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EqualVoice

2012

National Convening

1425 4th Avenue, Suite 900 Seattle, WA 98101-2222 [P] 206.691.3134 [F] 206.286.2725


WELCOME Dear Friends, On behalf of Marguerite Casey Foundation, welcome to Los Angeles for our 2012 National Convening: The Road of Hope. Thank you for joining us in conversation and in celebration of our work to build a family-led movement. Marguerite Casey Foundation’s goals for the convening are to: • Foster cross-issue, cross-strategy connections among our grantee organizations and family leaders. • Position our grantee organizations and family leaders to push forward movement building work in their communities. • Advance our collective understanding of what is possible through Equal Voice as the infrastructure for a family-led movement. As you know, last year, Marguerite Casey Foundation celebrated its 10-year anniversary. Since day one, we have placed families at the center of our work, we’ve made long-term general-support grants to grassroots organizations that educate and mobilize low-income families and their communities and launched the 2008 Equal Voice for America’s Families campaign. The 2008 campaign was in response to calls from our grantee partners to coordinate a unified cross-region effort – larger than any of the grantees could have done alone – that would call attention to issues facing low-income families. The result was a national family platform of issues and priorities determined by the families who participated in the campaign. Two months ago, we responded to our grantees’ request to update the 2008 national family platform. Families filled out a survey to identify the issues of most concern to them in 2012; almost 6,000 cited education as their number-one concern. On May 20, we hosted the first Equal Voice online convention. More than 15,000 families, mobilized by 85 of our grantee organizations, participated online, via social media, and at large and small gatherings. Thanks to you and to your commitment to ensuring that the voices of poor families are heard, the 2012 Equal Voice national family platform will reflect the issues and priorities as determined by families – an accomplishment we should all be proud of because poor families are almost always spoken for and about; rarely are they asked to speak for themselves. In the last two years, we have engaged in extensive planning to chart our next steps with Equal Voice: We went on a listening tour in our grantmaking regions, asking our grantees what should come next; we interviewed more than 40 colleagues and representatives of grantee organizations to gather ideas; and with grant support, several of our grantees worked together to convene focus groups of grantees to research options and to present ideas for building a structure that could support coordinated action. We drew on this input to produce a five-year plan that, starting in 2012, will guide our efforts to achieve two overarching goals by 2016. Our first goal: A membership structure that will function as a coordinating entity for our grantee partners and families and that will influence public discourse and public policy to the benefit of families. • We don’t know what this will look like. We hope it will look different from anything we’ve seen before. We don’t seek to create a separate organization where one is not needed, but we recognize the need for a structure that brings organizations and families together beyond geography, using new technologies and innovative approaches. We seek to learn from what has come before us, from the models that are out there already, and from the opportunities that new technology creates for such a structure.

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Carbon offsets for this Convening provided by:


