of women using contraception in 20 key countries. The Power of Ten also sees Marie Stopes committing to 10 million fewer unsafe abortions around the world. See page 15 for an insight into this vital goal. 2015 is also the deadline for the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. Goal Five: Improve Maternal Health is a driving force for our work. This goal has seen the least improvement to date but is crucial to achieving other goals associated with hunger, lack of education and extreme poverty. If the goals and targets set within our own strategy appear challenging, you are right. But with every life that is changed because of access to family planning, it is a life potentially saved. Every life is an important milestone in our work and it is very satisfying to be given the opportunity to play a part.

Glenyce Johnson Chair, Marie Stopes International Australia Board


Letter from the CEO Sexual and reproductive health is an amazing field to work in, yet there’s no denying it’s often a tricky subject. It is a sector which is too often shrouded in layers of stigma, taboo and subjects that can be deeply personal. This can make it difficult for people to understand family planning and its power. The challenge, of communicating our work and engaging with supporters, partners and allies among the Australian public, corporate and the not-for-profit sectors applies equally to our development work overseas and our sexual and reproductive healthcare services in Australia. I recognise the need for our sector to be better understood and less stigmatised. People understand the physical aspects of family planning in that it is designed to help control fertility and birth spacing. What is less easily understood is the real impact of family planning and the dramatic impact it can have on a women’s quality of life for such a low monetary investment. This publication goes some way in communicating these topics. To read about the greater potential and power of family planning in aid and development turn to page 6. In 2011, to further raise awareness of family planning in Australia we are launching new individual giving and community engagement activities.

Letter from the Regional Director This year saw a greater connection between our international programs and centres, with the income generated in Australia being donated to the Philippines program. I’m so moved to know the women we help here are helping mothers in developing countries. People often ask me what’s the one thing they can do to help. The simplest thing we can all do is to talk about it – to have conversations about family planning. To remain silent about the topic, is to reinforce the stigma associated with it.

Put simply, family planning saves lives. Last year, we estimate that Marie Stopes’ work saved the lives of more than 13,000 women worldwide. How? Two juxtaposed statistics explain it. Every year, 350,000 women die from pregnancy and childbirth related causes. Yet there are 215 million women around the world who want to use contraception but cannot access it. If we could meet this need for family planning and pregnancy related care, we would reduce maternal deaths by 70 per cent.

The key to bringing sexual and reproductive health into the public consciousness actually lies within all of us. We have the power to create change and it’s a simple solution. It’s the power of our voice.

In broader terms, family planning can give families the economic means to take themselves out of poverty, to feed and educate their children and to empower women in society. Turn to page 11 for more information.

Let’s start the conversation.

In Timor-Leste, we have more than doubled our program, reaching 33,500 clients. Most live in isolated, rural communities and are unable to reach existing services due to distance or cost.

Maria Deveson Crabbe Chief Executive Officer

Our Philippines program also continues apace. In particular, our social franchise business, BlueStar, which is engaging existing local midwives and providing training, capacity building and support (see page 23). Marie Stopes aims to have the greatest impact on the greatest number of people. In 2010, we investigated the need for our work in Indonesia, a

country with a population of nearly 230 million people and are now building a program there. We also made tough decisions. In the Pacific Islands, we closed down a program. In my first year at Marie Stopes, I have been very impressed by the way our impact is measured and analysed. Our ‘Impact Calculator’ uses modelling to tell us how many maternal deaths were prevented or how much money was brought into households, to name just a few. See page 5 for our 2010 results. In order for us to achieve all of this, our donors are vital. Institutional and bilateral donors, Marie Stopes’ Australian clinics and individual Australians who give from their own pockets have embraced our work and I thank them deeply. Reducing maternal deaths remains one of the most difficult of the Millennium Development Goals to achieve. Women – mothers, sisters, aunties - continue to die tragically and unnecessarily. Together, we can and must do better to honour Australia’s global commitment.

Liz Sime Regional Director


What We Do Why We Help Everyday, around the world, nearly one thousand women die from pregnancy related causes. Most of these deaths could be prevented with a simple, cost-effective solution which would give women the freedom of choice over their fertility – it is family planning.

Who We Are The Marie Stopes International Global Partnership is a network of country programs that directly deliver sexual and reproductive healthcare to underserved communities in more than 40 countries. We operate 627 clinics and thousands of outreach services, with nearly 7500 team members of mostly local staff. We also support 1300 private healthcare providers through social franchising. Marie Stopes International Australia plays an active role in the Global Partnership. In Australia, we have a special focus on the Asia Pacific region and support these country programs in delivering life-saving services and education.

Our Approach

• Charging clients, who can afford it, a small fee for our services - enabling us to subsidise those who cannot afford to pay and giving our programs long-term sustainability • Using a paramedical approach - training nurses, midwives and other health professionals to undertake small-scale procedures which makes our services more available when doctors are not • Working closely with local and national governments to ensure the unique needs of communities are properly understood

Vision A world in which every birth is wanted.

Mission Children by choice not chance.

Our Strategy and Goals At the end of 2010, we launched our 2011 – 2015 global strategy, ‘The Power of Ten’.

Marie Stopes is able to reach underserved communities because of our unique business model and innovative methods. We have the greatest impact by:

It aims to make the biggest contribution to the achievement of Millennium Development Goal Five: Improve Maternal Health.

• Reaching those that really need it - by foot, bike, car or boat – and not waiting for them to come to us

For the first time, our strategy sets mission-level goals which are:

• Creating catalytic delivery models, such as social franchising, to reach into communities through existing healthcare services and local networks

• A 10 point increase in country-level contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) for 20 key countries

• 10 million fewer unsafe abortions globally by 2015

Accreditation Marie Stopes International Australia is a fully accredited, non-government organisation with AusAID, Australia’s government aid program. For more information, go to www.ausaid.gov.au. As a signatory of the Australian Council for International Development (ACFID) Code of Conduct, we are committed to high standards in financial reporting, management and ethical practice. Information on the Code and its complaints handling procedure is available at www.acfid.asn.au.


