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Registration number: CCL-5164

Expression of interest LANDSCAPE design competition for CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL

JULY 2013


ANNE FLETCHER FLETCHER TECKMAN CONSULTING LTD

Gary Newton stone mason kent

KELLEY CHRIST 9 The Precincts, Canterbury, KT1 2EE kelley.christ@purcelluk.com www.purcelluk.com

All rights in this work are reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced, stored or transmitted in any form or by any means (including without limitation by photocopying or placing on a website) without the prior permission in writing of Purcell except in accordance with the provisions of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. Applications for permission to reproduce any part of this work should be addressed to Purcell at info@purcelluk.com. Undertaking any unauthorised act in relation to this work may result in a civil claim for damages and/or criminal prosecution. Any materials used in this work which are subject to third party copyright have been reproduced under licence from the copyright owner except in the case of works of unknown authorship as defined by the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. Any person wishing to assert rights in relation to works which have been reproduced as works of unknown authorship should contact Purcell at info@purcelluk.com. Purcell asserts its moral rights to be identified as the author of this work under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. PurcellŽ is the trading name of Purcell Miller Tritton LLP. Š Purcell 2013


CONTENTS 1.0 pRE-QUALIFICATION QUESTIONNAIRE

5

2.0 tEAM cOMPOSITION

15

3.0 relevant experience

24

4.0 press information

29

Appendix FBS.3.A last 3 years AUDITED ACCOUNTS: 2010

32

Appendix FBS.3.A last 3 years AUDITED ACCOUNTS: 2011

53

Appendix FBS.3.A last 3 years AUDITED ACCOUNTS: 2012

78

Appendix FBS.3.B 2013 statement of turnover, profit & loss, Cash Flow (Draft accounts)

104

Appendix FBS.3.C 2013 statement of cashflow

106

Appendix FBS.3.C 2013 Bank letter outlining current cash & credit facility

107

Appendix FBS.5 Employers liability insurance certificate

111

Appendix FBS.6 Public liability insurance certificate

112

Appendix FBS.7 professional indemnity insurance certificate

113

Appendix TPS.2 ISO9001 certificate

114

Appendix TPS.3 health & safety PROCESS MANUAL

116

Appendix TPS.3 health & safety CERTIFICATES

157

Appendix TPS.5 eQUAL oPPORTUNITIES pOLICY

161 3


1.0 pRE-QUALIFICATION QUESTIONNAIRE PRE-QUALIFICATION QUESTIONNAIRE Practice Information The questions below are for information only and will not be scored. 1

Practice name

Purcell

2

Address of registered office

15 Bermondsey Square, London SE1 3UN

3

Contact point for this tender

Kelley Christ, Associate

4

Address, telephone number and email address of Contact.

Purcell 9 The Precincts Kent CT1 2EE T: +44 (0)1227 475375 kelley.christ@purcelluk.com

5

Address of office where the services relating to this appointment will be provided (if different from 2)

Purcell

6

Telephone number including code

T: +44 (0)1227 475375

7

Contact email address

kelley.christ@purcelluk.com

8

VAT registration number (if applicable)

105 0807 13

9

Company status (Partnership, Limited Company, etc.)

Limited Liability Partnership

10

Please provide details of any parent company or ultimate holding company (if applicable).

11

If a Limited Company, please provide registration number and date of incorporation.

9 The Precincts Kent CT1 2EE

Purcell does not have a parent company of ultimate holding company. Purcell is the trading name of Purcell Miller Tritton LLP.

Registration no: OC315259. The company was founded in 1947 and was registered as a Limited Liability Partnership on 19 September 2005.

5

 


Mandatory Grounds for Exclusion Has your organisation (or its directors or any other person who has powers of representation, decision or control of the named organisation) been convicted of any of the following offences? 1

Conspiracy within the meaning of section 1 or 1A of the Criminal Law Act 1977 or article 9 or 9A of the Criminal Attempts and Conspiracy (Northern Ireland) Order 1983 3 where that conspiracy relates to participation in a criminal organisation as defined in Article 2 of Council Framework Decision 2008/841/JHA 4

No.

2

Corruption within the meaning of section 1 of the Public Bodies Corrupt Practices Act 1889 or section 1 of the Prevention of Corruption Act 1906 (as amended)

No.

3

The offence of bribery, where the offence relates to active corruption and/or bribery within the meaning of section 1 or 6 of the Bribery Act 2010

No.