Our second goal: Engaged families. We heard loud and clear that a role the foundation can play is in developing tools and supporting strategies that can be used to organize and mobilize families. For this reason, we plan to: • Position the national family platform as a tool for family organizing, tying it when possible to local, regional and state efforts. • Provide support to increase voter participation. • Engage youth in our work by building the capacity of organizations to reach out to and involve youth. • Build and use technology tools that will provide the infrastructure and vehicles necessary to coordinate outreach and build our impact. Why are we taking this approach? We believe no family should live in poverty. We believe that only a family-led movement will lift families out of poverty. We encourage change among our grantees, and we embrace it for ourselves. As a foundation, Marguerite Casey Foundation often goes against the grain – we are comfortable with risk, and we seek innovation. And we ask the same of our grantee partners. We often hear that our grantees are so busy with their work that they cannot take on more work. We hear this, and we respect it – and, yet, we know that unless we all change the way we are doing our work, we will not change the status quo. We need new ways of working, advocating and creating change. We know this to be true because so many of our grantee partners and our colleagues have given us that message and because families themselves have shown us that they can lead. We believe that by working together, we can have a greater impact – we can leverage change that is far greater than the size of our grants. We have been asked by our grantees to play this role, and we have asked for input about how to do it. Our grantee partners and families represent a tremendous array of talents, perspectives, experiences and opinions, and we ask that they – that you – go on this journey with us and support building a base of families who are listened to and viewed as a powerful constituency. We intend to work closely with our grantee partners and colleagues to shape what we do. That is why we formed the Equal Voice Advance Team, a group of grantee representatives whom we have asked to serve as a brain trust: that is, to gather ideas, to act as a sounding board for strategies, and to advise us on what is the best use of our resources. That is also a focus of this convening – to explore possibilities together. We will also listen to the voices of families. That is why we invited families to the convening and why we sponsored an online convention. Families are why Equal Voice was created. We expect lots of conversations and a genuine dialogue because we know we have to do things differently to change the future for families. We also know we need to work with our partners to find the strategies that ultimately move us toward a future in which families have a structure – tools, leaders and clout – that amplifies their voices. This will be a journey, and it will require an exchange of ideas and a willingness among all of us to step out of our comfort zones. If we do it right, we will achieve an equal voice for all families in our country. Thank you for joining us in Los Angeles, an important point in our journey, and for all of your efforts to build a better future for families. Sincerely,

Luz A. Vega-Marquis President & CEO


Mission

Marguerite Casey Foundation exists to help low-income families strengthen their voice and mobilize their communities in order to achieve a more just and equitable society for all.

Vision

We imagine a just and equitable society for all, where all children are nurtured to become compassionate, responsible and self-reliant adults; where families are engaged in the life of their communities, the nation and the world; and where people take responsibility for meeting today’s needs as well as those of future generations.

Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, Keynote Speaker

Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, joined Marguerite Casey Foundation’s board of directors in June 2001. He has been president of The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) since May 1992. Dr. Hrabowski currently serves as a consultant to the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and to universities and school systems nationally. He also serves on a number of civic and corporate boards. Dr. Hrabowski was named by Time magazine as one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World in 2012. In 2011, he was named a Top American Leader by The Washington Post and was featured on “60 Minutes” for his innovation and leadership in education. He holds honorary degrees from more than 20 institutions including Harvard, Princeton, Johns Hopkins University, Georgetown University, Haverford College and Harvey Mudd College. Dr. Hrabowski’s other awards include election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society, the prestigious McGraw Prize in Education and the U.S. Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring. He was named Marylander of the Year by the editors of The Baltimore Sun and was among Fast Company magazine’s first “Fast 50 Champions of Innovation” in business and technology. He co-authored Beating the Odds: Raising Academically Successful African American Males and Overcoming the Odds: Raising Academically Successful African American Young Women (both published by Oxford University Press), used by universities, school systems and community groups around the country.

Equal Voice for America’s Families Seven years after it was founded, Marguerite Casey Foundation recognized that the only way to find out whether its vision of a family-led movement was possible was to mount – in partnership with its grantees – a national campaign to engage families directly. In 2008, the Equal Voice for America’s Families campaign mobilized more than 30,000 families and organizations across the country to draft and adopt a national family platform that addressed the challenges facing poor and low-income families and the policy changes needed to improve the economic well-being of those families. The campaign was a manifestation of the foundation’s mission, but it was also a test. What would a familyled movement, taken to scale, look like at a moment when our country was more diverse than ever in its history and more economically stratified? 3

Over the course of the campaign, the foundation learned from the families that participated and, in doing


