__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

Glass Panel Greenhouse

Terrace Roof overlooking down on gallery spaces

Glass Panel Facade with Louvers on South-Facing Wall

GREENHOUSE

MARIA CLARA PEREZ IRAZABAL

DESIGN PORTFOLIO

Open Gallery Spaces connected by ramp Overground Tunnel

TICKET BOOTH

FERRY TERMINAL

selected works N

Scale: 1/8” = 1’

Plans

Conventional and Mechanical Workshop Spaces

Elevation

Transverse Section

Open Ground Floor Plan with Core Elevators Glass Panels looking down on Restaurant Balconies allowing view down to LED garden

GIFT SHOP Longitudinal Section

3

2

CAFE

4

Gridded Colonnade with Programatic Spaces

Axonometric

1

5

AMPHITHEATER

1-Extruded Party-Wall 2-Building in Axon View 3-Roof 4-Context 5-View of Double Height Space


CONTENTS

MARIA CLARA PEREZ IRAZABAL 18 Richmond Drive Old Greenwich, CT 06870 1.203.517.6033 | mperezir@syr.edu


01

REVIVED RESIDENCE

02

THE BLACK BOX

03 04 05 06 07 08 09

Nantou, Shenzhen, China

Los Angeles, California

THE UNDECORATED SHED Shoreditch, London, UK

MIXED-USE DWELLINGS Roosevelt Island, New York

ARTIFICIAL LANDSCAPE Roosevelt Island, New York

DETROIT CITY: SLOWROLL Detroit, Michigan

AN URBAN PROJECT New York, New York

REPRESENTATION Mixed Mediums

COMBE CAFETERIA Westchester, New York


REVIVED RESIDENCE Professor Fei Wang | Shenzhen Bi-City Biennale 2017 This project is situated in a series of five old industrial buildings, within the ancient city of Shenzhen, China. The existing structure is a three-story residential project with vertical circulation at both ends with exterior corridors running on the south facing facade. Throughout the process preservation of the preexisting structure became key, maintaining the current building by simply reorganizing and reprogramming the existing floors. The ground floor became a communal, public, and commercial space. The space consists of several public areas: a laundromat, a local market space, and a café space. This space will operate throughout the day connecting the market space with the fourth building in the series offering a similar open air communal space. The second and third existing floors become a daycare and a night school, as a way to integrate the context of the adjacent school. This will allow the building to be in constant use without wasting space. The addition consists of four floors of affordable residential space above the existing fabric to offset the elimination of housing that occurred during the restructuring of the existing and neighboring buildings. The intention is to bring both individuals and families together in one area to create a social living aspect. Exterior corridors have been added for the residential floors to keep with the architectural identity of the prior project. This desgin will give back to the public with community spaces both indoors and outdoors, and create affordable housing for families and individuals in Shenzhen. in collaboration with Joshua Siev

SCALE: 1/8” = 1’- 0”


Roof Fl. 106’-6”

Roof Plan 1’0” = 1/8”

Floor 8 94’-6” Floor 6 70’-6”

6th & 8th Fl. Plan 1’0” = 1/8”

Floor 7 82’-6”

Floor 5 58’-6”

5th & 7th Fl. Plan 1’0” = 1/8”

Middle Patio 36’-6”

Middle Patio 1’0” = 1/8”

Floor 3 25’-2”

3rd Fl. Plan 1’0” = 1/8”

Floor 2 13’-8”

2nd Fl. Plan 1’0” = 1/8”

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

3

2 Ground Fl. 0’-3”

1

Ground Floor 1’0” = 1/8”

2’-0”


THE BLACK BOX Guest Georgina Huljich | P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S Fall '16

A “mute icon” in architecture is at the same time an object and a building. By limiting its appearance, the mute icon demands closer scrutiny, stimulating conversation. The word “black box” does not only come from theater/the arts, it also questions functional flexibility, atmospheric darkness and plain mystery. This project will formulate itself through the experiment of different theater typologies to generate a unique interior experience. The autonomy of the black box is stripped through the vertical/horizontal collisions that created by a collection of elements. These elements were derived by an artist analysis in which certain aspects were emphasized creating a series of shapes. The collection then began to inform the programmatic spaces creating formal incongruities. Both exterior and interior qualities create a performance of micro articulation, and the grain of the texture presents a muted experience that creates the overall fuzziness throughout, that of the black box. in collaboration with Debbie Vapheas


