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MARIEMONT HIGH SCHOOL

COURSE D E S C R I P T I O N

2019-2020


ADMINISTRATORS Mr. Steven Estepp, Superintendent Dr. James Renner, Principal Mr. Trevor Block, Assistant Principal COUNSELORS Mrs. Amanda Leszczuk, Director of College & Career Counseling (aleszczuk@mariemontschools.org) Mrs. Victoria Zaya, grades 9 and 10 (vzaya@mariemontschools.org Mrs. Pam Tackett, grades 11 and 12 (ptackett@mariemontschools.org) Mariemont High School 1 Warrior Way Cincinnati, Ohio 45227 513-272-7600 513-527-5991 (fax)

CEEB code (ACT/SAT) = 363-205

www.mariemontschools.org/highschool


MARIEMONT HIGH SCHOOL 2019-2020 COURSE DESCRIPTION GUIDE Introduction This guide for students and parents presents the requirements for graduation, course descriptions, and other information useful in planning a student’s program of study at Mariemont High School. Since the purpose of the guide is to provide general information, students and parents should feel free to contact teachers, counselors and administrators in order to obtain specific information and recommendations regarding course selection.

Table of Contents Academic Letter.............................................................................................. Advanced Placement Program.................................................................... Class Standing................................................................................................. College and Career Planning Center......................................................... College Credit Plus........................................................................................ College Preparation....................................................................................... Community Service Policy.......................................................................... Course Load................................................................................................... Credit Recovery.............................................................................................. Cum Laude Society........................................................................................ Dropping and Adding Courses.................................................................... Flex Credit........................................................................................................ Grade Point Average and Class Rank........................................................ Grading Scale.................................................................................................. Graduation Requirements............................................................................ Granting of Credit.......................................................................................... Honor and Merit Roll.................................................................................... Honors Diploma............................................................................................. Incomplete Grades........................................................................................ Master Class..................................................................................................... Intersession..................................................................................................... National Honor Society................................................................................. Online Courses............................................................................................... Participation in Graduation.......................................................................... Pass-Fail Option............................................................................................. Physical Education Waiver........................................................................... Physical Education Waiver FAQ.................................................................. President’s Education Award....................................................................... Schedule Changes......................................................................................... Transferring to a Different Level.................................................................. Valedictorian and Salutatorian..................................................................... Weighted Grades............................................................................................

12 4 7 4 5 3 12 7 12 16 7 11 6 5 2 5 12 13 8 11 11 13 11 13 8 8 10 13 7 8 17 5

Great Oaks Institute of Technology and Career Development..........

18

Visual/Performing Arts.................................................................................. Business........................................................................................................... English.............................................................................................................. World Languages........................................................................................... Health and Physical Education................................................................... Mathematics................................................................................................... Science............................................................................................................. Social Studies.................................................................................................. Technology.....................................................................................................

20 31 33 41 48 50 57 63 69

Mariemont High School Fees......................................................................

72

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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS The Mariemont City School District Board of Education and the State of Ohio Department of Education establish minimum requirements for high school graduation. The following are the graduation requirements approved by the Mariemont City School District Board of Education. Subject area Credits English 4 Math 41 Science 32 Social Studies 33 Health ½ Physical Education* ½ Visual/Performing Arts** 14 Electives 55

Total

21

Mathematics units must include 1 unit of Algebra II Science units must include biology and chemistry/physical science 3 Social studies units must include one credit of American History and one credit of American Government 4 Visual/Performing Arts units may include one semester from MJHS, if previously arranged 5 Elective units must include one or any combination of world languages, visual/performing arts, business, career- technical education, technology or English language arts, mathematics, science or social studies courses not otherwise required. * ½ credit of physical education is required for graduation and can be obtained through flex credit or a PE waiver. Either the PE waiver or PE flex credit must be completed for two semesters. PE waiver has to be completed before senior year. Physical Education grades are excluded when determining a student’s eligibility to participate in athletics and extracurricular activities. ** Optional Junior High ½ credit in visual/performing arts courses chosen from the following: 1

2

Visual/Performing Arts Advanced Ceramics Advanced Computer Graphics Advanced Photography Advanced Placement Art History Advanced Placement Studio Art Advanced Sculpture Ceramics Computer Graphics

Drawing Fashion Design Glass Studio High School Band High School Chamber Choir High School Chamber Ensemble High School Concert Choir High School Concert String Orchestra

Introduction to 2-D Design Painting Photography Sculpture Stained Glass Studio Art

Assessments In addition to course credits, students will earn points toward graduation on seven end-of-course exams. The courses in which students take an end-of-course exam will be: English I and English II, algebra I, geometry, biology, American history and American government. Students can earn from 1-5 points for each exam, based on their performance: 5-Advanced; 4-Accelerated; 3-Proficient; 2-Basic; 1-Limited. Students must earn at least 4 points on the English I and English II exams 2


combined, 4 points on the algebra I and geometry exams combined, and 6 points on the biology, American history, and American government exams combined. In addition, students must earn 18 points total from these seven exams in order to graduate high school. Students who take American history or American government as part of Advanced Placement, College Dual Credit or Credit Flexibility programs can use their scores from the programs’ end-of-course exams in place of the state end-of-course exam scores to accumulate graduation points. A student who earned high school credit in any of the above courses before July 1, 2015 and a required end-of-course exam was not available automatically will receive a grade equivalent score toward the total points needed for graduation. Junior High students this year who take one of these courses for high school credit must take the end-of-course exam in this school year. Exam Retakes Students that score below proficient on an exam may retake it after they receive some extra help on the material. Students that score proficient or higher on an end-of-course exam can retake exams only if, once they take all the exams, they have not met the minimum graduation points to graduate. In this case a student can retake any exam after receiving some extra help on the material. Graduation Points With few exceptions, students must accumulate a minimum of 18 points from scores on their end-ofcourse exams to become eligible for a diploma. More Flexibility for Students and Families Students who do not earn the required number of graduation points can still meet the requirements for a diploma if they earn a remediation-free score on the ACT. This assessment will be given to students free of charge in the spring of their junior year. Students can also qualify for graduation by earning an approved industry-recognized credential and achieving a workforce-readiness score on a related job skills assessment. For complete information regarding graduation requirements, visit the Ohio Department of Education: http://education.ohio.gov/Topics/Ohio-Graduation-Requirements/Graduation-Requirements-2018-and-Beyond

College Preparation Admission to college is becoming more and more selective, and students competing for spaces are better prepared than ever before. For this reason, Mariemont High School recommends that students choose the most challenging courses they can handle. We also recommend students take the following numbers of courses in each academic area in order to have the best preparation for college:

English Mathematics Science Social Studies World Languages Visual/Performing Arts Health/PE

4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 2-4 credits 1 credit 1 credit

3


Public universities in Ohio strongly recommend a “minimum core” for college preparation. Students who lack any of the core credits may be required to take the additional course on campus, in addition to the college requirements. Minimum core credits include 4 English, 4 math, 3 science, 3 social studies, 2 of the same World Language, 1 visual/performing art. (NOTE: Visual/Performing arts courses listed on page 2 satisfy this recommendation.) Admissions policies vary among colleges and universities. Most admission counselors make admission decisions based upon the following: grades in college prep courses, overall grade average, rigor of high school curriculum, ACT or SAT scores (occasionally SAT subject tests), special talents, extracurricular activities and community service, and counselor and teacher recommendations. Please refer to college websites for updates on the policies of each college or university.

College and Career Planning Center

•  Director of College and Career Counseling presents informational meetings for parents of every grade level with the latest information regarding college admissions •  Regular email updates for juniors, seniors and their parents regarding college and scholarship opportunities • Individual college planning conferences with parents •  Counselor recommendation written for every qualified student upon student request •  Application essay evaluations available from English teachers and counselors •  Counselors have professional memberships in OACAC, NACAC and the College Board • N  umerous college and university admissions representatives meet with sophomores, juniors and seniors. •  College Application Workshops for seniors in June and August detailing activities and tasks to be completed to keep students on track for a successful college selection experience •  Naviance account for each student utilized for college information, college searches, and career planning •  Director of College and Career Counseling conducts classroom lessons for each grade level and facilitates workshops to teach students about careers and the college admissions process. • Monthly Career College Chats feature speakers with various careers who inform students of the career experience and qualifications required •  The Spotlight on College Series sponsored by the Mariemont School Foundation includes nationally known speakers to address various college topics •  Post-Secondary Planning College and Career Guide provided for each Mariemont High School student. This college binder includes over 70 pages of information to assist students and parents in the college process. It is digital and located in the student’s MHS Counseling Blackboard Course

Advanced Placement (AP Program) The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program (AP) is an opportunity for students to pursue collegelevel studies while still in high school. Through this program, they may earn college credit, advanced placement, or both. These benefits are realized when students earn acceptable scores on the May exam. (Colleges set their own standards for acceptable scores.) The AP Program enables students to compare their knowledge and understanding of a college-level subject with the high academic standards established by college faculty. Students who take AP courses learn a subject in depth, develop analytical reasoning skills, and form disciplined study habits. At Mariemont High School, twenty AP courses and one honors course are offered to prepare students for these exams: Studio Art, Art History, English Language, English Literature, Capstone Seminar, Research, Latin:Vergil, Spanish Language and Culture, Calculus AB, Calculus BC, Computer Science A, Statistics, Biology, Chemistry, Physics C, European History, Government and Politics: U.S., Psychology, U.S. History, and World History I Honors. Student selection for AP courses is based upon teacher recommendations, achievement test scores, previous class performance, and student motivation. If qualified students are interested in taking AP exams that are not offered as part of the Mariemont High School curriculum, they must consult with a school counselor and teacher early in the school year to get information on virtual or independent exam preparation. 4


Students enrolled in AP courses at Mariemont High School are expected to take the College Board’s AP exam in May. The College Board’s AP exams are designed to be culminating assessments for the enhanced content and skills of the College Board authorized AP courses. The Mariemont City School District believes there is value in working toward this goal, then seeing it through to the end. Students often describe the sense of satisfaction they feel after taking the exam. Even if students don’t feel they will earn a top score on the exam, MCSD believes the experience is well worth the time and expense. The AP exam fee is approximately $94.00. A fee reduction is available to academically qualified students who are unable to pay the full exam fee.

College Credit Plus Recently passed into law by the Ohio General Assembly, College Credit Plus (CCP) replaces the PostSecondary Enrollment Options (PSEO) program as Ohio’s official dual credit program. This program enables college ready students in grades 7-12 to take college courses for which they may earn both high school and college credit. Students may take particular dual credits here at MHS or may consider taking courses on the college campus. If students wish to take courses on the college campus, then they must see their counselor before April 1.

Weighted Grades

To compensate for the increased amount of student effort required in honors and AP level courses, letter grades at the semester will be weighted one additional point (e.g. A = 5 points, B = 4 points, etc.) in the computation of cumulative GPA’s. Transfer students with weighted courses will receive that weight on their transcript if MHS offers a similar weighted course in the MHS curriculum. When students transfer between weighted and non-weighted courses any time during a semester according to established procedures, the grade in the course in which the student is enrolled at the end of the semester will be the one computed in the GPA.

Mariemont High School Grading Scale 100 - 90

=

A

89 - 80

=

B

79 -

70

=

C

69 - 60

=

D

59 -

=

F

0

Granting of Credit & Semester Grade Averages In order to receive credit for a course, a student must earn a semester average of .6 or better. The semester final grade is computed by doubling the quarter grades in value (A=4, B=3, C=2, D=1, F=0) and using the exam grade as a single value then dividing the sum by 5. In interpreting the arithmetical average, consider .6 as the elevator. In other words, .6 will be called a D, 1.6 will be called a C, 2.6 will be called a B, and 3.6 will be called an A. Therefore, the range of each grade is as follows: 0 -

.5 = F

.6 -

1.5 = D

1.6 - 2.5 = C 2.6 - 3.5 = B 3.6 - 4.0 = A 5


It should be noted that the percentages used to derive quarter grades (i.e., 96%=A; 65%=D) are used for the determination of independent quarter and exam letter grades only; therefore, they are not used for calculating semester averages. Semester averages are computed using the four-point scale. In addition, any student who receives any combination of two F’s in a class (quarter grades or exam grade in a semester), may be recommended by the teacher for no credit for that semester. Procedure: The teacher will submit data to an Academic Standards Committee composed of the principal, assistant principal and the counselors to show reason why credit should be withheld. The principal’s decision will be based on three factors:

1. 2. 3.

Was student effort commensurate with his/her ability? Did the student have a poor attendance record? Are other relevant factors present?

IMPORTANT NOTE This school district considers semester examinations to be of importance. REGARDING EXAMS: Failure to take a scheduled exam will result in an automatic failure for the

entire semester.

All students must take the semester examination given in their course – at the scheduled time – unless excused due to special circumstances by the principal.

Students who are suspended during exams (and, thus, are absent) will not receive an automatic “F” for the semester. They will be expected to work with the principal to make alternate arrangements to take their exams.

Grade Point Average and Class Rank Grades from all courses and additional weights for honors and AP courses will be considered when computing the cumulative grade point average and class rank. Cumulative grade point averages and cumulative class ranks are computed at the end of each semester. Class rank and grade point average will be determined as outlined below: 1. All courses not designated as honors or AP shall be given the following grade points: 4 points for an A; 3 points for a B; 2 points for a C; 1 point for a D; and 0 points for an F. Courses on a pass/fail (P/F) basis are not calculated in the GPA. 2. All honors and AP courses shall be weighted on the five-point scale: 5 points for an A; 4 points for a B; 3 points for a C; 2 points for a D; and 0 points for an F. 3.

High school World Languages, Math and the optional Visual/Performing Arts semester credits earned in eighth grade at MJHS (and Algebra I Honors in grade 7) are added to class rank as the student completes semester 1 of grade 9. Honors Algebra I and Honors Geometry are weighted grades.

4. Seniors may choose to exclude their class rank from their transcript. NOTE: Valedictorian and salutatorian determination details are on page 17 .

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Class Standing Students will be classified in accordance with the following number of credits earned: 0

credits - Freshman

5

credits - Sophomore

10 credits - Junior 15 credits - Senior

Course Load While the minimum number of credits for which a student may register is 5.5, it is highly recommended that students take at least 6 credits (courses). Additional credits may be added as the student’s schedule permits. Unless special arrangements are made, each student must carry at least 5.5 credits each year (minimum of 5 courses one semester and 6 courses the other semester). Physical education I and II are not counted when calculating a student’s athletic and extracurricular eligibility.

Schedule Changes After Spring Registration In order to allow time for proper planning, students and parents are asked to make course choices well in advance of the next school year. These choices are finalized on the basis of thorough student and parent discussion, examination of this booklet, and opportunities for student-counselor-parent conferences. The faculty and budget commitments are then made. Therefore, schedule changes are discouraged and will be made only under these special circumstances: 1. The inability of the school to offer a selected course. 2. Inability to schedule one or more selected courses (course conflict). 3. Failure in a subject, not made up in summer school, which is required before the sequence may continue. 4. Failure of student, based on the recommendation of the teacher and counselor, to meet the level of competence (in June) expected for continued success in a sequential course. 5. When approved by the principal.