Ten Years of Movement Building In 2001, Marguerite Casey Foundation was created as a grantmaking foundation to address the root causes of child and family poverty. According to founding President and CEO Luz Vega-Marquis: We started with typical things foundations do when they are starting out: We did a lot of data collection, public opinion, research into the trends, opinion leader interviews. But we also did two things that were really different. One was commissioning 40 papers from practitioners and consumers to get their ideas about what to do. And then we took that information back to the community to hear their reactions, by holding listening circles in six sites across the nation with more than 600 community members. The idea that came out of that was that we should do movement building and focus on empowering families and not direct service. Their notion was that you cannot service people out of poverty. We are guided by a philosophy that believes the family has solutions to their problems. That to me is the most important distinction – that internalized belief that we need to listen to the voices of the families, to hear the solutions that they have, and then help them realize them. In practice, that has meant a collaborative approach to building a movement of low-income families to bring about change in public policy, attitudes and practices to ensure the well-being of all of America’s families. Marguerite Casey Foundation’s grantmaking strategy, Equal Voice, supports movement building by investing in organizations that ensure that families are at the forefront of efforts to address poverty and that recognize that, to support a movement, they must work across issues, regions and cultures. Organizations that incorporate the principles and philosophy of Equal Voice into their work: • Are part of the Equal Voice movement, which is driven by and gives visibility and voice to America’s low-income families. • Engage families to advocate in their own behalf for policy changes that improve the economic and social well-being of all families. • Build strong cross-issue networks to share knowledge, organize constituencies of low-income families and pursue policy advocacy campaigns for change. • Develop skills and leadership among families in communities. • Use resources to build organizational capacity for movement building, including financial sustainability. The specific indicators of progress and success for movement building within Equal Voice are: • Family engagement • Network development • Policy impact • Leadership development • Organizational capacity In the 10 years since Marguerite Casey Foundation’s creation, its grantees have engaged millions of families and have conducted policy campaigns to bring about change – at the neighborhood and community levels to state, regional and national levels – achieving wins and building their capacity to improve the well-being of all of America’s families.

so, made progress toward answering a fundamental question: How can foundations support movement building most effectively? What is the foundation’s role in a phenomenon that ultimately must involve thousands, be led by those most affected, and be shaped, in many ways, by factors far beyond the foundation’s sphere of influence? The Equal Voice movement has demonstrated – and continues to demonstrate – that movement building is a viable grantmaking strategy to build and support community self-determination. The campaign has already spawned the online newspaper Equal Voice, two documentary films and more than 30 Equal Voice networks for community engagement nationwide, and has engaged over 40,000 families in the past four years. Equal Voice is the embodiment of Marguerite Casey Foundation’s goals and mission to support a family-led movement; a philosophy; a grantmaking strategy; a movement; and a barometer by which to measure the progress made on issues affecting poor families.

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Convening Schedule at a Glance Sunday

Ongoing, beginning at noon 1:00 – 4:30 p.m. 5:00 – 6:00 p.m. 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Monday

7:45 – 8:45 9:00 – 10:00 10:00 – 11:00 11:00 – noon Noon – 1:00 1:00 – 1:30 1:30 – 3:00 3:00 – 3:30 3:30 – 5:00 5:00 – 6:00 6:00 – 8:00

a.m. a.m. a.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m.

Registration Equal Voice Reception Dinner & Convening Opening “The Road of Hope”

Breakfast Keynote, Freeman A. Hrabowski, III 2012 Equal Voice National Family Platform Mobilizing Families Through Equal Voice Lunch Break Salon Sessions Break Equal Voice Idea Swap Break Dinner & Program: 1992–2012: Los Angeles, 20 Years Later

Tuesday

7:15 – 8:15 a.m. 8:30 – 10:30 a.m. 10:45 – noon Noon

Breakfast Regional Caucuses Call to Action Convening Adjourns

Sunday July 22 Agenda 1:00 – 4:30 p.m.

Equal Voice Reception Location: Trattoria

5:00 – 6:00 p.m.

Dinner & Convening Opening Location: Grand Ballroom Convening Emcee: Greg Hodge, Khepera Consulting

The Road of Hope Location: Grand Ballroom Perspectives from Marguerite Casey Foundation grantee partners and family leaders about movement building with and for families and the impact of Equal Voice. Followed by opening remarks by Luz A. Vega-Marquis, president and CEO, Marguerite Casey Foundation. 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

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Monday July 23 Agenda 7:45 – 8:45 a.m.

