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Strategic Planning Guide

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Table of Contents Intended Audience.................................................................................................................................2 Acknowledgments.................................................................................................................................2 Introduction and Background................................................................................................................2 Conceptual Framework for MCCCD Integrated Planning.....................................................................4 Strategic Planning Guide Overview.......................................................................................................5 Strategic Planning and Operational Planning Definitions......................................................................5 Vision, Mission, and Values...................................................................................................................5 Governing Board Outcomes and Metrics..............................................................................................6 Core Planning Areas..............................................................................................................................6 System Level Strategies........................................................................................................................7 Integrated Planning Model.....................................................................................................................8 Unit level Planning...............................................................................................................................10 Strategic Innovations...........................................................................................................................10 Reporting.............................................................................................................................................10 Appendices.........................................................................................................................................12 Appendix A: MCCCD Governing Board Outcomes.......................................................................12 Appendix B: Governing Board Outcomes and Metrics.................................................................14 Appendix C: MCCCD Strategic Planning Committee September 2011........................................19 Appendix D: MCCCD Vision, Mission, and Values........................................................................ 20 Appendix E: Resources for Planning............................................................................................. 21 Glossary................................................................................................................................................ 21 Web Sites with Information to Inform the Planning Process........................................................ 22 Planning to Plan.................................................................................................................................. 23 Environmental Scanning.................................................................................................................... 23 Operational Planning.......................................................................................................................... 23 Appendix F: Reporting Templates............................................................................................24


Intended Audience The Strategic Planning Guide is intended for individuals whose responsibilities include leading strategic planning activities in a district functional area or at an MCCCD college. The Guide will also be useful to those who are charged with periodically reporting progress on Governing Board Outcomes and Metrics, as well as those who monitor the extent to which planning goals and objectives have been achieved. The Guide’s authors assume its users are familiar with the distinction between strategic and operational planning; accordingly, this document focuses on high-level organizational plans and on the long-term view of the future. Leaders of strategic planning activities are strongly advised to provide specific guidance to employees involved in operational planning in the form of locally developed tools and instructions with much greater detail than is found in this Guide.

Acknowledgments This document was developed under the direction of Maria Harper-Marinick, Executive Vice-Chancellor and Provost. It was written and edited with the assistance of Andrea Buehman, William Guerriero, Elizabeth Hunt-Larson, and Rene Willekens.

Introduction and Background The Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD) is comprised of ten colleges and two skill centers serving more than 260,000 students and community members annually with a wide range of programs and services. An on-going integrated, system-wide planning effort has always been critical given the magnitude and diversity of MCCCD and its importance to the community. Historically, the Maricopa system has consistently emphasized planning to help meet its mission and to promote a shared vision for the future. The board-approved district vision, mission, values, goals and strategic directions have provided a foundation for system-wide planning. Each college has its own unique planning process; however, all colleges and district functional areas have incorporated the system-wide strategic directions in their planning processes, participated in system-wide environmental scanning, and reported annually to the Governing Board on their plans and accomplishments. Annual Governing Board reports and board monitoring reports with related metrics have been used to monitor progress.

http://www.maricopa.edu/stratplan/ The planning process has evolved over time. Since 2010 several new planning initiatives have been introduced including the development of new Governing Board outcome statements, related outcome metrics, a system strategic plan, and an integrated planning model and reporting process. The MCCCD Governing Board has developed and approved new outcome statements and metrics to provide evidence of their attainment. The Governing Board outcomes describe the desired system outcomes and were developed to reflect the core mission, vision, and values of the district. Metrics help document how well the district is meeting its mission and inform improvement planning. The purposes of the metrics are to measure performance and success, to identify areas of challenge, and to inform constituencies of progress.

Revised Governing Board outcome statements were adopted in February 2011 in four major areas: • 1.1 University Transfer Education and General Education; • 1.2 Workforce and Economic Development; • 1.3 Developmental Education; and • 1.4 Community Development and Civic and Global Engagement. (Appendix A) http://www.maricopa.edu/publicstewardship/governance/boardpolicies/boardpolicies_toc.php The Executive Vice-Chancellor and Provost, Dr. Maria Harper-Marinick, convened a committee to select metrics to measure performance and success for each Governing Board outcome. The metrics committee was comprised of representatives from colleges, institutional research, and system administration. When possible, statewide community college metrics (Arizona Community Colleges Presidents’ Council metrics) or nationally normed survey instruments (e.g. CCSSE, Noel-Levitz) were used. The resulting metrics were approved by the Governing Board on May 24th, 2011. (Appendix B) http://www.maricopa.edu/publicstewardship/governance/boardpolicies/metrics.php A strategic planning committee was formed in spring 2011 to develop a new integrated planning model. During summer 2011 a review of system-wide planning efforts resulted in the definition of four Core Planning Areas. A sub-team of the strategic planning committee met to discuss how to incorporate the various initiatives and planning activities within the Maricopa system and integrate them with the Governing Board Outcomes. The Chancellor’s priorities, the Vision 2020 goals established by the Arizona Community College Presidents’ Council, and the 21st Century initiative recommendations were reviewed to ensure that the Core Planning Areas defined were inclusive. In August 2011 the following Core Planning Areas were presented to the Governing Board. These categories provide a framework for system-wide planning at all levels and replace the Strategic Directions that had been used in planning in prior years. The Core Planning Areas reflect alignment with the newly developed Governing Board outcomes.

Core Planning Areas • Access to Learning MCCCD provides access to learning opportunities for students and the community. •

Pathways to Success MCCCD builds educational and career pathways and supports student goal attainment.

