Page 1

Portfolio

Marie-Eve Lamarre Brodsky marie-eve.lamarre@mail.mcgill.ca

2013


Content Selection (2006-13)

Architecture Retaining Wall, 50 Bed Hospital for Haiti 9 Down Syndrome Stimuli Center 20 Permanent & Ephemeral Art Gallery 27 Housing Crisis in the North 29 Minimal Addition, Taming a Residual Space 1

31

In Progress Public Material Library at UQAM

Design-Build Sleeping in the Woods 37 Managing the Home Front: Urban Garden 33

Urban Design Measuring Collective Health 41 Urban Anomaly (short movie) 43 East Point Commuter Rail 39

Reseach & Exhibition 45 Behind the Walls 47 A Guidebook exploring PGL Architecture Selected Graphics 49 Rice Field Hairdresser 51 Forest Camp 53 Fukuoka Tsuchiya Boutique

55

Model Sanada House CV 57


“[...] provide a new permanent health care center, help protect the city from further erosion and flooding, and filter the river water to be suitable for drinking�

Multi-purpose infrastructure, view from new bridge [access to river, water bio-filter, hospital = retaining wall)

)

Regional approach, a new typology for health [water distribution+health centers+landscape infrastructure] 1

Existing floodplain & rubbles of former hospital [strategic hill location must be consolidated from erosion]

Structured floodplain, hosp [Structured, safe & permanent


- Architec t

onto - Tor

2012

ono rable mentio

n

h

-Seymour &Shi

evine Prize fo r rley L

2012

inabil Susta ity -

spital as retaining wall civic center on the hill]

for Humanity ure

Mc Gill University

morgue post-mortem mechanical room women’s ward delivery rooms & maternity clinic children’s ward wc/laundry kitchen cafeteria triage emergency room intensive care

pre-operation surgery

general ward

Retaining Wall, 50 Bed Hospital Water, Health, Proximity for Jacmel Jacmel, like its neighboring Haitian cities, lies amidst the devastation from constant floods, erosion, cholera, poverty, and the aftermath of the earthquake in 2010. Jacmel’s hospital was partially destroyed in the earthquake, and although an abundance of foreign aid has come into the city, the hospital has still not been rebuilt. Hôpital Saint-Michel, situated on the west side of the city along the embankment of Rivière de la Cosse currently cannot provide aid to the 20,000 Haitians who travel to the hospital to seek care every month. According to the United Nations, half of all hospital patients in Haiti suffer from waterborne diseases. This suggests that the improvement of water conditions in Jacmel and subsequently Haiti would greatly improve the wellbeing of its people and alleviate the pressure on the struggling health care facilities. The construction of a new 50 bed hospital on the existing site aims to do three things – provide a new permanent health care center, help protect the city from further erosion and flooding, and filter the river water to be suitable for drinking. These goals can be accomplished by imagining the hospital as a robust infrastructure that runs along the embankment, incorporating these elements into a 300m long retaining wall. Constructed by a simple gabion basket system, the facility inserts itself in the landscape and creates a new relationship between the river and the city. The wall does not block access to the water, but generates a new pedestrian route along its edge and further connects the hospital to the outlying villages through the establishment of a new bridge at the south end of the site. A public water distribution centre also anchors the bottom of the site, where the cleansed water is held and pumped as needed. The filtration system relies on biological processes and materials to decontaminate collected water, thus providing a long-term resource for the city. The linear organization of the hospital pavilions allows for the exterior circulation and waiting spaces to expand outwards and permeate a large landscaped public ground, also providing space for future expansion of the hospital. Unlike the disaster relief hospitals which are temporarily set up and then taken away, we envision all components of the hospital as a permanent addition to the city. By providing a wide range of public services and spaces, the hospital becomes a catalyst for new civic life in Jacmel.

classroom pharmacy

water distribution Program

Jacmel, Haiti McGill University, with Caileigh Mackellar 2


“[...] Unlike the disaster relief hospitals which are temporarily set up and then taken away, we envision all components of the hospital as a p

* Wall ramp located at the heart of hospital

** Wall path and typical ward

*** Water distribution center and circulation 3


permanent addition to the city. By providing a wide range of public services and spaces, the hospital becomes a catalyst for new civic life in Jacmel. �

*

**

***

4


Integrated secondary structure Gabion baskets stacked & fastened together Hygienic wall clip-on panel Local stone filling for variety of colors and finishes

Prefab flattened baskets /on site assembly

Constructive system [prefabricated gabion baskets, on-site assembly]

growing medium diffusion plate silt & carbon clay sand & colloidal silver geo-textile gravel

filtration basin

collecting pipe cistern

Gravity water bio-filter [two filters within the wall: for river water & for rain water ] 5

distribution hand pump

trough


Nurse station, circulation & waiting space [gabion basket wall assembly, lightweight roof assembly, water collecting roof system]

Infrastructure: riverside path & bio-filter [multi-purpose strategy: retaining wall, path, filter, hospital] 6


“[...] imagining the hospital as a robust piece of infrastructure that runs along the embankment, incorporating these elements into a 300 m long retaining wall. Constructed by a simple gabion basket system, the facility inserts itself in the landscape and creates a new relationship between the river and the city�

