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ARCHITECTURE Portfolio 2015-2017

MARIA ULLOA B.Arch 2019 CCA


ABOUT ME

I believe it’s important to incorporate green spaces in my work; to create a strong relationship with our Earth and embrace its natural characteristics as we continue to occupy more space on it. I’m interested in applying my ideas of organization to create structures that absorb and take advantage of existing conditions in order to become one with the site. I imagine unconventional ways of placing programs and clear, direct forms and facade detailing to create the most unique experience for habitants, and the best impression for all others.


CONTENT

01

HOTEL EXTENDED

15

CONCRETE VIEWS

25

CANTILIBRARY

33

ANALYSES


01


HOTEL EXTENDED New York, NY

Studio 3 | Fall 2016 Jason Anderson & Peter Anderson

Taking advantage of existing infrastructure, the High Line physically extends onto the hotel through two distinct conditions: Pedestrian traffic through green space and communal park spaces. A plaza that connects to the street level consists of further conditions found throughout the site. Private green spaces are placed on each floor to create interactions between guests on the same floor, and between floors themselves.

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DESIGN PARAMETERS

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Varying Green Spaces

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Art Gallery Clusters

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Dispersed Food Spots

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BASE CORE 1

4

1

HIGH LINE EXTENTION

2

2 2

1 1

2

3 BASE CORE

HIGH LINE EXTENSION

Consists of small shops, restaurants, cafes, an open gallery space [for local artists], administration, and a lobby space.

Consists of grand stairs leading up to the High Line level where the High Line itself is extended to surround the core.

Purpose of this mass is to take all the existing elements of Chelsea and use them to create a connection between the hotel and the street.

Purpose of this space is to create a visual connection to the core so that pedestrians can see the activity within, and to create a pavilion for the activity below.

Footprint kept minimal to allow for flexible, open, exterior space which creates a connection between 19th and 20th Street.

3

While this space is open to the public, individuals can’t necessarily acces the hotel itself directly through this space.

4

2

BASE CORE BASE CORE 1

HIGH LINE HIGH EXTENSION LINE EXTENSION

SHOPS, RESTAURANTS, CAFES, OPEN ART GALLERY

GREEN SPACE WRAPS AROUND CORE FOR PE

Consists of smallConsists shops, restaurants, of small shops, cafes, restaurants, an open gallery cafes,space an open gallery Consists space of grandConsists stairs leading of grand upstairs to theleading High L SPACE, ADMINISTRATION, & LOBBY TRAFFIC [for local artists], [foradministration, local administration, a lobby space. and aROTATING lobby MASS space. High Line itself High is extended Line itself to surround is extended the core to THE “L”artists],and Consists of rooms and park spaces for guests.

Consists of further rooms and parks laid out in a similar manner. Each level is rotated 2.6 degrees to in the end line up with

Purpose of this mass Purpose isPurpose to ofoftake this mass the is existing to space take all elements existing of Chelsea Purpose of Chelsea of this space Purpose is of to this create space a visual is toconne crea this massall is to create a corner that can becomethe more Chelsea’s water elements line. communal, while the ends of the “L” can of becomeChelsea more private. CONNECTION between Grand Stairs up HIGHcan LINE level and use them to create and use aExisting them connection to elements create between a connection the hotelcreate between and the the street. hotel the street. pedestrians that canlead see pedestrians thetoactivity see within, the act and Purpose of this mass is to and address that a difference in scale with the Provides maximum views neighborhood for guests on the 19th St. and High Line side. relationship between the building and the site, and the building and hotel and the city. pavilion for the pavilion activity for below. the activity below. Form provides a corner void closest to surrounding buildings which Open to the PUBLIC can hold vertical Form provides possible exterior visual connectionsspace between floors. Footprint kept minimal Footprint toeasily allow kept minimal forcirculation. flexible, to allow open, forexterior flexible, space open, Small Footprint creates a CONNECTION between 19th and which creates a connection which creates between a connection 19th and between 20th Street. 19th and 20th Street. While this space While is open this to space the public, is open individua to the 20th street Doesn’t give access the HOTEL itself necessarily acces necessarily the hoteltoitself acces the directly hotel throu itse


“L”

THE “L”

3 3

THE “L”