Effective Learning and Teaching MCCCD researches, assesses, and improves student learning and invests in strategies to improve organizational learning and effectiveness.

Organizational Integrity MCCCD develops and strengthens policies and practices to guide the effective use of public resources.

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After the four Core Planning Areas were developed, the strategic planning committee used a collaborative process to identify four System Level Strategies: One Maricopa, the seamless student experience, the developmental education initiative, and the completion agenda. These will be described further in the Guide. The System Level Strategies are common areas of emphasis within MCCCD that will be addressed in the planning process. The Core Planning Areas and System Level Strategies comprise the new Maricopa System Strategic Plan. The system level strategies will be reviewed periodically for changes, deletions, and updates. Next, the planning process and reporting framework were designed and this Guide was created. The strategic planning committee (Appendix C) had several goals when creating the new planning process. The key goals were to create an inclusive planning process, to align planning between all areas of the organization, and to outline a process that informs decision-making. The committee followed the basic tenets of planning, to develop a simple yet effective process that focuses on change. The process also recognizes that innovations are important to help accomplish the System Level Strategies and the outcomes established by the Governing Board. The model is inclusive of all levels of planning in MCCCD.

Conceptual Framework for MCCCD Integrated Planning The goal of the strategic planning committee was to adopt a planning model that: •

aligns district and college planning processes and cycles;

informs district functional area planning (i.e. Academic, Capital Development, IT, Fiscal, HR);

improves efficiency and effectiveness in a challenging fiscal environment;

links institutional priorities with human, financial, technology, and capital resources;

ensures planning efforts advance the new Governing Board Outcomes and related Metrics;

strengthens ONE Maricopa in support of the Chancellor’s priorities;

incorporates the 21st Century initiatives.

Other basic tenets of effective planning were applied to develop a planning process that: •

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encourages holistic thinking (looking at the entire organization);

connects and informs planning efforts at the District and College Level – “Integrated Planning”;

focuses on change;

focuses efforts on a manageable number of strategies, objectives, or goals;

includes system level strategies;

captures emergent strategies and innovations that may inform system level strategies in future planning cycles;

is updated and reviewed on a regular cycle;

is designed for ease of use and understanding.

Strategic Planning Guide Overview The Strategic Planning Guide provides an overview of the new planning model including terminology, components, processes and responsibilities in support of system-wide strategic planning. Specifically, it is intended to ensure that planners: •

understand the integrated planning model and the expectations for reporting planning activities;

• develop and implement plans aligned with Core Planning Areas and System Level Strategies; • understand how the Core Planning Areas are informed by the Governing Board Outcomes and will be able to

provide evidence of progress toward the Outcomes;

• share Strategic Innovations that reflect best practices that may be replicated within the system. The Guide begins with a review of two fundamental assumptions of strategic planning: The importance of distinguishing between strategic and operational planning, and the centrality of the organization’s vision, mission, and values in the strategic planning process. The review is followed by brief descriptions of planning components, processes, and responsibilities including Governing Board Outcomes and Metrics, Core Planning Areas, System Level Strategies, the Integrated Planning Model, Unit Level Planning, Strategic Innovations, and Reporting.

Strategic Planning and Operational Planning Definitions Strategic planning identifies ways in which MCCCD will achieve its future. As described by the Society of College and University Planning (SCUP), strategic planning is future oriented and represents a long term view of the future. “There are as many definitions of strategic planning as there are books on the subject. Reading across a number of those references, it becomes clear that strategic planning includes these key characteristics: it is future oriented, it should influence decision-making, and it should identify ways in which the organization will achieve its future. Strategic planning is generally considered an executive responsibility, but in higher education, all levels of the organization need to plan in this way.” (Society of College and University Planning) MCCCD planning definitions: •

Strategic planning – a visionary process resulting in major, long-range, and far-reaching goals for the future to

advance the college/district office/system-wide goals for service to students and the community. Strategic plans provide the foundation for operational planning in the form of policies, procedures, and strategies for obtaining and using resources to achieve those directions.

• Operational planning (action planning) – detailed, short-term statements about what is to be done, who is to do it, and how it is to be done.

Vision, Mission, and Values The process of strategic planning starts with an understanding of the vision, mission, and values of the organization. The vision is a statement of the future, the mission defines the purpose, and values are those beliefs essential to the organization. The vision, mission, and values provide the context for planning.

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• •

Vision: A vision statement represents the long-term aspirations of an institution or company. It represents the “ideal” future. Mission: A mission statement is a brief, concise statement which defines the “business” you are in, for whom, and why. It is your primary purpose. (Hartzler & Henry, 1994)

Values: Values are the underlying principles of what is important to the team or organization and what drives decisions and ways of operating. (Hartzler and Henry, 1994)

All planning units’ vision, mission, and values should be aligned with MCCCD mission, vision, and values. (Appendix D) Periodically these statements should be reviewed to be sure that they are congruent with the system statements, that they sufficiently distinguish the planning unit and that they are useful in planning at each organizational unit level.

Governing Board Outcomes and Metrics One of the most important roles of the Governing Board is to identify outcomes for the purpose of better serving and being accountable to its constituencies. These constituencies include the People of Maricopa County, Students, Private and Public Sector Employers, Universities, and Primary and Secondary Schools. In spring 2011 the MCCCD Governing Board adopted a series of new outcome statements and metrics which are defined as Policies that determine benefits that will occur for the Board’s constituents. These are prioritized and reflected in the budget. These replace the board outcomes last amended in 2004 and the institutional effectiveness measures used in the Governing Board Monitoring Report since 2006. New metrics were established to gauge the extent to which the District as a whole achieves outcomes in the areas of university and transfer education, workforce and economic development, developmental education, community development, and civic and global engagement. The new Governing Board Outcomes and related metrics form the basis of an updated Governing Board Monitoring Report, which will be previewed in February 2012 and formally reported to the Board in November 2012. These Governing Board Outcomes focus on improving access and student success, which are core components of the MCCCD mission. The Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost is charged with aggregating and analyzing the District data each year for the Monitoring Report. The Report is traditionally presented to the Governing Board in November. Each of the ten Maricopa Community Colleges is also responsible for publishing results for all of the adopted Governing Board Outcomes.