7


Topographic model with infrastructure 8


Interface for Learning: Down Syndrome Stimuli Center Down syndrome is considered to be both a developmental and a mental illness. This dual condition may explain why this illness is under serviced among the Canadian health care system. Due to screening tests, the number of new born babies with down syndrome is decreasing. Societal tendencies lean towards perfection and rejection of imperfection. As such, Umberto Eco’s account of beauty and ugliness is telling. One can describe beauty and perfection in detail but ugliness is only the lack thereof. The irregularity of the whole would be associated with ugliness. The concepts of perfection and subtraction served as a base to produce a mnemonic architecture challenging the body and stimulating the memory. The configuration is adapted to down syndrome’s favored learning methods and patterns. Physical challenges and stimuli. are central concepts which are embodied by repetition and redundancy. These would be noticed when underlined by changing environments and substitution of parts. Haptic, mnemonic and sequential elements compose the architecture which becomes an interface for learning. The center promotes weekend stays for children and parental relief. In addition, an out patient clinic gives access to stimuli room, regular health monitoring, physiotherapy, speech therapy. Users benefit from the interaction with other children. This clinic is anchored to its residential neighborhood. A public library, a cafeteria, and a rooftop splash pool serve as community center for the neighborhood, while the rest of the building is off-limit and encompass a gym, a stimuli room (Snozelen), a medical examination room, playrooms and dormitory. The overall circular shape is preferred because it allows one to be at once part of a large environment and to turn away from it to create a smaller world. Windows, staircases, structure, sky lights, bridge allow to act on memory to stimulate using a play on regularity and irregularity. The elemental and simple cylindrical shape of the building is punctured and modified to negotiate a relationship with its immediate environment and to guide the user. The exterior atrium is traversed by a path connecting residential streets, the hospital and the park surrounding the clinic. A textured metal wall act as a haptic signal which guides and encourages the vertical circulation

Montreal, Canada McGill University, with Caileigh Mackellar 9

1.

2.

3.

4.


1. Perfect, centripetal, exclusive, protective [contrasting with context] 2. Shifting axis for accessibility [adapting to context] 3. Damaging, fragmenting [opening to context] 4. Cues, stimuli and challenges vs sameness, continuity [structuring elements]

5. Center and path to atrium [double skin system: glass and wood slats]

10


“[...]a mnemonic architecture is put forward challenging the body and stimulating the memory. The configuration is adapted to down syndrome’s favored learning methods and patterns. Physical challenges and stimuli. are central concepts which are embodied by repetition and redundancy.�

+2

vertical circulation encouraged

+1

0

-1

(public)

(semi-public)

(private)

1. Distribution based on levels of privacy [to encourage vertical motion through the building] 2. Exploded Axonometric View [levels & materiality] 11


Envelope: Wood Cladding (outside skin) Metal Paneling (atrium wall)

+2

+1

0

-1

Cafeteria & Roof Terrace

Playroom & Dormitory

Library & Jungle Gym

Snoezelen Room; Reading Room; Medical labs; Staff room

Landscape: pathway; children park; access to hospital

12


1.

13


A

C

B

* A-A Entrance Atrium

* B-B Tactile Wall

* C-C Central Void for Circulation

1. Site plan with intervention [hospital parking lot, lane behind commercial street] 2. Exterior Atrium, tactile wall, interior stairs (single wood skin for exterior atrium) 14


Underground level

Moat

Office

WC

Mechanical Room Exit Stair

Reading Room

Analysis Laboratory Snoezelen Room

*

Medical Examination Room Observation Laboratory

15


Ground floor

WC Library & Toy Loan

Main Entrance

Office

Jungle Gym

Exterior Atrium

16


First floor

Guardian Room Playroom

* WC & Shower Room Emergency Exit Dormitory

Interior Catwalk

17


Top floor

Exit Stair

Cafeteria

Roof Terrace Change Rooms

Splash pool

18


gather

be useful

be subtle

make public

repair

C Underground Link

A Stairs as Observatory B Public Place (+1.5) over ground level

4

3 2

(0) ground level

(-1) underground level 19

1 cooling

heating

access


W

UrbanThreshold Underground: Permanent & Ephemeral Art Gallery

N

N

E

W

E

Permanence and impermanence are the facts of architecture. A building’s alterations over time, may be a reflection on its inability to adapt to changes which could be factored in the design.

orient S

S

Wind

N

N

W

E

This project takes place in Notre-Dame de Grâce neighborhood in Montreal along Sherbrooke Street West. The narrow site includes a building named ‘the annex’ which is located in front of a large sloped park. It is next to the Empress Theater, a former cultural hub currently in need of redevelopment. An urban analysis reveals the importance of the site as it constitutes the entrance to the neighborhood and an important hub for cultural activities. The various transit infrastructures have created enclaves that have damaged the connexion within the neighborhood.

