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COPYRIGHT © 2018 BY MARIAN L. THOMAS - DUPLICATION, DISTRIBUTION, SHARING IS NOT PERMITTED


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COPYRIGHT © 2018 BY MARIAN L. THOMAS - DUPLICATION, DISTRIBUTION, SHARING IS NOT PERMITTED


Who Would Think That One Act Of Love Could Affect Four Generations? On December 29, 1930, Mildred "Millie" Mayfield gave birth to a beautiful baby girl, Addie. Millie teaches Addie three things that she feels matters most in life; inner beauty, reading books and giving your “special something’ only to the man you marry. Addie lives up to the first two. On one autumn night in 1949, Addie falls for the irresistible red curls and vibrant green eyes of a young man from the other side of the railroad tracks. Neither knowing that the consequences of their love would have lasting effects.

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Known as one of the greatest white jazz pianists in New York, Timmy Taylor never had a reason to question his identity – until truth and betrayal strike. Will Timmy be able to push past the pain? Beautiful and talented, Nina Taylor inherited her father's gift, but not his looks. Certain that's how he made it big, she begins to bleach her skin. Will Nina learn to love the skin she’s in before it’s too late? Spanning from 1920 to 1996, this captivating tale of secrets, betrayal, and forgiveness will pull at the strings of your heart, and keep you turning pages while you pray for a happy ending.

COPYRIGHT © 2018 BY MARIAN L. THOMAS - DUPLICATION, DISTRIBUTION, SHARING IS NOT PERMITTED


Excerpt Prologue To the child inside me, I ain’t never gonna look in your eyes, see your smile, or hear the sweetness of your . laugh, the doctors say. It’s funny how we go through life looking for the commas, but in the end, all we get is a period. One single dot at the end that becomes the sum of our life. I would have sworn I’d have a life full of commas. I would have sworn I’d see my child. The thought of not getting a chance to see you grow is like a knife that keeps stabbing me over and over. Reality can’t pull it out. Doctors can’t do anything but leave it in.

When they first told me, I sat in this here hospital bed and stared at the May moon, knowing it was the last time I would see it. It has been quite a journey to get to this road of acceptance. But I reckon I got both feet planted on it now, and it doesn’t look like I got any other routes I can take. Doctors say my small hips can’t bring you into the world without help, and while my bones are healthy, my young, almost twenty-year-old heart isn’t. I can hear the rain outside my window. Good thing, I reckon, so folks in other rooms can’t hear my tears. You’ll be coming by the time the sun comes up and the rain stops, and I’ll be closing my eyes for the final time. My forty-nine-year-old mama, Mildred “Millie” Mayfield, always said I had strong bones and small hips. She spoke about it like it was my downfall. I would never have guessed she’d be right. Although I can’t remember a time, Mama wasn’t right. I never minded having small hips. I could wear just about anything. Things most girls wouldn’t dare. For instance, I could wear a polka dot skirt without it looking “meaty,” as my mama called some of the girls. While I’m a fan of my hips, I believe in inner beauty. When I turned eighteen, Thomas Gray Livingston and I were sitting by Bear Creek, watching the butterflies float by and soaking up the sun, when I told him about my belief in inner beauty and how if you don’t believe in your inner beauty, then you ain’t nothing but a caged butterfly. I told him that if you ain't showing the world your colors, you ain’t correctly giving life something it can use. I believe that everybody got colors inside them that are as bright and vibrant as the colors of God’s rainbow and they should never allow anyone, and I do mean anyone, to allow their God-given colors to be caged. They should let them fly. Let them glide along the edges of life and breathe in all the possibilities of doing great things with their colors. I believe in God. In love. In butterflies and in giving life something it can use. That’s what I believe, and you’ll see one day that I was right. .

. COPYRIGHT © 2018 BY MARIAN L. THOMAS - DUPLICATION, DISTRIBUTION, SHARING IS NOT PERMITTED


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COPYRIGHT © 2018 BY MARIAN L. THOMAS - DUPLICATION, DISTRIBUTION, SHARING IS NOT PERMITTED

Profile for Marian L Thomas

The Caged Butterfly Excerpt By Marian L. Thomas  

Who Would Think That One Act Of Love Could Affect Four Generations? Read the excerpt from this captivating tale of secrets, betrayal, and fo...

The Caged Butterfly Excerpt By Marian L. Thomas  

Who Would Think That One Act Of Love Could Affect Four Generations? Read the excerpt from this captivating tale of secrets, betrayal, and fo...

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