Core Planning Areas (2012 – 2015) The Core Planning Areas provide a conceptual framework for planning and are linked directly to the Governing Board Outcomes. The Governing Board has committed to maintaining these Core Planning Areas through 2015.

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Access to Learning MCCCD provides access to learning opportunities for students and the community.

Pathways to Success MCCCD builds educational and career pathways and supports student goal attainment.

Effective Learning and Teaching MCCCD researches, assesses, and improves student learning and invests in strategies to improve organizational learning and effectiveness.

Organizational Integrity MCCCD develops and strengthens policies and practices to guide the effective use of public resources.

System Level Strategies System Level Strategies are the initiatives that advance the system as a whole. These strategies are overarching and impact the entire organization through collaborative and coordinated efforts. ONE Maricopa: Colleges in MCCCD historically have met the needs of their communities through localized decisions about programs, services, and business processes. While this diversity makes the District stronger, it also can produce some inefficiencies and unintended barriers for students who may enroll in more than one college.  ONE Maricopa seeks to maximize resources and effectiveness using system wide approaches to address common challenges, to foster increased partnerships among Maricopa Colleges, and to reduce duplication of services and programs. The Chancellor has provided leadership by promoting the philosophy of “ONE Maricopa.” http://www.maricopa.edu/chancellor/onemaricopa.php The Seamless Student Experience: The seamless student experience (SSE) provides students a single point of access and a uniform process for admissions, registration, financial aid, and related student services across all of MCCCD colleges. SSE will allow students to seamlessly move from one MCCCD college to another without repeating or duplicating the processes to be admitted or to receive financial aid. Students will have a single academic transcript containing a record of all credits earned at MCCCD colleges. From a service point of view, students would access the “One Maricopa” student information system (online or in person) just once with the information applicable at any of the colleges universally. The Developmental Education Initiative: By leveraging strategies and innovations developed at the colleges, MCCCD will improve developmental education outcomes, close achievement gaps, and address student access to college-level courses and programs of study. Governing Board outcomes explicitly seek increases in the successful completion of developmental math, English, and reading courses, and progression to college-level courses. Students from all races, ethnicities, and socioeconomic strata are expected to perform comparably in developmental courses and beyond. Developmental course access and success will be enhanced by offering a variety of instructional modalities including online, hybrid, accelerated, and modularized approaches. The Completion Agenda: MCCCD is committed to increase the number of students completing associate degrees, certificates, and/or successful transfer to one of Arizona’s public or private universities by 50 percent by the year 2020. Attaining this goal will contribute to Arizona’s economic recovery as well as increase the quality of life for a more educated workforce. The Completion Agenda is aligned with the state and national movements toward greater accountably and productivity in higher education. The Maricopa goals are presented in the Governing Board Completion Statement (http://www. maricopa.edu/gvbd/message.php). This initiative aligns with the Arizona Board of Regents 2020 Completion Goals.

Integrated Planning Model The relationships among the components of the system (system-wide, college/unit, and district functional area) are depicted in Figure 1 that follows. The driving force is the MCCCD Vision, Mission, and Values. All plans must be consistent with the Vision and Mission of the District.

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The arrows surrounding the model represent the environmental forces and community needs that need to be reviewed when updating plans at the district and college levels.

All plans are integrated. Each planning effort will include components designed to support MCCCD’s Core Planning areas.

The planning levels depicted in figure 1 include college plans and the MCCCD district functional plans. College plans are developed at each college and include both strategic and operational plans. MCCCD functional plans are compiled at the district level and include Academic and Student Affairs, Human Resources, Information Technology, Capital Development, Business Services, and Fiscal Planning. At the heart of the model are the Planning Outcomes. These are the Governing Board Outcomes and Metrics and Chancellor’s Priorities. All plans should contribute to the improvement of these Planning Outcomes.

Figure 1 MCCCD Integrated Planning

Figure 2

Core Planning Area

System- level Strategy

Access to Learning

Seamless Student Experience

Pathways to Success

The Completion Agenda

Effective Learning & Teaching

Development Education Inititative

Organizational Integrity

ONE Maricopa

District Functional Area

Academic/Student Affairs Completion Candidates Project

College Operational Plans & Strategic Innovations

GB Metrics Chancellor Priorities

OP: Participation in SSP Innovation: Call Center

Increased number of certificates and degrees (GB Outcome 1.1 B.ii1; 1.2B.ii1)

Vision, Mission, & Values • Partnerships • Compensation

Planning Inputs

MCCCD Strategic Plan Core Planning Areas

• Demographics

• Access to Learning • Pathways to Success

• Effective Learning & Teaching • Organizational Integrity

Planning efforts are interrelated. College and district functional area plans are aligned with System Level Strategies and Core Planning Areas. System Level Strategies and Core Planning Areas support Governing Board Outcomes which, in turn, are aligned with MCCCD’s vision and mission. The plans inform one another and are used as a resource for decision-making across the system. The coordination of planning among colleges, district functional areas and the Governing Board is referred to as vertical integration as illustrated in Figure 3.