W

E

S

S

Sun Cour

Cour

Cour

Cour

Cour

Cour

Cour

Cour

F Access Ramp Massing Cour

7 E Outdoor Stage 6

Voids

D Public Path

5 1 Lane Access 2 Shared Hall (Theater & Gallery) 3 Access to Empress Theater

Currently, the sunken Decarie Expressway negatively serves as the threshold of the neighborhood. This massive piece of infrastructure fractures the experience of the city. My proposal aims to create a new threshold for the neighborhood. This can be achieved by linking the park to the site of the annex located in front. By opening the narrow site, a public space can take place opening up a dialogue with the other side: the park. The building is thus stretched underground, welcoming a linear promenade, a series of art galleries that connect with the basement level of Empress Theater. At street level, the roof of the volumes softly emerge out of the ground and welcomes various public elements: a public space, a path into the park and a stage in the park for outdoor performances. The facade of the Empress is revealed and welcomes a series of stairs which connects the public space to each levels of the theater.

4 Understreet Gallery 5 Skylit Gallery (Under Park) 6 Top Gallery 7 Park Access

street level

temporary

exterior

Underground

permanent

interior

public

Montreal, Canada McGill University 20


“[...] Permanence and impermanence are the facts of architecture. A building’s obsolescence may be a reflection of the inability of its mak “[...] Flexible designs and spaces that can welcome change in the urban life, adaptability supported by a permanent infrastructureable to w

1. public space: 2000 sq. ft 2. offices /reception: 240 sq. ft 3. access / hall + link to Empress: 2000 sq.ft. 4. gallery 1 (under street): 2500 sq. ft 5. gallery 2: 3500 sq. ft. 6. access / sunken garden: 650 sq. ft 7. outdoor stage: 1800 sq ft 8. outdoor path

1.

21

2.

3.

4.


ker to foresee the most evident outcome of all: change.� withstand any use�

Underground Plan

Ground Plan

7.

6.

5.

Long Section 22


23


Wall & Retaining Wall Detail

Wall Detail

Foundation Detail

Short Sections

24


Sectional Model 25


Permanence: n. The state or quality of lasting or remaining unchanged indefinitely; Temporary: adj. lasting for only a limited period of time; “...maybe we can be the first to actually experience the moment that preservation is no longer a retroactive activity but becomes a prospective activity [...] we will have to decide in advance what we are going to build for prosperity sooner or later...� —Rem Koolhaas Preservation is Overtaking us 26


New dwellings: inter generational, modern, climate-based arrangement + give a site specific, climate specific dwelling that works with existing family structure with flexibility

aerodynamic roof and exterior wall

double layer wall minimal opening

gabion basket

4 8 courtyard / microclimate

vestibule

16

24

Family Units 27

control shape #1

control shape #2

existing shape controlcontrol shape #1 shape #1vs longitudinal orientation exposed surfaceto main wind: 1/6

control existing control shapeshape #2 shapevs#2 lateral orientation exposed surface to main wind: 1/3

proposed shape using wind orientation power to cl existingexisting shape vs shape longitudinal vs longitudinal orientation exposed exposed surfaceto surfaceto main wind: main 1/6 wind: 1/6 1/6 exposed surface to main wind:


- Canadian Cen

2008

Montreal re -

or Architectu ter f

Retrofitting existing bungalows to connect to ground + consolidate existing bungalows, reduce need for importations: local stone fill (volcanic stones) Standard bungalow standard facades exposed sub floors gap stilts

adaptable strategy

access ramp

n

h

ono rable mentio

Housing Crisis in the North: Small Scale Territorial Approach The North of Quebec is currently experiencing a housing crisis. New homes will have to be built shortly. For the last 50 years, non-traditional prefabricated houses have been imported from the south, with no particular adjustments for the climate or for the specificity of the site.(from window placement to materials and partitions). Furthermore, the traditional relationship to the ground was broken with the arrival of modern heated homes. While, the direct contact to the ground was a key element of the traditional dwellings, no efforts were made to maintain it because direct contact of heated homes cause the thawing of the permafrost. This project questions and interprets new possible scenarios to reconcile the fundamental and traditional relationship to the earth and the contemporary ways of living of the inhabitants of northern Quebec. The needs and realities of this northern region act as positive constraints. (1) In order to adapt to existing structure, we have designed a modular system to reconnect existing bungalows to the earth. Using gabion baskets and local stones, a new raised ground maintains a necessary distance to the permafrost while bridging the gap. The system adapts to both existing and new homes as it is fitted around the stilts. This simple constructive method makes use of local labor and material to alleviate the need for imported goods. (2) The new prefabricated homes make use of dominant winds, while also showing minimal openings on most exposed sides. The units are grouped to recreate traditional community structure. Extended families are united in units housing from 4 to 16 people depending on desired proximity. When properly oriented, the grouping enables a micro climate within the group which also harnesses the wind to clear snow from pathways and entrances. Typical unit consist primarily of open spaces distributed on two floors with a vestibule. Thermal mass, radiant floors and vertical opening ensure comfort and efficiency. Because the traditional hunting practices are preferred by most households, large hygienic food preparation spaces replace southern style bungalow kitchens and ensures a safe disposal and storage of animal product.