Where We Work

Marie Stopes International Global Partnership

In 2010 Our Work had the Estimated Impact of Averting:

Unintended pregnancies

Abortions

And Saving:

Maternal deaths

Years of productive life lost to mortality or disability

In healthcare spend (AUD)

5


FAMILY PLANNING

SEXUAL & REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH

HUMAN RIGHTS REALISED

POVERTY ALLEVIATED

JULY 2011

LIVES SAVED

WOMEN EMPOWERED

DEVELOPMENT SUSTAINED


THE POWER OF CHOICE sun mon

tue

wed

thu

fri

31

sat 1

3

4

5

6

7

8

2

9

Family planning and pregnancy related care has the power to prevent 70 per cent of deaths related to pregnancy and childbirth which claim the lives of 1000 mothers every day across the globe1 There are 215 million women in the world who want to use family planning but cannot access it. If they could, hundreds of thousands of lives would be saved. When given choice, it is a fact that women tend to have smaller families. Smaller families mean everyone is fed, children are educated and healthcare becomes more affordable. Put simply, choice is a key strategy to ending poverty.

NAIDOC Week (AUS)

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

19

20

21

22

23

World Population Day

17

24

18

25

26

27

28

29

30

Spiralling fertility rates and population growth affect communities in many ways. From limited availability of food to accessing education and employment by women and girls – family planning is a solution to achieving sustainable development. Fertility control empowers women. It provides greater opportunities to work and learn, elevating the position of women in their communities and promoting gender-balanced decision making. Being able to choose how many children to have and the timing of your family is a basic human right. The icons in the family planning model (above) are displayed throughout this report to remind us of the power of family planning and its potential to save and change lives.

www.mariestopes.org.au

7


AUGUST 2011


CONTRACEPTION: THE SIMPLEST SOLUTION sun mon 30

tue

1

wed 2

3

thu

fri

Access to family planning and safe sex saves lives

sat

4

5

6

When a woman is able to choose the timing and size of her family, it not only reduces the risk of her own death but also of complications which can impact on her baby’s health. In Papua New Guinea (PNG), one woman in 270 dies as a result of pregnancy or childbirth. In Australia, it is one woman in 25,000 who suffers from a pregnancy related death.6

7

14

21

28

8

15

22

29

International Day of the World’s Indigenous People

9

16

23

30

10

11

12

13

International Youth Day

17

24

31

18

25

30

19

26

30

20

May is the first daughter of the tribal chief in a PNG village. As she will inherit her tribal land, May is encouraged to have a large family of at least six children with as many sons as possible. At 27, May and her husband have four children, born in as many years. Their fifth and sixth died in infancy causing May’s family to speculate on traditional superstitions such as curses on her fertility.

27

Many women in PNG grow up with the belief that family planning methods are irreversible and permanently prevent births. But one of May’s aunties had used contraception and sent her to see a Marie Stopes nurse for a check-up and advice.

30

Marie Stopes nurse, Agnes, explained how a mother’s body needs to fully recover after giving birth. She advised May to take a year’s rest before considering another child. May decided to use contraceptive injections to space her pregnancies. Two years later, she gave birth to another healthy baby boy. Information and access to contraception for women like May means they can significantly reduce their risk of being among the 350,000 who die each year during pregnancy or childbirth.

www.mariestopes.org.au

9


SEPTEMBER 2011


FAMILY PLANNING TO REDUCE POVERTY sun mon 30

1

4

5

tue

wed 2

6

3

7

thu

fri 1

8

A family’s economic potential is limited by frequent or complicated pregnancies and childbirth, unsafe abortion, HIV/ AIDS and sexually transmitted infections

sat 2

9

3

10

Being able to use contraception often may determine whether or not families can feed and educate all of their children. Denita is a 38 year old Filipino woman from a farming family. She has seven children - three of whom are still very young. Like most parents, Denita and her husband want their children to have proper education, food, shelter and good health.

Father’s Day (AUS)

11

12

18

19

25

26 World Contraception Day

www.mariestopes.org.au

13

20

27

14

21

28

15

22

29

16

23

30

17

24

30

Denita is planning a tubal ligation because during her most recent birth, doctors advised another pregnancy could kill her. “Right now”, she says, “it is very hard to live”. But Denita is looking forward to a better future with family planing because she will be able to work on the farm and help earn money to support her family. “It will change my life… because I can help my husband to sell coconuts and bananas,” she says. Regardless of where a woman happens to live, being able to choose when and how often she has children, can decrease pregnancy complications and increase her economic potential through work or education. A woman giving birth to a baby almost every year, has little opportunity for either. Contraception gives women like Denita the opportunity for economic and social participation. 11


OCTOBER 2011


SAVING MOTHERS’ LIVES Ninety-nine per cent of all maternalrelated mortality, illness and injury occurs in developing countries3

sun mon 30

31

tue

wed 2

3

thu

fri

sat

1

2

1

“To save mothers, is to save the future.” These words - spoken by the senior midwife in the remote, mountainous village of Bwindi in south-western Uganda - depict the stark reality and complexity of maternal health in developing countries. Delays in reaching medical care are a major contributor to maternal deaths, as many women must travel long distances. Elizabeth Babadda knows this only too well.

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Labour Day (ACT, SA & NSW)

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

“It’s really frustrating to see a baby dying, and it is so bad if the mother dies during the process,” the senior midwife says. In the operating theatre at Bwindi Community Hospital where Melanie is being treated for urgent complications, the tension is palpable. The mother watches on as the seemingly lifeless body of her baby is taken and attended to by medical staff. The reassuring words of the midwife saying, “baby’s okay” and the cry of her healthy, newborn girl instantly affirms the best possible result for mother and child.

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

25

26

27

28

29

International Day for the Eradication of Poverty

23

24

Queen’s Birthday (WA)

www.mariestopes.org.au

In the next cot is a baby orphan. Only a few metres separates these babies yet their futures could not be further apart. Rosetti will grow up without his mother, who died giving birth. As a consequence, evidence shows he is 10 times less likely to make it to five years old. Health risks increase in pregnancies that are at a very young or very old reproductive age. Risks also increase if pregnancies are numerous and close together. Reducing these risks through family planning can save mothers’ lives. 13


NOVEMBER 2011


A WORLD WITHOUT UNSAFE ABORTION sun mon 30

31

tue

wed 1

2

thu

fri 3

sat 4

5

If there is to be a world without unsafe abortion, women must be able to prevent unintended pregnancies.