Figure 3

Planning Outcomes G.B. Outcomes Chancellor’s Priorities

Planning Inputs

• Environmental Trends • Community Needs • 21st Century

MCCCD Functional Plan • • • •

Information Technology Human Resources Financial Resources Capital Development

College Plan

Gov. Board Outcomes

• Accreditation

• Operational Plan • College Strategic Plans (Innovation)

Aligns

Core Planning Areas

Aligns

Figure 2 uses one example to illustrate the relationships among levels of planning. The Core Planning Area of “Pathways to Success” informs the System-Level Strategy “The Completion Agenda.” An initiative undertaken by District Center for Curriculum and Transfer Articulation (a degree audit batch process to identify students close to completing a certificate or degree) is depicted as aligning with and supporting the Completion Agenda System Level Strategy. At the college level, the college operational plan depicts participation in the Student Success Project, and the related college strategic innovation is depicted as the call center.

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Informs

Informs

System Level Strategies

Aligns

Informs

District and College Plans and Innovations

Planning encourages a shared dialog across planning areas. For example, developmental education strategies will be shared among academic affairs areas at all colleges. Sharing best practices and strategic innovations will assist in creating horizontal integration.

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Unit level Planning A planning unit refers to each college and district functional area. The vision, mission, and values of planning units should be congruent with the system. Strategic planning and operational planning at the planning unit level reflect the unique communities that are served, however, plans should align with Core Planning Areas and reflect contributions to System Level Strategies. The metrics used at the unit level to measure progress should incorporate the Board metrics when appropriate. Analysis of the metrics relative to the college plans inform unit planning. Resources for planning are included in Appendix E.

Strategic Innovations Strategic innovations are initiatives that are not a part of the current organizational scope or differ substantially from the status quo. Innovations relate to Core Planning Areas and should contribute to the achievement of one or more of the Governing Board Outcomes. Strategic innovations should be identified and incorporated into the strategic plan of the planning unit. Select strategic innovations with the greatest potential to demonstrate improvement of a Governing Board Outcome will be shared.

Reporting System-wide reporting emphasizes highlights of the progress planning units have made in aligning to system level strategies and the challenges being faced. Reporting includes an analysis of Governing Board metrics and the unit planning efforts, a report on strategic innovations, and a report on alignment with system level strategies. The reporting emphasizes system level strategies. This assumes that detailed implementation plans and unit level plans will continue to be developed and monitored within the college or functional unit. The purpose of system reporting is that outcomes, innovations, and challenges will be identified and summarized. Three reports will be submitted and compiled using standardized templates (Appendix F) on the following schedule.

Which Governing Board Outcomes & Metrics has the college determined require immediate improvement? What challenges are the college experiencing related to these outcomes? Form 5.3 Strategic Innovations Report (Due Friday of the second full week of September) Includes a select few: “change-based” initiatives that match a Core Planning area and are designed to improve a Governing Board Outcome/Metrics results. This component should be linked to an existing or future College Strategic Plan Represents a way for MCCCD to capture “emergent strategies “that could become system level strategies in the future. Strategic Planning Timeline December 2011 – December 2012: The following represents the planning cycle for the District and Colleges:

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November 2011 Governing Board Monitoring Report sent to the Governing Board and published on the MCCCD Website

February 2012 Governing Board Work Session Conducted Summary of the Legacy 2011 Governing Board Monitoring Report, Update on the NEW MCCCD Strategic Planning Process, and Preview of the New Governing Board Outcomes and Metrics

December 2012 MCCCD Planning Guide Revised & Republished

Dec. 2011-Sept. 2012

July 2012

College and District Units Align

MCCCD Environmental Scan Updated And Published

planning to the new MCCCD Strategic Planning Framework

November 2012

November 2012

September 2012

MCCCD System Levels are Updated

Governing Board Monitoring Report Published

College and District Unit Planning Forms 5.1, 5,2, & 5.3 due

using information from the latest Environmental Scan, Governing Board Monitoring Report, and a summary of college and District successes and challenges derived from planning forms 5.1, 5.2, and 5.3

with NEW Governing Board Outcomes and Metrics

Form 5.1 Progress Report: Alignment with System-Level Strategies (Due Friday of the second full week of September) College/functional area progress in supporting existing system level strategies College/functional area challenges in implementing system level strategies Form 5.2 College Report: Governing Board Outcomes & Metrics Success & Challenges (Due Friday of the second full week of September) NOTE: Form 5.3 is designed to highlight select Governing Board Outcomes and Metrics that can be found in the full monitoring reports. The MCCCD Governing Board Monitoring Report, which includes aggregated data at the District Level, is posted on the MCCCD Website each November. College-level reports on the Governing Board Outcomes are produced by the institutional research staff at each college and published through the college websites. Which Governing Board Outcomes & Metrics has the college achieved at a high level or has shown recent improvement? - What has contributed to this success?

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Appendices

1.2 - Workforce and Economic Development Community residents will have access to support services, courses, programs, and workforce training in high-demand careers.

Appendix A: MCCCD Governing Board Outcomes The Governing Board Outcomes and related Metrics provide evidence that MCCCD is meeting its Mission. The governing board has identified desired outcomes and measures in order to better serve and to be accountable to its constituencies. These constituencies include the People of Maricopa County, Students, Private and Public Sector Employers, Universities, and Primary and Secondary Schools. These were adopted by the Board on February 22, 2011.

Students seeking career and workforce training will attain skills that meet employer needs. Students will complete Certificates of Completion and Associate of Applied Science degrees that prepare them for success in high demand careers. From 2011 to 2020, the percent of students earning Certificates of Completion and Associate of Applied Science degrees will increase. Students will benefit from enhanced educational delivery options.

