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MARIANA BARREIRA MONIZ ARCHITECTURAL PORTFOLIO


Educa!on 2014 - 2015 London, UK Architectural Associa!on School of Architecture - Masters of Science in Sustainable Environmental Design [Disserta•on “Guidelines towards retrofi•ng and 18th Century “Solar” into a Rural Hotel in the North of Portugal”]

2013 - Berlin, Germany Study Abroad Program - Fall Semester 2010 - 2014 Boston, Massachuse#s, USA Wentworth Ins!tute of Technology - Bachelors of Science in Architecture

Work Experience Mariana Barreira Moniz

April 2016 - Current IBI Group, London UK - Architectural Assistant Flat 40 Nigh•ngale House - A#end team mee•ngs and understand the scope of the service and •me scale for 29 Hillyard Street projects allocated to the team SW9 0NB, London UK - Assist architectural teams with design informa•on, primarily in Revit but addi•onally +44 7478 560417 (UK) with the use of other presenta•on so!ware +351 91 921 7417 (Portugal) - Take an ac•ve role in the development of projects marianacbmoniz@gmail.com - Prepare drawings, reports and informa•on Professional Skills - Work collabora•vely with other members of the team and / or consultants - Ensure, with other members of the team, that the project is effec•vely administered and managed Autodesk Revit - Understand and adhere to procedures including quality management and Autodesk AutoCad environmental management systems and health & safety Microsta•on Projects worked on: Adobe Photoshop Chase Farm Hospital, London Adobe Illustrator St Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, Canada Adobe InDesign BC Children’s and Women’s Health Centre, Vancouver, Canada Rhino Diva September 2015 - April 2016 Navisworks K&M, London UK Architectural Assistant [Architectural Design & Project ClearEdge Management] Ecotect - Responsible for 3D modelling of design projects for clients presenta•ons TAS - Prepara•on and design preliminary drawings, plans, eleva•ons and sec•ons for a SketchUp variety of building, construc•on and maintenance projects, along with preliminary LayOut cost es•mates Microso! Word - Visit project sites and takes field measurements and documents exis•ng condi•ons. Microso! PowerPoint - Assistance in the coordina•on and review of architectural, structural, electrical and Microso! Excel mechanical drawings Hand Drawing - Par•cipa•on in mee•ngs with design professionals, consultant engineers, contractors Model Making and agencies, as well as project management

Other Ac!vi!es Sep’17 - Oct’22 - Construc•on Skills Cer•fica•on Scheme (CSCS) Dec’16 - Dec’19 - First Aider at Work by the Bri•sh Red Cross 2015-Present - AA Alumni Membership 2011-2014 - So!ball Varsity Team 2012-2014 - AIAS Member (American Ins•tute of Architecture Students) Portuguese (Na•ve) English Spanish Photography Sports (Winter and Summer)

April 2014 - August 2014 Bond Brothers, Evere", MA USA - Internship [Virtual Design and Construc•on Department] - Responsible for 3D modelling of exis•ng condi•ons for the coordina•on process through laser scans - MEP and Architectural - Involvement in client mee•ngs and site visits May 2013 - August 2013 Onboard Interiors, Marblehead, MA USA - Internship [Interiors Design for Luxury Yachts] - Assisted with designs and final project installa•ons of Yacht interiors, as well as par•cipa•on in client mee•ngs - Marke•ng materials and updated materials library


01 | “a contemporary industrial revolution: a connection between elements” Ferry Terminal Fort Point, Boston MA USA

02 | “Haus am Kleistpark: transition from heritage to modernity” Performance Hall Berlin, Germany

03| “environmental awareness: a tail of two experiences” Research London, UK

04 | “the harbour exchange” Design Royal Docks, London, UK

05 | “Guidelines towards retrofitting an 18th Century “Solar” into a Rural Hotel in the North of Portugal”

Design and Research - Dissertation Portugal


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01 | “a contemporary industrial revolution: a connection between elements�

Ferry Terminal

Fort Point, Boston MA USA


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Image 01.1 - Concept Diagram (above) Image 01.2 - Concept Diagram (bellow)

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The design for the Ferry Terminal tower was achieved by understanding the brief of the project and focusing on the amenities needed. The Crew Lounge and the Obeservation Deck felt to be the most important aspects of the design, allowing for a very tall and slim approach. The Observation Deck (Public) is located about 24m above sea level, creating a magnificient 360º view over the bridge to downtown Boston. However, on the oposite end is where the Crew Lounge is located, due to its need for proximity to the ferries. During high tide the lounge would be completely sumbersed, giving the crew a beautiful underwater view, and during low tide, part of the lougne would be visible from land. In between the two focal points are the rest of amenities, such as, ticket center, cafe and bar, bookstore, along with, public and private washrooms.


