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mariahtrevizo@yahoo.com


Good Architecture is something that is derived from many factors, and personally, I believe those factors include the experience of the inhabitant and the context as to which the project will reside in. Without understanding the surrounding environment, one can not accurately design an architectural experience. Every project is an extension of the city, the neighborhood, and the street it exists on. Architecture is not just some still box that is meant to be admired from the outside, instead architecture should be a designed, aesthetic space made for any visitor to have their own experiences in it. By combining the culture and context of the site and designing for spatial experiences, the result is more likely to be a responsive product that contributes to the city it will exist within.


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London Bike Shelter, Spring 2011

Monaco Car Dealership, Fall 2011

Back-Yard Care Cabin, Fall 2012

MCC Penn Valley Expansion, Fall 2012

University of Kansas Field Station, Spring 2012

New Orleans Culinary Incubator Lab, Spring 2013


This studio focused on not only the overall design of a project in New Orleans, but also all of the details that go into the project itself. Another major aspect of this studio was understanding the culture of New Orleans, and incorporating the needs of the community into this. Overall, the idea of this project was to create a place where the exploration of new ideas, experimentation and the creation of forward-thinking solutions for food production and city life happens.


New Orleans Culinary Incubator Lab Spring semester 2013

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5.87in

Jan average temperature range

Mar average monthly precipitation

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 Jan

5.47in

Feb

Feb

Mar May Jul Sept Nov Apr Jun Aug Oct Dec

5.24in

Apr

5.02in

May

4.62in

Jun

6.83in

Jul

6.20in

Aug

6.15in 5.55in

Sept Oct

3.05in

Nov

5.09in

Dec

5.07in 4


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think tank: 6000 sf

tool lending library: 500 sf

demonstration gardens: 800 sf

commissary for food trucks: 1500 sf

Liberty’s Kitchen: 4000 sf

community access wood and bike shop: 500 sf seed bank: 800 sf

Whole Foods grocery: 20,000 sf the stop:1500 sf

commercial kitchen: 6000 sf

business incubator: 3000 sf

fresh foods grocery: 1500 sf This culinary incubator/lab will exist to serve the community by providing programs that educate on healthy food choices, growing and buying local food, and reaching out to disadvantaged members of the community. Some of the programs that will be incorporated into this project are Liberty’s Kitchen, The Stop, and the idea of mobile urban farming. All of these programs reach out to the community by either helping the disadvantaged youth, or providing classes and workshops that educate the community on local foods. Some of the other programs that will be

developed include a commercial kitchen and business incubator which will help young entrepreneurs advance their culinary careers. Another major aspect of this project will be the site design. One of the major inspirations I gathered from the site was the graffiti on the existing building. Many of the surrounding buildings also had different types of graffiti art which is why I am bringing that idea of graffiti and bold graphics into the site. Local artists will be able to come and have designated spaces to put up their artwork. This site will

become very industrial in nature and promote the idea of gathering the community weather it is for an urban farming project or to skate the new contours of the site.

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site context

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site section


breaking out into the community

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Developing Spaces

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site section

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winter sun

summer sum mmer mer sun su un

M is sis sip pi Riv er

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Bienville Ave.

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Continental St.

existing building plan

Dordenois St.

Broad St.

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Iso Wall Detail

steel roof membrane

zeeps structural system

exterior sheathing, 2” oriented strand board 5” expanded polystyrene rigid insulation 3” metal roof deck and concrete in fill W steel beam

double glazing

concrete floor

concrete backing wall thermal break thermal insulation glazing support corrugated steel panel stainless steel fixings corrugated plastic panel steel support brackets steel mesh walkway

concrete pillar

concrete floor thermal insulation

compact crushed aggregate sub layer vapor barrier

footing

soil

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Wall Details

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image of the community roof gardens looking toward the Broad St. direction


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image from Broad St. facing the new addition to the exisitng grocery store


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image inside the “think tank� gallery space where artists can display work


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DDI STUDIO design

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detail

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DDI Studio is comprised of a set of University of Kansas architecture students in their third year of undergraduate study, mentored by architect Brad Satterwhite and industrial designer Chris Grill of KEM Studio. The hands-on studio focuses on the building of prototypes as a tool to refine design.