stone filled gabion baskets transportable customized units

Inukjuak, North Quebec, Canada With E. Leclerc & V. Boulanger

wind test & orientation

control shape #2 shape #2 control lear snow

existing shape vs shape longitudinal orientation existing vs longitudinal orientation exposed surfaceto main wind: 1/6 wind: 1/6 exposed surfaceto main

existing shape vs lateral orientation existing shape vs lateral orientation exposed surface main wind: 1/3 wind: 1/3 exposedtosurface to main

proposed proposed shape using windusing power to clear shape wind powersnow to clear snow exposed surface main wind: 1/6 wind: 1/6 exposedtosurface to main

28


Minimal Addition Taming a Residual Space The School of Design at UQAM is located in the heart of downtown and has on its side a large opening leading to an alleyway providing access to the school as well as to the back of a series of restaurants. It serves as a secondary access and a delivery area for businesses of Sainte-Catherine street. In addition, its hidden and closed character allows for many wanderers and drug users to use this space on a regular basis, contributing to general insecurity. The qualification of this place remains ambiguous because its shape evokes both the lane, the enclave, the court and the passage. The program description was primarily aimed at restricting access to the court so as to give it back to the students of the School of Design, creating an exterior extension conducive to ongoing activities of the school (design events, exhibitions, screenings). We propose an enclosing system for the courtyard that is capable of maintaining the access when needed While is acts as a defense mechanism, it’s appearance and positioning is aiming to stay away from the appearance of a fence, rather borrowing the appearance of natural obstacles such as rock formations. The positioning of this element maintains a courtyard in the forefront of the space which maintains the link to the city and mediates the relation to the aforementioned users. This punctual element respects the topology of the ground and highlights the elements that are already present in this space. Thus, this slate wall is disposed in line with a notch found in the ventilation system. The wall is of varying thicknesses and of rough appearance on the side of the new courtyard and a smooth finish street side to accommodate video projections. Given the ongoing deliveries, a wide passage remains necessary. A lightweight metal sliding door on rails allows this space to remain accessible. It is secured to the wall by means of recessed tracks. This closure is intended as a sculptural element borrowing the architectural language of the school, interacting with existing elements (air vent). The integration of lithic material, sets the intervention apart from he surrounding environment. This addition becomes an autonomous object marking a threshold.

Montreal, Canada UQĂ€M With Marilyne Boulet & Martine Vincent 29

Site model with minimal addition

0 1 2 3 4 5 6

Street side Lane Slate wall

6

Sliding metal gate Ventilation exhaust pipe School of Design Back side of restaurants

2


5

4 3

1

0 30


5

4

2

3

1

Exemple of Casing Assembly, Studio Cube ®

Adaptive Public Material Library Origin Based Classification

5

588

D

2

450

A

11

9

B

4

CAISSON C - VUE ÉCLATÉE TITLE:

ÉCH: 1:10 4

SHEET 10 OF 13

WEIGHT:

2

3

1

ALUMINIUM

ARGENT

MAGNÉSIUM

BRONZE

OR

ZINC

CUIVRE

NICKEL

ÉTAIN

PLOMB

LAITON

TRADITIONNELLES

GRÉS

FAÏENCE

PORCELAINE

TERRE CUITE

ÉLECTRIQUE

RÉFRACTAIRES ISOLANTES

ISOLATION

RENFORT

PORTLAND

COULIS ET MORTIER

BÉTON ORDINAIRE

BÉTON ARMÉ

BÉTON PRÉCONTRAINT

NATUREL

ARTIFICIEL

COURANT

SPÉCIAUX

PIERRE DE COULEUR ET PIGMENTS

MODIFIÉ

NORMAL

DURCISSEMENT RAPIDE

FAIBLE DÉGAGEMENT DE CHALEUR

RÉSISTANT AUX SULFATES

Library in Hallway, Studio Cube ®

IGNÉE

SÉDIMENTAIRE

MÉTAMORPHIQUE

ADOBE

ARGILE

TERRE NOIRE

Élévation

TECHNIQUES

SILICE VITREUSE

VYCOR

VITROCÉRAMIQUES

BOROCILICATES

SODO-CALCIQUE

FIBRES DE VERRE

VERRES AU PLOMB

CIMENT

BÉTON ET AGRÉGATS

TYPE D'AGRÉGATS

Introduction Panel, Studio Cube ®

M. CÉRAMIQUES

VERRES

CIMENT ET BÉTON

GRAPHITES ET DÉRIVÉS

PLÂTRE ET GYPSE

Perspectives

31

REV

B

NON-FERREUX

SIZE DWG. NO.

M.

Montreal, Canada UQÀM, Studio Cube ® Professors: Börkur Bergmann & Koen de Winter Students: Corinne Bève , Francis Huneault, Guillaume Bélanger, Claudia Pace, Éléonore Leclerc, Étienne Dugal

A

CAISSON C

5

This project had many phases which were conducted by many contributors as part of a research group (see below): study and research, design and development of the library, construction drawing, funding and material sponsorship for building the library and for samples on display, training and outreach program.

