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CAMPS


Camps by Terry Meade


Didactic exercise Fall Semester 2010

Interior worlds: “Camps” Main Editor Gennaro Postiglione Course of Interior Architecture Faculty of Architettura e Società Politecnico di Milano www.lablog.org.uk Editor Maria Sammut

only for pedagogic purpose not for commercial use


INDEX 00_Camps by Terry Meade 01_sewer camp 02_CCC camp 03_weedpatch 04_trailer 05_tulare camp 06_tulare camp 07_aida refugee camp 08_tralier house 09_refugee education 10_campus camp 11_indoor camp out 12_survivalist camp out 13_jalozai refugee camp 14_greenham common women’s peace camp 15_tree camp 16_hobo camp 17_homeless camp


18_sans domicile fixe 19_homeless camp 20_benaco camp 21_tent 22_everyone i have slept with 24_portaledge 25_wall camp 27_chaos communication camp


Camps by Terry Meade

Abstract Words such as dwelling, inhabitation and occupation convey a set of meanings that are significant for Interiors. They carry suggestions of settlement, stability, and durability. A different significance is ascribed to these words when they are used in conjunction with the word camp, and conseuently they call forth a different appreciation of interior. The word camp lends a casual and contingent uality to suggest informal dwelling, conditional inhabitation and an occupation wedded to time more than to place. Camp spaces always contain something of the extraordinary or the exceptional. They are commonly fashioned for recreation and pleasure, or occur as a conseuence of natural disaster, conflict or displacement. They speak of both the momentary event and the marginal space. Camps therefore accommodate

an increasingly diverse set of occupants – tourists, pilgrims, cadets, refugees, migrants, soldiers, activists, humanitarian workers and detainees. People can (and do), set up camp in any space. Camps may occur as temporary shelters in sports grounds, airport lounges, and universities; they may be deliberately implanted into disused buildings; or occur as forms of illegal occupation in houses The camp is a piece of land placed outside the normal juridical order, but it is nevertheless not simply an external space. (1) The “state of exception”, identified by the Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben, as the abrogation of the principle of law, provides a frame through which to examine the refugee camp. The state of exception is based on the suspension,


overthrow or abolition of the pre-existing juridical order. Agamben begins his book Homo Sacer with the distinction that the Greeks made between zoe, or life in its natural state and bios, the ualified, cultural form of life. Zoe stands for the factual, animal functioning of the living organism (translated as the private sphere) and bios represents politicized life in the polis or community (the public sphere), which gives life meaning. (2) For Agamben, it is the camp and not the city that is currently the bio-political paradigm of the West. (3) In his hypothesis, he contends that the camp is the place where the state of exception has become the rule. Life in a state of exception means that the distinction between our biological body and our political body, (private survival and public participation), disappears. It is a zone within which inside and outside, inclusion and exclusion, city and house, are indistinguishable. Within this space, the individual is deprived of his or her prior condition as citizen.


Paper What is a Camp? Words such as dwelling, inhabitation and occupation convey a set of meanings that are significant for Interiors. They carry suggestions of settlement, stability, and durability. A different significance is ascribed to these words when they are used in conjunction with the word camp, and conseuently they call forth a different appreciation of interior. The word camp lends a casual and contingent uality to suggest informal dwelling, conditional inhabitation and an occupation wedded to time more than to place. Camp spaces always contain something of the extraordinary or the exceptional. They are commonly fashioned for recreation and pleasure, or occur as a conseuence of natural disaster, conflict or displacement. They speak of both the momentary event and the marginal

space. Camps therefore accommodate an increasingly diverse set of occupants – tourists, pilgrims, cadets, refugees, migrants, soldiers, activists, humanitarian workers and detainees. People can (and do), set up camp in any space. Camps may occur as temporary shelters in sports grounds, airport lounges, and universities; they may be deliberately implanted into disused buildings; or occur as forms of illegal occupation in houses. The refugee camp Camps have acuired a central place in the struggles and unresolved encounters between people and have become an increasingly prevalent condition of urbanity. This paper will focus on one particular form of camp, which is at the centre of uestions of identity, residency, safety and mobility. Refugee camps consist of improvised interiors, located outside the