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University of Kansas Field Station Keeven

Kutz

Mater

Trevizo


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Design Process

For the first part of this project, we developed individual designs; this design concept was developed through a detailed study of biomimicry as related to architecture. The overall structure of this design arose from looking at structures in nature itself and from there, I developed the hexagonal pattern found in the study of photosynthesis. This became my focus when designing the greenhouse for the KU Field Station. This preliminary design allowed for our final, group-project design to incorporate more sustainable materials and look toward biomimicry for future design decisions.

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Initial Design Concept

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Large sliding doors provide for a couple of opportunities, first large vehicles and other equipment are able to move through the building; and second, the field station does many experiments with mesocosms that are held in large tanks twelve feet in diameter and the doors allow for these to be transported in and out of the building. To accommodate for pedestrian circulation and egress, there are also standard size doors and double doors. This plan allows one bay for preparation and three bays for work space. Each bay is about the size of a two-car garage.

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1 Glasshouse


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Glasshouse

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Multipurpose Room

Greenhouse

Storm Shelter

2 Multi Purpose Space

3 Small Greenhouse

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The tower allows for visitors to view the surrounding site and creates an important connection by establishing a visual line back to the University Campus. From the top of the tower, onlookers can view the outline of Frasier Hall, an iconic campus building that can be seen from miles away. At night, the view would be particularly impressive, because of the glowing lights of Lawrence and the haloeffect it creates. The tower also allows the Field Station to harvest wind energy and bring internet access to this rural part of town, possible sources of revenue for the Field Station to subsidize the cost of experiments.

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The multi-pupose building is designed to expand to the south by opening large pivoting doors and essentially removing the south wall. From a warehouse aspect, this functions by allowing large vehicles and mesocosms to move throughout the space and for the entire space to become an open air pavilion. It also becomes a feature to create an indoor-outdoor setting for events and open up the patio to guests. It also showcases the framed view of the prairie landscape.

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The 1600 square foot multi-purpose room is a space to gather, have fundraising events, host classes, and on a daily basis, become a workshop. Large pivoting doors allow users to view the panoramic landscape. The room has a preparation area with three sinks and many storage cabinets. The walls are covered in peg board, which allows users to easily hang tools. It also gives them the opportunity to hang other items such as works of art for a rural studio or large documents for town meetings or other events. 36


Glasshouse 0’

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1’

Multi Purpose Space 3’

6’

10’


Small Greenhouse

In order to also build a mock up model of our design, we had to understand all details of the wall sections. Featured on this page are four different wall sections throughout our building. In all of the sections not only are different materials utilized, but also different connections are used based off of the material choice.

Polycarbonate Facade

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The parti for the design creates a space on the south side that is embraced on either side by the building, so named the “hug.” Three pivoting doors open up the workspace into the patio area blurring the definition between outdoor and indoor space. This allows for natural ventilation for the workshop’s users, and it also creates a space for visiting groups that provides a connection to the prairie. The patio can become an outdoor classroom or an expansion to the multipurpose room for an event venue.

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Glasshouse

Multipurpose Room

Greenhouse

Storm Shelter

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The structure is a basic kit-of-parts component from Varco Pruden. Using industrially manufactured components saves money, since Varco Pruden is a local company this places less stress on the environment.

Reclaimed wood salvaged from telephone poles has been cut and planed to size. Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) insulate the building with an R-value of 14 and are able to be installed quickly. SIPs are also capable of spanning the full distance between columns without further lateral support. We finished ours with peg board to accommodate the users’ needs. Perm-A-Barrier (Grace Construction) polyethylene membrane ensures the longevity of the wall. It insulates and seals out most moisture, but also allows vapor to escape the wall. It is flexible and easy to install, but must not be extensively exposed to sunlight.

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A trench of river rocks controls water drainage around the building and allows water to percolate back into the water table.

Corrugated metal acts like a rain screen and protects the membrane from sunlight while keeping out most moisture.

The concrete mixture is made from a mix of cement and flyash, a biproduct of coal production.