6

7

PIERRE

6

8

TERRE CRUE

7

C

10

CÉRAMIQUE INDUSTRIELLE

8

3

MINÉRAL NONMÉTALLIQUE

B

It is an accessible resource that will enable students No. DESCRIPTION Matériaux LONG. LARG. ÉPAIS. QTE alike to learn, conduct research and 1 and teachers Panneau arrière 556 437 select 5/8" 1 2 Bande 556 102 5/8" 2 Contreplaqué materials for their designs. The characteristics of traditional construction 5/8" 3 Panneau côté 618 437 5/8" 2 4 and novel Panneamaterials u dessous 602 behaviors 556 5/and 8" 1 are analyzed based on 5 Panneau dessus OSB 1/2" 650 588 1/2" 1 sustainability, an approach that challenges common 6 Coulisseau 553 76 5/8" 6 Contreplaqué 7 Montant de porte 434 76 5/8" 2 construction 5/8" classification based on use, trades and corporate products. 8 Traverse de porte 433 76 5/8" 2 9 All Panneau façadeare de porte OSB 1/2" 585 origin. 434 1/2" 1 materials grouped according to their This 10 Fond de tiroir 502 481 5/8" approach admits change:construction the use 5/8" of a material and its per-42 Contreplaqué 11 Façade de tiroir 481 191 5/8" 12 formance Côté can de tiro ir 502 library 175 obsolete. 5/8" 4 evolve without rendering the It is designed as a tool that supports evolutions and add-ons when necessary.

1 12

vitrines

C

MINÉRAL

The library650is a public reference center that is located within the School of Design at Université du Québec à Montréal (UQÀM). The Public Material library is a project in progress that is schedule to be built within the next year. It was developed by the academic research lab Studio Cube and focuses on new materials, new uses, new classification approaches and sustainability. CAISSON C

Display Windows

D

Introduction

6

7

Introduction

8


Mise en Oeuvre

LOCAUX

LOCAUX

EXOTIQUES

EXOTIQUES

POLYSULPHONES

POLYACRYLIQUES

CELLULOSIQUES

POLYMÈRES FLUORÉS

POLYOXYMÉTHILÈNE

Prototypes

FEUILLUS

RÉSINEUX

PANNEAUX CONTREPLAQUÉ

PANNEAUX DE PARTICULES

PANNEAUX DE FIBRES

POLYOLÉFINES

POLYAMIDES

POLYVYNILIQUES

POLYESTERS SATURÉS

POLYCARBONATE

POLYSTYRINIQUES

AMINOPLASTES

PHÉNOPLASTES

POLYESTERS INSATURÉS POLYÉPOXIDES

SILICONE

BUTYLE

NÉOPRÈNE

POLYURÉTHANE ÉLASTOMÈRE

Bibliothèque

NATUREL

RECOMPOSÉ

AUTRES PANNEAUX

THERMOPLASTIQUES

THERMODURCISABLES

ÉLASTOMÈRES

VERRE ARAMIDE

BORE

CARBONE

CARBURE DE SILICIUM

MINÉRALE

RÉSINEUSE

MÉTALLIQUE

Library

BOIS

FIBRES

HUILES, GRAISSES, RÉSINES NATURELLES

CAOUTCHOUC NATUREL

PAILLE, ROSEAUX, JONCS

CELLULOSES

PAPIERS, CARTONS

FIBRES

HUILES, GRAISSES, CIRES

OS, CORNES, NACRE

POLYMÈRES

FIBRES

MATRICE

COEUR DE STYROMOUSSE

COEUR NID D'ABEILLE

COEUR DE MÉTAL NERVURÉ

FER ACIER AU CARBONE USAGE GÉNÉRAL

ACIER À OUTIL

ACIER DE TRAITEMENT THERMIQUE

IconÉcos vitrines

VÉGÉTAL

ANIMAL

PÉTROLE

ASPHALTE

GOUDRON

SOLVANTS

COMPOSITE À MATRICE

PANNEAUX SANDWITCH

FERREUX

FONTE

ACIER INOXIDABLE

Display Windows

ORGANIQUE

HYDROCARBURE

COMPOSITE

MINÉRAL MÉTALLIQUE

Icons

Origin Based Material Classification Studio Cube ®

32


N

W

33

E

S

South & East Facade

South Facade

Structure

Wind Zones & location


Sleeping in the Woods Building a Room with a View Bedroom in the woods is a design-build project funded by Quebec city architecture firm CCM as part of their award program. With this project I wished to explore small scale habitat and test my design built skills with a 1:1 fully functional prototype. As a student in the final year undergraduate studies, I had worked on the theme of observatory and had imagined a forest cabin which could be built in a natural reserve and that would offer shelter to passerby. Such delicate environments cannot bear repeated foot traffic, thus a network of wooden elevated pathways were to allow general public to enjoy and gaze at off-limit environments. For a full experience of nature, stilt shelters were imagined as minimal dwelling for overnight bedrooms in the wood.

North & East Facade

On my end, as the family grew bigger with the birth of nieces and nephews, my husband and I decided to build a bedroom on his parents conservation land on Cape Cod, to serve as a summer vacation shelter for ourselves. The site was facing similar issues and requirements as the aforementioned park, both in terms of foot print and impact on the site. In addition, questions of privacy were important as well as choosing the right location for access, views and minimal impact on site. The geometry coupled with the natural slope allows to maintain privacy as any visitor must first use the long and narrow walkway to access the patio and the room. This project was shaped by a majority of found materials: from windows to lumber. This ensured to keep costs low which, in turn, created an interesting challenge because it was very difficult to plan ahead of time. With the remaining budget, we decided to use cedar shingles as cladding, a material that is widely used on Cape Cod. To maintain clean lines, we used the technique of woven corners. To bring maximum light in the room, we used corrugated transparent plastic sheets. The choice of this material enhances the experience as one can perceive the shadows of the tree and the rain drops falling on its surface.