Dropping and Adding Courses Seniors may not drop a course that is required for graduation. Courses may be added only within the first 10 school days of the semester unless permission is otherwise granted from teacher, parent, counselor, and principal. Courses may be dropped within the first 30 school days of the semester. Exceptions must have approval of the principal. Within the first 30 school days of the semester, students may drop an elective course with a parentsigned, drop-add form, as long as the required 5.5 credit course load remains intact. The course will be stricken from the record. After the 30th school day of the semester, students may still drop a course, but the course will remain on the permanent record. The record will show a semester grade of “F” if the student is failing the course for the quarter on the day of withdrawal from the course. The record will show a semester grade of “W” if the student is passing the course for the quarter on the day of withdrawal. In addition, the quarter grade at the time of withdrawal will be reflected on the quarter grade report. The record will show a semester grade of “W” if the student is failing the course, but lacks the necessary academic preparation and/or aptitude to be successful in the course, as determined by consultation with the teacher, counselor, and principal. 7


Incomplete Grades A grade of “I” means that the requirements for a course cannot be completed by the student before the end of a quarter and/or semester. A grade of “I” can be issued if there is sufficient documentation existing that an extenuating circumstance, beyond the control of the student, (such as a major illness) prevented the meeting of course requirements on time. Teachers will submit a form to the principal after the student has signed it. The form confirms the time allotted to complete course requirements. The form will indicate what the grade will be if work is not completed by the designated date. The “I” grade can only be issued after the approval of the Principal is given. Incompletes may prevent the student from being on the honor roll/merit roll for the quarter.

Transferring to a Different Level In the instance where a student is enrolled in a course beyond his/her measured aptitude and wishes to transfer to a lower level, withdrawal is possible if the teacher recommends the withdrawal and it is approved by the principal and parent. Upon teacher recommendation, transfer to a lower level course may be made at any time. The final grade will be based on an average of the work done in both courses. In the event a student wishes to enroll in a class at a higher level, principal approval is required. When students transfer between weighted and non-weighted courses any time during a semester according to established procedures, the course in which the student is enrolled at the end of the semester will be the one computed in the GPA.

Pass-Fail Option A student may elect to take, on a pass-fail basis, any non-required course, providing the request is made in writing. A written request is to be made to the school counseling office by the parent. The decision to take a course on a pass-fail basis must be made 2 weeks before the end of the first quarter of either semester. Once made, decisions about pass-fail are not reversible. In full year courses, the decision to take the course pass-fail may be made once, that is two weeks before the end of the first or third quarter. Colleges usually look upon a pass-fail as a C or less. Careful thought needs to be given to this decision and a counselor should be consulted. The principal will render the final decision as to whether the request will be honored. Pass-fail grades are not factored into the student’s GPA.

Physical Education Waiver In accordance with Senate Bill 311, students in grades 9-11 may be excused from the physical education (PE) requirement for graduation by participating in District-sponsored interscholastic athletics, marching band, or cheerleading for at least two seasons. If the physical education requirement is waived, the student will be required to complete one half-unit, consisting of at least 60 hours of instruction, in another course of study. Should a student become injured or not complete the season for ANY reason, he/she must find an alternate way to satisfy his/her PE requirement. Participation in interscholastic athletics, marching band, and cheerleading is a privilege, and not a right. This policy shall not in any way be construed as granting a student the right to participate in such district-sponsored activities. Board rules and policies including the Code of Conduct continue to apply. In addition, any student participating in this policy shall be subject to any athletic fee and/or pay-to-participate fee.

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Procedure for Documenting Physical Education Course Exemptions: 1. Prior to participating in a full-season of a sport, marching band, or cheerleading, the student should complete and turn in the PE Waiver Intent Form to the high school CCPC. PE Waiver forms can be obtained in the CCPC or downloaded from the high school page on the district website. 2. Forms will be kept in the athletic office or band office until the seasons are completed. Forms will then be verified by the athletic director or marching band director and given to the CCPC for record keeping. 3. The school counselor will add the PE Waiver to the student’s official transcript. Note: The Ohio Core Graduation Requirements mandate participation for at least two (2) full seasons of an approved activity in order to waive the PE requirement. Participation in only one (1) full season cannot be combined with 0.25 credits of PE to meet the PE requirement for graduation. Any student who has not fulfilled the PE requirement prior to the beginning of his or her senior year will be scheduled into a PE Flex Credit class. Participation in an athletic team, marching band or cheerleading will not qualify for the waiver during senior year without the approval of the administration. Approved Interscholastic Athletic Teams: Baseball

Basketball

Bowling

Cheerleading (Fall)

Cheerleading (Winter)

Cross Country

Football

Golf

Lacrosse

Marching Band

Soccer

Softball

Swimming/Diving

Tennis

Track and Field

Volleyball

See next page for Physical Education Waiver Frequently Asked Questions.

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Physical Education Waiver Frequently Asked Questions What constitutes a “full season” in Mariemont City Schools? A full season for athletic/cheerleading purposes is defined by the OHSAA as from the first day of practice until the last event or banquet. A full season of Marching Band will be defined from the first day of Band Camp until the completion of the last varsity football game. For Physical Education (PE) Exemption, will other activities (show choirs, non-school-sponsored athletics, etc.) which involve physical activity on the part of students be counted toward the two semesters of PE? No, the statute specifically limits the participation to interscholastic athletics, marching band, cheerleading, and JROTC. There is no authority granted to a board of education to include any additional participation. A student has participated in marching band and/or sports for two seasons, but has not completed a PE Waiver request. Can the student seek to receive credit retroactively? No. Are there any other requirements students must meet beyond the two full seasons of participation in interscholastic athletics, marching band or cheerleading? Yes, the student does not earn any credit with the P.E. waiver. Therefore, exempted students must also complete one-half unit in another curricular area. This one-half unit in another curricular area maintains the 21 required credits for graduation. What if a student is cut or ruled ineligible, quits, or has an athletic/activity code violation during the season? The statute requires participation “for at least two full seasons.” The season during which a student is cut or ruled ineligible, quits or has an athletic/activity code violation cannot be used to meet the two-season requirement. If a student participates in only one full season of an approved activity, can the student be excused from .25 units of PE and thus have to take only .25 units of PE to complete his or her PE requirement under the Ohio Core? No. The statute requires participation “for at least two full seasons.” There is no provision in the law that would permit any type of a partial waiver. What happens if a student is injured during the season? Injury will not prevent the completion of one season if the coach/director concedes that the student actively participated in 75% of practices and participated and/or was able to participate in 75% of the contests. Can team managers or statisticians complete the waiver? No. Mariemont team managers and statisticians are not eligible for the waiver. Only students physically participating in interscholastic athletics, marching band, and cheerleading are eligible. What if a student is “cut” from a team? Can he/she join another team that same season and have that count as a season toward the PE Waiver? Yes. As long as the student is able to join the team within three week days after being cut and a new PE Waiver form is submitted to the counselor within the established dates for each season. If I transferred into MHS from another school district, can I retroactively ask that the extracurriculars that I participated in my former high school be considered for PE Waiver at MHS? It depends. If your former school did not have a PE Waiver available, then you could submit the MHS forms with verification from your former school administrator and MHS for approved activities. If your former school had a PE Waiver available and you elected not to request it there, then you cannot request it at MHS. For more information, please see http://education.ohio.gov/Topics/Ohio-s-New-Learning-Standards/ Physical-Education/Frequently-Asked-Questions-about-the-Physical-Edu

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Flex Credit Participation in the Flex Credit option shall be in accordance with an instructional plan which will be developed based on the individual student’s needs. The instructional plan shall include the following: • instructional objectives that align with the district’s curriculum requirements • a description of the criteria and method for assessing student performance • an outline of specific instructional activities, materials and learning environments • the student will need to petition the administration to have the course weighted and/or qualify as a cum laude course Participation must be subject to the oversight of a credentialed teacher who will review the instructional plan, provide or supervise instruction, and evaluate student performance. See counselors for proper application materials. The application deadline for 1st semester is August 15, and January 10 for 2nd semester.

Master Class Flex Credit Master Class is a credit flexibility option that requires the same process as other flex-credit courses. Master Class is slightly different than a regular flex credit course in that the student is mentored during a specific bell of the day and at the end of the class makes a final presentation before a committee of teachers detailing their learning. The committee then grades based on a specific rubric. Master Class is an opportunity for students to turn their interest into a passion by creating their own curriculum, taking ownership of their learning and reflecting on how they progress as a learner. This class is not a core course or required elective credit, but counts as an extra elective credit towards graduation. Please see your counselor for a Master Class Credit Flexibility Application.

Intersession Intersession is an opportunity for all students to explore interests and careers and think about the future. Students will experience meaningful learning outside the traditional classroom by choosing to participate in one of three categories: Teacher-Led Courses, Experienceships, and College Explorations. Students will receive a Pass/Fail grade for their participation in Intersession and students will earn .25 credit for completing all necessary requirements of their Intersession choice. The .25 credit will not be included in student’s GPA’s.

Online Courses Internet-based elective courses, approved by the administration and adopted by the Board of Education, will be available to students on a limited basis. Chosen from the course offerings of approved online schools, students may be assigned one class period per day to work on that course work. Taught by teachers from around the world, course communication, evaluations, and assignments are accomplished using e-mail and the internet. The courses are adopted as MHS courses and are subject to the MHS grading scale and other requirements. Student progress will be monitored by a local Mariemont Site Coordinator. Students should consult with their counselor for details and course selection. The student will need to petition the administration to have the course weighted and/or qualify as a cum laude course.

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Credit Recovery Students who fail a required course are encouraged to recover that credit as soon as possible. If they fail the first semester they may, with counselor or principal approval, take an online course during second semester as part of their school day (at their own expense). Students’ schedules may be adjusted to accommodate a study hall to dedicate time for the credit recovery course. If they fail the second semester, they may recover the credit through an approved online or summer school course during the summer. Seniors may also have the option of taking a correspondence course for credit recovery (at their own expense). Programs for credit recovery must be approved by the Mariemont School Administration. The MHS Counseling Department will maintain current information about approved online and correspondence courses.

Community Service Policy • F or students to be recognized for completing the Community Service program at Mariemont High School, they must complete 40 hours between the end of their sophomore year and before the first Monday in May of their senior year. • Community Service is defined as volunteer effort that benefits the community. To qualify, student work must be done with a non-profit agency, be done outside the school day, be on a volunteer (nonpaid) basis, and be verified by an adult supervisor. • Of the 40 required hours, no more than 20 can be completed within the school district, or as part of the student’s regular routine. Projects like taking tickets at school sporting events, theater students painting a set for the play, or coaching an elementary school team can earn a student no more than 20 hours. Babysitting during a church service and fundraisers for churches also fall into the 20-hour maximum. • To ensure effective Community Service and for the 40 hours to count toward this requirement, all students shall submit a proposal to the Community Service Coordinator in advance of their first hour of service on every project. • Completion of Community Service will be listed on student transcripts as a pass/fail course with no effect on GPA. At the start of the senior year, MHS School Counseling Department will list the course as a course in progress and the grade column will remain blank. Once the student has completed 40 hours, the transcript will be marked “P” in the grade column for pass. Until the student has completed the 40-hour requirement, the transcript will continue to show “Community Service” as a course in progress. Students failing to complete 40 hours by the first Monday in May of the senior year will have their transcript marked with an “F” in the grade column for fail.

Academic Letter Mariemont High School will present an academic award to each student in grades 9 through 12 who maintains a 3.5 or better cumulative grade point average as determined by 1st, 2nd and 3rd quarter grades in English, Math, Science, Social Studies and year-long computer courses, weighted grades included.

Honor and Merit Rolls Students earning a 4.0 average or higher in courses in which they are enrolled will be on the honor roll. Students earning a 3.2 to 3.99 average in courses will be on the merit roll. These averages include weighted grades where applicable. The academic recognition will be published each quarter. Note: All courses except Pass/Fail classes are included in the grade point determination. Any student earning a “D”, “F” or “I” in any course is automatically excluded from recognition, regardless of grade average.

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National Honor Society The objective of the National Honor Society is to create enthusiasm for scholarship, to stimulate desire to render service, to promote worthy leadership, and to encourage development of character in students of Mariemont High School. The Society accepts members of the junior and senior classes who display strength in four areas: Academics, Leadership, Character, and Service. Often it takes significant time to develop a leadership or service dimension to one’s school life. It is recommended that students start early in the freshman year to develop these characteristics if they wish to be considered for membership. Grades alone will not qualify a student for the National Honor Society, although a 3.5 weighted GPA is minimal for application. Selection Procedure: Shortly after the beginning of the school year, a list of eligible junior and senior students will be prepared. Those eligible students will be invited to submit personal information forms (concerning leadership, character, and service) to a selection committee of faculty and staff. This committee, with the advice of the entire faculty, will select students for membership. Students denied membership in their junior year may re-apply in their senior year.

President’s Education Awards Awards from the U.S. Department of Education will be presented to seniors who have at least a 3.5 cumulative GPA including weighted courses and all electives, and a score on the ACT/SAT which ranks at the 85th percentile or higher. More information may be found at www.ed.gov/programs. Locate “find programs” then click on “title.”

Participation in Graduation Students may participate in the graduation ceremony only if they have met all graduation requirements, including credit and testing requirements.

Honors Diploma Ohio Department of Education Criteria See the following pages for existing and new High School Honors Diploma criterion, as set forth by the Ohio Department of Education.

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14

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Field Experience  

Portfolio  

Additional Assessments  

1/24/17

N/A N/A  

GPA ACT/SAT/   1 WorkKeys  

N/A

N/A

N/A

3.5 on  a  4.0  scale   8   27  ACT/1280  SAT

4 units,  including  two  units  of   2 advanced  science  

International Baccalaureate   Honors  Diploma  

Complete a  field  experience  and   document  the  experience  in  a   portfolio  specific  to  the  student’s   5 area  of  focus   Develop  a  comprehensive  portfolio   of  work  based  on  the  student’s  field   experience  or  a  topic  related  to  the   student’s  area  of  focus  that  is   reviewed  and  validated  by  external   6 experts   N/A  

3.5 on  a  4.0  scale   8   27  ACT/1280  SAT

1 unit   N/A  

4 units  minimum,  with  at  least  2   units  in  each  language  studied  

4 units  

4 units,  biology,  chemistry,  and  at   least  one  additional  advance   2 science  

4 units,  Algebra  I,  Geometry,   Algebra  II  (or  equivalent),  and  one   other  higher  level  course  or  4   course  sequence  that  contains   equivalent  or  higher    content  

3.5 on  4.0  scale     8 27  ACT/1280  SAT /WorkKeys  (6   Reading  for  Information  &  6   7   Applied  Mathematics) Complete  a  field  experience  and   document  the  experience  in  a   portfolio  specific  to  the  student’s   5 area  of  focus   Develop  a  comprehensive  portfolio   of  work  based  on  the  student’s  field   experience  or  a  topic  related  to  the   student’s  area  of  focus  that  is   reviewed  and  validated  by  external   6   experts Earn  an  industry-­‐recognized   credential  or  achieve  proficiency   benchmark  for  appropriate  Ohio   Career-­‐Technical  Competency   Assessment  or  equivalent  

N/A 4  units  of  Career-­‐Technical   3 minimum  

2 units  of  one  world  language   studied  

4 units  

4 units,  including  two  units  of   2 advanced  science  

4 units,  Algebra  I,  Geometry,   Algebra  II  (or  equivalent),  and  one   other  higher  level  course  or  4   course  sequence  that  contains   equivalent  or  higher    content  

Career Tech  Honors  Diploma  

Complete a  field  experience  and   document  the  experience  in  a   portfolio  specific  to  the  student’s   5 area  of  focus   Develop  a  comprehensive  portfolio   of  work  based  on  the  student’s  field   experience  or  a  topic  that  is  related   to  the  student’s  area  of  focus  that   is  reviewed  and  validated  by   6 external  experts   N/A  

3.5 on  a  4.0  scale   8   27  ACT/1280  SAT

3 units  of  one  world  language,  or   no  less  than  2  units  of  each  of  two   world  languages  studied   1  unit   2  units  with  a  focus  in  STEM   courses  