ROTATING MASS

4 4

4

ROTATING MASS ROTATING MASS

EDESTRIAN PRIVATE ROOMS ANDspaces PARK for SPACES FOR HOTEL MORE PRIVATE ROOMS AND PARK SPACES s of level roomsConsists and park rooms for and guests. park guests. Consists of further Consists rooms of andfurther parks laid rooms out andinparks aROTATED similar laid out manner. in Line where theofspaces Each level is rotated Each level 2.6 degrees is rotated to in 2.6 the degrees end line to up in with the end GUESTS 2.6 DEGREES BY FLOOR e. of this mass Purpose is to of create this mass a corner is to space createthat a corner can become space more that can become Chelsea’s morewater line. Chelsea’s water line. l, while the communal, ends of while the “L” the can ends become of the more “L” private. can become more private. ection to the core so MAXIMUM VIEWS for guests (19th St. and the High Line) by mass lining for a PurposeBegins of this Purpose is up to ofwith address thisthe mass aCITY’S difference is toGRID address in scale a smaller difference with the d to create a scaled connection to site s maximum Provides views formaximum guests views on thefor 19th guests St. and on the High19th LineSt. side. and High relationship Line side. between relationship the building between and the the building site, andand thethe building site, The “L” ends: PRIVATE rooms the city. the city. Ends by lining up with the CITY’S WATER LINE for a ovides a corner Form provides void closest a corner to surrounding void closestbuildings to surrounding which buildings which als can’t The “L” corner: SHARED parks larger scaled to site visual ily this hold space. vertical can easily circulation. hold vertical circulation. Form provides possible Formconnection provides visual connections possible between connections floors. betwee ugh


CONNECTING TO THE NEIGHBORHOOOD B

STORAGE KITCHEN UP

A

A

UP

1 9 T H

S T R E E T

B

N

Ground Floor Plan GROUND FLOOR PLAN Restaurant/Outdoor Theatre

1/8” = 1’-0”

The ground level invites neighborhood inhabitants to access the 0’ 4’ 16’ 32’ hotel’s programs, even if they aren’t overnight guests. The minimal footptrint allows for potential mixed -use programs to occur throughout the year. A connection exists for visitors to quickly access 20th St. from 19th St, allowing them to visually experience the activity of the building.


CONNECTING TO THE INFRASTRUCTURE

STORAGE

ST. OFFICE UP

UP

1 9 T H

S T R E E T

Third Floor Plan The third level invites the High Line’s inhabitants to access the hotel’s programs. Art gallery space is provided to connect with the local artists of the neighborhood. The hotel lobby is given visual access to the gallery and to the activity of the High Line. Luckily, if visitors wish to continue their walk, they can circulate downwards to the ground floor.

N

THIRD FLOOR PLAN High Line Extension/Art Gallery 0’

4’

16’

1/8” = 1’-0” 32’


BUILDING

CONNECTION

Section B-B B-B 1/8” = 1’-0” From the fifth floor SECTION up, guests have the 0 luxury of open, private parks on their 16’respective floors. 0’ 4’ 32’ In addition to the influence of using the public programs on the lower levels, guests are influence to share communal time in these varied park spaces. Visual connections are provided between each floor, as well with the overall parks and the city’s High Line.

STORAGE STORAGE

STORAGE

UP

UP

UP

UP

STORAGE

STORAGE

ST.

ST.

N

N


ADAPTING TO THE CITY’S CLIMATE

Facade Wall Section How can the open, green parks be maintained during New York’s harsh winters? Hotel Extended features a removable facade of inflatable ETFE film. Constructed on a track, the facade can easily be rolled away for the warm summers, and later set in place to keep the cold out. Intricate air pumping systems make use of natural air to inflate each insulating pillow.


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CONCRETE VIEWS San Francisco, CA Studio 2 | Spring 2016 Clark Thenhaus & Darell Fields

A sloping landscape along with a rocky and windswept shoreline allows for a dramatic exploration of terraced and cantilevered forms. My goal was, through these forms, to further explore varying habitable spaces in combination with experiences that give visitors an opportunity for maximum views. It was important to understand how these spaces alone could differentiate areas of private research, gathering green space, and exhibition.