Cape Cod, USA with David, Sam, Jacob Brodsky 34


35


“Sometimes the house of the future is better built, lighter and larger than all the houses of the past, so that the image of the dream house is opposed to that of the childhood home. Late in life, with indomitable courage, we continue to say that we are going to do what we have not yet done: we are going to build a house. This dream house may be merely a dream of ownership, the embodiment of everything that is considered convenient, comfortable, healthy, sound, desirable, by other people. It must therefore satisfy both pride and reason, two irreconcilable terms.” —Gaston Bachelard, The Poetics of Space 36


Clark st. City Garden Managing the Home Front Located in central district of Plateau Mont-Royal, the site sits amidst the bustling Saint-Laurent boulevard which is known for round the clock action. The city of Montreal has relatively strict guidelines as to how to intervene on private buildings. The street-scape is monitored to prevent the loss of character and identity. Their policies demand continuity between neighbors. In this case, each floor of the building have different owners and specific access had to be maintained. The main goal of this intervention was to re-establish privacy and boundaries for the small plot along Clark street without compromising access and visual continuity with the street. Another goal was to maintain the existing cedar trees which also needed to be stabilized. The access had to be as easy as possible to allow older visitors to access the dwelling. Finally, an indigenous flower garden with an edible component was an important aspect. An approach based on economy of means is preferred due to the small budget and the various constraints at hand. The fence is removed where it is not needed to open the space and give access for caring for the trees. The existing stair case then acts as a barrier. On the entrance side a lightweight cedar fence with a gate managing the access establish the boundaries of the property to protect the intimacy of the home from the nightlife and high traffic. The use of cedar wood for the fence re-visits the typical Montreal which is usually made of wrought iron fence without changing it’s proportions. Raised planter beds are built around the cedar trees, under the stairs and next to the entrance. This solution allow plantations to occur without massive restructuring of the ground and enabled us to obtain clean soil for the edible garden. The ground is united on either side of the fence and stairs with large slate tile that runs along the sidewalk in an inviting way while the change of material from concrete to slate establishes subtle ownership. Clean edges and reveals give a contemporary look to the whole.

Montreal, Canada With David Brodsky 37

1.

3.


1. General view of fence segment [3 gardens) 2. General view of cedar tree section (cedar wood, metal connectors) 3. Built work

2.

38


How Well is our City Doing? Measuring Collective Health This telehealth project imagines future scenarios for the promotion and the monitoring of city health. This project navigates the thin line between utopia and dystopia. An idealized scenario promoted by new technologies is proposed as an effort to provoke a critical attitude towards new possibilities. New advances in medical technology allow to measure health of an individual without engaging the patient physically, thus potentially removing individual and personal choice from the equation and giving rise to universal access to personal data. Mirror body scans can measure heart beat, body temperature, skin irrigation, breathing patterns, etc. The use of such tools could work to improve city health and collective well being with all the associated benefits. Despite positive outcomes, it also offers a version of the future where personal information is no longer protected. A city wide scenario is proposed. Health-play stations are installed across the city to act as an interface between health specialists and individuals. It borrows the language of urban furniture as well as children play stations, which helps to integrate this new element in the city. Throughout a playful approach, adults and children alike interact with stations which compile various health data such as strength, blood pressure, stress, aggressivity, balance and weight. Such an approach breaks free from the traditional health management scenario, which is location specific and private. Using advertisement strategies, a new visual identity for the city is shaped. All data is compiled hourly, displayed on city billboards and sent electronically as personal statement. Such billboards are found along major transit arteries, in metro stations in public places. The existence of a city health average and grading system could act on one’s willingness to be well. While this project seek to empower individuals to take control of their health and to be part of a collective effort, it is a caricature, an exaggeration. In the name of health such extreme scenarios could be made possible with available technologies. Thus, this project reiterates the importance of a critical approach to innovation.

+

+

+ +

+

+ +

+ + + + + + + + + +++ ++ + + ++ + + + + + + + + + + + + + +

+

+

+

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+Health-Play Station #01 berri-UQĂ€M metro

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global health monitoring

BROD19791222

JANE DOE

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Montreal, Canada McGill University 39

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“The multiplication of such tools could work to improve city health and collective well being with all the associated benefits. Despite positive outcomes, it also offers a version of the future where personal information is no longer protected.

posture

samples

stress & aggressivity

balance & mobility

weight

June 2012

You are generally below average for your age group vision acuity is acuteness or clearness of vision, which is dependent on the sharpness of the retinal focus within the eye and the sensitivity of the interpretative faculty of the brain. Visual acuity is a measure of the spatial resolution of the visual processing system. VA is tested by requiring the person whose vision is being tested to identify characters (like letters and numbers) on a chart from a set distance. Chart characters are represented as black symbols against a white background (for maximum contrast). The distance between the person's eyes and the testing chart is set at a sufficient distance to approximate infinity in the way the lens attempts to focus.