Self-tapping galvanized #10 Hex head screws

Galvanized corrugated metal, 1/4” depth

1.5” X 1.5” pine slats

Metal Purlins, 18 gauge steel, 4”X2.5”

Self -piloting galvanized #14 Hex head screws

W8 X 8 X 31

1.5” X 1.5” pine purlins

Ice and Water Shield

Self -piloting galvanized #14 Hex head screws

4” Structurally Insulated Panel (SIP) 5/8” Gypsum board

Concrete footing

3/8” Peg Board backed with 1X2 frames Perm-A-Barrier

Thermal break Water-filtering river rocks

Concrete knee wall

Concrete footing Control break

Concrete slab, 4” thick

By building a prototype wall section of the building, we were able to gain further understanding of how the elements of the walls work and how the construction process can be made easier. The process of constructing the mockup allowed us to make our design intent clearer and to maximize the effectiveness of our materials. (see next page)

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Built Prototype

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Through a project provided by the MASP scholarship group, we were given the opportunity to redesign the existing student center at MCC Penn Valley Community College in Kansas City, MO. This project is currently being developed through the graduate student, Eddy Tavio, at the firm where he is employed.

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MCC Penn Valley Expansion Mallon

Tavio

Trevizo


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Project Scope: Analyze the existing conditions of the student center; Research successful student-focused spaces across the nation; Relocate and consolidate current student functions into the core three floors of the student center; Plan for future expansion.

Architectural goals: Envision the existing student center as the premier space for student involvment and success; Leverage the centrality of the student center as the new face and “brand� of the MCC experience.

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The proposed addition to the existing student center on the Penn Valley campus allows for 360 degree views of the campus and the glass facade allows this addition to become the “lighthouse� of the campus. The balcony below now becomes a sheltered gathering space for students and faculty to use year round.


existing building

new addition

first floor plan

student center renovation

second floor plan

second floor expansion


fourth floor plan

The addition of a roof garden was developed as phase two of construction. The reason for this proposed addition was to allow for a gathering space that could not only be used by students and faculty, but also for graduation events; because the size of graduation classes for this campus stays within a range of 30 to 40 people. The curved railing on the roof terrace also extends down to the computer lab beneath allowing for natural light to penetrate the space through the mesh-metal material. roof garden addition

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East Elevation

North - South Section


360 degree views across campus

360 degree views across campus

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view from the student quad

view below the new student balcony

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section cut through student bridge

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Through several meetings and discussions with the Board of Directors at MCC Penn Valley Community College, I worked with Eddy Tavio, Penn Valley professors and directors to develope the design solution. For the concept of the interior student center we developed two “tube-like� structures that serve as study areas for the students. There are two main structures upon entering the student center with one structure connecting to the second floor and the other connecting to both the second

and third floor. Both structures also connect to catwalks to allow easy access for students. This project is still in discussion, and the semitransparent structures will likely also display the school branding which will be visible from the main entry to the student center. The idea of natural and artificial light was a large factor in the design and led to the idea of these light tubes that are almost interactive with visitors of the space.

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This studio focused on designing for the needs of a person of an aging person. This particular project involved designing a small back-yard cabin where a grandmother or grandfather could live close to their children in case they are in need of assistance. The design process also focused on creating detailed areas both inside and outside of the “cabin� that are specifically designed to assist an aging person.

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Back-Yard Care Cabin Fall semester 2012


process models

Accessibility Issues -Smooth, ground level entrances without steps -Surface textures that require low force to traverse on level , less than 5 pounds per 120 pounds rolling force -Surfaces that are stable, firm, and slip resistant per ASTM 2047 -Wide interior doors, hallways, and alcoves with 60” x 60” turning space at doors and dead-ends -Functional clearances for approach and use of elements and components -Lever handles for opening doors rather than twisting knobs -Components that do not require tight grasping, pinching or twisting of the wrist -Bright and appropriate lighting, particularly task lighting -Doors that do not project more than 7 in. into building corridors -Egress doors that open in the direction of travel -Paths of travel leading to an exit that do not pass through a secondary space subject to closure by doors, storage materials, or other barriers -Interior corridors that are at least 42 in. wide -Door openings at least 36 in. with an 18 in. clear space on the pull side of the door and a 12 in. clear space on the push side of the door -Accessible bathrooms with a 5 ft. turning circle -Bathroom grab bars in appropriate locations -Sinks in all bathrooms with clear-knee access -Slip resistant floors -Sleeping rooms with operable windows or an exterior means of egress -Casement windows

This project didn’t have a specific site, therefore we used the City of Lawrence, KS for climatic conditions. The design of the house revolves around the concept of a central courtyard in a U-shaped house design. This design also has a shed roof that allows for sun to warm the house during the winter and block the harsh summer sun.