Breakfast Location: Grand Ballroom (for the morning until lunch)

9:00 – 10:00 a.m.

Keynote Speaker: Freeman A. Hrabowski, III

10:00 – 11:00 a.m. 2012 Equal Voice National Family Platform In 2008, 30,000 families participated in developing and ratifying a national family platform that laid out the issues of concern to low-income families and put forward solutions. Leading up to today’s convening, thousands of families participated in a survey and an online convention on May 20 to refresh the platform. Convening participants review the 2012 platform and vote on its ratification.

BREAK-OUT SESSIONS

11:00 – noon Mobilizing Families Through Equal Voice This interactive workshop explores how to use the national family platform story to engage and mobilize families. Led by Active Voice, which uses film, television and multimedia to spark social change from grassroots to grass tops. Their team of strategic communications specialists works with mediamakers, funders, advocates and thought leaders to put a human face on the issues of our times. Active Voice worked with Marguerite Casey Foundation on the Equal Voice Youth Empowerment Project – which included the documentary Maria Full of Hope – to inspire young people to get involved in the issues that mean the most to them and their families. Noon – 1:00 p.m.

Buffet Lunch & Networking Location: Grand Ballroom Foyer

1:00 – 1:30 p.m.

Break

1:30 – 3:00 p.m.

Salon Sessions Location: Second-Floor Meeting Rooms (see salon session descriptions for room assignments)

Participants attend the 30-minute sessions of their choice at 1:30 p.m. and 2:15 p.m. Ten concurrent sessions are offered, and each topic is presented twice in a short, high-energy format to spur ideas and inform the Equal Voice Idea Swap that follows. 3:00 – 3:30 p.m.

Break

Equal Voice Idea Swap Location: Grand Ballroom Participants swap ideas from the salon sessions in guided small-group discussions. 3:30 – 5:00 p.m.

5:00 – 6:00 p.m.

Break

Dinner & Program: 1992 – 2012: Los Angeles, 20 Years Later Location: Grand Ballroom A special presentation led by representatives of Marguerite Casey Foundation grantees and colleagues from the Los Angeles area, who reflect on the experience of living in South Los Angeles before, during and after the civil unrest of 1992. Learn about the movement born from the unrest, how it exists today, where it is going and what it can teach us. 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

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Tuesday July 24 Agenda 7:15 – 8:15 a.m.

Breakfast Location: Grand Ballroom

8:30 – 10:30 a.m. Regional Caucuses Location: Second-Floor Meeting Rooms (see caucus list for room assignments) Participants meet in caucus sessions by region to explore the five movement building indicators (family engagement, network development, policy impact, leadership development, and organizational capacity) and to inform the future of Equal Voice. 10:45 – 12:00 Call to Action Location: Grand Ballroom Participants close the convening by exploring key ideas from the caucuses and the convening-at-large.

Text Voting brought to you by

Polleverywhere.com

Marguerite Casey Foundation is committed to a Green convening: • A reusable, recyclable bag • Reusable water bottle that is BPA free • This program that is 100% recyclable • Padfolios are made from 80% post-consumer recycled materials • Notepad of 100% recycled paper • Carbon offsets for transportation and lodging

The Westin Hotel LAX focuses on sustainability, providing: • • • • • • 7

Comprehensive recycling program Green transportation Paperless contributions Green seal approved chemicals for cleaning Water conservation Energy efficiency, conservation and management


Salon Sessions Monday, July 23 Salon Sessions 1:30 – 3:00 p.m.

Note: : The 10 sessions run concurrently for 30 minutes at 1:30 p.m. and again at 2:15 p.m.