3 units  

5 units,  including  two  units  of   2 advanced  science  

5 units,  Algebra  I,  Geometry,   Algebra  II  (or  equivalent),  and  one   other  higher  level  course  or  4   course  sequence  that  contains   4 equivalent    or  higher  content  

STEM Honors  Diploma  

Complete a  field  experience  and   document  the  experience  in  a   portfolio  specific  to  the  student’s   5 area  of  focus   Develop  a  comprehensive  portfolio   of  work  based  on  the  student’s  field   experience  or  a  topic  that  is  related   to  the  student’s  area  of  focus  that   is  reviewed  and  validated  by   6 external  experts   N/A  

3.5 on  a  4.0  scale   8   27  ACT/1280  SAT

3 units  of  one  world  language,  or   no  less  than  2  units  of  each  of  two   world  languages  studied   4  units   2  units  with  a  focus  in  fine  arts   course  work                                                                  

3 units  

3 units,  including  one  unit  of   2 advanced  science  

4 units,    Algebra  I,  Geometry,   Algebra  II  (or  equivalent),  and  one   other  higher  level  course  or  4   course  sequence  that  contains   equivalent    or  higher  content  

Arts Honors  Diploma     (Includes  dance,  drama/theatre,   music,  and  visual  art)  

Complete a  field  experience  and   document  the  experience  in  a   portfolio  specific  to  the  student’s   5 area  of  focus   Develop  a  comprehensive  portfolio   of  work  based  on  the  student’s  field   experience  or  a  topic  that  is  related   to  the  student’s  area  of  focus  that   is  reviewed  and  validated  by   6 external  experts   N/A  

3.5 on  a  4.0  scale   8   27  ACT/1280  SAT

3 units  of  one  world  language,  or   no  less  than  2  units  of  each  of  two   world  languages  studied   1  unit   3  units  with  a  focus  in  social   sciences  and/or  civics  

5 units  

3 units,  including  one  unit  of   2 advanced  science  

4 units,    Algebra  I,  Geometry,   Algebra  II  (or  equivalent),  and  one   other  higher  level  course  or  4   course  sequence  that  contains   equivalent    or  higher  content  

Social Science  &  Civic  Engagement   Honors  Diploma  

Ohio High  School  Honors  Diploma  

NOTE: Items  shaded  in  blue  are  changes  that  were  made  to  the  honors  diploma  system,  including  the  entire  STEM,  Arts,  and  Social  Science  and  Civic  Engagement  Honors  Diplomas    

2 Semesters   5  units  

3 units  of  one  world  language,  or   no  less  than  2  units  of  each  of  two   world  languages  studied   1  unit   N/A  

3 units  

Social Studies   World   Languages  

Fine Arts   Electives  

4 units  

3 units  

Science

4 units,  Algebra  I,  Geometry,   Algebra  II  (or  equivalent),  and  one   other  higher  level  course  or  4   course  sequence  that  contains   equivalent  or  higher  content  

4 units,  must   include  one   unit  of  algebra   II  or   equivalent  

Math

Academic Honors  Diploma  

Ohio Diploma  

Criterion  


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Ohio High  School  Honors  Diploma  

Writing sections  of  either  standardized  test  should  not  be  included  in  the  calculation  of  this  score.  The  Locating  Information  test  is  not  included  in  the  calculation  of  the  WorkKeys  score.  

Field  Experience  refers  to  experiential  learning  in  either  an  internship  or  apprenticeship.  Students  will  document  their  experiences  by  describing  their  understanding  in  a  portfolio.  

These scores  are  based  on  the  2016  ACT  and  SAT  assessments.  Concordance  tables  outlining  equivalent  scores  for  past  and  future  tests  that  differ  from  the  2016  versions  will  be  published  on  the  ODE   website.  Tables  to  concord  SAT  assessments  taken  prior  to  March  2016  can  be  found  here.  Further  information  on  test  concordance  can  be  found  here.  

8

Students  must  score  a  minimum  of  a  6  on  the  Applied  Mathematics  WorkKeys  Assessment  and  a  minimum  of  6  on  the  Reading  for  Information  WorkKeys  Assessment  in  order  to  meet  the  WorkKeys  score   requirement.  The  WorkKeys  option  applies  only  to  the  Career  Tech  Honors  Diploma.  

7

The  student  portfolio  is  a  collection  of  experiential  learning  and  competencies  based  on  the  student’s  field  experiences.  Students  will  engage  with  professionals  or  scholars  in  the  field  while  developing  their   own  portfolio  or  ePortfolio  of  original  work  that  documents  their  technical,  critical  and  creative  skills  representative  of  their  honors  focus;  students’  work  must  be  reviewed  and  evaluated  by  scholars  or   professionals  within  the  field/area  of  study  in  which  the  students’  work  is  focused,  and  the  scholars  or  professionals  must  be  external  to  the  district  staff;  students  will  give  a  presentation  to  showcase  the   work  and  provide  an  analysis  of  it  to  the  school  and  local  community.  If  the  student  does  not  complete  a  field  experience,  the  portfolio  can  be  based  on  a  collection  of  work  related  to  the  student’s  honors   diploma  area  of  focus.  

6

5

The fifth  mathematics  and  science  credit  for  the  STEM  honors  diploma  may  be  fulfilled  with  a  single  course.    

Program  must  lead  to  an  industry  recognized  credential,  apprenticeship,  or  be  part  of  an  articulated  career  pathway  which  can  lead  to  post-­‐secondary  credit.  

4

3

Advanced  science  refers  to  courses  that  are  inquiry-­‐based  with  laboratory  experiences  and  align  with  the  11/12th  grade  standards  (or  above)  or  with  an  AP  science  course,  or  with  an  entry-­‐level  college  course   (clearly  preparing  students  for  a  college  freshman-­‐level  science  class,  such  as  anatomy,  botany,  or  astronomy).  

2

1

½ unit  physical  education  (unless  exempted),  ½  unit  health,  ½  unit  in  American  history,  ½  unit  in  government,  and  4  units  in  English.  The  class  of  2021  and  beyond  will  need  to  have  ½  unit  in  world  history  and   civilizations  as  well.  

Diploma with  Honors  requirements  pre-­‐suppose  the  completion  of  all  high  school  diploma  requirements  in  the  Ohio  Revised  Code  including:  

Students must  meet  all  but  one  of  the  criteria  to  qualify  for  an  Honors  Diploma,  and  any  one  of  the  criteria  may  be  the  one  that  is  not  met.  

Completion of  any  advanced  standing  program,  which  includes  Advanced  Placement,  International  Baccalaureate,  College  Credit  Plus,  and  may  include  Credit  Flexibility,  can  be  counted  toward  the  unit   requirements  of  an  Honors  Diploma.    

For the  Academic,  International  Baccalaureate,  and  Career  Tech  Honors  Diplomas,  students  who  entered  the  ninth  grade  between  July  1,  2013  and  June  30,  2017  may  choose  to  pursue  the  diploma  by  meeting   the  requirements  of  these  criteria  or  the  previous  criteria.  Students  entering  the  ninth  grade  on  or  after  July  1,  2017  must  meet  these  criteria.  

NOTES:


Cum Laude Society The objective of the Cum Laude Society is to promote learning and sound scholarship. Outstanding scholarship is the sole basis for selection to Cum Laude Society. Students are elected for membership after semester one of grade 12 has been completed; equal weight is given to each semester. Student members must have been enrolled at Mariemont High School during the entire senior year and must have successfully completed a minimum of 14 full credits of Cum Laude course work. To be tapped, a student must have at least a 3.5 GPA based on a weighted 4-point scale. Weighted grades are retained when determining eligibility. Students must also have comparable SAT/ACT scores. The number of students admitted is restricted by the Cum Laude Society charter. The scope of all cum laude courses includes all college preparatory courses offered for high school credit. These would include arts, business, and other college preparatory electives. Physical education, FOCUS, and foundations level courses will not count as cum laude courses. Flex credit courses such as online and post-secondary courses could be considered as cum laude courses at the discretion of the principal and the cum laude committee. Flex credit classes which are proposed as honors or AP level courses could be given consideration for additional weighting of the grade point average by the principal and cum laude committee if the flex credit course being considered for additional weight was also offered to students at MHS. Students will not be able to take any more than 14 sections of cum laude courses per academic school year which would count in the calculation for cum laude recognition. If the student wishes to take additional courses, they would be included in the student’s transcript, but would not be included in the calculation for GPA and/or class rank. It is incumbent that students not attending junior high in the Mariemont School District not have an academic advantage over students attending MJHS. This must be considered when determining courses that are accepted for high school credit from other junior high schools as well as whether those courses are given additional weight.

16


Valedictorian and Salutatorian Selection Beginning with the Class of 2017 and carrying through the Class of 2020, the Valedictorian and Salutatorian (Val/Sal) will be chosen using the current Board policy. There will be no limit placed upon the number of credits a student can apply towards Val/Sal. Students will be permitted to use weighted courses that have been approved by school administration. Any additional weight or credit units applied towards CCP courses will be stripped for purpose of Val/Sal if the course is not available at MHS. The CCP courses will not have additional weights or credit units stripped for the purpose of class rank. Beginning with the Class of 2021, only high school courses taken during grades 9 through 12 will apply towards the selection of Val/Sal. The number of credits that can be applied towards the calculation of Val/Sal will be 28, as that is currently the number of courses that can be taken over a four-year period of time taking the maximum number of seven classes a day. We will maintain the practice of adding additional 0.1 weight for each cum laude course. The high school principal will decide which CCP and flex credit courses will receive additional weight due to their rigor. The method for determining class rank for the sole purpose of selecting valedictorian/salutatorian for Mariemont High School will be in accordance with the procedures outlined below: 1. Grades earned in courses enumerated for admittance into the Cum Laude Society will be used to determine valedictorian/salutatorian. For each Cum Laude course taken, one tenth of one point will be added to the “Cum Laude� GPA. This total adjusted GPA will determine the valedictorian/ salutatorian. If a Cum Laude course is valued at a .5 credit, a .05 add on will be used. 2. Weighted grades will be included with full weights applied. 3. Only students who have enrolled at Mariemont High School for their entire senior year will be considered.

17


GREAT OAKS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT www.greatoaks.com

CAREER PROGRAMS Grades 11, 12

14 credits

Beginning with their junior year, Mariemont High School students are eligible to attend one of the career development campuses of the Great Oaks Institute of Technology and Career Development. The curriculum on these campuses is an extension of that of the local high school. Most programs are offered for two consecutive years to juniors and seniors. Students who elect to attend Great Oaks are eligible to participate in all Mariemont High School athletics and extra-curricular activities. Great Oaks students graduate from Mariemont High School, participate in Mariemont High School’s graduation ceremony, and receive a Mariemont High School diploma. The course offerings are designed to develop the aptitude and skills of students for job entry into the world of work immediately after graduation. Because Great Oaks students also complete all of the Mariemont High School academic and graduation requirements, they are also prepared for college. There are also opportunities for Great Oaks students to earn college credit in each program. For eligibility to attend Great Oaks, it is recommended that a student should complete, at a minimum, the following courses in the high school in the ninth and tenth grades for a total of 8 credits: English - 2 credits Mathematics - 2 credits Science - 1 credit World History - 1 credit Physical Education - ½ credit Health - ½ credit Visual/Performing Arts - 1 credit A total of four of these credits must be earned in order to apply for admission. Students who are deficient in credits may still apply but will have to be evaluated separately for possible acceptance. A few programs, mainly co-op programs, are offered only to seniors. Any eleventh grade student interested in attending one of the career development campuses of Great Oaks should consult with his/ her counselor concerning programs available and requirements of those programs. Programs at the career campuses offer seven units of high school credit each year. Juniors are required to take a course in math, English, and American Government; seniors are required to take a course in math, American History and English. Great Oaks students need 21 credits for high school graduation. Special evaluation and educational programming is provided at Great Oaks for students having special needs associated with their educational, mental, physical, and social development. No student is denied educational opportunities at Great Oaks if his/her needs, abilities, interests and goals can be assessed and an individually prescribed program can be developed that will provide the least restrictive educational opportunities with the best chance of success.

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Programs at Live Oaks Career Campus Animal Science & Management

Health Technology

Automotive Technology/Collision

Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning

Automotive Technology/Mechanics

Heavy Equipment Operations & Engineering

Computer Service Technician and Networking

Precision Machining

Cosmetology

Veterinary Assisting

Digital Arts and Design

Web Applications & Game Development

Early Childhood Education

Welding

For a list of all programs offered at Great Oaks’ other campuses, visit: www.greatoaks.com/highschool /campuses

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VISUAL/PERFORMING ARTS 1 credit required for all students for graduation Course

Grade Level

Credit

Prerequisite

Visual/Performing Arts Advanced Ceramics

9, 10, 11, 12

½

Ceramics

Advanced Computer Graphics

9, 10, 11, 12

½

Computer Graphics

Advanced Photography

9, 10, 11, 12

½

Photography

Advanced Placement Art History

9, 10, 11, 12

1

Advanced Placement Studio Art

12

1

Intro to 2D Design and Studio Art

Advanced Sculpture

9, 10, 11, 12

½

Sculpture

Ceramics

9, 10, 11, 12

½

Computer Graphics

9, 10, 11, 12

½

Drawing

9, 10, 11, 12

½

Fashion Design

9, 10, 11, 12

½

Glass Studio

9, 10, 11, 12

½

Stained Glass

High School Band

9, 10, 11, 12

1

Prior participation or audition

High School Chamber Choir

9, 10, 11, 12

1

Audition only

High School Chamber Ensemble

9, 10, 11, 12

1

Audition only

High School Concert Choir

9, 10, 11, 12

1

Prior participation

High School Concert String Orchestra

9, 10, 11, 12

1

Prior participation or audition

Introduction to 2-Dimensional Design

9, 10, 11, 12

½

Painting

9, 10, 11, 12

½

Photography

9, 10, 11, 12

½

Sculpture

9, 10, 11, 12

½

Stained Glass

9, 10, 11, 12

½

11, 12

1

Studio Art

20

Intro 2D Design

Intro 2D Design

Intro 2D Design


VISUAL ARTS INTRODUCTION TO 2-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN (INTRO TO 2D DESIGN) Grade Level: 9, 10. 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester

Description: Introduction to 2-Dimensional Design is a lively, inviting, and comprehensive course for beginning level artists that includes interactive activities and multicultural studio projects representing a wide variety of cultures, artistic styles and art media. This course is designed to enrich the lives of its participants through discovery and creative problem solving. It provides students with a broader perception of their environments and cultural perspectives. This course is designed around the following key concepts: meaningful, hands-on learning experiences that allow for personal growth and creative expression; integration of the elements and principles of design, aesthetics, art criticism, art history, and studio production; sequentially planned experiences that build on concepts and provide learning opportunities that incorporate a wide variety of media, artistic styles and historical periods. Intro to 2D Design is a prerequisite for Drawing, Painting, Studio Art and AP Art. Prerequisite: none Fee: $20.00. Sketchbook is required.

CERAMICS Grade Level: 9, 10. 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: Ceramics is a course in which students will learn to approach ceramic artwork as both functional and decorative sculptural objects. Emphasis will also be placed on the elements and principles of design, as well as basic hand-building techniques: pinch, coil and slab construction. Craftsmanship, design and overall composition is a vital component of each and every project created, as well as within other studio art classes taken. Wheel throwing is introduced to students during the second half of the semester. Ceramics is a prerequisite for Advanced Ceramics. Prerequisite: none Fee: $40.00. Sketchbook is required.