THE UNDECORATED SHED Professor Francisco Sanin | London UP

Shoreditch is an up and coming community where graffiti is more than just an art mural, it creates a relationship with the building that becomes its canvas. The building then becomes what Venturi and Scott-Brown call a decorated shed. The site is made up of various “Decorated Sheds” and has an over ground, which stands alone, making that, “The Duck”. 6ʼ ”

UP

Glass Panel Greenhouse

6ʼ ”

6ʼ ”

The “Undecorated Shed” will act as an outlier in the community, due to the clean and see through facade. This allows the process of art and art itself to be exhibited in the building, while being able to see out, there is also the possibility to see in. This way, the art that creates a relationship to the building and the people passing by, just like what graffiti is able to accomplish. This structure will also house studios and galleries allowing artists of any mediums to interact with each other without having to hide in their own shadows. 1ʼ ”

Terrace Roof overlooking down on gallery spaces

DN

Glass Panel Facade with Louvers on South-Facing Wall

in collaboration with Jeffrey Liu

Open Gallery Spaces connected by ramp Overground Tunnel

Conventional and Mechanical Workshop Spaces

an

Open Ground Floor Plan with Core Elevators Glass Panels looking down on Restaurant Balconies allowing view down to LED garden

Gridded Colonnade with Programatic Spaces

Plan

Exploded Axon


Scale 1”=8ʼ

South Elevation Scale 1”=8ʼ

South Elevation Scale 1”=8ʼ

Section A

Scale 1”=16ʼ

Section A

Scale 1”=16ʼ

Section Section B A

Scale 1”=16ʼ Scale 1”=16ʼ

Section B

Scale 1”=16ʼ

Section B

Scale 1”=16ʼ

Section C

Scale 1”=16ʼ


MIXED-USE DWELLINGS Professor Elizabeth Kamell

Roosevelt Island is situated in the East River between Queens and Manhattan. With its ideal location between two important boroughs population in the last decade it has risen creating housing complications. This project aims to improve housing shortages in the City as well as create a social atmosphere for the dwellers of Roosevelt Island. Micro-Units are the solution for the problem allowing more dwellers per square feet maximizing space. Creating an identity within the urban fabric became of importance as well as creating a connection with the rest of the community. This mixed-use project wraps itself around the local field creating walkways and seating with views to the field, river, and Manhattan. Maximum interaction within the dwellers occurs within the social spaces while the micro-units are mirrored and repeated through the residential floors above. While families and larger apartment get scattered within.

Residential Plan 1” = 16’

Ground Floor Plan 1” = 16’

Unit Plan 1” = 2’


Field Elevation 1” = 8”

Side Street Elevation 1” = 8”


ARTIFICIAL LANDSCAPE Professor Jonathan Louie

Topography impacts design on a regular basis. Whether it’s carving into the landscape or simply building within, alterations are constantly being made where the building becomes part of the landscape. The southern tip of Roosevelt Island has a great opportunity for structure and landscape collaboration. With the river being a huge mode of transportation from borough to borough, a ferry terminal suits that gap. A street like path running North to South will act as a connector with access to the dock, ticket shop, and retail shops. A roof like structure is added with punctured spaces allowing the space to interact with the sky and the ground. It will also include shading mechanisms for daylight control. All these elements together will act as an artificial landscape allowing the user to interact with the spaces and provide its programmatic capabilities.

ROOF SLAB WITH OCULI

ROOF STRUCTURE

SHADING MECHANISM

COLUMNS

SITE PLAN 1/32” = 1’0”

EXPLODED AXON 1/16” = 1’0”


SECTION A-A 1/8” = 1’0”

SECTION C-C 1/8” = 1’0”

GREENHOUSE

FERRY TERMINAL

DD

TICKET BOOTH

CC

BB

GIFT SHOP

CAFE

AA

FLOOR PLAN 1/16” = 1’0” AMPHITHEATER


nday

kdays

kends

DETROIT CITY: SLOWROLL Professor Sekou Cooke

Downtown Detroit

This project introduces several architectural concepts for example primary urban narratives, diagram to building relationships, and complex programming. The use of a single predetermined client/user is also important as he/she will Temporary Density per Day have a relationship with the product and influence the design. Slowroll Bikers

Workers

Bike Services

This new facility will serve as the home for Detroit Bike City. It will serve as their primary base of operations and the start and end point for all future Slow Rolls. Slow Roll is a weekly bike ride that was started in Detroit, Michigan by community organizers and co-founders of Detroit Bike City. The city of Detroit, which has seen its population reduce from two million to| Oslo fewer than 800,000 in the last 60 years, has Eco Cube become the poster child for “shrinking cities”. The goal is not to reexamine any of the myriad city-scaled projects for urban revitalization. Instead to seek focus on a specific story within the city and speculate on its potential large-scale impact.