Membership Organization Prototypes: Identifying and Sharing Models

Location: National

Existing membership organizations can serve as models for building a national Equal Voice structure. With a focus on how to engage rural areas, explore how to connect with other organizations across your state and how to move a proactive agenda. Presenter: Kentuckians for the Commonwealth

Amplifying Your Work through Strategic Communications Location: Kennedy

Effective communication and technology tools have the potential to amplify your organization’s work, the issues facing low-income families, and solutions that work. This workshop offers ideas for integrating key messages about national family platform issues, Equal Voice and movement building, and resources to increase your organization’s technology capacity. Presenter: Progressive Technology Project

Technology for Engagement Location: La Guardia

Technology offers new ways to engage families and the potential to reshape movement building. Explore the various tools being used to engage and mobilize people in Equal Voice and other movement building efforts, and learn about how to amplify your work through technology. Presenter: Presente.org

Engaging Youth in Movement Building Location: O’Hare

Although youth participation is central to a successful movement, many organizations struggle to find approaches and tools that bring youth fully into their work and that support youth leadership. Learn about tangible youth engagement strategies to improve your organization’s family engagement process and outcomes and to build the collective power of Equal Voice. Presenters: Albany Park Neighborhood Council and Proyecto Juan Diego

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Salon Sessions Monday, July 23 Supporting Civic Engagement Location: Concourse Ballroom A

Voting is a core component of our democracy, offering the opportunity to elect officials who will address the issues facing families. Yet, throughout the country, barriers to the right to vote have emerged, threatening the opportunity for all people to have an equal voice in elections. Learn about threats to voting rights, strategies to protect the right to vote, and why protecting the right to vote is critical for advancing Equal Voice issues in the future. Presenter: Alliance for Justice

Policy Impact for Families* Location: Concourse Ballroom B

In a time of incredible challenges for families, many organizations and communities have achieved success in advancing constructive policies and defeating destructive ones. Learn about the recent success of the California DREAM Act and the lessons it offers for policy work in your community and through the Equal Voice network. How did the participants organize a coalition, and how did they use this strategic coalition to build their base over the long term? Presenter: Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights Los Angeles (CHIRLA)

Family Engagement* Location: Logan

Successful family engagement requires responsiveness to a community’s distinct goals, cultural traditions and guiding values. Learn about integrative approaches to family engagement – how to get and keep families engaged in your work and how to connect them to a broad Equal Voice movement for families. Presenter: Southern Echo

Network Building* Location: Midway

Grantees have built local and regional structures to advance shared interests, including but not limited to Equal Voice platform issues. This workshop spotlights the transformation that organizations and communities in Chicago have experienced because of their proactive development of networks. Learn how 54 Chicago-based organizations formed black-brown relationships to address Illinois state redistricting. Presenter: United Congress of Community and Religious Organizations

*One of Marguerite Casey Foundation’s five movement building indicators: skills and strategies that are pillars of building a movement of and for families. 9


Organizational Capacity Building* Location: Orly

Strong organizations have the potential to serve as the backbone for local, regional and national movements. This workshop explores how Equal Voice supports the fundamental ingredients that make up strong movement building organizations, and offers steps to put those ingredients in place in your organization through network building. Presenter: Rio Grande Valley Equal Voice, Texas and Equal Voice Network Mississippi Delta

Leadership Development* Location: Sea-Tac

Families must be at the forefront of a movement of and for families. Promoting and supporting leadership development for families will broaden and deepen the impact of your organization and the wider movement for an equal voice for families. Explore key elements of leadership development approaches for your organization and for families in your community that connect your work and families across geographies. Presenter: Right to the City

Regional Caucuses Tuesday, July 24 Regional Caucuses 8:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Note: All sessions will run for the full two hours in the second-floor meeting rooms. Session Topic Location Midwest ................................... Orly National ................................... National South ........................................ Concourse Ballroom B Southwest ................................ O’Hare West ......................................... Concourse Ballroom A Native American ....................... Sea-Tac

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Convening Participant Guide Finding new ideas to take back to your community. The convening lasts for just three days – what will you take back to your community? Setting objectives and capturing your experiences and thoughts as they happen can extend the convening’s impact. Use the suggestions below to get more from your time in Los Angeles!