Outcomes

AMENDED February 22, 2011, Motion No. 9781, 9782

Policies that determine benefits that will occur for the Board’s constituents. These are prioritized and reflected in the budget. 1.0 - Global Ends / Broadest Outcome Statement As an educational institution devoted to learning, Maricopa Community Colleges exist in order that the communities served have effective, innovative, learner-centered, flexible, and affordable life-long educational opportunities, with outcomes optimizing use of available resources. AMENDED February 22, 2011, Motion No. 9781, 9782

1.1 - University Transfer Education and General Education

A. Students will have access to quality higher education programs and support services necessary to increase retention and achieve their learning goals.

B. Students will be prepared to successfully pursue higher education beyond the community college. i.

Students will demonstrate post-secondary competencies in communication (writing, speaking, listening, reading), the humanities, science, critical thinking, problem solving, computer and information literacy, and mathematics.

ii.

Students will experience a seamless transfer to baccalaureate-granting institutions.

iii.

From 2011 to 2020, the percent of students earning the AGEC and transfer associate’s degrees will increase.

iv.

From 2011 to 2020, the percent of students matriculating to baccalaureate-granting institutions will increase.

1.3 - Developmental Education Students will develop the competencies necessary to be successful in college level work. Academic achievement gaps based on race, ethnicity, and income will be reduced. Students will benefit from enhanced educational delivery options. AMENDED February 22, 2011, Motion No. 9781, 9782

1.4 - Community Development and Civic and Global Engagement Maricopa County residents will have access to college programs, activities and events, and facilities as appropriate. Maricopa County residents will have access to courses of an avocational nature to include leisure, wellness, and specialized training. Students will have access to civic, political, and global learning opportunities. Students will develop the competencies to analyze and participate in democratic processes through community, civic, and global learning activities. AMENDED February 22, 2011, Motion No. 9781, 9782

C. Students will benefit from enhanced educational delivery options. AMENDED February 22, 2011, Motion No. 9781, 9782

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Appendix B: Governing Board Outcomes and Metrics 1.1 - University Transfer Education and General Education 1.2 - Workforce and Economic Development 1.3 - Developmental Education 1.4 - Community Development and Civic and Global Engagement Governing Board Outcome

Metric

B. Students will be prepared to successfully pursue higher education beyond the community college. i. Students will demonstrate post-secondary competencies in communication (writing, speaking, listening, reading), the humanities, science, critical thinking, problem solving, computer and information literacy, and mathematics.

1)

B. Students will be prepared to successfully pursue higher education beyond the community college. ii. Students will experience a seamless transfer to baccalaureate-granting institutions.

1)

2)

1.1 - University Transfer Education and General Education A. Students will have access to quality higher education programs and support services necessary to increase retention and achieve their learning goals.

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1) 2) 3) 4)

College-Level Course Success Rate Fall-to-Fall Retention Rate Graduation Rate (Degree/Certificate) Percent of students completing college-level math and/or English 5) Percent of full- and part-time students making satisfactory academic progress within two years, as measured by the number of credits completed 6) Semester-to-Semester Retention Rate 7) Number and percent of students who achieve their stated education or training goals 8) Percent of students achieving a successful community college outcome as measured by accomplishment of academic milestones 9) FTE year end enrollment 10) Cost of attendance as a percentage of Arizona mean family income 11) Selected items from the Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory: a) The quality of instruction I receive in most of my classes is excellent b) Academic support services adequately meet the needs of students c) College shows concern for students as individuals d) College does whatever it can to help me reach my educational goals 12) The ratio of credits completed to credits attempted for fall and spring terms (excludes high school dual enrollment)

2)

3)

4)

B. Students will be prepared to successfully pursue higher education beyond the community college. iii. From 2011 to 2020, the percent of students earning the AGEC and transfer associate's degrees will increase.

1)

2) 3)

B. Students will be prepared to successfully pursue higher education beyond the community college. iv. From 2011 to 2020, the percent of students matriculating to baccalaureate-granting institutions will increase.

1) 2)

Successful completion of Arizona General Education Curriculum (AGEC) courses Selected Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) items: a) How much has college experience contributed to knowledge, skills, and development in writing, speaking, thinking critically/analytically, numerical problem solving, computing and information technology? b) Does college emphasize using computers in academic work? Percentage of community college students in a given academic year who are new transfers to state public universities with a transfer degree or certificate (AA, AS, ABUS, AGEC) or transfer a minimum of 80% of college level credits earned at a community college Student participation in Maricopa’s signature transfer programs (ASU Alliance/MAPP, NAU Connection) CCSSE results compared to the national mean for the following items: a) Frequency, satisfaction with, and importance of transfer credit assistance Survey and focus group results about the transfer experience conducted within the Arizona transfer system Percent of students with a transfer intent who earned an AGEC or transfer degree (AA, AS, ABUS) Number of transfer associate’s degrees and AGECs awarded annually. Number of unduplicated students earning a transfer degree and/or AGEC Transfer rate to state public universities Number and percent of students who transfer to an Arizona public university, public out-of-state, or private institution granting baccalaureate or higher degrees

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C. Students will benefit from enhanced educational delivery options.