ADVANCED CERAMICS Grade Level: 9, 10. 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: This course is geared towards students that have already taken Ceramics and are motivated to undertake ambitious work in clay while furthering their understanding of ceramic art as a means of artistic expression. Students will learn how to create more advanced functional and decorative sculptural objects than they learned in the beginning level Ceramics course. Emphasis will be placed on the elements and principles of design, as well as basic hand-building techniques: pinch, coil and slab construction. Students will continue to learn how to wheel throw and view many diverse ceramic techniques that were not introduced in Ceramics. Students will be pushed much more than they were in the beginning Ceramics course. Prerequisite: Ceramics Fee: $40.00. Sketchbook is required. 21


COMPUTER GRAPHICS Grade Level: 9, 10. 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semesterr Description: This class is an introduction to computer graphics. Students will use the computer as a design tool in combination with the elements and principles of design to create aesthetically pleasing works of art. Throughout this course, students will learn various software programs (Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, painting & animation software programs, etc.), how to use a digital drawing tablet, as well as basic graphic design and layout techniques. In addition, students will study the works of various artists in order to gain a better understanding of the computer graphics field, which includes graphic design, advertising design, computer illustration, computer animation, toy design, etc. Students will also have the opportunity to incorporate photography into their projects. (For those students with previous photography experience this course may provide an opportunity to build art works for their AP Studio portfolio). Prerequisite: None Fee: $35.00

ADVANCED COMPUTER GRAPHICS Grade Level: 9, 10. 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: Advanced Computer Graphics builds on the fundamental skills learned in Computer Graphics. Students will continue to use the computer, various software programs, a digital drawing tablet, etc. as design tools in combination with the elements and principles of design to create aesthetically pleasing works of art. Projects will go beyond what was learned and achieved in Computer Graphics. Projects will be tailored to students’ interests and geared towards possible career avenues/opportunities in the computer graphics/ graphic design world. (i.e.: animation, digital painting, brochure, web design layout, etc.). Students will study the works of various artists in order to gain a better understanding of the computer graphics/graphic design fields. Students will also have the opportunity to incorporate photography and video into their projects. (For those students with previous photography & video experience, this course may provide an opportunity to build art works for their AP Studio portfolio). Prerequisite: Computer Graphics Fee: $35.00

DRAWING

Grade Level: 9, 10. 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: This class is an in-depth study of drawing techniques and media that encourage the development of a personal style. Students develop and express original ideas and experiences through a variety of drawing materials. Media will include graphite, colored pencil, charcoal, oil and chalk pastel, ink wash and mixed media. This class is a studio course, while works may be generated through various site visits. Prerequisite: Intro to 2-Dimensional Design Fee: $15.00. Sketchbook is required. 22


FASHION DESIGN Grade Level: 9, 10. 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: Fashion Design is a newly developed course that will advance students’ knowledge of fashion design by studying the history of fashion and how the elements and principles of design are incorporated to create successful yet aesthetically pleasing designs. Design terminology for apparel and recognition of design styles are incorporated as vital components of the course. Students will be required to demonstrate creative use of their imagination while using design experimentation through various major projects and a visual design journal. Students will learn beginning-intermediate construction techniques, how to use and interpret pattern instructions, and how to handle fibers and fabrics that require special handling, such as silk, organza, tulle, overlock knots and plaids. Students will also be required to learn and will be assessed on their knowledge of design terminology, styles, and applicability of the elements and principles of design and how they are used in fashion design. Prerequisite: None Fee: $35.00. Sketchbook is required.

STAINED GLASS Grade Level: 9, 10. 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: This course is designed to enable students to have an opportunity to create stained glass art works such as: sun catchers, window panels, and mosaics. Students will learn about the elements and principles of design, color theory, and craft techniques. In addition, students will learn the history of stained glass and glass mosaics, while being exposed to famous glass artists. Students will also learn about the various types of glass and how they are made. Orderly and safe working habits will be heavily stressed. Projects will begin small and progress to larger works. Other warm glass techniques such as fusing, slumping, casting, and bead-making may be explored. Prerequisite: None Fee: $45.00

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GLASS STUDIO Grade Level: 9, 10. 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: This class will give students an opportunity to further their craft skills and design skills using both cold and warm glass techniques. Creativity will be stressed as students create more in depth stained glass panels and mosaics, as well as 3-dimensional glass art works, jewelry pieces, glass paintings, etc. Projects will involve cold glass as well as warm glass techniques such as: glass fusing (melting glass together in layers in a kiln), glass slumping (melting glass in a kiln over objects to make them 3-dimensional), glass casting (melting glass in molds), glass etching (a process used to create designs in glass), glass painting (using both glass frit and paint), etc. May also include flame working (glass bead-making). Students will again be exposed to famous artists, art history, and art criticism. Instruction on the safe use of equipment and materials will be stressed. Prerequisite: Students must have successfully completed Stained Glass. Fee: $55.00

PAINTING Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: This class is an in-depth study of painting techniques and media that will encourage the development of a personal style. Media will include acrylic, watercolor, dyes, gouache, and mixed media. Students will express original ideas by developing solutions that utilize design and technical skills, while studying different artists and art styles along the way. Prerequisite: Intro to 2-Dimensional Design. *Successful completion of Drawing is strongly recommended. Fee: $15.00 plus cost of major supplies ($25-50). Sketchbook is required.

PHOTOGRAPHY Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: Photography is a beginning level introductory course that covers the basic fundamental skills of photography. No previous experience is required. During this course, students will learn how to use compositional guidelines as well as the elements and principles of design to compose their photographic imagery. Students will work mainly with digital cameras using Photoshop on the computer. They will also be briefly introduced to Black & White film. In addition, students will be exposed to both famous photographers throughout history, as well as art criticism. Photos must be taken on the student’s own time outside of class. Prerequisite: None Fee: $35.00 plus a 35mm digital camera (compact or SLR) ** In addition, access to a 35mm film camera would be useful, but not required.

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ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: Advanced Photography builds on the fundamental skills and compositional guidelines learned in Photography. In this course students will be further challenged artistically and creatively to produce photographic imagery with dramatic effect, while developing the art of seeing. Students will again be exposed to famous photographers throughout history, as well as art criticism. In addition, students will learn about the history of photography and the camera, as well as different photography careers. Students will work mainly with digital cameras using Photoshop and other software programs on the computer. Most photos must be taken on the student’s own time outside of class. Prerequisite: The successful completion of Photography Fee: $35.00 plus a 35mm digital camera (compact or SLR) ** In addition, access to a 35mm film camera would be useful, but not required.

SCULPTURE Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: Sculpture is a hands-on course that will teach basic-intermediate hand-building skills and techniques while utilizing a variety of 3D building materials such as paper, cardboard, wire, plaster, clay, wood, papiermache, found objects, etc. Students will learn to think of three-dimensional objects as an object that can be viewed from all sides while further developing their skills in additive, subtractive, assemblage, and mixed media based sculptural techniques. Lessons in art history are also incorporated into projects, referencing the style or theme used by artists. Individual creativity and experimentation with a variety of media will be stressed. Sculpture is a prerequisite for Advanced Sculpture. Prerequisite: None Fee: $35.00. Sketchbook is required.

ADVANCED SCULPTURE Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: This course is geared towards student who have taken Sculpture and are motivated to undertake more ambitious work in three-dimensional building materials and techniques while furthering their understanding of sculpture as a means of artistic expression. Students will learn much more advanced sculptural techniques than they learned in Sculpture. Emphasis will be placed heavily upon the elements and principles of design as well as creating sculptural objects that are expressionistic, meaningful, and aesthetically pleasing from all sides. Advanced 3D design will be explored through problem-solving and design solutions while furthering students’ skill in additive, subtractive, assemblage, and mixed media sculptural materials and techniques. Individual creativity and experimentation with a variety of media will be stressed. Prerequisite: Sculpture Fee: $35.00. Sketchbook is required.

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STUDIO ART Grade Level: 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: This course gives advanced students a chance to expand areas of interest and develop portfolios. Assignments will be based on the elements and principles of design. For those students planning to take AP Studio Art in the future, this course provides an opportunity to prepare portfolio pieces in advance for AP Studio Art. Students will show growth and discovery through studio art experiences with a variety of media and techniques. All students are required to keep an edited collection of their work. Students will document all work through a digital photo file as well as an actual portfolio. Prerequisite: Intro to 2-D Design and permission of instructor. *Successful completion of Drawing and Painting are strongly recommended. Fee: $30.00 plus cost of major supplies ($25-50). Sketchbook is required.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT STUDIO ART Grade Level: 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: This is an accelerated art studio class that corresponds to the national advanced placement curriculum for 2D studio art. Students will make purposeful decisions about using the elements and principles of art through a variety of mediums and processes which may include: painting, collage, photography, digital imaging, fabric design, illustration and printmaking. Students are encouraged to develop and show a personal style or “voice” in their artwork. Students will submit a 2D Design Portfolio in digital form in the spring instead of taking an exam. The 2D Design Portfolio is broken down into three sections: Section I: Breadth – a variety of works demonstrating understanding of the principles of design (12 pieces). Section II: Concentration – works showing an in-depth exploration of a particular theme or idea (12 pieces). Section III: Quality – 5 actual works that represent the student’s best accomplishments. These 5 pieces may come from the student’s Breadth and/or Concentration sections. Prerequisite: Intro to 2-D Design, Studio Art, and permission of the instructor. *Successful completion of Drawing and Painting are strongly recommended. Fee: $40.00 plus cost of major supplies, including digital photo costs. Approximately $94.00 for the Advanced Placement portfolio submission, payable in April prior to the test. NOTE: It is assumed that students will submit an AP Portfolio in the spring. However, if a student elects not to submit a portfolio, he/she will still receive high school credit upon successful completion of the course. AP Studio Art portfolios can also be used for college submissions. The grade will be weighted.

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ADVANCED PLACEMENT ART HISTORY Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: AP Art History is a course designed to give students the opportunity to discover, appreciate, and acquire knowledge of art history through the ages, from the Paleolithic era to contemporary times. The students will learn to examine and critically analyze major forms of artistic expression from diverse cultures and understand their contributions to the arts. A variety of art media and styles will be studied as students look at architecture, manuscripts, painting, drawing, printmaking and sculpture, as a reflection of a given civilization and time period. This class will give students the opportunity to use their prior knowledge of history, geography, politics, religion, languages, literature, and the visual arts. The history of art will be taught and learned by students through a combination of materials such as: selected readings, visual presentations, research papers, educational videos, and museum visits. Students’ active participation and discussion related to reading assignments and slide show lectures are required for the class. Students will learn how to write about art using a specialized vocabulary to describe and critically analyze work. The curriculum is modeled after introductory college level art history survey courses and reflected by the College AP Art History Course Description. Tests and quizzes are given throughout the year using the format of the AP Art History Exam with multiple-choice, short answer, and long essay questions, some of which are based on slides. Students are to approach their study in a self-disciplined manner, including preparation for class, reading, visual and written note taking, essay writing, and class participation. Students enrolled in this course are expected (or encouraged) to take the AP Art History examination. The grade will be weighted. Prerequisite: None Fee: $15.00 and approximately $94.00 for the Advanced Placement Art History exam, payable in April prior to the exam.

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PERFORMING ARTS HIGH SCHOOL CONCERT CHOIR Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: The Mariemont High School Concert Choir is open to all students who enjoy singing and possess a desire to participate in a non-auditioned vocal group. Students enrolled in this course will learn and perform a variety of music appropriate for the size of the ensemble, including everything from classic choral music to jazz, Broadway and pop. The class will focus on learning correct techniques for singing both solo and ensemble music, music reading, audition techniques, rehearsal techniques and etiquette. The Mariemont High School Concert Choir is a performance-based organization. The ensemble will perform at a wide variety of school and community events, including concerts, sporting events, and other events in the community. This group also travels to perform every other year. Previous locations have included New York City and Disneyworld. Attendance and performance at all concerts is required and will reflect a large part of your grade. Fee: $80.00. This will cover the cost of performance attire, theory books, accompanist and solo & ensemble fees. Prerequisite: Previous performance in a choir and/or permission of the instructor. NOTE: This course may be repeated for credit.

HIGH SCHOOL CHAMBER CHOIR Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: The Mariemont High School Chamber Choir is open to all students, grades 9 through 12, who possess advanced skills in singing. Enrollment is by audition. Students enrolled in this course will learn and perform a variety of music in a small, select ensemble, including everything from classic choral music to jazz, Broadway and pop. The class will focus on learning advanced technique for singing both solo and ensemble music, music reading, audition techniques, rehearsal techniques and etiquette. The ensemble will perform at a wide variety of school and public events, including concerts, sporting events, and other community events. Attendance and performance at all concerts is required and will reflect a large part of the grade. Fee: $80.00. This will cover the cost of performance attire, theory books, accompanist and solo & ensemble fees. Prerequisite: Audition only. Students must have participated in at least one year of concert choir. NOTE: This course may be repeated for credit.

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HIGH SCHOOL BAND Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: The Mariemont High School Band is a two-semester course open to all students in grades 9-12 who demonstrate proficiency and/or desire to play a band instrument. Students who enroll in this course will rehearse music for concert band throughout the school year, marching band music during the first quarter, and pep band music after marching season and into the second quarter. Students will also attend a weeklong band camp at the end of July and other rehearsals throughout the summer months. High School Band provides its membership with a well-rounded, balanced exposure to nearly all facets of current instrumental music performance. Private instruction on one’s instrument is highly recommended but not required. Prerequisite: Prior participation in a school band and/or permission of the director. Fee: $100.00 for Marching Band, including Band Camp and Marching Band show drill design. NOTE: This course may be repeated for credit.

HIGH SCHOOL CHAMBER ENSEMBLE Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: The Chamber Ensemble is open to students in grades 9 through 12 who possess advanced skills on the violin, viola, cello, or double bass. Enrollment is by audition. This performance and skill-based class will include small and large ensemble playing and advancing skill technique. Pianists need the instructor’s permission to register. The strings study and perform idiomatic literature for string orchestra. Special placement for advanced woodwind and brass players may also be available during some semesters. This performance-based class will include class A & B concert, solo and ensemble music literature as well as original unabridged literature. Prerequisite: Audition Only Fee: $85.00 NOTE: This course may be repeated for credit.

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HIGH SCHOOL CONCERT STRING ORCHESTRA Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 Credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: The Concert String Orchestra is open to all students in grades 9 through 12 who play violin, viola, cello or double bass. With approval, students interested in studying for the first time and who are willing to take some private lessons, will be admitted. The emphasis of the course is on growth in proficiency of ear training, technique, orchestral literature, rehearsal skills and etiquette and performance. Enrollment is by audition or director recommendation only. This performance-based class will include class B & C concert, solo and ensemble music literature. Prerequisite: Prior participation in a school string orchestra and permission from the orchestra director. Students new to the district will need to play an informal audition. Fee: $85.00 NOTE: The course may be repeated for credit

 

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BUSINESS High School of Business consists of four one-year courses designed for students who are preparing for a college Business Administration program and/or interested in someday working in or owning a business. Courses employ business problems and projects and operate at an accelerated pace. Students will have opportunities to communicate with local business professionals through speakers, field trips, and an observational internship. Membership in the business club, DECA, is co-curricular; you must be enrolled in a business course to participate in the club activities. Program Courses and Recommended Sequence:

* Year One

Business Application and Economics

Year Two

Marketing

Year Three

** Year Four

Finance Strategic Management

* Business Applications and Economics Course is required prior to enrollment in other program courses. ** Strategic Management requires that Business Applications and Economics, Marketing and Finance be completed prior to enrollment.