norms of dwelling where the usual tools and values of inhabitation are called into uestion. They are almost always perceived to be transitory spaces located on the edges of urban centres. They are usually formed in situations of Biopolitics is the intervention of authorities into citizens’ bodily, biological lives. Described as the basis of modern politics it designates the regulation of the security and welfare of human lives as its primary role. unease, threat or emergency, and they can take on a permanence that confounds their temporary nature. Freuently identified with neglected, abandoned or not considered vestiges of territory, the configuration of refugee camps eludes the recognised structures of formal cities they are attached to – structures such as intentional design, specified use and recognisable typology. The state of exception The camp is a piece of land placed outside the normal juridical order, but it is nevertheless not simply an external space. (1) The “state of exception”, identified by the Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben, as the abrogation of the principle of law, provides a frame through which to examine the refugee camp. The state of exception is based on the suspension, overthrow or abolition of the pre-existing juridical order. Agamben begins his book Homo Sacer with the distinction that the Greeks made between zoe, or life in its natural state and bios, the ualified, cultural form of life. Zoe stands for the factual, animal functioning of the living organism (translated as the private sphere) and bios represents politicized life in the polis or community (the pub-

lic sphere), which gives life meaning. (2) For Agamben, it is the camp and not the city that is currently the bio-political paradigm of the West. (3) In his hypothesis, he contends that the camp is the place where the state of exception has become the rule. Life in a state of exception means that the distinction between our biological body and our political body, (private survival and public participation), disappears. It is a zone within which inside and outside, inclusion and exclusion, city and house, are indistinguishable. Within this space, the individual is deprived of his or her prior condition as citizen. The most extreme manifestation of this is the death camp, the place where life does not even have political value and where law is transformed into an endless series of arbitrary regulations. In such extremes life is whittled down to mere biological existence, to what Agamben calls bare life. Agamben writes that people in the death camps in world war two existed in absolute privacy and, at the same time, they had absolutely no private domain. This blurred distinction between biological body and political body, exists in other spheres or sites of exception such as refugee camps, enclosed asylum centres, military bases and occupied zones. Places such as Camp Delta in Guantanamo bay, and the hidden camps established by the Bush Administration for the rendition of prisoners have become emblems of the state of exception. Agamben argues that the current political condition is thus manifested as a confusion of the private and the political and thus the disappearance of the private domain. Private events are now turned into spectacle.


A “phenomenon such as Big Brother is paradigmatic, where television merges private and public into what is almost literally a camp situation.” (4) The refugee camp belongs to those spaces, which cannot be easily accommodated within a rigid polarity of insideoutside, a space that is often only acknowledged apologetically. It is an “outside” caught within the “inside” of the city or of planned collective existence. Every city has such an outside – a displaced group in a neighbourhood cut off from the major flows of the city. The refugee, the Illegal immigrant and the asylum’ seeker are those who can no longer claim citizenship. They “abide in a zone reduced to bare life with no rights”, where “the distinction between zoe and bios, between mere life and a humane existence, has been eliminated.” (5) The refugee camp contains the paradox of mobility and insecurity. Refugees are uprooted, stateless, deprived of state, place, function and papers. For the refugee, the road back to the lost home is all but cut. For people dispersed in camps, regions, uarters and zones the stability of geography and the continuity of land disappear. Inhabitants of a refugee camp are usually subject to special laws and special status. Borders and barriers deny residence. ravel from one place to another is barred and lives are interfered with arbitrarily. Thus life is scattered, discontinuous, marked by the artificial and imposed arrangements of interrupted or confined space and by the dislocations and unsynchronized rhythms of disturbed time. Refugee camps belong to non-spaces of a shifting transitory and volatile materiality. They usually lack

basic amenities and services, including water, electricity, streets, sidewalks, gardens, patios, trees, plazas, or shops. There is an increased exposure of private life, while public space is simultaneously eroded. The camp inhabitants experience an extraordinary proximity to their interior world and its contents, which in turn may deprive them of a larger or comprehensive understanding of their surroundings and environment. Refugee camps have both a permanent and provisional aspect. They are often simultaneously constructed and occupied with little assistance or regulation from outside agencies. The inhabitant is endlessly making do in makeshift homes. Construction is usually a long-term project of gradual improvement as the camp progresses from temporary refuge to temporarypermanent, taking on solidity over time. Because nothing is secure, the refugee camp is a territory where defence takes hold, commonly demonstrated through an obsessive personal control of space, an exaggerated sense of solidarity and a passionate hostility to outsiders. There is a complex relationship between the non-hierarchical, decentralized, nomadic space of the camp and the environment within which it is situated. The space of the refugee camp is freuently interpreted through the sedentary space of the settler or resident, enclosed by walls, anchored to place and tagged by territorial control. ust as the camp, located on the edge of the city affects its surroundings, conversely, the city provides a field of references to transform the utilitarian logic that guides the design of the refugee camp. Maintaining