4

Fraud, where the offence relates to fraud affecting the financial interests of the European Communities as defined by Article 1 of the Convention relating to the protection of the financial interests of the European Union, within the meaning of:

No.

a. the offence of cheating the Revenue; b. the offence of conspiracy to defraud; c. fraud or theft within the meaning of the Theft Act 1968 and the Theft Act 1978; d. fraudulent trading within the meaning of section 458 of the Companies Act 1985; e. defrauding the Customs within the meaning of the Customs and Excise Management Act 1979 and the Value Added Tax Act 1994; f. an offence in connection with taxation in the European Community within the meaning of section 71 of the Criminal Justice Act 1993; or g. g. destroying, defacing or concealing of documents or procuring the extension of a valuable security within the meaning of section 20 of the Theft Act 1968 5

Money laundering within the meaning of the Money Laundering Regulations 2003

No.

6

Other offence within the meaning of Article 45(1) of the Public Sector Directive

No.

Please confirm whether any of the following applies to your organisation. Where the answer is yes, please provide details. 1

6

Please state if any Director or Partner has been involved in any company that has been declared bankrupt or been put into Administration, Liquidation or Receivership. Canterbury Cathedral, Landscape Design Competition, EOI, July 2013

No.


2

Is the organisation bankrupt or being wound up, having its affairs administered by the court, or have you entered into an arrangement with creditors, suspended business activities or any analogous situation arising from similar proceedings under national laws or regulations?

No.

3

Is the organisation the subject of proceedings for a declaration of bankruptcy, for compulsory winding-up or administration by the court or for an arrangement with creditors or of any other similar proceedings under national laws or regulations?

No.

4

Has any employee whom you would propose to use to deliver this service been convicted of an offence concerning his professional conduct by a judgement which has the force of res judicata?

No.

5

Has any employee whom you would propose to use to deliver this service been guilty of grave professional misconduct?

No.

6

Has the organisation failed to fulfil obligations relating to the payment of social security contributions in accordance with the legal provisions of the United Kingdom or the country in which it is established?

No.

7

Has the organisation failed to fulfil obligations relating to the payment of taxes in accordance with the legal provisions of the United Kingdom or the country in which it is established?

No.

8

Has the organisation failed to obtain the necessary license in the relevant State in which he is established or is not a member of an organisation in that relevant State when the law of that relevant State prohibits the provision of the services to be provided under the contract by a person who is not so licensed or who is not such a member?

No.

9

Has the organisation not registered on the professional or trade register of the relevant State in which he is established under conditions laid down by that State.

No.

10

Is the organisation or any of its Partners or directors guilty of serious misrepresentation in providing any information referred to within this regulation 23, 24, 25, 26 or 27 of the Public Contract Regulations or has not provided such information in response to a request by the contracting authority?

No.

11

Please give details of any relatives or any relevant persons associated with the applicant who are in senior positions within the client organisation and confirm there are no conflicts of interest in that respect. Please note that if any conflict of interest is identified you are required to inform the Cathedral of the steps you would take to satisfy the Cathedral that the conflict can be resolved and comply with any steps required by the Cathedral to resolve the conflict. Please answer yes to this question if this is not acceptable to you.

No.

7


Financial and Business Standards The questions below will be marked in accordance with the evaluation criteria set out in Evaluation Criteria.

1

Question

Response

Score Available

Please provide your organisation’s bank details. Including name and address and contact number for your branch.

Enclosed.

For information only

Sort code: 60-15-31

Weighting

Account no: 68582358 Bank:: NatWest Branch details: Norwich City office 45 London Street Norwich NR2 1HX Phone: 0116 255 3041

2

3 a

8

Please confirm that if requested you would be able to provide a banker's reference.

Yes.

[Answering yes to this question will score 10 and an answer of no will score 1]

Enclosed at Appendix FBS.3a.

For information only

Please provide one of the below: copies of your organisation’s audited accounts for the last three years. If you are a subsidiary of a group and you are relying on group resources for the purposes of this PQQ, this information is required for both the subsidiary and the parent company; or

Canterbury Cathedral, Landscape Design Competition, EOI, July 2013

100%


b

c

4

a statement of your turnover, profit and loss and cash flow position for the most recent full year of trading (or part year if full year not applicable) and an end period balance sheet, where this information is not available in an audited form as set out in 3a. above. If you are a subsidiary of a group and you are relying on group resources for the purposes of this PQQ, this information is required for both the subsidiary and the parent company; or

Enclosed at Appendix FBS.3b.