BUSINESS APPLICATIONS AND ECONOMICS Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 days/week, all year Description: Business Applications and Economics will help you develop knowledge and skills in business administration. You’ll examine business activities, processes, and forms of ownership. You’ll acquire an understanding of economic principles and identify current trends, issues and conditions impacting business, and determine the impact of the global environment on operations, innovation, technology, leadership and communications will also be addressed.

MARKETING Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 days/week, all year Description: Marketing will provide you with fundamental knowledge of marketing activities, including sales channels, marketing information management, marketing research, market planning, marketing communications, pricing, and product and service management, branding and selling. You’ll conduct marketing research and engage in market planning. Employability skills, technology, leadership and communications will be incorporated in classroom activities. Prerequisite: Business Application and Economics 31


FINANCE Grade Level: 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 days/week, all year Description: Finance will help you develop skills in financial analysis, financial reporting and corporate investments. You’ll predict corporate performance and profitable investments using financial statements, ratio analysis and other analysis techniques. You will have an opportunity to participate in on-line stock games. Employability skills, technology, leadership and communications will be incorporated in classroom activities. Prerequisite: Business Applications and Economics

STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT Grade Level: 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 days/week, all year Description: Strategic Management will help you develop skills needed to manage a small business. You will create and implement a business plan, supervise employees, and develop a budget using management skills and technology. You will utilize project management skills to guide decision making in planning and operating a business. You will complete an observational business internship. Prerequisite: Business Applications and Economics, Marketing and Finance

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ENGLISH 4 credits required Course

Grade Level

Difficulty Level

Credit

Prerequisite

English I CP

9 College Prep

1

See course description

English I Honors

9 Honors

1

See course description

English II CP

10 College Prep

1

English I CP

English II Honors

10 Honors

1

See course description

AP Seminar

10 Honors

1

English I or Eng I Hon

English III CP

11 College Prep

1

English II CP

AP English Language and Composition

11 Honors

1

See course description

English IV CP

12 College Prep

1

English III CP

AP English Literature and Composition

12 Honors

1

See course description

11, 12 Honors

1

AP Seminar

10, 11, 12 College Prep

½

See course description

9, 10, 11, 12 College Prep

½

See course description

Contemporary Literature *

10, 11, 12 College Prep

½

See course description

Fantasy and Science Fiction *

10, 11, 12 College Prep

½

See course description

Journalism/Newspaper *

10, 11, 12 College Prep

1

See course description

Nonfiction and the Documentary *

10, 11, 12 College Prep

½

See course description

9, 10, 11, 12 College Prep

1

See course description

AP Research * Classic Film * Creative Writing *

Yearbook/Publications *

* Course does not satisfy the English requirement, but credit counts as an elective

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ENGLISH I CP Grade Level: 9 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: In this course, freshmen continue the formal study of literature. Students study literary devices and read and analyze short stories, poetry, drama, non-fiction, and the novel. Students study vocabulary and formal grammar including parts of speech, punctuation, sentence sense, correct agreement, and capitalization. They are also required to write creative and persuasive compositions, and to develop proficiency in paragraphing, sentence structure, and organization. Students in this course will be required to write a research paper. During the summer prior to the ninth grade, students are required to read a specified selection from a recommended reading list. Prerequisite: None Fee: $30.00

ENGLISH I HONORS Grade Level: 9 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: English I Honors is offered for those students who exhibit exceptional talent in English. The core curriculum, although the same as English I CP, is enhanced by additional challenging literary selections. In general, the quantity and quality of work expected from students is greater. In addition, summer reading is required. Prerequisite: Enrollment based on past performance in English, the recommendation of the student’s 8th grade English instructor. Fee: $30.00

ENGLISH II CP Grade Level: 10 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: Students continue their study of literature through short stories, poetry, drama, nonfiction, and novels. Throughout unit studies, students will develop proficiency in writing, making specific choices about paragraphing, structuring sentences, utilizing mechanics, and organizing a formal essay. Units are arranged thematically, so students will also be asked to think through essential questions, making regular connections between course content and the real world; developing these understandings in the form of writing, reading, and presentations. During the summer prior to the tenth grade, students will be required to read a specified selection from a recommended reading list. Prerequisite: English I CP Fee: $30.00

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ENGLISH II HONORS Grade Level: 10 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: English II Honors is offered for those students who exhibit exceptional talent in English. The core curriculum, although the same as English II CP, is enhanced by additional challenging literary selections. In general, the quantity and quality of work expected from students is greater. Additional summer reading and a research project are required. Prerequisite: Enrollment based on past performance in English, the recommendation of the student’s English I instructor. Fee: $ 30.00

ADVANCED PLACEMENT SEMINAR Grade Level: 10 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade AP Seminar is a year-long course that has students investigate real-world issues from multiple perspectives, gather and analyze information from various sources in order to develop credible and valid evidence-based arguments. Students learn to synthesize information from different sources, develop their own lines of reasoning in research-based written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. During the second semester students will complete group and individual projects and presentations. Students wishing to gain AP credit will also sit for the end-of-course exam. Students who enroll in this course fulfill the prerequisite for the AP Capstone Research course, and may work toward a Capstone Diploma. Students interested in taking this course should be self-driven, engaged, and open-minded, willing to take control of their own learning. They will be required to submit a piece of writing before being enrolled in this course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of English I or English I Honors and submission of a writing sample. Fee: $15 and approximately $94.00 for the Advanced Placement Exam in Seminar, payable in April prior to the test.

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ENGLISH III CP Grade Level: 11 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year. Description: In this course, juniors study American literature in a survey approach. During this study, students read and analyze short stories, poetry, drama, nonfiction, and the novel. Students are required both to do extensive work in critical analysis and other forms of expository writing including a research paper on a non-literary topic. Through written assignments, students will continue to develop proficiency in paragraphing, structuring sentences and utilizing mechanics. Formal vocabulary lessons stressing pronunciation, meaning, spelling, and usage are an integral part of this course. During the summer prior to the eleventh grade, students are required to read a specified selection from a recommended reading list as well as a second book of the student’s choice. Tests, papers, and oral presentations on these readings will be required when students enter class in the fall. Prerequisite: English II CP Fee: $10.00

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION Grade Level: 11 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: AP English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. In addition, students will study American literature in the context of various thematic units during the course. This course is for students who exhibit exceptional talent in English. The quantity and quality of work expected from students is greater than that of English III College Preparatory; thus students must be prepared to manage time wisely and utilize developed study skills Prerequisite: Recommendation of sophomore English instructor, and/or permission of Advanced Placement English Language and Composition instructor. Multiple texts are required as summer reading. Tests, papers, and oral presentations on these readings will be required when students enter class in the fall. Fee: $15.00 and approximately $94.00 for the Advanced Placement Exam in English Language and Composition, payable in April prior to the test. NOTE: It is assumed students will take the AP exam in May. Many colleges award credit when students achieve a score of 3 or higher on the exam.

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ENGLISH IV CP Grade Level: 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: In this course, students will study the four modes of writing: narrative, descriptive, expository, argumentative. Special attention will be paid to developing voice, style, and structure. Additionally, students will sharpen their research skills, including building familiarity with multiple style guides and citation methodologies (e.g. APA and MLA). Students will be required to complete a research paper that culminates in a multimedia presentation and an oral defense of their work. In addition to Canterbury Tales, Beowulf, and Macbeth, students’ fiction and nonfiction reading will be self-selected, with the goal of having each student graduate high school with a well-articulated and complex skill set and mindset that will serve their endeavors and interests beyond high school. During the summer prior to twelfth grade, students are required to read two texts approved by their instructor. Prerequisite: English III CP Fee: $ 12.00

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION Grade Level: 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: Students enrolled in AP English Literature and Composition will be involved in extensive careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Students will be expected to do wide reading, analyzing, and independent researching of literary periods, texts and philosophies. Students will deepen their understanding of the ways writers use structure, style, tone and theme through focus on smaller-scale elements—figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and others. Students will be expected to move at a more rapid pace and engage in more depth than English IV CP classes, and therefore must be prepared to manage time wisely and utilize developed study skills. Prerequisite: AP English Language and Composition, recommendation of junior English instructor, or permission of Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition instructor. In addition, students must read three (3) required books and complete assignments during the summer prior to their senior year. Fee: $15.00 and approximately $94.00 for the Advanced Placement Exam in English literature and composition, payable in April prior to the test. NOTE: It is assumed students will take the AP exam in the spring. Many colleges award credit when students achieve a score of 3 or above on the exam.

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ADVANCED PLACEMENT RESEARCH Grade Level: 11 or 12 Course Credit: 1 elective credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Students in this course will also be enrolled in a core English course. Description: In this course, students will deeply explore an academic topic, problem, or issue of individual interest. Through this exploration, students design, plan, and conduct a year-long research based investigation to address a research question. In the AP Research course, students further their skills acquired in the AP Seminar course by understanding research methodology; employing ethical research practices; and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information as they address a research question. Students explore their skill development, document their processes, and curate the artifacts of the development of their scholarly work in a portfolio. The course culminates in an academic paper of approximately 4000-5000 words (accompanied by a performance or exhibition of product where applicable) and a presentation with an oral defense. AP Research is the second course in the AP Capstone program. AP Seminar is a prerequisite for AP Research. If you earn scores of 3 or higher in AP Seminar and AP Research and on four additional AP Exams of your choosing, you will receive the AP Capstone Diploma. This signifies outstanding academic achievement and attainment of college-level academic and research skills. Alternatively, if you earn scores of 3 or higher in AP Seminar and AP Research only, you will receive the AP Seminar and Research Certificate. Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP Seminar Fee: $15 and approximately $94.00 for the Advanced Placement Exam in Capstone Seminar, payable in April prior to the test. NOTE: This course may not be substituted for required English courses.

CLASSIC FILM Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, offered one semester Description: This semester course provides both a historical context and critical film examination. Students will delve into classic film and examine the effects these “roots” have on the film industry of today. They will consider film’s influences in society, past and present, and scrutinize some film-related careers. A good portion of the course will focus on “reading” film, utilizing a genre approach. Prerequisite: English I CP or English I Honors Fee: None NOTE: This course may not be substituted for required English courses.

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CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE

(Will be offered every other year. Will be offered in ’20-’21.) Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, semester Description: The purpose of this course is to explore our own and other’s cultures, cultural values, and perspectives using contemporary literature. We will read contemporary adult and young adult literature written by authors from a variety of races, ethnicities, backgrounds, classes, genders, and orientations. This course is designed for a student that enjoys reading and discussing their reading with others. It will allow for a deeper understanding of how literature both reflects and influences our contemporary world. We will study the works of authors such as Sherman Alexi, Marjane Satrapi, Margaret Atwood, Zadie Smith, and Isabel Allende among others. Prerequisite: English I CP or English I Honors Fee: None NOTE: This course may not be substituted for required English courses.

CREATIVE WRITING Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, offered 2nd semester Description: Students will create, in a writing workshop atmosphere, a wide variety of writing pieces: personal narratives, descriptive writing, poetry, short stories, plays, and journals. Through these carefully guided writing assignments, students will continue to develop proficiency in mechanics, sentence structure, paragraphing, and creative expression. Prerequisite: None Fee: None NOTE: This course may not be substituted for required English courses.

FANTASY AND SCIENCE-FICTION

(Will be offered every other year. Will be offered in ’19-‘20.) Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: Students will explore classic and contemporary fantasy and science-fiction literature in depth. They will delve into questions about the popularity of the genre, stylistic choices of authors, and critical interpretation of the works. Possible authors include J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, J.K. Rowling, Margaret Atwood, Orson Scott Card, Kurt Vonnegut, and Stephen King among others. Prerequisite: English I CP or English I Honors Fee: None NOTE: This course may not be substituted for required English courses.

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JOURNALISM/NEWSPAPER Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: Students will receive practical experience in the fields of journalism: print, online, and emerging media. This course will include practical study in journalistic ethics, law, writing, layout, design, photo journalism, production, interviewing and reporting techniques. Students will be required to serve as writers and editors for the online school newspaper, The Warpath. Articles may also be submitted to local newspapers. Students will be required to maintain a “professional” blog and participate as members of a scholastic, journalism community. Prerequisite: Students will be required to have a B average in English, complete an application, and interview with the instructor. Fee: $15.00 NOTE: This course may not be substituted for required English courses. Students may take this course for semester credit with teacher and counselor approval.

NONFICTION AND THE DOCUMENTARY Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: Students will read compelling nonfiction and view carefully selected documentaries that complement one another. Students will engage in lively and scholarly dialogue over both the text and documentary. Possible texts and documentaries include Nickel and Dimed and Walmart: the High Cost of Low Prices; Fast Food Nation, The Omnivore’s Dilemma, or In Defense of Food and Supersize Me, Food Inc., Vegucated, or Forks Over Knives, Into Thin Air and the IMAX Everest film. Other compelling nonfiction may include Wes Moore’s The Other Wes Moore, Bill Bryson’s A Walk in the Woods, and Jon Krakauer’s Into the Wild. Prerequisite: None Fee: None NOTE: This course may not be substituted for required English courses.

YEARBOOK PUBLICATION Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: This course is open to students grade 9-12 who have an interest in creating photographic publications. Students will be given an opportunity to use their creativity and ideas to produce the Mariemont High School Chieftain. They will be responsible for all aspects of creating, editing, and publishing. Students will learn about theme development, photography, copywriting, editing and adherence to style rules. They will also experience the business of publishing a yearbook, which includes sales and fundraising. The students will learn how to efficiently and effectively use online tools to design and create the yearbook. Students could be assigned editor’s responsibilities. Prerequisite: Application and interview with the instructor. Fee: $10.00 NOTE: This course may not be substituted for required English courses and may be repeated for credit. 40


WORLD LANGUAGE Course

Grade Level

Credit

Prerequisite

Latin II

9, 10, 11, 12

1

Latin I

Latin III

10, 11, 12

1

Latin II

11, 12

1

Latin II

12

1

Latin IV: Latin Literature Survey

Spanish I

9, 10, 11, 12

1

Recommend C or better in English

Spanish II

9, 10, 11, 12

1

Spanish I

Spanish III

10, 11, 12

1

Spanish II

Spanish IV

11, 12

1

Spanish III

12

1

Spanish IV

Mandarin Chinese I

9, 10, 11, 12

1

Recommend C or better in English

Mandarin Chinese II

9, 10, 11, 12

1

Mandarin Chinese I

Mandarin Chinese III

10, 11, 12

1

Mandarin Chinese II

Mandarin Chinese IV

11, 12

1

Mandarin Chinese III

Latin IV: Latin Literature Survey AP Latin: Vergil

AP Spanish Language and Culture

Some colleges require applicants to have a minimum of two years of the same world language in high school. A few may require three or four years of the same world language. Those not specifically requiring a world language will generally recommend a minimum of two years in the same language. A demonstrated language proficiency, evidenced through successful completion of four years of the same language, may enable a student to complete the language requirement for some colleges. Check specific requirements with your counselor. It is recommended that entering freshmen whose average in seventh and/or eighth grade English is C or lower should defer the study of any world language until their sophomore (or even junior) year. Students may take courses in more than one world language at the same time, if their schedules permit.

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LATIN NOTE: At every level of Latin instruction, the following Standards for Classical Language Learning describe what Latin students know and are able to do. COMMUNICATION Students read, understand and interpret Latin. Students use orally, listen to, and write Latin as part of the language learning process. CULTURE Students demonstrate an understanding of the perspectives of Roman culture as revealed in the practices and the products of the Romans. CONNECTIONS Students reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines through the reading of Latin and the study of ancient culture. COMPARISONS Students recognize and use elements of the Latin language to increase knowledge of their own language. Students compare and contrast their own culture with that of the Greco-Roman world. COMMUNITIES Students use their knowledge of Latin in a multilingual world. Students use their knowledge of Greco-Roman culture in a world of diverse cultures.