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Image 01.4 - Circulation Diagram (Main)

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Image 01.3 - Circulation Diagram (Secondary)

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The main circulation is meant to take place within the central core, which will serve the entire building from Crew Lounge to Observation deck through elevators and stairs. There is also a secondary mean of circulation throught small steps from platform to plaform. This way the visitor can enjoy each platform to its full potential.


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Image 01.5 - Plan with Section cuts (not to scale)

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Image 01.6 -  SECTION A (not to scale)


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Image 01.7 - SECTION B (not to scale)


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Image 01.8 - SECTION C (not to scale)


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02 | “Haus am Kleistpark: transition from heritage to modernity�

Performance Hall Berlin, Germany


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Image 02.9 - Concept Diagram (above) Image 02.10 - Location (bellow)

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The concept for the Performance Hall was achieved through a deep analysis of the site and its surrounding roads. These roads created and axis which lead to the shape and angles of the new building addition. By doing so, it allowed the design to be connected and cohesive with the location as well as being innovating and attractive.


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Image 02.12 - FIRST FLOOR (not to scale)

Image 02.11 - GROUND FLOOR (not to scale)


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Image 02.13 - Plan with Section cuts (not to scale)

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Concrete

Insulation

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Earth

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Gravel

Mechanical Shaft

Image 02.15 - Materials key

Image 02.14 - WALL SECTION A (not to scale)


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Image 02.16 - DETAIL B (not to scale)


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03 | “environmental awareness: a tail of two experiences”

Research

London, UK


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Image 03.20 - Peoples’ staying time key

Image 03.19 -  Overlay of movement of people in the lobby (9:30 10:30)

Image 03.17 - Overlay of movement of people in the lobby (13:00 14:00)

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Image 03.18 - Overlay of movement of people in the lobby (17:30 18:30)

The “outdoor experience” was a research project conducted during the MSc in Sustainable Environmental Design at the Architectural Association School of Architecture. The aim of this project was to study the outdoor environment as well as its relationship with the indoor transitional spaces, of Central Saint Giles and City Hall, not only in terms of infrastructures but also taking in consideration the occupants opinion about the spaces. The project started with intensive analysis of previous reports provided by the school, and was followed by spot measurements and quick interviews to the occupants of the spaces in question. Being one of the buildings London’s City Hall, measurements were not allowed inside, however a study of its surroundings was done.


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Image 03.21 - Surface temperature taken at around 14h00

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Image 03.22 - Spot measurements - Temperature (Celcius)

Image 03.24 - Spot measurements - Wind (m/s)

Central St Giles

Image 03.23 - Spot measurements - Relative Humidity (%)

Image 03.25 - Daylight factor (%)


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Image 03.26 - Number of interviews

Image 03.27 - Clothing the occupants were wearing during interview

Image 03.28 - Preferred locations Image 03.30 - Exit preferred by the occupants Image 03.29 - Number of smokers and chosen location to smoke

O Image 03.31 - How often the occupants visit the space

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The “outdoor experience” was a research project conducted during the MSc in Sustainable Environmental Design at the Architectural Association School of Architecture. The aim of this project was to study the outdoor environment as well as its relationship with the indoor transitional spaces, of Central Saint Giles and City Hall, not only in terms of infrastructures but also taking in consideration the occupants opinion about the spaces. The project started with intensive analysis of previous reports provided by the school, and was followed by spot measurements and quick interviews to the occupants of the spaces in question. Being one of the buildings London’s City Hall, measurements were not allowed inside, however a study of its surroundings was done. Image 03.32 - Indoor Comfort


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Image 03.33 - Spot measurements - Temperature (Celcius)

Image 03.34 - Spot measurements - Relative Humidity (%)

London’s City Hall


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Image 03.35 - Spot measurements - Wind (m/s)

Image 03.36 - Spot measurements - Wind (m/s)


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04 | “the harbour exchange”

Design

Royal Docks, London, UK


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Image 04.37 - Exploded Axon of Cafe

I N T R O D U C T I O N The Royal Docks are located in the East part of London and is currently under a long and difficult process of regeneration, due to its gradual abandonment after the 80’s because of the shift in the needs of the trading markets that gave it life in the first place, after the introduction of the metal containers as primary units serving the business and the big ships needed to carry them that wouldn’t fit in the docks.