Melbourne Cup Day (VIC)

6

13

7

14

8

15

Every hour, every day, five mothers will die from an unsafe abortion. Another 2000 women will be left with illness, injury or permanent disability2

9

16

10

17

11

18

12

19

Desperation drives women to submit themselves to unsafe abortions. Dafina from Tanzania gives a confronting insight into women facing the predicament of an unintended pregnancy with no access to safe, quality abortion services. “The first method I used was the leaves of a bush plant mixed with ground rocks which I inserted into my uterus, but there was no sign of the pregnancy being terminated.” Dafina says. “Next I tried to use the branch of the bush plant, which I inserted…after 15 minutes of waiting the blood started to come.

20

21

22

23

24

Universal Children’s Day

27

28

29

30

27

25

International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women

28

26

“The second abortion happened this year. This time I tried a mixture of melted sugar mixed with beer which didn’t work. “So then I ground up 10 pain killers with strong local alcohol and drank it…but still it didn’t work.

29

“Finally I tried a mixture of ground glass with sea water and detergent which I inserted into my uterus. “Finally, the pregnancy terminated. “This time the bleeding wouldn’t stop…I bled for more than five days.”

www.mariestopes.org.au

15


DECEMBER 2011


ISOLATION AND DISTANCE sun mon 30

tue

31

wed 1

2

thu

fri 1

The poorest and most disadvantaged communities are often not in urban areas

sat 2

3

Marie Stopes provides education and family planning services in rural village halls, huts, churches and even tents if there is no other suitable venue.

World AIDS Day

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 Human Rights Day

11

12

18

19

13

20

14

21

15

22

16

23

17

24

Christmas Day

26 Boxing Day (Christmas Public Holiday)

www.mariestopes.org.au

27 Boxing Day Public Holiday

Mobile midwife, Fernanda, works in remote villages in Timor-Leste, up to eight hours from the capital of Dili. She speaks of the immediate health risks endured by women with a lack of family planning options available. “There was a lady... she started bleeding. She was four months pregnant with her 13th child,” Fernanda says. The woman had been pushed in a cart by her husband to the closest health facility. When they finally made it, there was no midwife or doctor to treat her. “Fortunately, we had just arrived on outreach,” Fernanda said. “She had lost a lot of blood and was only semi-conscious. “We were able to provide emergency treatment and afterwards a family planning consultation.

International Human Solidarity Day

25

Isolation compounds sexual and reproductive health risks. Women often cannot make the long journeys or bear the costs involved in going to a town to access services.

28

29

30

31

New Year’s Eve

“They felt 12 children was enough and wanted to use family planning, so, I provided her with an IUD,” she said “So, no more children.” Not only was her life saved, but the woman and her husband were able to return home to their 12 children without the worry and uncertainty of another dangerous pregnancy or miscarriage. 17


JANUARY 2012


UNLOCKING HALF THE WORLD’S POTENTIAL Access to family planning contributes to increased gender equality by giving women control of their fertility

sun mon

tue

wed 3

thu

4

5

fri

“Hey sista - education is the key... put your mind to the book and learn... so you will get to play a part in society.”

sat

1

2

6

7

New Year’s Day

New Year’s Day Public Holiday

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

So begins the chorus of one of the hit songs by Sierra Leonean pop star, Lady Felicia. The self-styled princess of pop has captured the hearts and minds of young girls across Sierra Leone using her music to send a simple message: “Children don’t give birth to children”. “I use music as a tool to reach people,” says Lady Felicia. “So, ‘Teenage Pregnancy’ was just one song that I put together so the little girls out there can really relate to it and see themselves in it.” Lady Felicia recognises maternal mortality is preventing young women from realising their potential. “We have lost so many lives,” she says. “I would love to see leaders and people around the world advance the status of women in our society.”

22

23

24

25

Chinese New Year - Year of the Dragon

29

30

26

27

28

Australia Day

31

28

29

30

31

As more women like Lady Felicia speak out about female empowerment and how closely it is linked to family planning, more women will be compelled to seek out solutions. Publicly talking about family planning is one of the methods Marie Stopes uses to break down traditional roles and give women opportunities previously not available to them.

Visit www.makewomenmatter.org to see our interview with Lady Felicia

www.mariestopes.org.au

19


FEBRUARY 2012


LIFE-SAVING SEXUAL HEALTH EDUCATION There are 33.3 million people living with HIV4

sun mon 1

2

5

6

tue

wed 3

7

1

8

thu 2

9

fri

Education, condoms, voluntary testing and counselling. These simple well known interventions remain at the heart of preventing HIV transmission.

sat 3

10

4

11

These simple facts are highlighted by Joe’s story. At 16, Joe was a rising volleyball sports star in his community. He was selected to play in one of the national Papua New Guinean volleyball teams. All participants were required to undergo a full medical check-up, including screening for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) as well as voluntary HIV/AIDS testing and counselling. While attending the Marie Stopes Centre for testing, Joe met nurse Agnes who reinforced the importance of practicing safe sex and told him the good news that all of his tests were negative.

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

Valentine’s Day

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

International Day of Social Justice

26

27

28

29

29

30

31

Unsurprisingly, Joe became very popular with girls from the village. One in particular, Vero, caught his eye and they soon began a sexual relationship. Joe left for Australia for a volleyball tournament and on his return a month later he discovered that Vero was very ill with what was thought to be tuberculosis. However, blood tests soon confirmed Vero had HIV. Joe’s world was turned upside down as he was suddenly faced with the prospect of HIV and not knowing if he had a future. In his distress he contemplated suicide but instead summoned the courage to go back to nurse Agnes. When he discovered his status was still negative, Joe cried with joy and relief. Thanks to Anges’ advice, Joe had always used a condom when having sex with Vero. That decision may have saved his life.

www.mariestopes.org.au

21


MARCH 2012


INNOVATION FOR IMPACT Social franchising is at the forefront of innovating for impact

sun mon 1

2

tue

wed 3

thu

1

fri 1

sat 2

3

Social franchising is revolutionising the way Marie Stopes reaches into communities to save and change lives. Existing private healthcare providers are mobilised to work at the community level under the trusted brand of the social franchise. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the Philippines where midwives and health workers are enlisted and up-skilled to be Marie Stopes ‘BlueStar’ midwives.

