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What it is?

SALMONELLA

EBOLA

The genus Salmonella was named after Daniel Elmer Salmon, an American veterinary pathologist is a genus of rod-shaped. They are chemoorganotrophs, obtaining their energy from oxidation and reduction reactions using organic sources, and are facultative anaerobes.

Dr.Ngoy Mushoia 1976

How it can Poluted food be transfered ? Deaths 30 deaths 2012

is the human disease which may be caused by any of four of the five known ebola viruses. EVD is a viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF), and is clinically nearly indistinguishable from Marburg virus disease (MVD). Fluids(secretions,blood)

31 deaths 2012

http://articles.latimes.com/keyword/salmon ella

http://www.webmd.com/a-to-zguides/ebola-hemorrhagic

http://www.naturalnews.com/salmonella.ht ml

http://articles.cnn.com/keyword/eb ola

Diarrea Fever Stomach cramps vomiting

Nausea Influenza Fever with chills Chest pain

Articles

symptoms


Similarities & Diferences

Can cause dead. Can be treat. You have diarrea. Only present fever without skin problems

Can cause dead. Can be treat. Chest Pain. Fever with chills

Conclusion: Salmonella and ebola are very dangerous sicknesses because both can cause even the death.They have similar symptoms but the reaction is different for example in both you present fever but in ebola you also have chills.The ebola is most dangerous.One reason toy say that is because in 2012 there were more dead people that die because ebola tan fron salmonella.

August 10, 2009 | Karen Kaplan This is salmonella's world. We're just living in it. The bacterium appeared on the planet millions of years before humans, and scientists are certain it will outlast us too. It's practically guaranteed that salmonella will keep finding its way into the food supply despite the best efforts of producers and regulators. Since breaking off from its close cousin E. coli more than 100 million years ago, salmonella has evolved into more than 2,500 strains. Some, such as Typhi, sicken humans but have no effect on other animals. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported last Tuesday that 30 people, in 19 American states have become infected with a rare salmonella strain known as Bredeney, likely from tainted, commercially available peanut butter. According to the CDC, the culprit is Trader Joe's Valencia Creamy Salted Peanut Butter, which prompted the producer to voluntarily recall their product. Although the outbreak is spread across the United States, Massachusetts has the


highest number of infections. The average age of those infected is seven, with four people having been hospitalized as a result.

Food related salmonella outbreaks are on the rise

Surprisingly, this is not the only food related salmonella outbreak to hit the U.S. The CDC has reported no fewer than 12 outbreaks in 2012 alone, with progressively more outbreaks each year since 2006, when the only reported instance involved tomatoes. Aside from peanut butter, other food items that have carried salmonella this year include mangoes, cantaloupe, ground beef, poultry, dog food, tuna products, and food available at a Mexican style fast food chain known as Restaurant Chain A.

Food-borne salmonella infections usually cause a range of symptoms, such as fever, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. As they can be deadly to children, the elderly and people with weakened immunity, health regulators advise those who develop these symptoms to consult their doctor immediately. Trader Joe's misfortune has prompted other companies to remove their peanut butter from stores, on account of a risk of infection.

Make safe peanut butter at home

Fortunately, nut butters are not that difficult to make at home. In fact, they are a staple in the diets of health enthusiasts, vegetarians and vegans everywhere. The advantages of making your own nut butter are that you know where the nuts come from, you can ensure proper hygiene and you don't need to use any preservatives or flavorings that add no nutritional value. And unlike commercially available peanut butter, which is made from roasted and heavily slated peanuts, homemade peanut butter can be raw, less salty and 100 percent clean.

To make peanut butter at home, all you need is a good food processor or blender, a bit of vegetable oil and a handful of nuts. A simple and delicious recipe involves processing two cups of raw peanuts, half a cup of raw almonds, two tablespoons of sunflower oil and a pinch of salt until a smooth, homogenous paste is obtained, which usually takes no more than a few minutes. The same process can be used to make all kinds of nut butters, out of almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts, cashews, macadamia nuts, and so on.


Raw, homemade peanut butter is bursting with heart-healthy fats, vitamins and minerals, as well as a range of cancer-fighting substances. Resveratrol, a natural disease-fighting phenol that is most famous for occurring in grapes and wine, can also be found in significant quantities in raw peanuts. A 2000 study that investigated the nutritional content of peanuts after different types of processing found that raw peanuts have the highest content of beta-sitosterol, a substance that has been shown to reduce cholesterol levels and help prevent colon, prostate and breast cancer

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037401_salmonella_peanut_butter_recall.html#ixzz2Mal8NxyH

Ebola hemorrhagic fever (Ebola HF) is a severe, often-fatal disease in humans and nonhuman primates (monkeys and chimpanzees) that has appeared sporadically since its initial recognition in 1976.

The disease is caused by infection with Ebola virus, named after a river in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire) in Africa, where it was first recognized. The virus is one of two members of a family of RNA viruses called the Filoviridae. Three of the four species of Ebola virus identified so far have caused disease in humans: Ebola-Zaire, Ebola-Sudan, and Ebola-Ivory Coast. The fourth, Ebola-Reston, has caused disease in nonhuman primates, but not in humans.

Where is Ebola virus found in nature?

The exact origin, locations, and natural habitat (known as the "natural reservoir") of Ebola virus remain unknown. However, on the basis of available evidence and the nature of similar viruses, researchers believe that the virus is zoonotic (animal-borne) and is normally maintained in an animal host that is native to the African continent. A similar host is probably associated with EbolaReston isolated from infected cynomolgous monkeys that were imported to the United States and Italy from the Philippines. The virus is not known to be native to other continents, such as North America.


Where do cases of Ebola hemorrhagic fever occur?

Confirmed cases of Ebola HF have been reported in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Gabon, Sudan, the Ivory Coast, and Uganda. An individual with serologic evidence of infection but showing no apparent illness has been reported in Liberia, and a laboratory worker in England became ill as a result of an accidental needle-stick. No case of the disease in humans has ever been reported in the United States. Ebola-Reston virus caused severe illness and death in monkeys imported to research facilities in the United States and Italy from the Philippines; during these outbreaks, several research workers became infected with the virus, but did not become ill.

Ebola outbreak kills 10 in Congo By Joe Sterling, CNN | August 21, 2012 The Ebola virus has killed 10 people in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the World Health Organization said Tuesday. As of Monday, WHO said, the deaths are among 13 probable and two confirmed Ebola cases reported in Orientale province in eastern Congo. The Congolese Ministry of Health has set up a task force to deal with the outbreak and is working with WHO, UNICEF, Doctors Without Borders and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Twelve cases and eight deaths occurred in the area of Isiro, a town in Congo's north, WHO said.


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