Image 04.38 - Solar Angles

In the project a masterplan was proposed aiming to provide the community with areas for family recreation, sports and leisure, that can be used all year round as they offer flexibility and adaptive opportunities to the public, along with student accommodation. The facility I took control of was a Café that doubles as an outdoor space for the summer and an indoor space for the winter, designed for casual users of the outdoor gym and general public.


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Image 04.39 - Structure in different lighting environments

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This structure aims to provide a quick grab-andgo bar with indoor and outdoor seating, as well as, restaurants and showers for the visitors. Several tests and designs were studied, developed and its performance was simulated.

The cafe is a free-running building, requiring no mechanical heating or cooling, realying only on cross-ventilation and internal gains, performing better with the London 2050 vision. By adding vents and allowing the glazing areas to open accordingly to the weather, permits the occupants to adjust the strcuture as they fell, creating a relationship between human and built form. Due to its prime location, by the water, it was critical that the cafe would take advatange of it.


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Image 04.40 - Internal Gains

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Image 04.41 - Plan with Section cuts (not to scale)

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Image 04.42 - SECTION A with U-Values (not to scale)

Image 04.43 - SECTION A (not to scale)

Image 04.44 - SECTION B (not to scale)


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Image 04.45 - Elevation - Louvers closed

Image 04.46 - Elevation - Louvers open

Image 04.47 - Daylight Autonomy

Image 04.48 - Useful Daylight illumination


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05 | “Guidelines towards retrofitting an 18th Century “Solar” into a Rural Hotel in the North of Portugal”

Design and Research - Dissertation Portugal


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2050_Prevailing Winds - Summer

2050_Prevailing Winds - Winter


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Image 05.49 - Douro Region Location

I N T R O D U C T I O N Keeping in mind the idea of creating awareness about letting the history live through material things, a great way to do so is by allowing the public to be able to interact with the built form that remains. Portugal, and especially the Douro Region (North), has so much to offer for tourists and those who come to experience the food, wine, the landscape but also the history. A great way to allow the tourist to have the best experience possible is by providing shelter, on a typical “Solar House” that can provide great typical food, overlooking their own vineyards and most of all the history of the region. Due to its traditional construction of the eighteenth century, these specific houses have several issues when it comes to the comfort of their guests, as well as a very high maintenance cost.

Some of the issues may be related to the very thick masonry walls which don’t provide much insulation but have a very high thermal mass. During the summers the bedrooms perform very well without any mechanical equipment, but during the very cold winters the house requires heating during the day and night, increasing consequently the energy consumption of the house. Several analysis were done, not only in terms of literature to support the work but also in terms of the location’s context and climate. Research on the typologies and charatecteristics of these houses, along with field work, was crucial in order to achieve a true base case for the design strategies that were implemented. Finally, guidelines and conclusions regarding strategies for improving the performance of these “Solar Houses” will be proposed.


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Image 05.50 - Category descriptions and limits for mechanical conditioned (PMV) and free-running (K) buildings in EN15251 [Source: Nicol, Fergus, Michael A. Humphreys and Susan Roaf, 2012]

Image 05.52 - Research of the Hotels guests through guests reviews and public websites.

Image 05.51 - Case Study Hotel Rural Casa dos VIscondes da Várzea [Source: www. hotelruralviscondesvarzea.com]


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Balcony

Living Room

Room 1.29 Room 1.22

Image 05.53 - Location of Data Loggers

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P E R F O R M A N C E After analysing the results from the data loggers, along with information given by the owners, one can conclude that the living room and bedrooms temperatures do not reach above 19 ºC due to the a thermostat set for that temperature. Both bedrooms have a very constant temperature between them, although in room 1.29 is higher than in room 1.22 and that may be because the area adjacent to room 1.22 has a bigger area, therefore there will be less heat transfer from one room to the other.

Image 05.54 - Result of Data Loggers in terms of temperature

It is clear the indoor temperature in any room does not fall within the adaptive thermal zone, set by CEN Standard EN15251.


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Image 05.55 - Minimum bedroom requirements according to Portuguese Legislation

Image 05.58 - Traditional window sizes

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O R I E N T A T I O N These houses do not have a typical orientation following the cardinal points, instead its orientation is according to the entrance of the propert, and so, it is important to understand how a bedroom may perform in different orientations, keeping always in mind which is the optimal orientation. The best orientation for a 19.5% WFR is east/west during the summer, but south orientation allows for a better performance when the WFR is 21.7%. For both situations, it is clear that during the period where guests are in the room, the indoor temperature falls within the conformt band.