1)

2)

Percent of transfer/general education students engaged in non-traditional courses: online, hybrid, and accelerated classes of eight weeks or less (excluding high school dual enrollment) Survey results compared to the national mean for selected items on the CCSSE, Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory, and the ECAR Students and Information Technology in Higher Education Survey a) CCSSE: i) How often do you use Internet for assignments, use email to communicate with instructors, use computers in academic work? ii) Frequency, satisfaction with, and importance with computer labs b) Noel-Levitz: i) Computer labs are adequate and accessible ii) Classes are scheduled at times that are convenient for me iii) College emphasizes using computers in academic work c) ECAR Survey: i) Instructors use information technology (IT) effectively in courses ii) Instructors have adequate IT skills for carrying out course instruction iii) Describe your overall experience using course or learning management systems iv) IT improves my learning v) IT makes course activities more convenient

B. Students seeking career and workforce training will attain skills that meet employer needs. i. Students will complete Certificates of Completion and Associate of Applied Science degrees that prepare them for success in high demand careers.

Degrees and Certificates Awarded Annually 1) Number of occupational program completers passing a licensing exam or earning an industryrecognized credential

B. Students seeking career and workforce training will attain skills that meet employer needs. ii. From 2011 to 2020, the percent of students earning Certificates of Completion and Associate of Applied Science degrees will increase.

1)

Graduation Rate (Degree/Certificate Completion)

C. Students will benefit from enhanced educational delivery options.

1)

Percent of occupational students engaged in non-traditional courses: online, hybrid, and accelerated classes of eight weeks or less (excluding high school dual enrollment) Survey results compared to the national mean for selected items on the CCSSE, Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory, and the ECAR Students and Information Technology in Higher Education Survey (survey items listed in Item 1.C. above)

2)

1.3 - Developmental Education A. Students will develop the competencies necessary to be successful in college level work.

2) 3) 4) 5)

1.2 - Workforce and Economic Development A. Community residents will have access to support services, courses, programs, and workforce training in high-demand careers.

1)

2)

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Percentage of high-demand occupations with corresponding college certificate or associate degrees a) AZ Commerce produces the list every other year– fastest growing by jobs by number b) College course, program or training directly related to occupation Percentage of high-demand occupations with corresponding college certificate or associate degrees Percent of the fastest growing (emerging) occupations with corresponding college offering a) AZ Commerce produces the list every other year – fastest growing by jobs by percent growth b) College course, program or training directly related to occupation

1)

Success rate in college-level math after completion of developmental math Success rate in college-level English after completion of developmental English Success rate in college-level courses after completion of developmental reading Success rate in developmental courses Graduation rate of students who were ever enrolled in a developmental course

B. Academic achievement gaps based on race, ethnicity, and income will be reduced.

1)

The variability of performance for each demographic variable (gender, ethnicity, and Pell grant status) will be measured for developmental level course completion and subsequent success in college level courses

C. Students will benefit from enhanced educational delivery options.

1)

Percent of developmental students engaged in non-traditional courses: online, hybrid, and accelerated classes of eight weeks or less (excluding high school dual enrollment) Selected items from the following national surveys: CCSSE, Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory, and the ECAR Students and Information Technology in Higher Education Survey (Survey items listed in Item 1.C. above)

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Appendix C: MCCCD Strategic Planning Committee

1.4 - Community Development and Civic and Global Engagement A. Maricopa County residents will have access to college programs, activities and events, and facilities as appropriate.

1)

2) 3) 4)

B. Maricopa County residents will have access to courses of an avocational nature to include leisure, wellness, and specialized training. C. Students will have access to civic, political, and global learning opportunities.

D. Students will develop the competencies to analyze and participate in democratic processes through community, civic, and global learning activities.

1)

College-Going Rate: percent of high school graduates who enroll directly in community college within eight months of completing high school Enrollment of underserved populations Enrollment of returning adults who have completed some college Number of programs, events, and activities open to the community

Andrea Buehman

Debbie Kushibab

Harold Cranswick Janet Langley Paul Dale James Mabry Eddie Genna Josh Mackey

Unduplicated annual non-credit headcount

William Guerriero William Mullaney Chris Haines Gaye Murphy

CCSSE results compared to the national mean for the following items: a) How often participate in a community-based project for a course b) Degree to which students are encouraged to do community service c) Ample opportunities to volunteer in community d) How much emphasis on working with students from diverse backgrounds The number of activities held on campus that address political or global subjects 1) 2)

3) 4) 5) 6) 7)

Sylvia Hantla Tom Saudargas Maria Harper-Marinick Jim Simpson John Snelling George Kahkedjian Debbie Thompson Randy Kimmens RenĂŠ Willekens

CCSSE results compared to the national mean for the following items: How much has college experience contributed to knowledge, skills, and development in contributing to welfare of the community How important to volunteer in a community service project How often have serious conversations with diverse students The number of students participating in study abroad programs Participation in service learning opportunities The number of students registered to vote as measured by a custom question on CCSSE and Noel-Levitz

ADOPTED May 24, 2011, Motion No. 9814

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Appendix D: MCCCD Vision, Mission, and Values

Appendix E: Resources for Planning

MCCCD Vision:

Glossary

A Community of Colleges…Colleges for the Community…working collectively and responsibly to meet the life-long learning needs of our diverse students and communities

The Maricopa Community Colleges vision, mission and values.

MCCCD Mission: The Maricopa Community Colleges provide access to higher education for diverse students and communities. We focus on learning through: University Transfer Education, Continuing Education, General Education, Community Education, Developmental Education, Civic Responsibility, Workforce Development, Global Engagement and Student Development Services.

MCCCD Values: Community. We value all people – our students, our employees, their families, and the communities in which they live and work.  We value our global community of which we are an integral part.