Blood pressure sometimes referred to as arterial blood pressure, is the pressure exerted by circulating blood upon the walls of blood vessels, and is one of the principal vital signs. When used without further specification, "blood pressure" usually refers to the arterial pressure of the systemic circulation. During each heartbeat, blood pressure varies between a maximum (systolic) and a minimum (diastolic) pressure. The risk of cardiovascular disease increases progressively above 115/75 mmHg.. Regarding hypotension, in practice blood pressure is considered too low only if noticeable symptoms are present

Posture Posture can easily be impacted by poor health and other factors. Thus, anyone using posture to assess personality, character, or psychology must first rule out possible underlying medical conditions which may be affecting a person's posture. In orthopedics, a valgus deformity is a term for outward angulation of the distal segment of a bone or joint. The opposite deformation, medial deviation of the distal bone, is called varus.

llowing specialists:

Optometrist G.P. Physical therapist

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Health status june 2012

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Urban Anomaly Life on Admiral BrĂźcke, short movie A turbulent century ends for Berlin. The city has been torn by a succession of changing ownerships and repeated actions on the urban fabric. The Third Reich and the socialist era were traumatic for the city as the ruling class imposed their urban design vision of the territory, Destruction and reconfiguration changed the face of the city. The magnitude of the events and the scars left behind made Berlin an unique territory. Signs of appropriations are omniscient, a proof of berliners attitude towards the role of the cityscape. Could it be in response to a territorial form of oppression that the citizen now vigorously appropriates public spaces? While trying to find examples of spaces that would illustrate this attitude towards the city, we stumbled upon the Admiral BrĂźke. This bridge is located in the heart of the district of Kreuzberg in Berlin. It traverses a water canal and accomodates car and pedestrian traffic. While it acts as a transit link between each sides of the canal, it demonstrates the qualities of a park, a place where passers-by decide to pause and relax. This urban anomaly maintains its traditional configuration while housing a contradictory use. Indeed, with the large flow of people using the bridge as a park, its main function is almost negated. Against all odds, there appears a second function, that of a place of intense socialization. Although a bridge is synonymous with movement and transition, people are willing to stop to eat or drink in the center of the bridge. With static shots of everyday scenes, our model-video attempts to translate the atmosphere that prevails there. Tight frames give order to the chaos created by the coexistence of several types of users. Finally, we took a step back for our turn to enter the small details making up for this anomaly urban.

Kreuzberg, Berlin, Germany UQĂ€M Summer School in Berlin, with Francis Huneault 41


“Against all odds, Admiral Bridge maintains car traffic while acting as a public place. Do we take charge of the urban space or does it take charge of us? What allows self appropriation of the city? This short movie is an ode to life reshaping cities by taming one of its most stubborn part: transit infrastucture“

Admiral Brücke Canal

Car traffic Network

Transit, Connectivity in the City Along the Water Canal (Network of Transit Infrastructure) 42


Site model with various scale infrastructure

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Residential Neighborhood Car Access /Kiss and Ride Parking lot & Trenches Access to Towers / Planted Pedestrian Ramp Train Station Elevated Walkways to the Park

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East Point Commuter Rail T.O.D. to Protect Conservation Land Characterization exercise of a peri-urban area of Montreal located in Pointe-aux-Trembles, specifically a zone of 500 m of radius. The proposed development was done according to the principles of “Transit Oriented Development”. This design establishes a dialogue between natural areas of a protected natural park and the residential neighborhood nearby. It postulates that the new railway (Train de l’Est) connection will turn the natural park to a popular destination. This project includes a new train station along Sherbrooke Street, new services, an increased residential density and new access to the nature park. We propose a design that will minimize the impact of the new commuter rail on the protected site by making thoughtful links, taking into account the duality of the site. The concept is to use a landscaping approach to reinforce the presence of the site in the city which begins to act as an official and prestigious threshold to the island. The Nature Park infiltrates and structures the parking lot through a system of irrigation and water collecting trenches. Elevated walkways stretch out to all parts of the site, allowing a new experience of the park, protecting at once its fragile ecosystem and interesting views. The walkways also connect huts for camping activities (see “Sleeping in the Woods”). The implementation of large scale elements such as residential towers bordering the natural park situates the new train station in the skyline as well as limiting the foot print of the new development. This densification is key to the success of a transit Oriented Development where the use of cars is reduced. The idea is to create a hub organized around hierarchies of movement. This concept is supported by a built platform partially covering the parking lot and stretching vertically in subtle ramps. This element includes a kiss and ride for cars and gives easy access to foot traffic coming form all directions: towers, low rise neighborhood, parking lot, walkways and train station. The ascending structure is also planted to ensure an experience rooted in the natural scenery that characterizes the rest of the site. Thus, the vegetation changes from a scenic connotation to a more structured urban concept that forges links between the enclaves found on either side of the track and on either sides of Sherbrooke Street.