4

5

6

7

Labour Day (WA)

11

25

www.mariestopes.org.au

9

10

International Women’s Day

Cardela has been a midwife in Manilla for 11 years and now works as a BlueStar midwife.

12

13

14

15

16

17

19

20

21

22

23

24

Labour Day (VIC), Adelaide Cup Day (SA), Eight Hours Day (TAS)

18

8

26

27

28

29

Thanks to BlueStar, Filipino women are more comfortable in receiving more accessible sexual and reproductive health advice from trained local people. Midwives also are better able to build sustainable businesses to support themselves while helping their communities.

30

31

“I’m happy to become a BlueStar midwife,” she says. “I am known here in our community not just as a midwife but a well-trained midwife with knowledge in family planning so they seek my advice.” Thanks to her involvement in BlueStar says Cardela, “I have the equipment, I have the supplies, I have the technical knowledge. They really trust me when it comes to family planning and deliveries.” Without the innovation of using existing suppliers to increase family planning usage, many mothers would continue to be at risk. “So many pregnant mothers, they don’t know about the high risks so they continue to have babies,” Cardela says “Right now mothers have more time to take care of themselves and spacing births between pregnancies promotes good health.” 23


APRIL 2012


MORE YOUNG THAN EVER BEFORE In the world right now, there are more young people than ever before

sun mon 1

2

tue

wed 3

4

thu

fri

sat

5

6

Good Friday

8

9

10

11

12

Imagine growing up in a community where young people are three times more likely to contract a sexually transmitted infection and teenagers are four times more likely to become pregnant.5

13

Now, imagine that community is in Australia.

7 Easter Saturday World Health Day

14

Sexual and reproductive health are shameful subjects in many places around the world, including Aboriginal communities throughout Australia. “...these young girls are only 13 or 14 when they’re having their babies. They’re just too young,” says Desley Tamiano, a senior youth worker in Danila Dilba, just outside of Darwin. “Having a child is a huge responsibility for an adult let alone for a teenager. I come across that quite a bit. It would be good to try and not come across it quite so much I suppose,” she said.

Easter Monday

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

Reducing the stigma is essential to equipping young people with the knowledge and resources to take control of their own sexual and reproductive health and empower their lives. That’s where SNAKE Condoms comes into the equation. SNAKE is Australia’s first and only indigenousfriendly, socially-marketed condom brand. Community health and youth workers, such as Desley, use SNAKE as a tool to engage with young people about the importance of safe sex as well as other life skills.

29

www.mariestopes.org.au

30

27

28

29

30

31

SNAKEfest community events and sexual health workshops are also helping young people to make the right choices. “I’d like to see SNAKEfest and the SNAKE Condom promotions, in whatever form they take, right across the country. It should be in every indigenous community,” Desley said. 25


MAY 2012


WHAT NO WOMAN SHOULD SUFFER sun mon 1

2

tue

wed 1

2

thu

fri 3

sat 4

5

At least one in three women globally has been physically or sexually abused at some time in her life Gender-based violence can take on many forms; sexual abuse, physical violence, emotional, psychological or verbal abuse and withholding of income or money.

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Labour Day (QLD & NT)

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

The reality of gender-based violence is that it can pervade a woman’s entire life. It continues the cycle of gender inequality and often puts a woman’s life at risk. In an emergency, such as a natural disaster or armed conflict, the risk of gender-based violence, especially sexual violence is heightened. In Myanmar, after cyclone Nargis, Marie Stopes conducted extensive gender-based violence training with our staff. The team was taught how to identify genderbased violence and how it is so often closely aligned with a woman’s sexual and reproductive health.

20

27

21

28

22

29

23

30

24

31

25

30

26

31

Six community counsellors were employed to give education and advice to the community. One team member noticed the effect of the training on the people they counselled. “We provided counselling to one man from the community. Before he was angry and agitated, but it changed him and he became different, calm – afterwards his whole family thanked us for helping him,” she recalled. Open discussion and education is key to breaking the cycle of gender-based violence.

www.mariestopes.org.au

27


JUNE 2012


MDG FIVE: IMPROVE MATERNAL HEALTH sun mon 1

2

3

4

tue

wed 1

5

2

6

thu

fri 3

7

2

Unless every woman who wants it can access family planning, United Nations’ Millennium Development Goal Five: Improve Maternal Health will never be met

9

Alice Oppen, Trustee of Women’s Plans Foundation, is one of the many donors to Marie Stopes who strongly believes supporting family planning can improve maternal health and change lives. “All women must be able to manage fertility so we can become part of the world’s decision-making process,” she says.

sat 1

8

Ms Oppen also highlights the greater potential of family planning: “In some developing countries, there is still a cultural assumption that a woman’s identity is all about childbearing and serving.”

Foundation Day (WA)

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

Queen’s Birthday (All states except WA)

17

24

18

25

19

26

20

27

21

28

22

29

23

30

“But we see that where health and education reach into areas of poverty, women can space births, survival rates improve and health costs go down.” Program funding to increase contraceptive usage or family planning options can have a direct impact on Millennium Development Goal Five. “[it allows] women to recover their health between pregnancies and maternal and infant mortality rates improve with birth spacing and choice of family size,” Ms Oppen says. She says that’s why “Women’s Plans Foundation supports Marie Stopes because donations can be targeted for contraception for the women who want and need it most.” At Marie Stopes we aim to work closely with our donors to help them have an impact on maternal health and achieving Goal Five.

www.mariestopes.org.au

29


2010 Country Achievements Asia Pacific Results had the Estimated Impact of: couples provided with a year’s worth of contraceptive protection

pregnancies averted

unsafe abortions averted

And Saving: maternal lives saved

Australian Indigenous

China

SNAKE Condoms is Australia’s first socially-marketed condom for young indigenous people. Since inception, SNAKE Condoms has grown to be nationally distributed with a sexual health education program aimed at reducing STIs and unintended teenage pregnancy in indigenous communities.

In 2010, the Australian Indigenous Program:

Since 2000, Marie Stopes has opened five sexual health centres. Called You&Me, the centres provide much needed services to at-risk groups such as unmarried young people, migrant populations and people living with HIV/AIDS. Each centre provides voluntary, confidential, high quality sexual and reproductive healthcare services as well as medical and surgical abortion services.