Keep families at the center. What Marguerite Casey Foundation does is always about the families – building the capacity of people in their communities.

Explore the five movement building indicators. Marguerite Casey Foundation

has identified five elements necessary for movement building: family engagement, network development, policy impact, leadership development and organizational capacity. How strong is your organization and how strong is your community in the five areas? How can you make them stronger?

Dive into conversations. Engage with each other in conversations; listen intently; share your experiences – the best teachers about movement building and family engagement are all around you.

What are your goals for the convening?

What will you do during – and after – the convening to achieve those goals?

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Record your insights, ideas, questions, quotes, facts and resources from each part of the convening and the actions you plan to take after the convening.

Convening Section

Insights & Ideas

Questions that Came to Mind

Quotes

Facts, Websites, Resources

Actions to Take After the Convening

Sunday Night: Opening

Monday Morning: Keynote & Plenary

Monday Afternoon: Salon Sessions

Monday Afternoon: Equal Voice Idea Swap

Tuesday Morning: Regional Caucuses

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Acknowledgments Our Board of Directors

Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, Chair Patricia Schroeder, Vice-Chair David Villa, Treasurer Douglas X. Patiño, Secretary

Melody Barnes Angela Diaz William H. Foege

Equal Voice Advance Team Alice Aguilar, Progressive Technology Project Shantha Ready Alonso, National Council of Churches Scott Douglas, Greater Birmingham Ministries Sophia Bracy Harris, Federation of Child Care Centers of Alabama Donna Bransford, Bay Area Equal Voice Caucus Bill Chandler, Mississippi Immigrants Rights Alliance Marjorie Childress, SouthWest Organizing Project Joe Givens, Isaiah Institute Lori Goodman, Diné Citizens Against Ruining our Environment Jaribu Hill, Mississippi Workers’ Center for Human Rights Brian Kettenring, Leadership Center for the Common Good Roger Kim, Asian Pacific Environmental Network Bill Kopsky, Arkansas Public Policy Panel Thamara Labrousse, Miami Workers Center Sally Lew, Equal Voice for Southern California Families Alliance Rev. Michael Livingston, National Council of Churches Heather Mahoney, Kentuckians for the Commonwealth Eric Mann, The Labor/Community Strategy Center Josina Morita, United Congress of Community and Religious Organizations Amelia Parker, Statewide Organizing for Community eMpowerment Joyce Hall Parker, Citizens for a Better Greenville Gihan Perera, Florida New Majority Maria Rodriguez, Florida Immigrant Coalition Isabel Rubio, Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama Monica Sandschafer, Arizona Center for Empowerment Leoncio Vásquez Santos, Centro Binacional para el Desarrollo IndÍgena Oaxaqueño Deborah Scott, Georgia STAND-UP Ashley K. Shelton, One Voice Louisiana

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Jill Shenker, National Domestic Workers Alliance Michael Seifert, Rio Grande Valley Equal Voice, Texas Patty Siegel, Founder, Parent Voices Diane Takvorian, Environmental Health Coalition Madeline Talbott, Action Now Juanita Valdez-Cox, La Unión del Pueblo Entero Gloria Walton, Strategic Concepts in Organizing and Policy Education (SCOPE) Jamal Watkins, Center for Social Inclusion

Marguerite Casey Foundation Staff Luz A. Vega-Marquis, President & CEO Kathleen Baca, Director of Communications Peter Bloch Garcia, Program Officer Rich Boswell, Grants Administrator William Cordery, Program Officer Ericka Cox, Program Officer Jennifer Gianni-Haubry, Finance Manager Sunny Hong, Administrative Assistant Suphatra Laviolette, Administrative Specialist, Communications Joyce Lee, Chief Financial Officer Lupe Lopez, Director of Strategic Collective Capacity Cheryl Milloy, Evaluation & Research Officer Kathy Mulady, Reporter, Equal Voice newspaper Piilani Pang, Director of Human Resources & Administration Cynthia Renfro, Director of Programs & Evaluation Jessica Tracey, Administrative Assistant Karen Urlie, Administrative Specialist, Programs & Evaluation Vanessa Ushio, Graphic Designer & Web Manager Herb Williams, Assistant Secretary to the Board of Directors