Image 05.59 - Number of occupants for the simulation

Image 05.57 - Static Parameters used for the simulations

Image 05.56 - U-Values accoridng to existing characteristics


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Image 05.60 - Bedroom - Base Case - Plan

Image 05.62 - Bedroom - Base Case Schedule

Image 05.61 - Bedroom - Base Case - U-Values according to existing characteristics of Hotel Rural Casa dos Viscondes da Várzea

Image 05.63 - Living Room - Base Case Plan

Image 05.65 - Living Room - Base Case Schedule

Image 05.64 - Living Room - Base Case - U-Values according to existing characteristics of Hotel Rural Casa dos Viscondes da Várzea

Image 05.66 - U-values for both insulated and non-insulated walls

Image 05.67 - U-Values for single and double glazing [Source: TAS]

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From the introduction to the base case, several studies were made in order to establish the best orientation for the bedrooms concluding that South orientations is preferred, when aiming for a good indoor thermal comfort. Studies consisted on evaluating different strategies to achieve good indoor thermal comfort for both the bedrooms and living room areas, starting by establishing the base case . The architectural and constructions parameters were established from the field work.


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Image 05.68 - Different glazing apertures of the Conservatory and Living Room [Source: TAS]

Image 05.69 - Loads Gained per year in the Living Room [Source: TAS]

C O N S E R V A T O R Y Most Solares incorporate a very long balcony along one of the sides of the living rooms and my provide a good effect on the adjacent room, when utilized as a conservatory. Giving the option of closing it with glazed panels during the winter it may provide an improvement on reducing the overall energy consumption of the house by increasing the indoor temperature of such room. By incorporating a mixed mode ventilation with natural ventilation and mechanical ventilation it provides a very substantial reduction, regarding loads gained throughout an entire year.

The base case does not include the conservatory adjacent to the living room, but once this is added in case one, even if its closed, there is already a very considerable drop regarding loads gained. The values presented for case two, represent a mixed-mode ventilation, where the windows start to open when the indoor temperature reaches 20ºC and is fully opened with such reaches 25ºC. This strategy supports the argument of the possibility to only provide mechanical cooling when extremely necessary.


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The addition of insulation along with, bigger glazing areas and a mixed mode-ventilation system was proven to be the best strategy to increase or decrease the indoor temperature, winter and summer respectively, while reducing the overall energy consumption of the house, considering one bedroom and a living area with an adjacent conservatory. It is clear that when increasing the number of occupants and their schedules, the required energy consumption in the winter decreases, due to the occupancy’s heat gain. Although this is good during the winter periods, it might be a concern during the hotter months and for those situations the best strategy is to provide the guest with operable windows, either manually or automatically, that may be opened in order to introduce fresh air into the room, therefore reducing the indoor temperature of that same room. The same strategy is applied to the living room although, in this situation, the conservatory provides a thermal barrier during the winter, by its ability to be completely inclosed during the winter. By doing so, the indoor temperature increases, allowing for a lower energy consumption regarding heating equipment. The strategy for the hotter months is the same as explained for the bedroom, providing an open conservatory, creating cross ventilation into the living room, reducing this way the need for mechanical cooling to lower the indoor temperature. the indoor temperature of that same room.


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A P P L I C A B I L I T Y Firstly, due to the wall construction of this traditional Solar, a very substantial intervention such as the addition of insulation on the interior of the house will allow for a higher level of heat storage capacity within the walls, consequently reducing the infiltration rate values. Along with the insulation, the replacement of single glazed windows into double glazed windows will provide not only with less heat losses but protect the guests from uncomfortable noises from the exterior. Secondly, if possible, the glazing area may be double by adding another equal sized window adjacent to the one existing (if any), always keeping the same architectural fabric of the external facade, regarding the bedrooms. This strategy contributes to higher solar gains throughout the entire year, increasing the indoor temperature. This is of special relevance when considering mechanical heating, since it will require less heating gains in order to have the temperature reach 20ยบC. Moreover, adaptive strategies should be incorporated, especially regarding the summer months, when the temperature can reach very high levels than in the winter. This should represent a combination of operable windows and a cooling equipment. By introducing operable windows, the guests may feel in control of the temperature of the room by keeping the windows open longer, cooling the room below 20ยบC or closing the windows to reach a higher temperature. This approach is considered to be the most crucial when considering the energy consumption of the house.

Lastly, when considering the financial costs of the electrical consumption, the above mentioned strategies are proven to help reduce the overall consumption therefore, reducing the electrical bill. The traditional Solares are situated in a vast sized land, within vineyards, chapels and more, providing the possibility of introducing renewable energies. Such panels will become a crucial help, when decreasing the costs of electrical consumption, as explained in the previous chapter, and should be introduced specially during the Douro Region, where there is a lot of empty land and great global radiation values.

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