• Provided more than 150,000 SNAKE condoms

In 2010, Marie Stopes in China:

• Held two SNAKEfests reaching at least 400 people

• Trained 30 HIV positive volunteers through the Positive Talks project to speak to young people, government employees, hospital staff and media about HIV prevention, conducting more than 630 sessions reaching 45,000 people

• Distributed a SNAKE Yarns Newsletter reaching 250 communities with the latest sexual health news • Increased sales of t-shirts, hats and arm bands promoting safe sex messages in the community by 209 per cent on previous year

Looking Forward the Program Aims to: • Hold a sexual health and rights forum for 35 young indigenous women in Melbourne • Expand SNAKE Condoms into very isolated communities in Central Australia

• Held an art exhibition featuring HIV positive people in their homes to help reduce the stigma towards those living with HIV/AIDS • Trained 60 young people in sexual and reproductive healthcare leadership through football and art initiatives, reaching more than 150,000 young people • Conducted an intervention project to educate men who have sex with men (MSM) communities about HIV risks and the importance of voluntary testing

Looking Forward the Program Aims to: • Develop a strategic partnership with the Government National Population and Family Planning Commission to reach more at-risk groups with family planning and sexual health services

years of productive life lost to death or disability saved

in healthcare spend (AUD)

• Train 500 field educators to provide one-on-one sexual health education to women • Conduct a second round of Positive Talks to continue to reach out to the community with HIV education

The Philippines Marie Stopes in the Philippines delivers family planning and other services through 11 clinics and extensive outreach services. Since establishment in 1990 ,the program is now at the forefront of social franchising with more than 200 BlueStar midwives operating throughout the country.

In 2010, Marie Stopes in The Philippines: • Increased contraceptives services by 11 per cent supplying over 196,000 IUDs • Provided 1.2 million couples with a year’s worth of contraceptive protection • Dramatically increased BlueStar midwives family planning services by 87 per cent from last year

Looking Forward the Program Aims to: • Increase long-term, family planning methods and provide an additional 250,000 couples with a year’s worth of contraceptive protection • Have BlueStar midwives provide 52,000 IUDs to women who want voluntary long-term family planning


Myanmar

Mongolia

Looking Forward the Program Aims to:

Marie Stopes is one of the few providers able to work in Myanmar. Since 1997, we have provided best practice, integrated sexual and reproductive healthcare services.

Marie Stopes was the first non-government family planning provider in Mongolia when the program was established in 1997. Marie Stopes has since become the country’s leading condom and emergency contraceptive provider, making contraceptive social marketing the cornerstone of the program.

• Expand services from eight to 13 districts

In 2010, Marie Stopes in Myanmar: • Helped nearly 300,000 women with sexual and reproductive healthcare and family planning services • Completed the ‘Reproductive Healthcare in Emergencies’ project which saw 18,000 internally displaced people receive emergency sexual and reproductive services • Worked in conjunction with three other nongovernment organisations by providing HIV training and support. In addition, family planning clinical support was provided to 23 public and private providers • Made sexual healthcare services for young people a particular focus, with 25 per cent of clients being in late adolescent age group

Looking Forward the Program Aims to: • Focus on the prevention of maternal deaths through increased family planning services for marginalised young women • Increase education about HIV transmission, treatment and care services • Provide technical and clinical support to nongovernment organisations to improve sexual and reproductive healthcare services for the community

In 2010, Marie Stopes in Mongolia: • Sold 3.6 million socially marketed condoms • Continued to increase availability and access to medical abortion and increase family planning services by 30 per cent on previous year • Successfully registered the use of implants with the national health authority, widening contraceptive access and choices

Looking Forward the Program Aims to: • Supply 130,000 couples with a year’s worth of contraceptive protection • Train service providers to insert implants and which will be provided to 2000 women

Timor-Leste Marie Stopes is the only organisation providing sexual and reproductive healthcare services. Since inception in 2007, we have provided specialist family planning services to more than 20,000 women. A focal point is the Mobile Midwives project which sees family planning education and services go out to remote and rural communities.

In 2010, Marie Stopes in Timor-Leste: • Reached 52,000 people with sexual education sessions

• Pilot education sessions specifically for young people in two districts and establish a 24-hour sexual and reproductive healthcare information line

Papua New Guinea Marie Stopes has centres in Port Moresby, Mount Hagen and Lae. One of few non-government organisations specialising in family planning and sexual and reproductive health, we work alongside local nurses and midwives to deliver these vital services.

In 2010, Marie Stopes in Papua New Guinea: • Re-launched three youth-friendly sexual healthcare centres • Provided nearly 500 young people and 100 youth members of PNG’s Australian Football League (AFL) team with “Well Youth Checks” • Provided sexual and reproductive healthcare advice and education to more than 10,000 callers through the “Yangpela Hotline” • Reached 450,000 listeners through a radio drama about “A Day in the Life of Nurse Agnes” - a Marie Stopes Papua New Guinea family planning nurse

Looking Forward the Program Aims to: • Train two new tubal ligation healthcare providers to increase availability of long-acting contraceptive methods • Conduct an advocacy project with public and private service providers and local community leaders to increase intrauterine device (IUD) usage

• Provided family planning and general healthcare services to 33,000 women and men • Through providing contraceptives, gave 14,000 couples a year’s worth of contraceptive protection

31


Independent Auditor’s Report To the Members of Marie Stopes International Australia We have audited the accompanying summary financial report of Marie Stopes International Australia which comprises the statement of financial position as at 31 December 2010, the statement of comprehensive income, the statement of changes in equity and table of cash movements for designated purposes for the year then ended derived from the audited financial report of Marie Stopes International Australia for the year ended 31 December 2010 and the discussion and analysis. The summary financial report does not contain a statement of cash flows or all the disclosures required by the Australian Accounting Standards and accordingly, reading the summary financial report is not a substitute for reading the audited financial report.

Directors’ Responsibility for the Summary Financial Report The Directors are responsible for the preparation of the summary financial report and for such internal control as the directors determine are necessary to enable the preparation of the summary financial report.

Auditor’s Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the summary financial report based on our procedures which were conducted in accordance with applicable Australian Auditing Standards. We have conducted an independent audit, in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards, of the financial report of Marie Stopes International Australia for the year ended 31 December 2010. We expressed an unmodified opinion on that financial report in our report dated 30 March 2011. The Australian Auditing Standards require that we comply with relevant ethical requirements relating to audit engagements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial report for the year is free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the summary financial report. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the summary financial report, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation of the summary financial report in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control.