WELCOME Dear Friends, On behalf of Marguerite Casey Foundation, welcome to Los Angeles for our 2012 National Convening: The Road of Hope. Thank you for joining us in conversation and in celebration of our work to build a family-led movement. Marguerite Casey Foundation’s goals for the convening are to: • Foster cross-issue, cross-strategy connections among our grantee organizations and family leaders. • Position our grantee organizations and family leaders to push forward movement building work in their communities. • Advance our collective understanding of what is possible through Equal Voice as the infrastructure for a family-led movement. As you know, last year, Marguerite Casey Foundation celebrated its 10-year anniversary. Since day one, we have placed families at the center of our work, we’ve made long-term general-support grants to grassroots organizations that educate and mobilize low-income families and their communities and launched the 2008 Equal Voice for America’s Families campaign. The 2008 campaign was in response to calls from our grantee partners to coordinate a unified cross-region effort – larger than any of the grantees could have done alone – that would call attention to issues facing low-income families. The result was a national family platform of issues and priorities determined by the families who participated in the campaign. Two months ago, we responded to our grantees’ request to update the 2008 national family platform. Families filled out a survey to identify the issues of most concern to them in 2012; almost 6,000 cited education as their number-one concern. On May 20, we hosted the first Equal Voice online convention. More than 15,000 families, mobilized by 85 of our grantee organizations, participated online, via social media, and at large and small gatherings. Thanks to you and to your commitment to ensuring that the voices of poor families are heard, the 2012 Equal Voice national family platform will reflect the issues and priorities as determined by families – an accomplishment we should all be proud of because poor families are almost always spoken for and about; rarely are they asked to speak for themselves. In the last two years, we have engaged in extensive planning to chart our next steps with Equal Voice: We went on a listening tour in our grantmaking regions, asking our grantees what should come next; we interviewed more than 40 colleagues and representatives of grantee organizations to gather ideas; and with grant support, several of our grantees worked together to convene focus groups of grantees to research options and to present ideas for building a structure that could support coordinated action. We drew on this input to produce a five-year plan that, starting in 2012, will guide our efforts to achieve two overarching goals by 2016. Our first goal: A membership structure that will function as a coordinating entity for our grantee partners and families and that will influence public discourse and public policy to the benefit of families. • We don’t know what this will look like. We hope it will look different from anything we’ve seen before. We don’t seek to create a separate organization where one is not needed, but we recognize the need for a structure that brings organizations and families together beyond geography, using new technologies and innovative approaches. We seek to learn from what has come before us, from the models that are out there already, and from the opportunities that new technology creates for such a structure.

LOBBY LEVEL LINDBERGH GRAND BALLROOM GRAND BALLROOM FOYER TERRACE

LOBBY LEVEL

Trattoria GRAND BALLROOM

LINDBERGH A B

GRAND BALLROOM FOYER

TERRACE

SECOND FLOOR NATIONAL O’HARE ORLY SEA-TAC STAPLETON BALLROOM FOYER TEMPLHOFF

CONCOURSE BALLROOM MIDWAY LOGAN LA GUARDIA KENNEDY THE THEATER

NATIONAL

STAPLETON SEA-TAC

O’HARE ORLY BALLROOM FOYER CONCOURSE BALLROOM A B SECOND FLOOR

MIDWAY LOGAN LA GUARDIA

THE THEATER

KENNEDY

Carbon offsets for this Convening provided by:


EqualVoice

2012

National Convening

1425 4th Avenue, Suite 900 Seattle, WA 98101-2222 [P] 206.691.3134 [F] 206.286.2725


2012 Equal Voice Convening Program