a home-space reuires the preservation of patterns that have become familiar. Habits of life, expression or activity in the new environment inevitably occur against the memory of these things in another environment. Edward Said has elouently described the way that Palestinians in refugee camps maintain their sense of place against the hostile enclosure on the outside. He points to acts of repetition and an attention to detail in the closely managed acts of “speaking through the given.” We keep recreating the interior, tables are set, living rooms furnished, photographs and objects arranged... but it inadvertently highlights or preserves the rift or break fundamental to our lives. Something is always slightly off, something always doesn’t work. Pictures in Palestinian houses are always hung too high, and in what seems to be random places. Something is always missing by virtue of the excess. I do not mean that the result is tragic or sad; to the contrary, the rift is usually expressed as a comic dislocation, the effect of too much for too little a space or for too uninteresting an occasion. The oddness of these excesses and asymmetries, their constitutively anti-aesthetic effect, their communicated insecurity seems to symbolise exile – exile from a place, from a past from the actuality of a home. (6) There is always an element of temporality within any concept of interior and the camp challenges spacetime coordinates through which normative subjects orient themselves. By their nature, temporal phenomena cause disturbances and irregularities in regular and ordered systems. The mobility of the camp threat-

ens basic assumptions about building and dwelling, allowing spaces charged with potential to emerge. Camps foster practices that can disrupt processes of territorialisation and create new concepts of deterritorialisation proposing alternative strategies and alternative positions for the inhabitation of space. Camps unshackle interior space from architectural containment and challenge conventional notions of interiors as being determined by enclosure or defined by property and ownership. They are spaces without borders, without centre, and without periphery. The camp is a free-floating space not formed directly by enclosure but from controls that are subject to continuous change. Inhabitation is not bound to a particular place but marked by displacement. Camps are outside of static relations, predetermined rules and hierarchical and centralized organizational structures. As low, temporarypermanent constructions, they spread horizontally rather than verticality. They do not possess totalised systems or schemas but can arrange and rearrange their co-ordinates in a number of ways, allowing unconventional spatial orientations. The transitory home, rapidly formed and rapidly worked in ever changing localities is increasingly prevalent in the contemporary world. Struggles over the utilisation of public places, disputes over real estate, the forming of borders and fortifications, all encourage the appearance of informal dwellings or camps within developed cities. With rising costs of social and physical infrastructures, rising levels of immigration, unemployment, aging populations, increasing numbers of empty and aban-


doned buildings, the temporary condition of dwelling and the way spaces are commandeered or claimed can provide a vantage point to reflect on the nature of contemporary inhabitation. The significance of camps lies in the opportunities they offffer to rethink notions of the interior through situations that are mobile and constantly changing.


References Agamben, Giorgio. 1998. Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life. Stanford, Cal.: Stanford University Press. De Cauter, Lieven. 2004. The Bloody Mystifications of the New World Order. In The Capsular Civilisation. Ed. Lieven De Cauter, 154-171. Rotterdam: NAi publishers. Hailey, Charlie. 2009. Camps: A Guide to 21st Century Space. London: the MI Press. Said, Edward. 2000. Interiors. In The Edward Said Reader. New York: Vintage Books.


ATLAS


‘10/camps/sewer camp

The Vienna sewer collapsed in the period of rapid growth of the city. Many could not find the hoped-for work, resulting in an increased number of homelessness. These soon discovered the refuge in the underground. Since the sewage is largely accessible, drains a lot and branches into chambers and corridors. The drains provided for many an ideal shelter, which was mainly in the cold season basis for survival.


‘19/camps/CCC camp

Three hundred thousand men between the ages of seventeen to twenty-three were enrolled into the Civilian Consevation Corps, thirty thousand of which were veterans, and ten thousand African-Americans. They opted for long days and hard, dirty work, living in quasi-military camps often far from home in the nation’s publicly owned forests and parks, all to send money to their needy families. The main aim, and Roosevelt’s dream was to conserve the nation’s natural resources, whilst bringing an army of unempoyed youngsters to a ‘‘healthier environment’’. If war and politics had not intervened in the nineyear long life of this programmed camp, it would have epitomised national youth service aswell as voluntary work camps.