Our procedures included testing that the information in the summary financial report is derived from, and is consistent with, the financial report for the year and examination on a test basis, of audit evidence supporting the discussion and analysis and other disclosures which were not directly derived from the financial report for the year. The summary financial report and the audited financial report do not reflect the effect of events that occurred subsequent to the date of the auditor’s report on the audited financial report. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.

Independence In conducting our audit, we have complied with the independence requirements of the Australian professional accounting bodies.

Opinion In our opinion, the summary financial report of Marie Stopes International Australia for the year ended 31 December 2010 is consistent, in all material respects, with the financial report from which it was derived.

BDO Audit (NSW-VIC) Pty Ltd

SANDRA LAWSON Director Dated this 29th day of May 2011 Melbourne, Victoria BDO Audit (NSW-VIC) Pty Ltd ABN 17 114 673 540 The Rialto, 525 Collins Street Melbourne VIC 3000 Tel +613 8320 2222 Fax +613 8320 2200 www.bdo.com.au


Exchange rate loss 10% Domestic projects

Fast Finance Marie Stopes International Australia’s overall result for the 2010 financial year was a deficit of $489,520. Total income was $6.57 million and total expenses were $7.06 million. This result reflects investment in supporting our country programs and their continued sustainability. In 2010 there has been a change to Marie Stopes’ internal accounting policy and practice relating to the transfer of income. If you would like more information about these changes please contact us to request a full copy of our audited financial statements.

4% Fundraising costs Expenditure Government, Accountability and inand 2010 administration multi-lateral Exchange rate loss private 2% 4% 10% Domestic projects 4% Funds to Fundraising costs Community and Government, Accountability international Program and multi-lateral and education administration programs support private 2% public fundraising 4% 65% costs costs 1% 14%

The following graphs represent Marie Stopes’ revenue, expenditure and Australian support office direct costs by country in 2010. The revenue and expenditure graphs are calculated by line item as a percentage of the total income or expenditure which can be viewed in the financial statements on the following pages.

Community education and public fundraising costs 1%

Funds to international programs 65%

Program support costs 14%

Australian support office direct costs include salaries, technical assistance and any other direct project costs incurred in this financial year by country.

Revenue in 2010 Exchange rate gain 8%

Australian Support Office Direct Costs by Country in 2010

Papua New Guinea 2.2% Timor-Leste 6.0% The Philippines 8.4% Papua New

Donations and gifts 10%

Other income 1% Grants - AusAID 14% Grants Other overseas 37%

Grants Other Australian 30%

Guinea 2.2% Timor-Leste 6.0% The Philippines Pacific 8.4% 24.6%

Indigenous Australia 23.6%

Indigenous Cambodia Australia 23.6% 1.1% China 5.3%

Pacific 24.6%

Myanmar 27.5%

Myanmar 27.5%

Indonesia 0.2% Cambodia Kenya and 1.1%Tanzania 1.1% China 5.3% Indonesia 0.2%

33


Financial Statements Statement of Comprehensive Income for the Year Ended 31 Dec 2010

Consolidated

MSIA

2010 $

2009 $

2010 $

2009 $

687,989 11,196 -

774,845 35,125 -

682,344 10,747 -

768,193 27,002 -

1,033,511 2,127,311 2,652,566 21,830 38,649 6,573,052

1,989,736 392,084 11,861,272 16,114 260,279 15,329,455

1,033,511 1,896,437 2,652,556 18,704 38,608 6,332,907

1,989,736 11,861,272 13,704 260,279 14,920,186

4,932,966 1,094,216 32,185

12,447,698 1,922,535 24,032

4,932,966 1,094,216 32,185

12,447,698 1,922,535 24,032

64,366 144,820 268,875 11,196 6,548,624 311,339 202,609 7,062,572

24,032 48,063 469,676 35,125 14,971,161 348,035 116,469 15,435,665

64,366 144,820 146,304 11,906 6,426,763 128,732 202,604 6,758,099

24,032 48,063 360,301 27,002 14,853,663 96,127 144,653 15,094,443

Excess/ (shortfall) of revenue over expenditure

(489,520)

(106,210)

(425,192)

(174,257)

Other comprehensive revenue (expenditure) Fair value loss on revaluation of property Total excess/ (shortfall) of revenue over expenditure

(489,520)

(346,339) (452,549)

(425,192)

(346,339) (520,596)

REVENUE Donations and gifts - Monetary - Non-monetary Bequests and legacies Grants - AusAID - Other Australian - Other overseas Investment income Other income Revenue for International Political or Religious Proselytisation Programs Total Revenue DISBURSEMENTS International programs - Funds to international programs - Program support costs Community Education Fundraising Costs - Public - Government, multilateral and private Accountability and administration Non-monetary expenditure Total International Aid and Development Programs Expenditure Expenditure for International Political or Religious Proselytisation Programs Domestic Projects Exchange rate loss Total Expenditure


Statement of Financial Position as at 31 Dec 2010

Consolidated 2010 $

Statement of Changes in Equity for the Year Ended 31 Dec 2010

MSIA

2009 $

2010 $

2009 $

Current assets Cash and cash equivalents Financial assets

Consolidated

Retained Earnings/ (Accumulated Losses)

Balance at 31 December 2009 2,959,801

2,386,059

2,803,743

-

-

-

-

120,536

1,258,677

117,332

Revaluation of assets

-

49,084

-

49,084

Balance at 31 December 2010

39,726

41,093

39,550

40,946

4,155,894

2,596,772

4,101,970

2,315,618

Property, plant and equipment

107,190

739,602

107,190

739,602

Total non-current assets

107,190

739,602

107,190

739,602

4,263,084

3,336,374

4,209,160

3,055,220

Inventories Other Total current assets

Deficit for the year

MSIA

Non-current assets

Total assets Current liabilities Interest bearing loans & borrowings Provisions Total current liabilities