LATIN II Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: Latin II students read, understand, and interpret stories, proverbs, graffiti and poems. The communicative skills of listening, speaking, and writing are emphasized as tools to improve reading. Students reinforce and further their knowledge of other academic subjects, especially history, science, and English, through various interdisciplinary connections with Latin. Latin II students also link with the worldwide classical community through computer technology, using instructional and enrichment software. Students recognize the influence of Latin on the specialized language of various professional fields and recognize its use in the media. Latin II students begin to develop a more sophisticated understanding of the linguistic relationship between English and Latin, using their knowledge of Latin to figure out the meaning of English words. Prerequisite: Latin I Fee: $5.00 National Latin Exam

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LATIN III Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: Latin III students examine the Roman influence on American life in the areas of language, government, domestic life, art, and ideas. Students read and understand, with appropriate assistance, passages of Latin adapted from original authors, including letters, inscriptions, poetry, and history. Students develop an enhanced ability to read, write, understand, and speak English based on their knowledge of Latin. Latin III students recognize and use elements of the Latin language to enlarge their English vocabulary as well as to prepare for the PSAT and SAT I Verbal tests. Students understand the link between classical languages and certain professional fields through specialized terminology. Prerequisite: Latin II Fee: $5.00 National Latin Exam

LATIN IV: LATIN LITERATURE SURVEY Grade Level: 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: Latin IV students read translate, understand, analyze and interpret un-adapted Latin passages, including the various works of Catullus, Ovid, and Cicero. Students learn the scansion of various poetic meters (dactylic hexameter, elegiac couplet, and the hendecasyllabic line). In studying poetry and rhetoric, the students will also learn poetic and rhetorical devices and figures of speech employed by Latin authors. Students gain an understanding of the development of Latin lyric poetry as a literary genre and the importance of Classical rhetoric as a foundation for public speaking in the Western world. Prerequisite: Latin III Fee: $5.00 National Latin Exam

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ADVANCED PLACEMENT LATIN: VERGIL & CAESAR Grade Level: 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: AP Latin: Vergil students acquire a critical appreciation of Vergil’s epic poem, the Aeneid, and Julius Caesar’s Commentaries on the Gallic Wars. Students will read Latin poetry and prose with historical and literary sensitivity. Students develop linguistic skills by translating poetry and prose from the reading list, precisely and literally; by reading passages of prose and poetry with comprehension; and by analyzing literary texts in clear, coherent written arguments, supported by textual examples. Students will also scan the dactylic hexameter verse and learn the poetic and rhetorical devices commonly used by Vergil and Caesar. Prerequisite: Latin IV and recommendation of Latin teacher. Completion of summer reading (the Aeneid) in translation. Students will have the opportunity to take the AP Latin exam in May. Fee: Approximately $94.00 for the Advanced Placement Test, payable in April prior to the test. $5.00 National Latin Exam

MANDARIN MANDARIN CHINESE I Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: This course is an introduction to Mandarin Chinese language and culture with focus on speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Basic grammar and vocabulary are taught with an emphasis on the ability to communicate simple ideas in real world situations. Students are assessed on individual performance in the following areas: homework, class participation, quizzes, speaking tests and projects. At the end of the course, the students will be expected to perform in speaking, listening, reading and writing Chinese at a level of proficiency appropriate for continuing on to the next course in the sequence. Prerequisite: None Fee: None

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MANDARIN CHINESE II Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: This course elaborates on the basic grammar taught in Mandarin Chinese I emphasizing the student’s ability to produce original language, to further develop acquired skills, and to continue study of civilizations and cultures. Students are assessed on individual performance in the following areas: homework, class participation, quizzes, speaking tests, and projects. At the end of the course, the students will be expected to perform in speaking, listening, reading and writing Chinese at a level of proficiency appropriate for continuing on to the next course in the sequence. Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese I Fee: None

MANDARIN CHINESE III Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: In Mandarin Chinese III, students review and build upon previously learned Mandarin Chinese language and culture from the past two years. Students continue to refine their spoken and written Mandarin Chinese skills. More advanced vocabulary and grammatical structures are introduced. Students are assessed on individual performance in the following areas: homework, class participation, quizzes, speaking tests, writing tests and projects. At the end of the course, the students will be expected to perform in speaking, listening, reading and writing Chinese at a level of proficiency appropriate for continuing into the next course in the sequence. Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese II Fee: None

MANDARIN CHINESE IV Grade Level: 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year In Mandarin Chinese IV, students review and build upon previously learned Mandarin Chinese language and culture from the past three years. Students continue to refine their spoken and written Mandarin skills. More advanced vocabulary and grammatical structures are introduced. Reading and writing Chinese characters will be reinforced. Students are assessed on individual performance in the following areas: homework, class participation, quizzes, speaking tests, writing tests and projects. Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese III Fee: None

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SPANISH SPANISH I Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: In Spanish I, students will be able to speak in simple Spanish from the first day of class. Students will learn correct pronunciation and simple grammatical structures. Students will have the opportunity to express themselves in written and oral forms through guided exercises. Students will read short passages in Spanish that will allow them to develop an understanding and appreciation of customs and culture of Spanish-speaking nations. Learning will be facilitated through the use of audio-visuals, the internet, group activities and class presentations. Current periodicals, websites, music and films will be integrated in the instruction and projects. Prerequisite: None Fee: None

SPANISH II Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: In Spanish II, students continue to improve their conversation skills through guided and free exercises in class. More emphasis is placed on personal expression; vocabulary is learned so that their ability to communicate about daily experiences increases. More sophisticated grammar structures are introduced so that oral and written activities are clearer and more complex. Students will read short selections in Spanish and English that acquaint them with the customs and cultures of Spanish-speaking countries. Current periodicals, websites, music and films will be integrated in the instruction and projects. Prerequisite: Spanish I Fee: None

SPANISH III Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: In Spanish III, students review and build upon previously learned Spanish from the past two years. Students continue to refine their spoken and written Spanish skills by being involved in a variety of activities involving personal conversation and narrative. Students read and listen to stories, prose, essays and simple books. Students analyze, write and discuss materials they read or view in films. More advanced vocabulary and grammatical structures are introduced to facilitate expressing personal opinions, wishes, feelings, past and future events. Students will learn about the cultures of the Spanish-speaking people by reading/listening to specific information and participating in a variety of individual and group activities. Context, cultural acquisition, and aural practice will be enhanced by online resources, current periodicals, audiovisuals and computer technology. Prerequisite: Spanish II Fee: None 46


SPANISH IV Grade Level: 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: In Spanish IV, students continue to read, write, and converse in Spanish. Emphasis is on mastery of detailed vocabulary, phrases and advanced grammatical structures leading to communicative competence in Spanish. Through the study of literature selections, current periodicals, online material, and exposure to educational and authentic films and music, students expand their understanding of language and culture. Frequent interactive activities will lead to improved listening, pronunciation, intonation and eventual fluency. Group activities and individual projects are undertaken throughout the year. Prerequisite: Spanish III Fee: $18.00

AP SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE Grade Level: 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: The Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Culture course is a rigorous course and equivalent to a third-year college level course. This course is conducted in Spanish and requires students to improve their proficiency in Spanish communication and culture. Students are required to use Spanish in class. The course focuses on the integration of authentic resources including online print, audio and visual resources as well as traditional print, graphics, articles and literature resources. Instructional materials, activities, assignments, and assessments are appropriate to this level. Students will develop proficiency in synthesizing written and audio material, and build proficiency in speaking and listening. The course centers on thematic units and its content is aligned with the College Board AP Spanish Language and Culture course description. Prerequisite: Spanish IV. Completion of summer work. Fee: $45.00 and approximately $94.00 for the Advanced Placement exam, payable in April prior to the test (the exam is not mandatory). If the student elects not to take the exam, the students will still receive high school credit upon successful completion of the course. The grade will be weighted.

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HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION ½ credit Health required for graduation ½ credit of physical education Is required for graduation and can be obtained through Flex Credit or PE waiver.

HEALTH Grade Level: 9 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester (required for graduation) Description: Health class will explore the three pillars of personal wellness that are important for overall health: physical, mental and social. The student will identify and analyze risk factors that influence his/her wellness and quality of life. Topics include anatomy/physiology of the body, nutrition/fitness, stress reduction, suicide prevention, selfesteem, sexual risk avoidance/reduction, substance abuse, teen violence, driving safety and training in adult one-rescuer CPR as well as use of the automated external defibrillator (AED). Classroom lecture, guest speakers/workshops, online exploration of wellness resources, documentaries, group discussions, written reflections, student presentations and tests/quizzes will be used to evaluate student progress and to reinforce concepts. Prerequisite: None Fee: None

HEALTHY TRANSITIONS Grade Level: 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: Personally explore current health and wellness issues that high school juniors and seniors face as they adapt to transitioning to post-secondary life, especially college. Pertinent topics include goal-setting, effective communication, stress management, body image, decision making/risk taking, nutrition and exercise, campus life, and building relationships. These components of wellness are reinforced through round table discussions, shared book readings, guest speaker presentations, MHS graduate student interviews, documentaries, reflections, and life skills booklet use. Prerequisite: Successful completion of health class Fee: None NOTE: This course may not be substituted for the graduation requirement for health, Physical Education I or II.

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION I/II FLEXIBLE CREDIT Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: ¼ credit Description: Credit flexibility calls for a great deal of maturity and self-discipline on the part of the student in order to earn the high school credit. All students should spend time discussing this credit flexibility option with their parents, school counselor, and mentors to make sure this would be a good fit. The following 2 components are required to earn the ¼ credit of physical education using the flexible credit method. I. Physical Activity - tracked weekly on a Google calendar - 75 hours required for semester II. Written Reflection - questions provided in Blackboard - exam grade To begin the process of signing up, students need to first complete a flexible credit application and wait for approval. Prerequisite: approved application Fee: None

MARIEMONT HIGH SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION WAIVER Please see related information on page 9

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MATHEMATICS 4 credits required for graduation

Course Algebra I CP

Grade Level

Difficulty Level

Credit

Prerequisite

9 College Prep

1

Geometry CP

9, 10 College Prep

1

Algebra I CP

Geometry Honors

9, 10 Honors

1

See course description

Algebra II CP

10, 11 College Prep

1

Geometry

1

See course description

11, 12 College Prep

1

Algebra II

PreCalculus CP

9, 10, 11, 12 College Prep

1

Algebra II

PreCalculus Honors

9, 10, 11, 12 Honors

1

See course description

Algebra II Honors Algebra III CP

9, 10, 11 Honors

Calculus CP

11, 12 College Prep

1

PreCalculus CP or Honors

AP Calculus AB

11, 12 Honors

1

See course description

Statistics CP

11, 12 College Prep

1

Algebra II CP or Honors

10, 11, 12 Honors

1

PreCalculus CP or Honors AP

AP Calculus BC

12 Honors

½

AP Calculus AB

Multivariable Calc. I Honors

12 Honors

½

AP Calculus BC

Multivariable Calc. II Honors

12 Honors

½

AP Calc. BC & Multivar.Calc. I

AP Statistics

Cryptology 9, 10, 11, 12 College Prep ½ none Explanation of Math Tracking: 1. Accelerated level begins in 7th grade with Algebra I Honors and is for exceptionally strong math students. At least an 85% average in the preceding math class is required for continuing at this level. Course work is appropriate for the exceptional student. Students can be placed at this level at the recommendation of the students’ 6th grade math teacher before the start of 7th grade. 2. Honors level begins in 7th grade with Pre-Algebra Honors and is for strong math students. At least an 85% average in the preceding math class is required for continuing at this level. Course work is appropriate for excellent students. Students can be placed at this level at the recommendation of the students’ 6th grade math teacher. 3. The college preparatory level is designed for the majority of college-bound students. It begins in the 8th grade with Algebra I CP. Students can be placed at this level at the recommendation of the students’ 7th grade math teacher. NOTE: It is strongly recommended that students strive to take PreCalculus or higher. Some colleges will not accept Statistics as a fourth math credit.

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ALGEBRA I CP Grade Level: 9 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: The structure and properties of real numbers are reviewed and extended; the concept of variables is expanded. Emphasis is placed on the four basic operations on integers and fractions, linear equations and inequalities, problem solving, laws of exponents, factoring, techniques for simplifying and combining rational and irrational numbers, a study of the coordinate plane, ratio and proportion, systems of linear equations, fractional and quadratic equations and functions. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. Fee: $20 MathXL access code. Graphing calculator is required.

GEOMETRY CP Grade Level: 9, 10 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: This course deals with both problem solving and proofs of the properties of angles, parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, polygons, circles, and selected solid figures. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I CP and teacher recommendation. Fee: $20 MathXL access code. Graphing calculator is required.

ALGEBRA II CP Grade Level: 10, 11 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: The course develops the properties of real numbers, linear functions, relations, graphing, systems of equations, matrices, polynomial and rational expressions, complex numbers, exponents, quadratic functions, conics and quadratic systems, logarithms, and conic section curves. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry CP and teacher recommendation. A TI83 or T184 graphing calculator is required.

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PRECALCULUS CP Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year. Description: Emphasis is placed on refinement and advancement of algebraic skills as a student moves towards calculus. The course content includes simplifying algebraic expressions, solving algebraic equations, polynomial and rational functions, graphing, conic sections, complex and transcendental numbers, circular functions (trigonometry), sequences and series, and matrices. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II CP and teacher recommendation. A TI83 or T184 graphing calculator is required.

CALCULUS CP Grade Level: 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: This course is for students who have completed PreCalculus and is designed to introduce students to the concepts of Calculus and prepare them to take Calculus at the collegiate level. Topics will include a brief review of trigonometry and polynomial functions in addition to limits, differentiation, and integration. This course does not prepare students for the AP Calculus exam but does cover a variety of topics typically taught in a first year college Calculus course. Prerequisite: PreCalculus CP or Honors with a “C� or higher and teacher recommendation. A TI83 or T184 graphing calculator is recommended.

ALGEBRA III CP Grade Level: 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: This course is designed to prepare students for an entry level college math course. It will include further development and use of algebraic concepts, equations and inequalities, graphs and functions (including polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric) and topics in probability. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II and teacher recommendation. Fee: $20 MathXL access code. A TI83 or T184 graphing calculator recommended.

52


STATISTICS CP Grade Level: 11, 12 only Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: Statistics is for students intending to enter fields that deal with the collection and analysis of data. The course covers descriptive statistics, probability, distributions, testing, correlation and regression. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II CP or Honors Algebra II and teacher recommendation. It is strongly recommended that PreCalculus be taken concurrently (or previously). Fee: $20 MathXL access code. A TI83 or T184 graphing calculator is required.

GEOMETRY HONORS Grade Level: 7, 8, 9, 10 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade. Description: This course deals with both problem solving and proofs of the properties of angles, parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, polygons, circles, and selected solid figures, coordinate geometry, and transformation. This course is designed for students with a high mathematics aptitude and interest. The high level of effort and achievement expected demands that the student prepare daily for class and should plan to spend a minimum average of one hour on homework and test preparation each day. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors Algebra I with an 85% average or better and/or teacher recommendation. Fee: $20 MathXL access code. A graphing calculator is required.

ALGEBRA II HONORS Grade Level: 9, 10, 11 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: This course develops the properties of real numbers, linear functions and relations, systems of equations, graphing, determinants, polynomial and rational expressions, sequences and series, permutations, combinations, complex fractions, complex numbers, exponents, logarithms, and conic section curves. This course is designed for students with a high mathematics aptitude and interest. The high level of effort and achievement expected demands that the student prepare daily for class and should plan to spend a minimum average of one hour on homework and test preparation each day. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors Geometry with an 85% average or better and/or teacher recommendation. Fee: $20 MathXL access code. A TI83 or T184 graphing calculator is required.