16


DESIGN PARAMETERS

Maximum Views

Surface Morphology

Modes of Access


Extending

Terracing

Extending+ Terracing


Landscape+ Extending+ Accessibility

Landscape+ Extending+ Views

Landscape+ Extending+ Terracing


THE CANTILEVER

DN

UP

N

N

THIRD FLOOR PLAN Research Facility 0’

4’

SECOND FLOOR PLAN Nursery

SCALE: 1/8”=1’ 16’

40’

0’

4’

SCALE: 1/8”=1’ 16’

40’

Second Floor Plan

PLANT NURSERY INTERIOR

SECTION A-A SCALE: 1/8”=1’

0’

4’

16’

The second level provides a nursery for plants to be grown to an age when they can survive planting in one of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area parks. Maximum views and natural light welcome visitors to explore the nursery as they make their way through the natural trails of Land’s End. SECTION B-B SCALE: 1/8”=1’

40’

0’

4’

16’

40’


THE EXCAVATION

UP

N

FIRST FLOOR PLAN Exhibition Level

ALE: 1/8”=1’ 40’

0’

4’

SCALE: 1/8”=1’ 16’

40’

First Floor Plan The second level provides a nursery for plants to be grown to an age when they can survive planting in one of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area parks. Maximum views and natural light welcome visitors to explore the nursery as they make their way through the natural trails of Land’s End. SECTION A-A

SECTION B-B

4’

16’

40’

0’

4’

SECTION C-C

SCALE: 1/8”=1’

SCALE: 1/8”=1’

0’

16’

SCALE: 1/8”=1’

40’

0’

4’

16’

40’


ANALYSIS

Anchoring Wall Anchoring Wall Anchoring Wall

Branched Off Programming Branched Off Programming Branched Off Programming

2 PM

11 AM

2 PM 2 PM

11 AM 11 AM

9 AM 9 AM 9 AM

SUNLIGHT RESPONSE SUNLIGHT RESPONSE SUNLIGHT RESPONSE

SOLAR RESPONSE

Entrance/ Entrance/ Main Circulation Entrance/ Main Circulation Main Circulation

Research Facility Research Facility Research Facility

Nursery Nursery Nursery Exhibition Level Exhibition Level Exhibition Level

Primary Circulation Primary Circulation Primary Circulation

RELATIONSHIP TO EXISTING PATHWAYS

RELATIONSHIP TO EXISTING PATHWAYS RELATIONSHIP TO EXISTING PATHWAYS RELATIONSHIP TO EXISTING PATHWAYS

Secondary Circulation Secondary Circulation Secondary Circulation

EXHIBITION SPACE INTERIOR

VIEWPOINT DIRECTIONALITY VIEWPOINT DIRECTIONALITY VIEWPOINT DIRECTIONALITY

VIEWPOINT DIRECTIONALITY


TECTONIC SYSTEMS

THIRD LEVEL

SECOND LEVEL

FIRST LEVEL

CONCRETE STRUCTURE

CONCRETE COLUMN AND BEAM GRID

FOUNDATION

GROUND

GROUND AND EXCAVATIONS


FINAL MODEL

EXTENDING THE LANDSCAPE


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CANTILEVERED LIBRARY San Francisco, CA Studio 1 | Fall 2015 Mark Donahue & Thomas Ryan

Placed adjacent to Octavia Park, and focusing around the concepts of natural lighting and level-differentiated programs, Cantilevered Library optimizes the advantages of this Hayes Valley site. A cantilevered entrance not only draws visitors in, but also allows for a continuation of an open gathering space. Inspiration was drawn from Sou Fujimoto’s Musashino Art University Library.

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DESIGN PARAMETERS

Park Continuation

Pedestrian Patterns

Lighting Patterns


GEOMETRY

WRAPPING

MASSING

PUBLIC/PRIVATE

CIRCULATION


FIRST FLOOR PLAN

Wrapping+ Terracing

SECOND FLOO

01

02

04

Facade Study

03

Light vs. Dark

Final Form

01

Public Park

02

Entrance

03

Community Room


OR PLAN

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

ROOF PLAN

07

06

09

05

08

04

Staff Offices

05

Break Room

06

Stacks

07

Reading Area

08

Children’s Room

09

Lightwell


WEST ELEVATION

LONGITUDINAL SECTION


URBAN A

South of Market District VICTORIA MANOLO DRAVES PARK

GENE FRIEND RECREATION CENTER

SITE

FOOD SPOTS HOWARD & LANGTON MINI PARK

Site Analysis The neighborhood surrounding the site not only lacks general green spaces, but lacks variation within those provided that could potentially serve multiple uses for residents of all kinds.

MID SPACE: Voids located in spaces between buildings that aren’t necessarily open to the neighborhood’s inhabitants.