‘35/camps/weedpatch

Between 1935 and 1940 over one million people left their homes in Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas and Missouri to escape the wind, dust, and drought and set out for California where they heard there was a lot of work to be found picking crops, and where no one ever went hungry. They settled in Arvin Migratory Labor Camp, which later became known as Weedpatch Camp, as it was to in John Steinbeck’s novel, Grapes of Wrath, which is still used up until today. Including a post office, school and library, it provided a place of refuge for temporary workers, mostly farmers who followed the migration of crops and agriculture, as their sole form of income. Such camps were self sustainable and the community fed itself through its own resources and residents.


http://www.weedpatchcamp.com/Life%20in%20 Camp/cafteria.gif


‘36/camps/trailer

http://www.designboom.com/eng/funclub/airstream_history.html

When he failed in producing already existing trailer plans for a do-it-yourself magazine, Wally Byam, decided to design his own trailer. With the hefty change of lifestyle of Americans at the time, and the increase in popularity of life on the road, his Airstream trailer succeeded and is being improved till this date. It produces enough space and comodity for someone choosing a temporary place to live, choosing to travel, rest, see the sights and learn about distant societies, as Byam envisioned.


eng/funclub/air-


‘37/camps/tulare camp

http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide ctDetails?artobj=137701&handle=li

Lying on her side, this woman’s dishevelment and fretful expression convey the suffering and hardship endured by thousands of migrant farm laborers who were forced out of their homes and off their land during the Dust Bowl. In such situations identity, residency and safety all come in serious question, which can trouble some peolple more than others. These types of camps are truly a case where the state of exception is reached.


w.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artObje artobj=137701&handle=li


‘40/camps/tulare camp

h t t p : / / p e o p l e. c o h u m s . o h i o - s t a t e. e d u images/0001r.jpg

Tulare camp was also one for migrants seeking work in California. Some migrants had succumbed to the hazards and travails of the road and lost much of their dignity. On the other hand most insisted on staying clean, when possible, and wearing clean clothes when engaging in various recreational activities, such as singing, playing music, and dancing.


o p l e. c o h u m s . o h i o - s t a t e. e d u / c h i l d s 1 /


‘49/camps/trailer house

The trailer captures the philosophy of a camp in all its stages, through a gradual process of building a more permanent house in something frequently perceived as being temporary. This informal process is rationalized in Marcel Breuer’s Trailer House, where the trailer embedded in the house’s coure serves as a domestic bridge between diverse programs and spaces. reference: http://www.breuertrailerhouse.com/entryTrailer.html


‘50/camps/aida refugee camp

Still offering refuge to Palestenian victims to present date, the fifty year old expanding site is far from temporary. Around 10000 people live here and the so called camps are built of masonry, predicting that it would stand for more half centuries. A concrete wall closes the site, on which the refugees transformed it into a mural, projected the site’s history through art. Anger, pain, distresses, joy love and freedom are all themes characterising the wall. This further sustains the fact that camps are the basis of the town and the eventual city.


‘59/camps/refugee education

Palestine Arab Refugees Schoolroom in UNRWA’s Dekwaneh Camp.

Aged between ten and twelve, Palestine Arab Refugees in Dekwaneh Camp are provided with education. Schooling in a refugee camp shows the extent to which such camp has moved towards one of permanency as organising such a system requires time and space.

http://downloads.unmultimedia.org/photo/medium/131/131891.jpg


‘61/camps/campus camp

`The lack of infrastructure brought by what was left of World War II stirred up the need for growth within the community, and much more so, its’ students. American university campuses experienced a rapid transformation, very clearly noted at the University of Florida. Salvaged barracks provided housing on the campus periphery, for students and their families, and other military building stock was used as infill in the main campus. The contrast between the early twentieth-century buildings and the mass-produced military structures highlight the difference between what is permanent and temporary. The latter, transformed the collegiate Gothic identity of the campus layout through a shift in scale and temporarity that disguises the original campus infrastructure.