For information only

a statement of your cashflow forecast for the current year and a bank letter outlining the current cash and credit facility position If you are a subsidiary of a group, and you are relying on group resources for the purposes of this PQQ this information is required for both the subsidiary and the parent company.

Enclosed at FBS.3c.

For information only

Please confirm you will supply a performance bond and/or guarantee if required by the Cathedral and that such bond and/or guarantee will be in form approved by the Cathedral.

Yes.

For information only

9


5

Please confirm your organisation has (or would be willing to obtain if awarded the contract) Employers Liability Insurance sufficient to achieve the level of Employer’s Liability Insurance required by law. If this insurance is already in place please provide details of this policy, along with a copy of the certificate.

6

Please confirm your organisation has (or would be willing to obtain if awarded the contract) Public Liability Insurance to provide £5,000,000 Public Liability cover. If this insurance is already in place please provide details of this policy, along with a copy of the certificate.

7

Please confirm your organisation has (or would be willing to obtain if awarded the contract) Professional Indemnity Insurance for at least £1,000,000 Professional Indemnity cover. If this insurance is already in place please provide details of this policy, along with a copy of the certificate.

Yes. Insurer: Hiscox Insurance Company Limited Policy Number: HU P16 1704459 Extent of Cover: £10m for any one claim. No level of excess. Expiry Date: 29/10/13 A copy of our insurance certificate is enclosed at Appendix FBS.5.

Yes. Insurer: Hiscox Insurance Company Limited Policy Number: HU P16 1704459 Extent of Cover: £10m for any one claim. No level of excess. Expiry Date: 29/10/13 A copy of our insurance certificate is enclosed at Appendix FBS.6.

Yes. Insurer: Lloyd’s, London and Hannover Re Policy Number: P13A296354P Extent of Cover: £2m for any one claim. Expiry Date: 01/07/2014 A copy of our insurance certificate is enclosed at Appendix FBS.7.

Total

10

Canterbury Cathedral, Landscape Design Competition, EOI, July 2013

Pass/Fail [This question requires a yes answer, if you cannot answer yes to this question, you will be scored 0 and the Cathedral will not continue to evaluate your tender]

Pass/Fail [This question requires a yes answer, if you cannot answer yes to this question, you will be scored 0 and the Cathedral will not continue to evaluate your tender] Pass/Fail [This question requires a yes answer, if you cannot answer yes to this question, you will be scored 0 and the Cathedral will not continue to evaluate your tender] 10

100%


Technical and Professional Capability The questions below will be marked in accordance with the evaluation criteria set out in Evaluation Criteria (page 42).

1

2

Question

Response

Score Available

Question 2: Team composition of the Submission Requirements on page 27.

Our response to this question is detailed in Section 2: Team Composition of this document.

[This question will be scored in accordance with the Evaluation Criteria on page 42]

Does your organisation hold a recognised quality management certificate (ISO9001 certificate or equivalent)?

Yes.

[A “Yes” will score 10 and a “No” will score 1.]

Enclosed at Appendix TPC.2.

Weighting 25%

15%

If yes, please enclose a copy. 3

3b

4

5

6

Please confirm you have a written health and safety at work policy and enclose a copy of your organisation’s health and safety management system, enclosing any certificates.

Yes.

If “No” please explain why.

Not applicable.

[This question will be scored in accordance with the Evaluation Criteria on page 42]

Has any court/industrial/ employment tribunal or equivalent body upheld a decision of unlawful discrimination against the Bidder in the last 2 years?

No.

[A “Yes” will score 1 and a “No” will score 10.]

Please confirm that you have an equal opportunities policy which ensures compliance with all antidiscrimination legislation, and sets out steps to treat all people fairly and equally. Please provide details of this equal opportunities policy.

Yes.

[A “Yes” will score 10 and a “No” will score 1.]

Has any court/industrial/ tribunal or equivalent body upheld a decision under Health & Safety Legislation against the Bidder in the last 2 years?

No.

Total

Enclosed at Appendix TPC.3.

Enclosed at Appendix TPC.5.

[Providing this information will gain a maximum score; failure to provide this information will be evaluated in accordance with question 3b.]

[A “Yes” will score 1 and a “No” will score 10.]

60

15%

15%

15%

15%

100%

11


Relevant Experience The questions below will be marked in accordance with the evaluation criteria set out in Evaluation Criteria (page 42).