NL Architects| Taipei

MVRDV Bank | Oslo

Precedents

N

Axonometric

Scale: 1/32” =


Maria Clara Perez ARC 207 | Sekou Cooke

Transverse Section

Macomb Street

Monday

Bush Street

n

Slow Roll City| Detroit, Michigan

Monday

Weekdays

1950

“Motor City”

Weekdays

Longitudinal Section

1900 “Motor City”

1900

1950

TODAY

TODAY

Weekends

Monroe Avenue

Weekends N

Plans

Scale: 1/16” = 1’

Detroit The Shrinking City Detroit The Shrinking City

Eco Cube | Oslo

Eco Cube | Oslo

NL Architects| Taipei

N

Monroe Elevation

Scale: 1/16” = 1’

Monroe Elevation

Scale: 1/16” = 1’

N

Macomb Elevation Macomb Elevation

Precedents

N

Scale: 1/16” = 1’ N

Scale: 1/16” = 1’

Precedents

NL Architects| Taipei


AN URBAN PROJECT Professor Timothy Stenson

Context

The goal was to develop simultaneous understandings of context and architectonic forms, and their interrelation through design. Sited in New York City, this project bridges from urban ecology engagement and context formation, to programmatic accommodation and spatial-tectonic formation. Looking at the physical characteristics of the site as well as latent ecologies that exist in, around, and through your site help build up the overall design. This project accommodates both public and semi-private, with options tailored to the distinct character of the neighborhoods. They will accommodate 6 housing units and a neighborhood/ associated public and event space. The public space serves as a new DIA gallery that will be accessible to the public.

Exterior View

N

Plans

Plans

Scale: 1/8” = 1’

N

Scale: 1/8” = 1’


Elevation

Transerse

Section

Longitudinal Section

3

2 4

Axonometric

1

5

1-Extruded Party-Wall 2-Building in Axon View 3-Roof 4-Context 5-View of Double Height Space


REPRESENTATION This wide array of different representational drawings display a series of different drafting techniques developed. Figure ground, perspectives, plans and sections are all examples of drafting techniques showed below. An Architect has to know the skill of hand drafting in order to have a direct connection to their work. With the modernization of our times computers have grown and hand drafting is being lost.


COMBE CAFETERIA Professional Work | COMBE Inc.

Exploring several career paths during summer internships allows one to get different insights into the real world. One of the opportunities received was to redesign the cafeteria of Combe Inc. Working hand in hand with a client, in this case the CEO of the company, a mood board was created and renders followed with an aesthetic vision for the CEO. After several meetings the design was approved and was implemented in the Fall. A before and after picture shows how the cafeteria was modernized with a clean and updated aesthetic, improving the employee experience.

BEFORE


AFTER


esuohneerG lenaP ssalG

secaps yrellag no nwod gnikoolrevo fooR ecarreT

llaW gnicaF-htuoS no srevuoL htiw edacaF lenaP ssalG

ESUOHNEERG

YRREF LANIMRET

pmar yb detcennoc secapS yrellaG nepO lennuT dnuorgrevO

TEKCIT HTOOB

N

’1 = ”8/1 :elacS

snalP

secapS pohskroW lacinahceM dna lanoitnevnoC

noitavelE

noitceS esrevsnarT

srotavelE eroC htiw nalP roolF dnuorG nepO tnaruatseR no nwod gnikool slenaP ssalG nedrag DEL ot nwod weiv gniwolla seinoclaB

POHS TFIG noitceS lanidutignoL

3

MARIA CLARA PEREZ IRAZABAL 18 Richmond Drive Old Greenwich, CT 06870 1.203.517.6033 | mperezir@syr.edu

2

EFAC

4

secapS citamargorP htiw edannoloC deddirG

1 llaW-ytraP dedurtxE-1 weiV noxA ni gnidliuB-2 fooR-3 txetnoC-4 ecapS thgieH elbuoD fo weiV-5

5

RETAEHTIHPMA

cirtemonoxA

Profile for Maria Clara Perez

Design Portfolio  

Design Portfolio  

Advertisement