1st pic pg 385


‘66/camps/indoor camp-out

In her article for Ladies’ Home Journal, Margaret White focuses on a new line of sleeping bags made for indoor camping, complete with bandanna and patchwork quilt covers or blue-and-white damaskprint percale. This shows the need for a one to camp, even within the standard household, creating a temporary space within a permanent one. This inside-outside camp, cuts to the roots of the combination of domesticity and mobility, which has become an uneasy mix of autonomy and necessity.


‘70/camps/survivalist camp

The first published U.S Army Field Manual FM 21-76 provides the necessary information to enable anyone to build a space for survial. It can be compared to an architectural manual, except that it includes the builder’s emotional situation and state of mind. An exhausted person may develop a passive outlook, therby losing the will to survive. Such camps for survival are made to fit the body. This is usually overlooked, and the space is made too big, resulting in failure of the ‘structure’.


‘80/icamps/jalozai refugee camp

Lasting until 2003, one of the largest refugee camps in Pakistan. This woman in particular shows temporary living, guarding her belonging, versus the more permanent camps in the background. On the same camp site both of these types of living can be found. The possession of an electric fan shows how even the possesions are not certain of and when they are to be actually in use.


‘81/camps/greenham common women’s peace camp

On September 15, 1981, the female Welsh group ‘Women for Life on Earth’ protested the siting of ninety-six nuclear cruise missiles at the RAF. Here, Amagben’s the women’s ‘bios’ went out of the norm, as a sacrifice for their ‘zoe’. Even though the camp was known that it was to be used temporarily, the need for division of space and organization can be notes in the background.


‘83/camps/tree camp

Breaking away from the common idea that camps ‘spread horizontally rather than vertically’, tree camps are mostly used for recreational reasons or for protests, more than for refugee displacements. Such composition resembles that of a high rise building in a modern city. One might feel as if the ground is the sky, resulting in a shift of perspective of one’s ‘neighboorhood’, as if towering over the world such as with birds-eye view. Nature acts as the structure of these camps and each camp acts as a shelter for the one beneath it.


‘84/camps/hobo camp

The first Hobo Convention was first hosted in Britt, Iowa, in 1900, and an annual meeting is organised until present date. Historically the hobo camp falls between a camp for he homeless and a work camp. The loss of possibility of work brought by the Great Depression and the earliest of such camps were called rail-yard camps, due to the mobility of former employees. A hobo camp, or as hoboes themselves call it, ‘Hobo Jungle’ can be both permanent and temporary, the former acting as relay points for hobo movement, and latter provide grounds with many leftover amenities , such as shaving kits, cooking pots and campfire fuel.


http://www.northbankfred.com/ britt_84b.html


‘90/camps/sans domicile fixe

Starting off as a protest, led by Jean-Baptiste Legrand, and serving for two purposes. That to provide a site for Parisian citizens to give up their homes temporarily in solidarity with the homeless, while at the same time creating an urban space for dialogue among agencies and those with and without a permanent place to live. The positioning of the red tents along the canal resulted in an urban image, evoking transition, dialogue and dispute. The SDF camp returns urban density and mixed-income settlement to the canal’s cleared urban space.


‘91/camps/homeless camp

In the late 1980s, a group of young architecture students, known as the Mad Housers, had a mission to raise awareness of homelessness and to initiate rehousing programs. The Metra’s Union Pacific West tacks, was the spine of the Tranquility City, formed by installation of a number of the Mad Housers 6 by 8 by 10 feet huts. They stated clearly that the huts were ‘temporary, emergency shelters’, but at the same time keeping in mind that: ‘The best indicator of a camp’s future longevity is its longevity’.


Out of place: homeless mobilizations, subcities, and contested landscapes Di Talmadge Wright - book


‘94/camps/benaco camp

Nearly a quarter of a million refugees crossed Rwanda’s eastern border to enter Tanzania. At that instant, Benaco camp became the world’s largest refugee camp, and in two months time the second largest ‘city’ of its host country. This was outnumbered by camps west of Rwanda where an estimated one million displaces refugees settled. This leads the definition of a camp as being a temporary space quite contradictatory as even the settling phase of this displacement takes longer than one’s average idea of short-term. The presence of schools and health centres within these camps show how such large scale refugee camps shift towards the permanent than the temporary.