1

Question

Response

Score Available

Question 3: Relevant experience of the Submission Requirements on page 27.

Our response is included in Section 3: Relevant Experience of this document.

[This question will be scored in accordance with the Evaluation Criteria on page 42]

Total

10

Weighting 100%

100%

Declaration Please print off and complete the Declaration Form on page 45 of this document and enclose a digital and hard copy with your submission. We have included our filled in declaration form on the following page.

12

Canterbury Cathedral, Landscape Design Competition, EOI, July 2013


DECLARATION FORM The following declaration should be completed by the lead consultant only. I declare that to the best of my knowledge the answers submitted in this PQQ and any supporting documents are true and correct. I understand that the information will be used in the process to assess our suitability to be invited to tender for Canterbury Cathedral’s requirement. I acknowledge that the Cathedral may reject this PQQ and/or disqualify this team from the procurement process if there is a failure to answer all relevant questions fully or if I/we provide false/misleading information. I confirm (please tick) that our submission includes: 

1. Completed Questions 1-4 of Submission Requirements (page 27)

2. CD or memory stick with PDF files (obligatory)

Signed: Name : Kelley Christ Position (Job Title) : Associate On behalf of : Purcell Date : 17th July 2013 Telephone number : 0207 397 7171

13


2.0 tEAM cOMPOSITION

canterbury cathedral Lead Consultant

Quantity Surveyor

Landscape Architect + Lighting Consultant

Interpretation Consultant

Sustainability & Engineering Services

Specialist Crafts People

BARE, LEANING & BARE

TONKIN LIU

ANNE FLETCHER

ARUP

GARY NEWTON

Synergy group

Fletcher Teckman Consulting Ltd

Stone Mason Kent

We are delighted to submit our expression of interest for the design of the landscaping within the Canterbury Cathedral Precinct. To reflect its outstanding significance as one of the three World Heritage Sites in Canterbury, any proposals for change must be of the upmost quality and exceptional sensitivity. We believe that any proposals must be anchored in a fundamental understanding of the Precinct and overlaid with intelligent and perceptive observations for improvements and enhancements to meet the Dean and Chapter’s aspirations. Amplifying the cultural significance of the Cathedral and its Close is a task as exciting and interesting as it is challenging and complex. Purcell understands this from direct experience, having worked at the Precinct for several years now.

15


OUR TEAM WILL MAKE THE CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN PROJECT A SUCCESS BECAUSE: We have the best people working on the best buildings… We believe our team composition demonstrates a creative yet sensible approach to the project, and the real strength lies in key individuals who will contribute directly to its evolution. We have already taken significant steps to galvanise our working relationship, as demonstrated by the approach to your project outlined in Section 3. We strongly believe we are the best team to develop a new strategic approach to the landscape of the Precinct so as to improve the experience of all who journey there. Lead & Conservation Architect: Purcell Beyond the role of supporting the incumbent Surveyor to the Fabric John Burton, key Purcell individuals have a deep knowledge and passion for the Cathedral and its Close, developed through their involvement in broader strategic thinking about its future evolution. We believe it is unwise to pursue any scheme which cannot find favour with UNESCO, the CFCE, the Cathedral’s FAC, English Heritage, the amenity societies and the local authority. Purcell has an unrivalled track record in negotiating wonderful and transformational solutions which unlock the potential of heritage sites previously plagued by apparently intractable problems.

Cost control and financial reporting: Bare, Leaning & Bare Synergy/Bare Leaning & Bare have worked closely with Purcell on a number of significant projects. They are a ‘safe pair of hands’ who will ensure that any proposal is underpinned by sound financial advice and best judgement honed on an unparalleled breadth of work within Cathedral Precincts and significant historic buildings across the country. Landscape, Art and Architecture, Lighting Design: Tonkin Liu The competition brief places great emphasis on the desire to find new and emerging talent. We interpret this to be an aspiration to see old problems ‘with new eyes’. Tonkin Liu has brought this fresh perspective to the team. They bring their unique ability to devise much lauded, thought-provoking, bespoke and poetic work through a sensitive engagement with context and brief. Our statement of approach in Section 3 is the fruit of an initial collaborative workshop led by Tonkin Liu to galvanise the team’s initial responses to your project and the rich possibilities for inspiration and interpretation with the Precincts.