53


PRECALCULUS HONORS Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade. You may choose to take this course as a dual credit through the University of Cincinnati. Description: The course follows Algebra II Honors and prepares a student for calculus. The course content includes functions, complex numbers, solving polynomial functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry and analytic geometry, vectors, circular functions, matrices, polar equations, and parametric equations. This course is designed for students with a high mathematics aptitude and interest., intending to pursue a math/science field. The high level of effort and achievement expected demands that the student prepare daily for class. Course Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II Honors with an 85% average or better and/or teacher recommendation. A TI83 or T184 graphing calculator is required.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade. Description: The advanced placement statistics course is an accelerated in-depth study of the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Specific course content includes constructing and interpreting graphical displays of univariate and bivariate data, sampling methods, probability theory and distributions, (binomial, geometric, poisson, normal), hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, chi-square and F distributions and nonparametric statistics. This course is designed for students with a high mathematics aptitude and interest. The high level of effort and achievement demands that the student be prepared to work at a consistent and accelerated pace. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II CP or Honors Algebra II and teacher recommendation. It is strongly recommended that PreCalculus be taken concurrently (or previously). Fee: $20 MathXL access code plus approximately $94.00 for the Advanced Placement exam, if students choose to take it, payable in April prior to the test. A TI83 or T184 graphing calculator is required.

54


ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS AB Grade Level: 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade. Description: The AP calculus course can result in the gaining of college credit depending upon a students’ score on the college board test given in May. Specific course content includes the rate of change of a function, differentiation and its applications, integration and its applications, methods of integration, transcendental functions (trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, natural logarithms and exponential), and analytic geometry. This course is designed for students with a high mathematics aptitude and interest. The high level of effort and achievement expected demands that the student prepare daily for class and should plan to spend a minimum of one half hour on homework and test preparation each day. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors PreCalculus with an 85% average or better and teacher recommendation. Fee: $20 MathXL access code, plus approximately $94.00 for the Advanced Placement exam, payable in April prior to the test. A TI83 or T184 graphing calculator is required.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS BC/MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS I HONORS Grade Level: 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year weighted grade Description: The first semester of Advanced Placement Calculus BC designed to build upon the material learned in AP Calculus AB and prepare students to take the Advanced Placement Calculus BC exam. Students will complete the AP Calculus BC curriculum studying techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and vector functions and their applications. During the second semester course in advanced calculus students will begin the study of Multivariable Calculus with applications of vector functions, conic functions, surfaces in space, and cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Multiple integrals, line integrals, partial derivatives, and differentials will be investigated as well as a beginning study of vector analysis. Toward the beginning of the fourth quarter, attention will return to the AP Calculus BC curriculum in an effort to prepare for the AP Calculus BC Exam in May. Prerequisites: Successful completion of AP Calculus AB with a grade of “A” or “B” and a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Calculus AB Exam and teacher recommendation. Fee: $15 for purchase of an AP exam review guide and approximately $94.00 for the Advanced Placement exam, payable in April prior to the test. Also, a T183 or T184 graphing calculator is required.

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MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS II HONORS Grade Level: 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: This course is a year-long course to be taken after successful completion of Multivariable Calculus I. Topics covered in Multivariable Calculus I will be revisited at a much deeper level. Multiple integration will be investigated in the form of double and triple integrals and their applications. Other areas of exploration are surface integrals, vector fields, Green’s Theorem, Divergence Theorem, and Stoke’s Theorem. This course uses an MIT OpenCourseWare offering and requires a significant amount of independent study. Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP Calculus BC and Multivariable Calculus I with a grade of “A” or “B” and a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Calculus BC Exam and teacher recommendation.

CRYPTOLOGY Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, semester Description: This semester course is an introduction and exploration of the mathematical science of sending secret messages. Students will study cryptography, encryption and decryption of information using mathematical processes. Students will discover the history behind encryption and its uses today. Careers in cryptology will be examined. The application of Caesar ciphers, Vigenere circles and squares, matrices, modular arithmetic the binary number system, factoring and other mathematical processes for encoding and decoding information will be a primary focus. NOTE: Cryptology does not satisfy the mathematics graduation requirement. Prerequisite: None Fee: None

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SCIENCE 3 credits required for graduation Course

Grade Level Difficulty Level

Biology CP

9 College Prep

Biology Honors

Credit 1

9 * Honors

1

AP Biology

11, 12 Honors

1

Physics CP

11, 12 College Prep

1

Physics Honors

11, 12 Honors

1

AP Physics C

12 Honors

1

Chemistry CP

10 College Prep

1

Chemistry Honors

10 * Honors

1

AP Chemistry

12 * Honors

1

Astronomy

11, 12 College Prep

1

Anatomy & Physiology

11, 12 College Prep

1

Forensic Science

11, 12 College Prep

1

* Student enrollment based upon specific selection criteria.

The courses offered by the Science Department are designed to provide an opportunity for students to engage in scientific inquiry, to develop positive attitudes toward the scientific enterprise, and to make decisions that are evidence based, reflecting an understanding of the relationships among science, technology, and society. Students will develop analytical, laboratory, and mathematical skills as well as explore career opportunities in science. In each class, the scientific method is developed as a way of solving problems. Note taking skills are stressed, and the writing of laboratory reports is required. The Science Department encourages students to take four years of science. Students following a strong high school science program will be prepared for higher education and for problems of the future.

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BIOLOGY CP Grade Level: 9 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: Biology CP is a college preparatory course which utilizes laboratory exercises, many of which will require the use of the microscope. Observation, problem solving, modeling and the use of scientific method will be emphasized. Lab exercises are often used to support or illustrate concepts presented in the text and lecture. Topical biology and technical advances will be discussed and explored, including cells and their functions; introductory biochemistry; genetics; animals, plants, and the relationships among organisms; ecology; and evolution. In addition, Biology explores the foundations and practices of science in general, teaches the basic processes of scientific inquiry, and emphasizes the importance of mathematics and measurement. Biology emphasizes problem solving, critical thinking, and decision making. Careful listening, reading, interpretation of data, inference, note taking and discussion will be important for understanding concepts completely. Prerequisite: Recommendation of previous year’s science teacher. Fee: $25.00

BIOLOGY HONORS Grade Level: 9* Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: Biology Honors is an in-depth introductory lab course including cellular biology, genetics, taxonomy, variation in organisms, ecology and evolution, as well as the historical development and research aspects of science. Biotechnology and recent advances will be emphasized, as will literature research. Honors biology students will be involved in special projects. Biology emphasizes problem solving, critical thinking, and decision making. In addition, Biology explores the foundations and practices of science in general, teaches the basic processes of scientific inquiry, and emphasizes the importance of mathematics and measurement. This course is suggested for those who have been highly successful in science and math and want to graduate with a strong science background. Students taking this course are encouraged to continue to AP Biology. Prerequisite: * Enrollment based upon specific selection criteria. Fee: $25.00

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ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY Grade level: 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: This course builds on topics studied in Biology CP and Biology Honors through in-depth lecture and lab experiments. Emphasis will be placed on molecular and cell biology, genetics and evolution, population biology, biodiversity, and ecosystem dynamics. Students are expected to do independent study and work at an accelerated pace. This is a college level course that will prepare students for taking the AP Examination. Prerequisites: Chemistry, recommendation of previous science teacher, and permission of the AP instructor. Fee: $50.00/Approximately $94.00 for the Advanced Placement Test, payable in April prior to the test.

CHEMISTRY CP Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: This is an introductory course designed to acquaint students with the basic principles of modern chemistry. The course provides for classroom, laboratory, and homework experience in developing concepts of: chemical measurement, classifications of matter, atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, the gas laws, reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids, bases and salts. The course will provide a basic chemistry appropriate for individuals who intend to enroll in a liberal arts program at the collegiate level. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of biology Fee: $25.00

CHEMISTRY HONORS Grade level: 10 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: This is an introductory physical chemistry course designed to introduce the student to the fundamental concepts and principles of modern chemistry. The course provides for classroom, laboratory, and homework experience in developing concepts of: chemical measurement, classifications of matter, atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, the gas laws, solution behavior, thermochemistry, reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids, bases and salts. Problem solving skills will be stressed in mathematic relationships as well as in the conclusions that can be derived from laboratory observation. The honors chemistry course is designed to provide an excellent chemistry background for those who wish to continue the study of science or engineering in college. Prerequisite: 10th grade student enrollment based on recommendation of biology teacher and successful completion of Geometry CP/Honors with a “B� or better. Fee: $25.00

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ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY Mariemont High School seniors have an opportunity to take AP Chemistry at Indian Hill High School. If a junior, at the time of course registration, is interested in taking this class senior year, they should contact the counseling department. Below is a description of the class that is taught at Indian Hill High School: Description: The motivated, science-oriented student who is successful in Advanced Chemistry and who intends to pursue a career in a science-related field should enroll in AP Chemistry. This is a college-level general chemistry course and requires a strong mathematics background. Teaching methods include both lecture and laboratory experiences. Due to the length of the college-based laboratory experiments, students will be required periodically to finish laboratory work outside of assigned class time periods. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation

PHYSICS CP Grade Level: 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: Physics CP is a college preparatory course that presents students with a survey of the core topics in physics. The topics include motion (linear and two-dimensional motion), forces, momentum, energy, and waves. The course utilizes laboratory experiments, investigations, demonstrations and discussions to conceptually develop and model everyday occurrences. An emphasis is placed on the student’s ability to both conceptually describe and mathematically describe everyday occurrences. Students are expected to be able to apply problem-solving techniques that involve predominately algebra (with some geometry and basic trigonometry). This course is suggested for those students who have been successful in science and math classes and want to graduate with a strong science background. This course is appropriate for students entering any field of study seeking to expand their knowledge in the area of physical science. Prerequisite: Successful completion of biology, chemistry, geochemistry, geometry, Algebra II and recommendation of previous science teacher. Fee: $5.00

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PHYSICS HONORS Grade Level: 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: Physics Honors is a college preparatory course that presents students with an in-depth introduction to the core topics in physics. The topics include motion (linear and two-dimensional motion), forces, momentum, energy, waves, and electricity. The course utilizes laboratory experiments, investigations, demonstrations and discussions to conceptually develop and model everyday occurrences. An emphasis is placed on the student’s ability to both conceptually describe and mathematically describe everyday occurrences. Students are expected to be able to apply problem-solving techniques that involve algebra, geometry, and basic trigonometry. This course is suggested for those students who have been highly successful in science and math classes and want to graduate with a strong science background. This course is appropriate for students considering pursuing a technical field such as engineering, architecture, healthrelated careers, mathematics, and sciences. Students taking this course are encouraged to continue into AP Physics. Prerequisite: Successful completion of biology, chemistry, geometry, PreCalculus and recommendation of previous science teacher. Fee: $5.00

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS C Grade Level: 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: This is an accelerated college level physics course that provides an in-depth continuation of the principles of physics. This course uses calculus, algebra, and trigonometry extensively in an intensive investigation of kinematics and electricity and magnetism. Emphasis is placed on gaining conceptual understanding and on the extensive use of mathematics to describe aspects of the natural world. This course is designed for students interested in pursuing fields such as engineering, advanced sciences, or other technical fields. This course is equivalent to a first year college physics course that would be required of students entering any of these advanced fields. In order to attain success in this class the students should expect to spend a minimum of one hour daily on challenging homework and/or test preparation. Prerequisite: Physics and Calculus, and recommendation of physics teacher. Fee: $20.00/The Advanced Placement Test fee is approximately $188.00 payable in April prior to the test, for any student wishing to take the AP exam. (This fee reflects a $94 fee for the Kinematics exam and $94 for the Electricity & Magnetism exam.)

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ASTRONOMY Grade Level: 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: Students will become well acquainted with the solar system and the stars. Stellar evolution, galaxies, and cosmology will be discussed. Independent observations of the night sky and field trips will build on classroom work. A college level text is required reading for this course; students will be expected to read the text independent of classwork. Tests and exams are based on required reading assignments. Prerequisite: None Fee: $5.00, plus field trip fees when applicable.

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY Grade Level: 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: This course will be based on selected experiments and study in the structure and function of the human body systems, including the nervous, skeletal, integumentary, muscular, circulatory, and respiratory systems. Lab exercises will include metabolism, heart rate, reflexes, and muscle contraction, among others. Independent reading is required in this course. Tests and exams are based on the college level text. Prerequisite: Successful completion of biology and chemistry. Fee: $30.00

FORENSIC SCIENCE Grade Level: 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit 5 periods/week, full year Description: This course is a very “hands-on� introduction to the application of scientific methods related to the practices and analysis of physical evidence found at crime scenes, in addition to the examination of crime labs, methodology, the criminal justice system and the law. Numerous lab activities and case studies will be completed in the following areas: types of evidence, crime scene evaluation, evidence analysis techniques for fingerprints, hair, fibers, drugs, toxicology, trace evidence, soil and glass, blood, DNA, forensic entomology, human remains, firearms, tool marks and impressions. Attention will also be given to document and handwriting analysis. Biotechnology and instrumental methods of analysis to the classification of physical evidence include use of ultra-violet, visible, and infrared spectral analysis, chromatography, and electrophoresis. Guest speakers share field experiences. Videos and field trips add relevance to a wide variety of lab investigations. Prerequisite: Successful completion of biology, chemistry, or Physics Fee: $30.00

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SOCIAL STUDIES Course

Grade Level Difficulty Level

Credit

World History I Honors

9 Honors

1

Modern World Studies I CP

9 College Prep

1

Modern World Studies II CP

10 College Prep

AP European History

10 Honors

1

American History CP

11 College Prep

1

AP United States History

11 Honors

1

American Government CP

12 College Prep

1

AP Government and Politics: U.S

12 Honors

1

Law and Criminal Justice *

10, 11, 12 College Prep

½

Sociology *

10, 11, 12 College Prep

½

Psychology *

11, 12 College Prep

½

Philosophy *

10, 11, 12 College Prep

½

AP Psychology *

11, 12 Honors

½

Prerequisite See course description

See course description See course description See course description

See course description

* These courses do not satisfy graduation requirement. Mariemont High School requires three credits of social studies for graduation. It is recommended, however, that college-bound students complete one social studies credit each year for a total of four social studies credits: Freshman year: Modern World Studies I (highly recommended) or World History I Honors Sophomore year: (one credit is required)

Modern World Studies II or AP European History

Junior year: (one credit is required)

American History or AP United States History

Senior year: (one credit is required)

American Government or AP Government and Politics

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WORLD HISTORY I HONORS Grade Level: 9 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: The World History I Honors course develops students’ capacities and abilities to think and reason in a deeper, more systematic way, better preparing them for subsequent college level (AP) courses. The content covers a broad range of history: from approximately 8000 B.C.E. until approximately 1800 C.E. The four historical thinking skills emphasized during the course – Crafting Historical Arguments from Historical Evidence, Chronological Reasoning, Comparison and Contextualization, and Historical Interpretation and Synthesis – provide an essential structure for learning to think historically. These skills not only apply to World History I Honors; they also represent the types of skills required in all college-level historical scholarship. Expectations for student work ethic are exceptionally high. Students will be utilizing AP level textbook and materials. Prerequisites: JH Social Studies and English teacher recommendations Fee: None

MODERN WORLD STUDIES I CP Grade Level: 9 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Course Objective: Students will attain social studies skills focusing on critical thinking, analysis and an understanding of primary source documents as they study the emerging modern World. The students will look at all regions of the world as they see an increasingly connected world. They will examine the social, political, geographical, cultural economic issues facing the world from the time period of roughly 1400-1918 C.E. Description: This course will emphasize a survey of Western history including major units on the Renaissance, Reformation, the Development of Islamic Empires, Exploration and Colonization, the Age of Absolutism, the establishment of modern cultures in Africa and Asia, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, the Age of Napoleon, the Industrial Revolution, the Rise of Imperialism and World War I. Prerequisite: None Fee: None

MODERN WORLD STUDIES II CP Grade level: 10 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Course Objective: Building and expanding upon the framework of World Studies I, the World Studies II course is an in-depth study of the 20th Century. Students will become globally competent by recognizing and understanding how human societies and cultures have changed and developed in the twentieth century. Description: This course is unique in its emphasis on the world of the twentieth century, beginning with the Versailles Treaty at the end of World War I, the course covers the Russian Revolution, nationalist movements, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, independence of colonies, and movement towards democracy. In addition, during the second semester, a special emphasis will be placed on current events, focusing on Nationalism vs. Multi-nationalism vs. Supra-nationalism vs. Micro-nationalism, global institutions, the environment, terrorism, and economic development/globalization. Prerequisite: Modern World History I Fee: None 64


ADVANCED PLACEMENT EUROPEAN HISTORY Grade Level: 10 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: Advanced Placement European History prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those of an introductory college European history course. To participate in the program, students should be highly motivated and develop the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal with the requirements of a stimulating and demanding course. The national AP examination is given at the end of the year, which may allow students to receive college credit based on their performance. Prerequisite: World History I Honors (recommended) or World History I and recommendation of previous social studies teacher. Fee: $15.00 and approximately $94.00 for the Advanced Placement Test, payable in April prior to the test. NOTE: Students are encouraged to take the AP exam. The exam is not mandatory. If a student elects not to take the exam, he/she will still receive high school credit upon successful completion of the course; the grade will be weighted.