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Montreal, Canada UQÀM with Martine Vincent 44


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Behind the Walls Exhibit This exhibit was presented in April 2013 at Espace Projet Art Contemporain + design in Montreal. House interiors are the less visible part of a city for its private condition.“Behind the Walls“ aims to make this interior world permeable through the work and reflections of 13 participants. Beyond architecture, a dwelling is more than a mere container but a catalyst for domesticity. The understanding of dwelling varies for every inhabitant. Cultural and societal differences together with the diversity of dwelling type have a strong influence on the use of spaces, the notion of family or the cohabitation are some examples of this variety. Through this exhibit, we were looking to challenge and reflect on our ways of living. How do we use the spaces of our houses and apartments? How do we adjust or appropriate them? How could we reinvent traditional perception and depiction of such spaces? How can we quantify, qualify, compare and measure such places? In addition, we were interested in the role that furniture, equipment and plants play to set and qualify our homes. How are residential spaces used today? Founded in September 2009, Espace Projet is a non-profit gallery whose mandate is to present the work of emerging artists and independent curators. Wishing to encourage new practices and interdisciplinary approaches, the gallery promotes bold proposals in visual arts and design. While the gallery is involved in the cultural life of Montreal district of Villeray, it wishes to be active locally, nationally and internationally. The gallery is composed of two different spaces that can accommodate exhibitions, films, events, performances and conferences. The program of the gallery is two fold: the exhibitions/events that are initiated by the gallery staff as well as exhibition/event initiated by artists and curators renting the gallery. All proposals are evaluated by the program committee.

Montreal, Canada with Marta Masferrer & Éric Aubertin Artists: (top) Jenny Lewis (bottom) Karolina Jastrebska, Raison Mobile, photos : Kate Bouchard 46


Graduate Research: The Modern Architecture of PGL (1957-1973) : Architectural Visits This research was produced as part of a Graduate Certificate in Modern Architecture and Patrimonial Conservation (UQÀM) under the supervision or prof. Réjean Legault. It constituted the final research report to obtain the diploma. I chose to explore how diffusion of knowledge can be used as a tool for architectural conservation, thus the choice of a guidebook format was instrumental in this project. This guidebook compiles research made in archives, architectural press and interviews with architect partner of the firm: Louis-Joseph Papineau. The reason for working on this topic came from the lack of resources available about PGL architects and their body of work. I could not believe that the work of such a prominent firm of the 1960’s and 1970’s had not been studied and documented in detail. Moreover, site visits revealed poor physical integrity of the buildings still in place and their anonymous character was not to help preserving and valuing such buildings. This project revisits their production as a whole and a selection of 12 buildings in more details. This firm was instrumental in defining Canadian modern architecture and forging a local expertise for the use of new constructive methods. Their approach was based on research and development, passive systems and thorough site studies, economy of means as well as prefabrication. These key elements are still central to successful contemporary practices. This research is currently being updated and adapted for an exhibit taking place in 2014 at Centre de Design at Université du Québec à Montreal and will be used for an anthology to be published after the exhibition.

Advisor: Réjean Legault, UQÀM 47

“[...] “If there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must


write it.� Toni Morrison

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Rice Field Hairdresser This project is located in the country side of Ibaraki prefecture (Japan) between two ricefields. The hair salon proposes a relaxing experience to its clients with views to the open horizon. The buildings is made of simple post and beam timber construction. The plan is devided in order to create various experiences for the clients, allowing various degrees of privacy while appearing as one single space. The front of the salon is used as a waiting room and a cafĂŠ has an access to a covered terrasse. Natural light is favored providing ideal conditions for hair coloring.(SUWA) 50


Forest Camp This project proposes to bring salary man from urban areas of Japan and introduce them to the beautiful country side of Miyagi prefecture.There, they can acquire survival skills in the wild. The two buildings are identical and make use of simple construction techniques. The main structure is made of steel and the secondary structure is made of local wood. The open plan interior includes a traditional irori fire pit, an elevated tatami space, an alter space along with futon storage. This project aims to revitalize with tourism a region badly struck by the 2011 tsunami. My responsibilities included material selection, CAD drawing, 3d modelling, render and taking part in the ongoing design. (SUWA) 51


Irori

Tatami room

Alter space

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Fukuoka Tsuchiya Boutique This project takes place within an existing structure. Tsuchiya brand is characterized by high quality craftsmanship and materials, small production and clean and ageless designs. For this boutique, the concept was to reinterpret classic japanese structure and zen garden to bring serenity and rustic yet contemporary feel to the store. The louver partitions allow light to penetrate with restrain, leaving the field of vision opened while shaping circulations. My responsibilities included material selection, CAD drawing, 3d modelling, render and taking part in the ongoing design. (SUWA) 54


Sanada House This project is in the development phase and is scheduled to be built the fall of 2013. This single family home will be located in Machida, a city within the Tokyo greater metropolitan area. The site includes strong features: an important variation in topography and a bamboo grove. It is designed for the six members of the Sanada family. My responsibilities on this project included building a wood structural model as well as participating in the production of construction drawings and ongoing design. (SUWA) 55


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Student & Professional Work (2006-2013)  

Architecture, Design Build, Urban Design, 3d Modeling, Research and Patrimonial Assesment by Marie-Eve L. Brodsky