2,569,390

4,405,118

Provisions Total non-current liabilities

2,333,408

-

37,257

-

37,257

54,444

44,590

47,267

40,000

4,527,514

2,651,237

4,452,385

2,410,665

-

462,467

-

462,467

19,597

17,177

16,689

16,810

19,597

479,644

16,689

479,277

Total liabilities

4,547,111

3,130,881

4,469,074

2,889,942

Net assets

(284,027)

205,493

(259,914)

165,278

Funds available for future use Revaluation reserve - building Retained earnings/(losses) Total available funds

120,108

120,108

120,108

$ 205,493

(489,520)

-

(489,520)

-

-

120,108

(284,027)

Retained Earnings/ (Accumulated Losses)

Asset Revaluation Reserve

Total

$

$

$

45,170

120,108

165,278

(425,192)

-

(425,192)

-

-

-

(380,022)

120,108

(259,914)

Balance at 31 December 2009

Balance at 31 December 2010

Table of Cash Movements for Designated Purposes Cash available at beginning of financial year

Non-current liabilities Interest bearing loans & borrowings

$ 120,108

-

Revaluation of assets 4,473,070

$ 85,385

(404,135)

Deficit for the year

Trade and other payables

Total

2,108,256

1,156,367

Trade and other receivables

Asset Revaluation Reserve

120,108

(404,135)

85,385

(380,022)

45,170

(284,027)

205,493

(259,914)

165,278

Marie Stopes International Clinics - Philippines Choice Camp Other designated purposes Other nondesignated purposes* Total

Cash raised Cash disbursed during during financial year financial year

Cash available at end of financial year

-

1,591,849

1,591,849

-

713,518

2,312,144

1,803,676

1,221,986

1,672,541

4,151,669

4,086,395

1,737,815

2,386,059

8,055,662

7,481,920

2,959,801

*Other non-designated purposes includes cash raised and disbursed that are not recognised as revenue or project expenditure. The above figures have been extracted from the Audited Financial Statements for the year ended 31 December 2010. For a detailed financial report please call us on 1800 003 707 or email at info@mariestopes.org.au

35


Our Donors A wide range of donors have contributed to Marie Stope International Australia’s work including multi-lateral, bi-lateral, international and private donors, philanthropies, trusts and foundations, as well as individual donors

Australia Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (OATSIH): SNAKE project - a socially marketed condom brand AusAID Non-Government Organisations Cooperation Programme (ANCP): Australian community engagement on international aid and development

China Business of Social Responsibility – Health Enables Returns (BSR-HER): Peer-led sexual and reproductive health and HIV/AIDS prevention among female factory workers Gates Foundation and Global Fund: Intervention project in Xi’an. Engaging with local advocacy group to raise awareness about HIV and encourage voluntary testing

Guizhou Provincial Family Planning Commission: Working with two counties in Guizhou to improve government family planning services in rural areas Jiangsu Provincial Family Planning Commission (JPFPC): “Rebranding Project”, supporting a policy move to “rebrand” government family planning centres towards a more client-focused model Nike: Young Leaders project trains young people in peer education skills, supporting them to engage their peers with positive messages about sexual and reproductive health United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and United Nations AIDS (UNAIDS): Positive Talks project providing training to volunteers in public speaking for various events

Mongolia AusAID Non-Government Organisations Cooperation Programme (ANCP): Engaging both the public and private sexual and reproductive health sector in Mongolia The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria (GFATM): Social marketing of condoms and lubricants, promoting condom use among young people and the general population of Mongolia Ministry of Health, Mongolia: Medical abortion training for public sector doctors to increase their knowledge and confidence to prescribe and support clients seeking medical abortions United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA): Provision of contraceptive supplies


Myanmar

Papua New Guinea

3 Diseases Fund through United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC): A partnership for injection drug use, HIV and related vulnerability

Anonymous Donor: Increasing access to long-term family planning services in two provinces; Lae and Port Moresby

3 Diseases Fund through Save the Children, Consortium: Targeted HIV prevention and care through behaviour change interventions, sexually transmitted infection (STI) management and referrals for target groups

Anonymous Donor: Expanding access to family planning services in the Highlands region through support to existing centre and establishing two new centres

Reproductive Health Access, Information and Services in Emergencies (RAISE): Providing sexual and reproductive healthcare services to internally displaced populations from cyclone Nargis United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA): Provision of sexual and reproductive healthcare services via static and mobile clinics, reproductive health for young people, life-saving sexual and reproductive healthcare in emergencies, birth spacing and maternal health projects Marie Stopes International SCALE Fund and Anonymous Donor: Services for Contraception and Abortion Launched and Expanded (SCALE) AusAID Periodic Assistance for Humanitarian Assistance to Burma (PFHAB): Increasing access to sexual and reproductive healthcare through outreach and clinical service delivery

AusAID Non-Government Organisations Cooperation Programme (ANCP): Support for 50 outreach sessions, recruitment of field educators, training of additional service providers in two centres Global Fund Tuberculosis, Aids and Malaria (GFTAM): Youth-friendly centres in Port Moresby, Mt Hagen and Lae to prevent HIV/AIDS, STIs, teen pregnancy and violence against women Population Services International (PSI) with Exxon Mobil: Conducted outreach “Well Man & Well Woman” checks involving HIV rapid testing, STI diagnosis and management, and sexual and reproductive health educations and counselling, as well as family planning

The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF): Youthfriendly health prevention services provided through sexual and reproductive healthcare centres and the “Yangpela Hotline” Women’s Plans Foundation: Sexual and reproductive healthcare services, education and program facilitation

The Philippines Marie Stopes International: Increasing access to long term family planning methods through clinics and outreach services in all 80 provinces Marie Stopes International Scale Fund: Social franchising program “BlueStar Philippinas” expanding access to affordable family planning services though 300 midwife franchisees

Timor-Leste American Foundation (Scale), AusAID, European Commission and Australian Public Supporters and Corporate Donors: CHOICE / Reaching Out project, extending the reach of comprehensive sexual and reproductive healthcare services to vulnerable communities in rural areas

National AIDS Council Secretariat (NACS) of PNG: Increasing access to integrated sexual and reproductive health, and HIV services

37


Board Members

Glenyce Johnson (Chair)

Dr Yasmin Ahmed

Jane Black

Dana Hovig

MAcc, MAICD Elected: 2009

MBBS Elected: 2010

MSc Dev (Pop & Rep Health), DMS, BA (Hons) Elected: 1998

CEO Marie Stopes International global partnership, MSc Intl Pol Econ, BA Econ Elected: 2007

Dr Alison McIntosh

Rachel Molloy

Julie Mundy

Virgilio Pernito

PhD Population Planning, MSc, BA, RN, Midwife, Dip. Public Health Nursing Elected: 1998

BAS Human Movement, Grad. Dip. Marketing Elected: 2010

Company Secretary, B.Comm (Hons); GAICD, PBAS Elected: 2009

MBA, MPA Elected: 2010

In 2010 Dr McIntosh retired from her position on the board. We thank her for her tireless passion and commitment.