‘94/camps/tent

http://sigalitlandau.com/page

Installations shown in the framework of ArtFocus 1 were exhibited in vacant shop spaces at Tel Aviv’s New Central Bus Station. Through a hole in a plaster wall, Sigalit Landau discovered the space as a hideout of the homeless or Palestinians working far from home. This became the entrance into her installation. Using some of the things that she found, while leaving the remaing in the way she found them, referrring to them as ‘vestiges of life’.


ttp://sigalitlandau.com/page/projects/tranzit.html


‘95/camps/everyone i have slept with

http://www.scienzepostmoderne.org/Di seArti/Autori/Emin/OpereEmin.html

Tracey Emin uses a camp to exhibit the people she had slept with, not only sexually, but also literally. Just like a camp gives the identity of its user at one glance, this installaiton engage personal themes such as autobiography, memory, and desire, all which define Emin’s identity.


w.scienzepostmoderne.org/Diverori/Emin/OpereEmin.html


‘96/camps/portaledge

A deployable hanging tent system designed for rock climbers who spend multiple days and nights on a big wall climb. This sketch of such a portaledge shows clearly the detailed deisgn process for such a structure, providing vapour barriers, insulation layers and carabiner connections. This may be greatly compared to the standard design process for ventilation and heating in buildings.


‘98/camps/wall camp

For a week, early in the summer, wall camps provided respite from the vertiginous context of Baffin Island’s Great Sail Peak. Such camps were long established by Warren Harding in 1957, who made it clear that every extreme vertical climb needed such camps along its route. This contradicts the common interpretation of camps which ‘spread horizontally rather than verticality.’


PAGE 95 SCAN


‘99/camps/chaos communication camp

Finding the requisite open space in the former Soviet-East German airbase near Berlin, hackers gathered in the first of a series of CCCs. Although hacking, is to most synoymous with computer crime, such camps are organised to push forward this culture and encourage hackers to discover the beauty in computing. Camps allow for such nonstandard use of site and facilities, and at the same time uniting the main promotion of both the camp and the hacker: decentralisation.


‘00/camps/village concept

Dignity Village in Portland exemplifies the village concept camp. Starting off as Camp Dignity, when eight homeless men and women raised tents on public land. The group, led by Jack Tafari, (far right) came armed with a vision of a better future for not only for themselves, but for all of Portland. Their mission was to begin a transfromation into a green, sustainable urban village, which is an ongoing process untill today. Out of necessity, residents have employed wind power, water collection, and strawbale construction, making the village comcept and at the same time relaying an effective plan for public space.


http://www.dignityvillage.org/photos/index. html


REFERENCES

‘10: Sewer Camp, Vienna 3.ManTour http://www.drittemanntour.at/en/der-wiener-kanal-geschichte.html ‘19: CCC Camp ‘35: Weedpatch Trailer ‘36: Trailer ‘37: Tulare Camp ‘40: Tulare Camp ‘46: Trailer House ‘50: Aida Refugee Camp Calameo http://en.calameo.com/read/0000390979 0464db53151 ‘61: Campus Camp Camps A Guide to 21st Century Space, Charlie Hayley, MIT Press, London, 2009,

‘66: Indoor Campout: Camps A Guide to 21st Century Space, Charlie Hayley, MIT Press, London, 2009, ‘70: Survivalist Camp: ‘80: Jalozai Refugee Camp, Pakistan CNN http://us.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/asiapcf/05/24/pakistan.refugee.camp/index. html ‘81: Greenham Common Women’s Peace Camp, Berkshire Camps A Guide to 21st Century Space, Charlie Hayley, MIT Press, London, 2009, p41 ‘83: Tree camp, Loiret Camps A Guide to 21st Century Space, Charlie Hayley, MIT Press, London, 2009, p90 ‘84: Hobo Camp ‘90:


Sans Domicile Fixe, Paris Camps A Guide to 21st Century Space, Charlie Hayley, MIT Press, London, 2009 p41 ‘91: Homeless Camp ‘94: Benaco camp, Rwanda Camps A Guide to 21st Century Space, Charlie Hayley, MIT Press, London, 2009, p327 ‘95: Everyone That I Have Slept With ‘96: Portaledge Camps A Guide to 21st Century Space, Charlie Hayley, MIT Press, London, 2009, ‘98: Wall Camp Camps A Guide to 21st Century Space, Charlie Hayley, MIT Press, London, 2009, ‘99: Chaos communication camps, Berlin Camps A Guide to 21st Century Space, Charlie Hayley, MIT Press, London, 2009, p71


Camps