Vision: A vision statement represents the long-term aspirations of an institution or company. It is represents the “ideal” future. Mission: A mission statement is a brief, concise statement which defines the “business” you are in, for whom, and why. It is your primary purpose. (Hartzler & Henry, 1994) Values: Values are the underlying principles of what is important to the team or organization and what drives decisions and ways of operating (Hartzler and Henry, 1994)

Governing Board Outcomes and Measures: Outcomes are statements of what is optimally desired in order to serve constituents. Measures are specific indicators of success used to measure the accomplishment of the outcomes.

Excellence. We value excellence and encourage our internal and external communities to strive for their academic, professional and personal best. Honesty and integrity. We value academic and personal honesty and integrity and believe these elements are essential in our learning environment.  We strive to treat each other with respect, civility and fairness. Inclusiveness. We value inclusiveness and respect for one another.  We believe that team work is critical, that each team member is important and we depend on each other to accomplish our mission. Innovation. We value and embrace an innovative and risk-taking approach so that we remain at the forefront of global educational excellence. Learning. We value lifelong learning opportunities that respond to the needs of our communities and are accessible, affordable, and of the highest quality.  We encourage dialogue and the freedom to have an open exchange of ideas for the common good. Responsibility. We value responsibility and believe that we are each accountable for our personal and professional actions. We are responsible for making our learning experiences significant and meaningful. Stewardship. We value stewardship and honor the trust placed in us by the community.  We are accountable to our communities for the efficient and effective use of resources as we prepare our students for their role as productive world citizens.

The purpose of the measures is to measure success and identify areas of challenge in order to better meet the district mission. Board measures are accountability metrics that will also inform constituencies of progress. Core Planning Areas: Core Planning Areas are general categories that provide an organizational framework for planning and reporting. All major planning initiatives and the Governing Board Objectives are related to one or more of the core planning areas. Integrated Planning Model: Integrated Planning is the linking of vision, priorities, people, and the physical institution in a flexible system of evaluation, decision-making and action. It shapes and guides the entire organization as it evolves over time and within its community.( SCUP) Planning Unit: The part or the system or organization that is preparing a strategic and operational plan. In Maricopa each college and functional district area are considered planning units. System Level Strategies: System Level Strategies are defined as the initiatives that advance the system as a whole. System Level Strategies are overarching and impact the entire organization through collaborative and coordinated efforts.

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Web Sites with Information to Inform the Planning Process National center for education statistics: Digest of Educational Statistics http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/ College Navigator http://nces.ed.gov/collegenavigator/ IPEDS Data Center http://nces.ed.gov/ipeds/datacenter/ Fast Facts http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/ The Condition of Education http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/

Bureau of Labor Statistics: Occupational Outlook Handbook http://www.bls.gov/oco/

U.S. Census Bureau: Educational Attainment http://www.census.gov/hhes/socdemo/education/ American Factfinder http://factfinder2.census.gov/main.html

Planning for Higher Education Society for College and University Planning http://www.scup.org/page/resources/topic-issue/ community-colleges

Related Organizations (Source SCUP http://www.scup.org/page/resources/topic-issue/community-colleges )

AIR: The Association for Institutional Research has the mission “to support quality data and decisions for higher education.”  ASHE: The Association for the Study of Higher Education “promotes collaboration among its members and others engaged in the study of higher education through research, conferences, and publications The Campus Compact is dedicated to promoting community service, civic engagement, and servicelearning in higher education. CCBO: The Community College Business Officers “is committed to providing educational and professional support, networking opportunities, and timely trend and demographic information for business officers representing community colleges and community college system offices in the US and in Canada.” EDUCAUSE and its EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative have an extensive set of related resources, focusing mostly but not solely on IT, and on many aspects directly pertinent to teaching and learning. The League for Innovation in the Community College is an international organization dedicated to catalyzing innovation in the community college movement. The Lumina Foundation for Education “strives to help people achieve their potential by expanding access to and success in education beyond high school.” The RP Group: The Research & Planning Group for California Community Colleges provides a useful set of resources of interest within California but also elsewhere.

Planning to Plan The Society for College and University Planning has made several suggestions for planning at any organizational level. Identifying and including key people in the planning process are essential. Including a broad cross-section of constituencies will improve the planning process. Communication of the plan throughout the organization will increase the likelihood of its accomplishment. In addition, having a common understanding of planning terms can be helpful in facilitating discussions. A glossary such as contained in this guide is helpful. Finally, successful planning involves developing a common understanding of the philosophy of planning and an understanding that the planning process is fluid, cyclical, and on-going. Further, according to SCUP, the planning process should be as simple as possible. The number of strategies should be limited. Having too many objectives can be overwhelming. The planning process should be focused on its purposes and outcomes rather than on the planning process itself. A useful plan helps with decision-making and is elegant, simple, and focused on the goal of informing decision-making. http://www.scup.org/

Environmental Scanning Environmental scanning is an essential component of the strategic planning process. The purpose of environmental scanning is to anticipate and plan for the external opportunities and challenges that the system will face in the future. The results of environmental scanning are used by planners as they revise and update their strategic plans to prepare to address changes in the external environment. Key trends and implications for the system are identified in the following areas: economic and workforce trends; educational trends; trends relating to external stakeholders and partnerships; political and legislative trends; and social and technological trends. According to James Morrison, scanning the external environment for signs of change and potential events on the horizon is critical to meeting the challenges and opportunities of the future. Environmental scanning is on-going and provides input to planning. http://horizon.unc.edu/courses/papers/enviroscan/

Operational Planning Operational planning, developing measurable, short-term objectives and detailed statements about what is to be done, who is to do it, and how it is to be done is best accomplished within the planning unit. These are plans to implement the outcomes of strategic planning. This process often involves setting work standards and schedules necessary to implement the objectives. Whereas strategic planning looks at the organization as a whole, operational plans focus on action carried out by specific supervisors and department managers in the implementation of daily and weekly operations. Important to operational plans are specificity and time frame for completion for the action in the plan. Operational planning involves both the development of plans to improve and change daily operations as well as the development of capital projects that will ultimately be used in daily operations.