Patrons

Lyn Alison

Dr Sally Cockburn

Sean Cummins

Former Senator and Leader of the Australian Democrats

‘Dr Feelgood’, MBBS, GP, Public Health Advocate, Award Winning Australian Radio and TV Presenter

Co-Founder of CumminsRoss and former Chief Executive of cumminsnitro (now SapientNitro)

Ian Howie

Jane Sloane

Sean Triner

Former UNFPA Country Programme Manager and Global Director of Human Resources

Executive Director Communications, Stakeholder Relations and Marketing for HealthWorkforce Australia and former Executive Director of IWDA

Co-Founder Pareto Fundraising and Pareto Phone

Dr Michael Hewitt Gleeson International Management Consultant Trainer and Co-Founder of the School of Thinking

39


MSIA Executive Structure Marie Stopes International Australia’s head office is located in Melbourne, Australia. Our Senior Management Team provides support to both our international development programs in the Asia Pacific and beyond, to our Australian sexual health centres and Indigenous Program.

Liz Sime

Madryn Sanderson

Jayne Gaunt

Regional Director Programs Asia Pacific

Marketing and Communications Director

Operations Director Australian Clinics

Jill Michelson

Lao Biesbroek

Sally Holmes

Director Clinical Services

Director Human Resources

Director Corporate Services

Maria Deveson Crabbe Chief Executive Officer* *Maria Deveson Crabbe is also acting Director of Finance as this role is currently being recruited.


Get Involved In 2010 Marie Stopes held a number of community engagement events to raise awareness of our work.

Events June saw a Marie Stopes community engagement forum for the Timor-Leste program, which allowed our supporters and the public to meet Timor-Leste Country Program Director Melinda Mousaco and Head Midwife Fernanda Serra. Supporters were able to learn more about the Timor-Leste program and sexual and reproductive healthcare challenges in developing communities. The event was supported by AusAID’s ANCP program. A film night in June screened Sex and The City 2. Speakers, Marie Stopes CEO Maria Deveson Crabbe and TimorLeste Country Program Director Melinda Mousaco, gave compelling talks to a packed theatre, many of whom had not previously been exposed to the grave situation facing many mothers around the world.

Our Supporters Supporters discovered a new way of making a difference to the work of Marie Stopes in 2010 by participating in sponsored events via Everyday Hero including Sean Triner, Co-Founder of Pareto Fundraising, who raised $10,000.

Social Media In 2010 Marie Stopes continued to branch into new ways of engaging with the community. A Facebook page has developed a following of supporters. To become a fan, visit www.facebook.com/msiaustralia.

Volunteers and AYADs

We also had two Australian Youth Ambassadors for Development (AYADs) assist our country programs on year-long assignments. Veronica Bradford went to Papua New Guinea as an Operations Coordinator, helping improve the program’s logistics, operations and human resources. Alice Knight went to China as a Program Development Officer helping the team with new business development and donor management.

Want to Get Involved? There are so many ways you can help make a difference. To get involved with Marie Stopes or become a supporter simply visit our website at www.mariestopes.org.au or contact us on Freecall 1800 003 707 (24 hours).

Volunteers and interns enriched our achievements throughout the year by generously donating their experience, skills and time.

41


Thank You

• Our team members, here in Australia and around the world for their tireless commitment • The Australian Government, international governments and related agencies for making our work possible • Our industry, inter-agency, corporate and institutional partners who have been invaluable • Individual supporters, private donors, Trusts and Foundations • The Board and Patrons • And finally, to the women, men, children, families and communities where we work

counselling

commitment

enabling inspiring invaluable

advocating partnerships dedication ground-breaking relationships

Credits Photography Peter Barker, Veronica Bradford, Lynton Crabbe, Jill Mead, Christina Simons, Susan Schulman, Chris Turner

Printing Printlinx 706 Lorimer Street, Port Melbourne Victoria 3207 Australia Tel 03 8290 0100 Published May 2011 by Marie Stopes International Australia


References 1. Singh S et al., Adding It Up: The Costs and Benefits of Investing in Family Planning and Maternal and Newborn Health, New York: Guttmacher Institute and United Nations Population Fund, 2009 2. Shah I and Ahman E, Unsafe Abortion in 2008: Global and Regional Levels and Trends, Reproductive Health Matters, Volume 18, Issue 36, 2010 3. Maternal Mortality in 2005: estimates developed by WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA and the World Bank, Geneva: World Health Organization, 2007

Environmental Statement 4. Global Report: UNAIDS Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic 2010, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), 2010 5. Bloodborne Viral and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People: Surveillance and Evaluation Report 2010, Sydney, NSW: National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, The University of New South Wales, 2010 6. State of the World’s Populations, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), 2010

Marie Stopes is committed to reducing its environmental impact and has printed this annual report in the most environmentally friendly options available to us. This annual report is printed on recycled paper which is Forest Stewardship Council accredited, using vegetable based print inks, Computer To Plate (CTP) systems and in a small print run. FSC accredited paper is stock from sustainable and responsibly managed forest. CTP systems replace the use of film and chemical based printing plates, which uses less energy and does not produce excess chemical waste. We print only as many copies as we will need to reduce energy output, costs and potential waste of excess reports.

43


If you would like more information about our work or would like to donate to our programs please contact: Marie Stopes International Australia GPO Box 3308 Melbourne Victoria Australia 3001 Email: info@mariestopes.org.au Freecall: 1800 003 707 (within Australia) Tel: +61 (0) 3 9658 7500 Fax: +61 (0) 3 9658 7579 Web: www.mariestopes.org.au ABN 79 082 496 697 All donations of $2.00AUD or more are fully tax deductible


Annual Report 2010