A wide range of mid-spaces were found from block to block. While some extended to the outer boundaries of the sidewalk, making them visible to outsiders, most are confined within the walls of buildings. While intended for uses like private backyards and outlooking terraces, the only “successful” open and green spaces are those categorized under recreational parks. This is due to a lack of not only space, but light, accessibility, and an uninviting environment.

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San Francisco, CA


ANALYSES

Downtown District

Toronto, ON

TALLER BUILDINGS

SITE

SITE

SHORTER BUILDINGS

COURTYARD

ORNAMENTATION

ROOFTOP

PARK

Site Analysis The site surrounding 60 Richmond expresses a clear organization of building heights and of green spaces. There is clear relationship between these two analyses: Areas to the west have taller buildings and a lack of green spaces. Areas to the east have shorter buildings and many varying green spaces.

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PRECEDENT

60 Richmond Hous

Toront

Solid Box

VOID SOLID

A volume is subtracted to create a central void

Two horizontal voids are taken out connect central void to the outsid

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U TYPE

O TYPE

U TYPE

L TYPE

Floor Plan Strategy

Through methods of carving, a generous amount of voids exist in the building. Most evident is the light-well that allows light to efficiently enter the depths of floor plates. Branching off this appear multiple terraced green spaces existing on all of the exposed facades.

Floor Plan Types

O TYPE


T ANALYSIS

sing Cooperative

ROOF

to, ON

HOUSING

HOUSING

HOUSING +GREEN

PUBLIC

HOUSING +GREEN

HOUSING +GREEN

HOUSING

Vertical columes are taken out to create multiple-height spaces HOUSING

HOUSING +GREEN

HOUSING

HOUSING

HOUSING +GREEN

More voids are taken out to make facade occupiable HOUSING

ROOF

to de

HOUSING

HOUSING

HOUSING

HOUSING +GREEN

FLOORS 9-11 HOUSING

4. UNITS

SOLID

3

2

VOID

1

HOUSING

FLOORS 6-8

PUBLIC

3. CIRCULATION

UNITS

2. GREEN SPACE

FLOORS 2-5

GREEN SPACE

1. LIGHT-WELL

Circulation + Units

4

HOUSING +GREEN

HOUSING +GREEN

PUBLIC

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UNDERSTANDING THE TYPOLOGY

VIEW

MARIA ULLOA CONTACT

AFFILIATIONS CONNECTING TOWER

Connects public spaces to private mulloa@cca.edu spaces visually. Could potentially connect them physically, where linkedin.com/in/maria-ulloa-7920b0a3

Alpha Rho Chi Positions: Worthy Scribe Recruitment Chair Historian Chair

residents could access the public spaces directly through this mass.

SKILLS Adobe Suite — Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Premier AutoCAD Rhino 3D — Modeling, Rendering Grasshopper Revit Certified Maxwell Render V-Ray CASCADING FORM Laser Cutting Provides varied level housing CNC that optimizes use of natural and green spaces. Potential 3Dlight Printing to create a continuous form of circulation that from Ceramics — travels Sculpture, Wheel Throwing interior to exterior. Moments of overlap create potential for verticality.

EDUCATION

California College of the Arts — 2014-2019 Bachelor’s of Architecture Ocean County College — Summer 2015, 2016

EXPERIENCE CARVED SLAB Contains a large carve to Center create a 2Digital Color — 2016-Present flow between the neighborhood and the building. Provides a smaller Position: 2D Output Assistant carve for separate entry for residents. Creates a separation between public and private that is still inviting.

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

Fluency in English Native Spanish Speaker

AIAS Students of Color Coalition

AWARDS

SOUTHWEST VIEW

Creative Achievement Award — 2014 CCA Diversity Scholarship — 2014 Jury Nomination (Studio 2) — 2016 Jury Nomination (Studio 3) — 2016 SFCSI Foundation Scholarship, First Prize — 2016

INVOLVEMENT Constructing Paper Cranes for the World Tree of Hope, Most Holy Redeemer Church, San Francisco — 10/2015 Strawberry Hill Butterfly Restoration Project, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco — 03/2016 St. Anthony’s Dining Room Service, San Francisco — 12/2016


THANK YOU!

Maria Ulloa Architecture Portfolio  

Works done throughout the first three years in the Bachelor's of Architecture program at California College of the Arts

Maria Ulloa Architecture Portfolio  

Works done throughout the first three years in the Bachelor's of Architecture program at California College of the Arts

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