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Summer Sun Winter Sun


“Dizzy-Assist” As a person ages, a major concern for them is falling and not having someone there to help them. One way to prevent more falls, especially in their own home would be to have “grab-bars” built into the walls every couple of feet, so that when a person starts to get tired, and might fall, they can quickly reach out and hold themselves up. Studies have also shown that people can easily identify vertical lights in comparison to horizontal lights, which is why all of the grab bars are vertical and lit from behind for easy viewing.

Floor Lighting Most accidents occur from tripping over unseen objects on the floor which is why there was a need for some type of floor lighting,. Therefore, there is a lighting device that runs 6” above the floor in order to illuminate any potential hazards. This lighting is directional, but aims to illuminate three different directions; the immediate floor beneath, the area in front of the lighting device, and the area immediately above.

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Process Development

space for a courtyard

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tilting the roof

creating an entry way

developing exterior spaces

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footprint of existing house

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pathway signage

Companionship Pet ownership among seniors can also act as a therapeutic agent that allows individuals to escape stress and concentrate on something other than the challenges that face them in their daily lives. The elderly who have pets seem to: - have a buffer against loneliness - maintain a clear sense of purpose - derive a profound sense of satisfaction from living with an animal - become more likely to exercise - have lower blood pressure - have a decreased likelihood of depression

dog leash handle

compost pile

dog post / light

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Section AA entry

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kitchen command center

bath

laundry


entry area work / play kitchen center sun trap bathroom laundry room bedroom

Programming

Section BB compost pile

sun trap

work / play

bath

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East Elevation

South Elevation

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West Elevation

North Elevation

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task lighting

views to outside

ledge for reading material retractable table extra work space

ledge to easily stand up

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Dining is an experience that can mean different things depending upon the location of the person eating. In this instance, the bar dining experience was recreated with special assists and functions that can be utilized by a person of age. For example, the table not only functions as an eating space, but also as an expandable work station and reading area.


Being close to nature is one of the ways that an elderly person can make a speedy recovery, which is why this house plan revolves around the idea of the U-shaped courtyard. The shading provided in the “sun trap� area allows the resident to sit outside even in the winter and be warmed by the rays of the sun. This area can also be closed off when not in use for security reasons.

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ramp system next to chair

space for leg room

sleeping areas for small pets

When a person of age owns a pet, it can act as a therapeutic agent that allows the person to escape stress and concentrate on something other than the challenges that face them in their daily lives. For this reason there are many pet-friendly designs incorporated in the house and outside, form the pet beds in the living area to the light / pet post outside.


recessed grab bars slot to place keys and forgetful items next to door dog leash handle

rails for coats, etc...

rail for umbrella envelope mail rack

When entering a house, one of the most important features should be to have an area to transition from the outside to the inside. In this space, there are devices for “people of age” like there are throughout the house, along with the special features such as rails for items like wet umbrellas and places to place mail and keys upon entering the back-yard cabin.

slope for “wet” items storage for shoes

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secret storage provided from light shelf

task lighting task lighting

entry to back of closet

space for everyday outfits

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When we age, it is easier to accept the idea that when we get sick, we could spend a large amount of time in bed, and in the bedroom, which is why the space around the bed is important. There are two different types of task lighting provided in the storage system surrounding the bed, and areas to store your everyday items without going through your entire closet.


visible storage task lighting recessed handrail hide-away table

Cooking is a pass-time that many “people of age� could spend more time doing, which is why this kitchen is designed with as much ease as possible; from the angle of the kitchen area surrounding the cook to the dining table that can easily be stored away when not in use. This kitchen area also serves as the main function of its space and allows the resident to look back at the main house to see if any visitors are on their way.

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Unlike earlier projects, this specific project had a new and exotic site in Monaco. The whole studio focused on developing the form of the building through many different study models and through analyzing the site. Topography played a major part in the development of the form of the building because the entire site is located on a hill. The program was designed to house a unique collection of cars, but also serve as a dealership.