AMERICAN HISTORY CP Grade Level: 11 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: This is a required course for all juniors. It deals with the leading aspects of American history from the Civil War to the present. Attention is given to political issues, institutions, political parties, leadership, and diplomatic and constitutional questions; as well as economic, social, and intellectual trends. This course also focuses on what is unique in the American historical experience and relates American history to the broader global context. This course also requires a major research paper in the 3rd quarter. Prerequisite: Modern World History II Fee: None NOTE: Students must pass American History to graduate. Students must also pass Ohio’s state American History test in the spring.

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ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY Grade Level: 11 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: Advanced Placement American History prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those of an introductory college survey of history course. Students should develop the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with problems and materials studied. Students are expected to do extensive reading. The national AP examination is given at the end of the year, which may allow students to receive college credit based on their performance. Prerequisite: World History II/AP European History and recommendation of previous social studies teacher. Fee: $15.00 and approximately $94.00 for the Advanced Placement Test, payable in April prior to the test. NOTE: Students are encouraged to take the AP exam. The exam is not mandatory. If a student elects not to take the exam, he/she will still receive credit upon successful completion of the course; the grade will be weighted.

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT CP Grade Level: 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: American Government is designed to provide the student with a survey of the American federal, state, and local governments. The emphasis will be on the relationship between these divisions of government and the role of the citizen in upholding each. Research is an integral part of the course work. In addition to government, economics and financial literacy will be taught. Prerequisite: CP or AP United States History Fee: None NOTE: Students must pass American Government to graduate. Students must also pass Ohio’s state American Government test in the spring.

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ADVANCED PLACEMENT GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS: U.S. Grade Level: 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: Advanced Placement Government and Politics prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those of an introductory college political science course. Students should develop the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with problems and materials studied. In addition, students enrolled in this course will gain an understanding of economics and financial literacy.This course requires a summer reading assignment, and students read one extra book during the year. The national AP examination is given at the end of the year, which may allow students to receive college credit based on their performance. Prerequisite: American History, World History II, and recommendation from previous social studies teacher. Fee: $15.00 and approximately $94.00 for the Advanced Placement Test, payable in April prior to the test. NOTE: Students are encouraged to take the AP exam, but the AP exam is not mandatory. If a student elects not to take the AP exam, s/he will still receive credit upon successful completion of the course.

INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY Grade Level: 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: This course is designed to provide the student with an introduction to the study of psychology. Topics to be covered include: influence of biology on behavior, human capacities of thinking, learning and communication, motivation, emotion, and mental health. Students are required to read a number of scholarly articles related to the field of psychology and review them critically. Attempts are made to apply the material covered to specific situations in everyday living and to provide a clearer understanding of our own behavior and the motivations of those around us. Prerequisite: None Fee: None NOTE: This course may not be substituted for required social studies courses.

AP PSYCHOLOGY

Grade Level: 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester (Spring) only in length Description: The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychology course (1 semester), and recommendation of Psychology teacher Fee: $15.00 and approximately $94.00 for the Advanced Placement Test, payable in April prior to the test. NOTE: Students are encouraged to take the AP exam. The exam is not mandatory. If a student elects not to take the exam, he/she will still receive credit upon successful completion of the course; the grade will be weighted.

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SOCIOLOGY Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: This course is designed to describe sociological concepts, examine the basic structures and functioning of society, and consider current social problems. Social problems considered vary according to class interests, but represent problems associated with social stability, minorities, and the individual in society. Students are required to read a number of scholarly articles related to the field of sociology and review them critically. Class materials include a basic text, a variety of current articles from the field, community resource persons, and student research. Prerequisite: None Fee: None NOTE: This course may not be substituted for required social studies courses

PHILOSOPHY Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: Philosophy is a class that challenges not only your intuition, critical thinking skills, and understanding of others, but also your own beliefs. In studying such renowned philosophers such as Plato, Socrates, David Hume, and Rene Descartes, students are exposed to an entirely new level of interpretation, problem solving, and verbal debate and discussion skills. With such an incredible class atmosphere, this course makes you think about, and subsequently question, ideas that you had automatically accepted in the past; furthermore, in depth discussions and class debates may even lead you to question some of your more deeply-rooted personal ‘philosophies.’ In essence, Philosophy is not just a class that teaches you how to find a voice in the crowd and accept the perspectives of others, but it is also an exceptional opportunity to learn more about yourself. Prerequisite: None Fee: None NOTE: This course may not be substituted for required social studies courses.

LAW AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: This course provides an overview of the legal system of Ohio and the United States. Topics include legal foundation, criminal law, juvenile justice, civil law, contract law, business law, and family law. Students will be able to apply the concepts learned in class to real-life case studies in order to foster an understanding of how the law works in our daily lives. Prerequisite: None Fee: None NOTE: This course may not be substituted for required social studies courses.

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TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMMING COURSES COMPUTER PROGRAMMING IA/IB Grade Level: 9-12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, one semester Description: Computer Programming IA is a beginning course in programming. Fundamental programming concepts are presented using TRUE BASIC. TRUE BASIC is a procedural language purposefully designed for the teaching of programming. Course content includes, but is not limited to, TRUE BASIC commands and language specifics, writing console applications, looping structures, decision structures, and elementary data types. By implementing elementary programming constructs, students are able to establish the groundwork of problem solving skills using technology. The logic developed, and the need for precise solutions in this course, are sure to enhance the student’s problem-solving skills in his/her mathematics courses. An exposure to the concepts of object-oriented programming occurs via Jeroo. Jeroo is an interactive programming application whereby a transition to Java begins. Building upon a fundamental knowledge of programming acquired in “Computer Programming 1A,” students continue delving deeper into the realm of object-oriented programming (OOP). A language switch from TRUE BASIC to Java is completed. A migration to Java of the elementary programming constructs learned in TRUE BASIC occurs. The concepts of modularity and data encapsulation/abstraction are further investigated. This semester of programming of “low-level” Java will ease the transition into AP-level Java, which tends to be much more rigorous and rapidly paced. Fee: None

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COMPUTER SCIENCE A Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Computer Science A Exam where successful results (as determined by the individual colleges) may earn college credit. The course includes an indepth and rapidly paced study of Java. The course emphasizes programming methodology with a concentration on problem solving and algorithm development. It is meant to be the equivalent of a firstsemester course in Computer Science at a post-secondary school. It also includes the study of data structures and abstraction. A comprehensive analysis of a case study is an integral part of this course. It should be emphasized that this course represents college-level achievement. Therefore, this course is recommended for highly motivated students who have interest in pursuing degrees and careers in computer science, engineering, mathematics and applied mathematics, and science. Prerequisite: Computer Programming I, and teacher recommendation. Fee: $15 for the purchase of an AP exam review guide and approximately $94.00 for the Advanced Placement exam, payable prior to the test.

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HONORS DATA STRUCTURES Grade Level: 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: This course was formerly taught as Advanced Placement Computer Science AB. The College Board no longer offers an AP exam for this upper-level Java course. However, the course has changed in name only. The content is the same as the previous APCS AB course. The course includes an in-depth and rapidly paced advanced study of Java. The course builds upon the topics of “AP Computer Science Level A” as well as a more formal and in-depth study of algorithms, data structures, and inheritance. The course is recommended for students who have interest in pursuing degrees and careers in computer science, engineering, mathematics and applied mathematics, and science. Prerequisite: AP Computer Science Level A and teacher recommendation. Fee: None

HONORS ADVANCED COMPUTER SCIENCE TOPICS Grade Level: 12 Course Credit: 1 credit, 5 periods/week, full year, weighted grade Description: This course is an exploration of a wide variety of leading-edge computer science topics. These topics include, but are not limited to, JavaScript, Dynamic HTML, database manipulation and interaction via SQL, PHP, and ASP.NET. Both client-side and server-side code will be explored. It is designed as a postadvanced placement experience for students who are highly self-motivated and interested in broadening their horizons in computer science. Prerequisite: AP Computer Science A, Honors Data Structures, and teacher recommendation. Fee: None

INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING AND DESIGN Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: IED is the first course in a sequence of four courses which follows the national Project Lead the Way curriculum. Students use a problem-solving model to improve existing products and invent new ones. They learn how to apply this model to solve problems in and out of the classroom. Using sophisticated three-dimensional modeling software, students communicate the details of the products. Emphasis is placed on analyzing potential solutions and communicating ideas to others. Prerequisite: None Fee: None

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PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING Grade Level: 10, 11, 12 Course Credit: ½ credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: This survey course of engineering exposes students to major concepts they will encounter in a postsecondary engineering course of study. Students employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solutions of engineering design problems. They develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges, documenting their work and communicating solutions to peers and members of the professional community. Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering and Design. Fee: None NOTE: Principles of Engineering and Introduction to Engineering and Design may be taken concurrently.

DIGITAL ELECTRONICS Grade Level: 11, 12 Course Credit: 1 Credit, 5 periods/week, full year Description: From smart phones to appliances, digital circuits are all around us. This course provides a foundation for students who are interested in electrical engineering, electronics, or circuit design. Students study topics such as combinational and sequential logic and are exposed to tools used in industry, including logic gates, integrated circuits, professional circuit design software, and programmable logic devices. Students who meet Project Lead the Way (PLTW) end-of-course criteria may purchase optional college credit for this course. Prerequisite: Principles of Engineering Fee: None

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MARIEMONT HIGH SCHOOL FEES 2019-2020 SCHOOL YEAR $ 15.00 / $94.00 AP Test $ 15.00 / $94.00 AP Test $ 15.00 / $94.00 AP Test $ 15.00 / $94.00 AP Test $ 30.00 $ 30.00 $ 30.00 $ 30.00 $ 10.00 $ 12.00 $ 15.00 $ 10.00

AP Latin: Vergil & Caesar AP Spanish Lang. and Cult. Latin II Latin III Latin IV: Latin Lit. Survey Spanish IV

Advanced Ceramics Advanced Computer Graphics Advanced Sculpture Advanced Photography AP Art History AP Studio Art

$ 40.00 $ 35.00 $ 35.00 $ 35.00 $ 15.00 / $94.00 AP Test $ 40.00 plus cost of major

Algebra I CP Algebra II Honors Algebra III CP AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC AP Statistics Geometry CP Geometry Honors Statistics CP

$ 20.00 $ 20.00 $ 20.00 $ 20.00 / $94.00 AP Test $ 15.00 / $94.00 AP Test $ 20.00 / $94.00 AP Test $ 20.00 $ 20.00 $ 20.00

supplies / $94.00 AP Test

Ceramics Computer Graphics Drawing Fashion Design Glass Studio Intro 2D Design I Painting

$ 40.00 $ 35.00 $ 15.00 $ 35.00 $ 55.00 $ 20.00 $ 15.00 plus cost of

AP Comp. Science Level A

$15.00 / $94.00 AP Test

$ 15.00 / $94.00 AP Test $ 15.00 / $94.00 AP Test $ 15.00 / $94.00 AP Test $ 15.00 / $94.00 AP Test

Anatomy/Physiology AP Biology AP Physics C

$ 30.00 $ 50.00 / $94.00 AP Test $ 20.00 $188.00 AP Test

(This fee reflects a $94 fee for the Kinematics exam and $94 for the Electricity & Magnetism exam.)

Astronomy Biology CP Biology Honors Chemistry CP Chemistry Honors Forensic Science Physics CP Physics Honors

$ 5.00 $ 25.00 $ 25.00 $ 25.00 $ 25.00 $ 30.00 $ 5.00 $ 5.00

major supplies ($25-$50)

Photography Sculpture Stained Glass Studio Art

$ 35.00 $ 35.00 $ 45.00 $ 30.00 plus cost of

AP European History AP Government and Politics AP Psychology AP United States History

$ 5.00 / $94.00 AP Test $ 45.00 / $94.00 AP Test $ 5.00 $ 5.00 $ 5.00 $ 18.00

AP Seminar AP English Lang. & Comp. AP English Lit. & Comp. AP Research English I CP English I Honors English II CP English II Honors English III CP English IV CP Journalism/Newspaper Yearbook/Publications

major supplies ($25-$50)

High School Chamber Choir $ 80.00 High School Concert Choir $ 80.00 High School Band $100.00 High School Chamber Ensemble $ 85.00 High School Concert String Orchestra $ 85.00 Locker Fee Parking Fee

$ 5.00 $ 50.00 per semester

*NOTE:

Fee “scholarships” are available to cover part of the fine and practical arts course fees. Students for whom the fees are a hardship may speak with their counselor about accessing the “scholarship.” Fee “reductions” are available to cover part or all of the AP exam fees. Students for whom AP exam fees are a hardship may speak with their counselor about filing for a fee reduction. Fees are subject to change.

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A D MINISTRATOR S Mr. Steven Estepp, Superintendent Dr. James Renner, Principal Mr. Trevo r Block, Assistant Principal

COU NSELOR S Mrs. Amanda Leszczuk, Director of College & Career Counseling (aleszczuk@mariemontschools.org) Mrs. Victoria Zaya, grades 9 and 10 (vzaya@mariemontschools.org) Mrs. Pam Tackett, grades 11 and 12 (ptackett@mariemontschools.org)

Mariemont High School 1 War r i o r Way C in c i n n at i , O h i o 4 5 2 2 7 51 3 - 272-76 0 0 5 13-5 2 7-5 9 9 1 ( f ax)

CEEB co de ( AC T/ S AT) = 3 63 -2 05

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Profile for Mariemont City School District

2019-20 Mariemont High School Course Description Guide  

Mariemont High School Course Description Guide for the 2019-20 school year

2019-20 Mariemont High School Course Description Guide  

Mariemont High School Course Description Guide for the 2019-20 school year