AACC: the American Association of Community Colleges “is the primary advocacy organization for the nation’s community colleges. The association represents almost 1,200 two-year, associate degree–granting institutions and more than 11 million students. “

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Appendix F: Reporting Templates 

Form 5.1 Progress Report: Alignment with System Level Strategies

Form 5.1 Progress Report: Alignment with System Level Strategies Progress Report: July 1, 2011 – June 30, 2012

College/District Unit: Core Planning Areas

System Level Strategy

Plans for July 1, 2012June 30, 2013

What progress has the college/unit

Identify the most important

made toward implementing the sys-

next steps the college/unit

tem level strategies? The responses

will implement to advance the

need to be concise and list specific

system level strategy. Identify

actions and achievements. If limited

when these next steps will be

progress has been made, please

implemented.

Progress Report: July 1, 2011 – June 30, 2012

College/District Unit: 2. Pathways to Success MCCCD builds educational and career pathways and supports student goal attainment.

explain the challenges.

Seamless Student 1. Access to Experience Learning The seamless student experience MCCCD provides access (SSE) provides students a single point of access and a uniform to learning opportunities for process for admissions, registration, students and the financial aid, and related student services across all of MCCCD colcommunity. leges. SSE will allow students to seamlessly move from one MCCD college to another without repeating or duplicating the processes to

Plans for July 1, 2012June 30, 2013

The Completion Agenda MCCCD is committed to increase the number of students completing associate degrees, certificates, and/or successful transfer to one of Arizona’s public or private universities by 50 percent by the year 2020. Attaining this goal will contribute to Arizona’s economic recovery as well as increase the quality of life for a more educated workforce. The Completion Agenda is also aligned with the State and national movements toward greater accountably and productivity in higher education. The Maricopa goals are presented in the Governing Board Completion Statement (http://www.maricopa. edu/gvbd/message.php). This initiative aligns with the Arizona Board of Regents 2020 Completion Goals.—

be admitted or to receive financial aid. Students will have a single academic transcript containing a record of all credits earned at MCCD colleges. From a service point of view, students would access the “One Maricopa” student information system (online or in person) just once with the information applicable at any of the colleges universally.

3. Effective Teaching & Learning MCCCD researches, assesses, and improves student learning and invests in strategies to improve organizational learning & effectiveness.

Developmental Education (e.g. Summer Institute) By leveraging strategies and innovations developed at the colleges, MCCCD will improve developmental education outcomes, close achievement gaps, and address student access to college-level courses and programs of study. Governing Board outcomes explicitly seek increases in the successful completion of developmental math, English, and reading courses, and progression to college-level courses. Students from all races, ethnicities, and socioeconomic strata are expected to perform comparably in developmental courses and beyond. Developmental course access and success will be enhanced by offering a variety of instructional modalities including online, hybrid, accelerated and modularized approaches.

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Form 5.1 Progress Report: Alignment with System Level Strategies Progress Report: July 1, 2011 – June 30, 2012

College/District Unit:

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Organizational Effectiveness MCCCD develops and strengthens policies and practices to guide the effective use of public resources.

Plans for July 1, 2012June 30, 2013

Form 5.2 College Report: Governing Board Outcomes and Metrics Success and Challenges Reporting Period: July 1, 2011– June 30, 2012 College: Improvement and/or Excelling Governing Board Outcome Metrics Identify a Maximum of 3 Governing Board Outcomes/ Metrics

ONE – Maricopa (Google Mail Implementation, Partnerships Projects among Colleges, etc.) Colleges in MCCCD have historically met the needs of their communities through localized decisions about programs, services and business processes. While this diversity makes the District stronger, it can also produce some inefficiencies and unintended barriers for students who may enroll in more than one college.  ONE Maricopa seeks to maximize resources and effectiveness using system wide approaches to address common challenges, to foster increased partnerships among Maricopa Colleges, and to reduce duplication of services and programs. The Chancellor has provided leadership by promoting the philosophy of “ONE Maricopa”.

Governing Board Outcome

Related Metric

Describe the extent to which the college has improved and/or has exceeded a benchmark.

How has the college contributed to this improvement?

Critical Challenges - Governing Board Outcome Metrics Identify a Maximum of 3 Governing Board Outcomes/ Metrics Governing Board Outcome

Related Metric

Describe any results that were lower than expected and the challenge related to improving this Governing Board Outcome and Metric.

How is the college responding to this challenge?

1. 2. 3.

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Form 5.3 Strategic Innovations Report College/District Unit:

Core Planning Areas

Strategic innovations should be linked to the most recent College Strategic Plan or MCCCD Unit Plan. Identify no more than one or two innovative initiatives per Core Planning area that the College or MCCCD Unit is planning or implementing. These initiatives should be strategic in nature and change based.

Which Governing Board Outcome and related Metric(s) is the innovation designed to improve?

1. Access to Learning MCCCD provides access to learning opportunities for students and the community.

2. Pathways to Success MCCCD builds educational and career pathways and supports student goal attainment.

3. Effective Teaching & Learning MCCCD researches, assesses, and improves student learning and invests in strategies to improve organizational learning & effectiveness.

4. Organizational Effectiveness MCCCD develops and strengthens policies and practices to guide the effective use of public resources.

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Strategic Planning Guide | Maricopa Community Colleges