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Monaco Car Dealership Fall Semester 2011


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120 ft

Process Study Models

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This site in Monaco played a large part in the development of the design. Due to the limited number of available sites, the design actually consumed the entire site on the corner, while attaching to the adjacent building. In this dealership, there are two separate functions that are located in two separate buildings: attaching circulation to the office to the car-exhibit area. The car-exhibit part of the building is located under the transformative roof structure that allows light in at different intervals.

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EAST-WEST ELEVATION

EAST-WEST SECTION

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NORTH-SOUTH ELEVATION

NORTH-SOUTH SECTION

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Parking (Below Ground)

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Ground Floor

entry

entry


Second Floor

Third Floor entry entry

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What started out as a two week project developed into an entire program during my second year with this bike station located in front of the Tate Modern Museum in London. The purpose of this shelter developed with a similar program of a bike station in Millennium Park in Chicago. This facility was created with the purpose of people renting bikes to take to work and other daily activities.

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London Bike Shelter Spring Semester 2011


site boundary studies

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During the beginning of the semester we spent time trying to understand the complexity of the city. Through the development of site boundary studies I started to develope design options based on the lines formed by either adjacent buildings, landmarks, structures, or major intersections.


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Process Models

Diagrammatic Elevations

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ϭϮŌ


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Donald Judd’s abstract art was my initial precedent that started to reveal itself in my designs through the forms of the light wells. The spaces between each level differentiates based on the spacious feeling that each higher level brings. The ground level is used for bike storage and also has locker storage for pedestrians who need to simply leave their bike and a few personal items before going to work. The middle level houses the showers and rest rooms, along with bike parts and bike repair shops, located in a quadrant in the middle of the floor.

Lastly, the top level encompasses a cafe and bar, with direct access to the roof that includes more seating for large events. The top level also extends two bridges that directly link the bicycle commuter station to the Tate Modern Museum.

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Although these photos were originally taken for just documentation, it later developed into a hobby and side business venture. Due to my background in architecture, I am drawn to photograph architecture itself, public spaces, and art. These photos in particular were mainly taken in France and Barcelona during a five week study abroad trip. I hope to continue to pursue this throughout my life and career path.

Looking toward the Business District Paris, France


Study Abroad Photography Summer 2012

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Chateau de Chenonceau Paris, France


Le Tour De Eiffel Paris, France

Barcelona Pavilion Barcelona, Spain

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Pavilion adjacent to the Pompidou Center Paris, France

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Mariah Y. Trevizo

816.519.8056

mariahtrevizo@yahoo.com

education 2009 - Present

University of Kansas, School of Architecture GPA: 3.47 Studio GPA: 3.67

employment history Summer 2013

2011-2013

2011

MOA Architecture - Denver, CO Prepared packages for CD, DD, and Schematic Design; made a model for their gallery space; created design options for the layout of their office. Billy Vanilly Cupcakes - Lawrence, KS Baked and decorated cupcakes and custom cakes; managed the kitchen and employees, while extending friendly customer service. McAlister’s Deli - Lawrence, KS Worked on the registers in front of the house and delivered food to the customers, while extending good customer service.

involvement

awards

2011 - Present

2013 Spring Recipient of the Mary Ann Traiger Award 2013 Spring KU Undergraduate Research Symposium Finalist 2013 Spring MOA Architecture Scholarship/Internship 3rd Place Finalist 2011 Spring & 2012 Fall University of Kansas Honor Roll 2009 - Present Multicultural Architectural Scholar

American Institute of Architecture Students, University of Kansas Chapter (2011 - Present) - Secretary of AIAS KU Chapter, 2012 - 2013 - Midwest Quadrant Conference Planning Committee, Fall 2012

skills

references

Revit Hand Drafting AutoCAD Model Making Fluent in Spanish SketchUp Lumion Adobe software (for both PC and MAC)

Bill Carswell Associate Professor at the University of Kansas 785.864.4365

study abroad

Steve Padget Architecture Professor at the University of Kansas 785.864.5185

5 weeks - Southern France, Barcelona

Rene Diaz Architecture Professor at the University of Kansas 785.864.3079


Revised Architectural Portfolio