We have assembled a multi-disciplinary team of proven ability to deliver this project at all stages: from concept design and securing consents, to management of the works on site. Purcell will be Lead Consultant and provide the heritage expertise necessary to ensure that the team’s proposals are steered through the rigorous process of consultation, achieving support from the wide array of key stakeholders.

16

Canterbury Cathedral, Landscape Design Competition, EOI, July 2013

Interpretation: Anne Fletcher Anne Fletcher is well known for her wonderful contributions to ensuring some of England’s best loved places are better understood and accessible in the widest sense of the word. Her involvement with projects at St Paul’s Cathedral, York Minster and Rochester Cathedral has deepened her understanding of these special places as destinations for tourists and pilgrims alike. Anne is a member of the ICOMOS Cultural Tourism Committee. Multi-Disciplinary Technical Support – Sustainability and Engineering Services: Arup A number of different disciplines may be required to provide expertise in support of proposals as they evolve in the future stages of competition and ultimate project. These are likely to include environmental, structural, civil, hydraulic, below ground drainage, mechanical and electrical engineering services. To streamline the project team, and communication and coordination between consultants, we are partnering with Arup, a ‘one stop shop’ for the technical support of the design team. As with many of the disciplines encompassed by Arup’s portfolio, project delivery services may be useful in latter stages of the project, depending upon the scale and complexity of phasing to implement the scheme.


We achieve the best results Specialist Craftspeople Canterbury Cathedral’s Works Team, including specialist stonemasons and conservation glaziers, is a wonderful resource bank of in-depth understanding of context, materials and craftsmanship. Ideally, our team will utilise the knowledge and skills of these individuals, particularly Heather Newton, as head of stonemasonry. As we appreciate that this may divert valuable resources away from essential projects of fabric repair, we are partnering with Gary Newton, who will act as a technical consultant on the special potential and use of materials, particulary Caen stone. We will also involve the Cathedral Works Fellowship in any practical practical during the evolution of your project.

We believe in working closely with our clients to define, understand and achieve their objectives, to develop responsive, creative schemes which will delight their users, which have economy in their construction and cost, and are responsible in their use of materials and their environmental sustainability. This approach is reflected in the awardwinning projects that our team members have been instrumental in.

Archaeology Understanding the archaeological implications within the project area is fundamental to devising a viable scheme for the Landscaping. Though not included as part of our team, the involvement of the Cathedral Archaeologist, Professor Martin Biddle, and the longterm archaeological contractor, the Canterbury Archaeological Trust will be critical. Purcell has developed working relationships with both.

Purcell have a close working understanding of the range of demands placed upon the Cathedral's Close due to their long term associations with the place 17


TEAM PROFILES Purcell is a national team of architects, heritage consultants and surveyors who share a passion for the thoughtfully designed evolution of buildings, places and communities. Creative in our vision, thoughtful in our approach and pragmatic in our delivery, we work collaboratively to empower people and create outstanding opportunities that bring our client’s aspirations to life. Founded in 1947 by Donovan Purcell, we have helped evolve some of the most historically important and sensitive buildings and places in the UK and abroad. We provide a start-to-finish service that integrates funding and planning advice, heritage consultancy, conservation and architectural services across eight sectors. Our ambition is to create inspiring and enduring architecture. National capability, local sensitivity We have 13 UK offices spread geographically to give us the ability to provide a local and personal service to clients but with the back-up, support and resources of a much larger organisation. We currently employ over 180 staff, of which over 50 have specialist conservation training and/or accreditation, making us the largest specialist conservation practice in the country. Our work spans ecclesiastical and secular buildings, and a very wide range of end user clients. We continue to grow, opening new offices in key strategic areas to increase our local offer. This increases our ability to work at the highest professional levels of design and conservation excellence.

Tonkin Liu is an award-winning architectural practice, whose work encompasses architecture, art and landscape. We offer forward-thinking clients a design that is finely tuned to the place it is sited, the people who will occupy it, and the culture that surrounds it at the time. This emphatic search for new beginnings is set out in our book “asking looking playing making”, published in 1999. Our unique story-telling methodology searches for archetypes that will inform the process of design from inception to completion, giving the project a lasting resonance. Each project embodies our relationship to nature. Some projects celebrate changing weather and seasons, some evoke the power of nature as symbols, whilst others emulate form and performance, using lessons in nature to inspire pioneering construction techniques. Our preoccupation with nature informs the design process, whether through biomimicry or by using the elements nature generously gives us for free. We are interested in doing what we have not done before and our aim is always the same: to satisfy the mind and touch the heart.

We employ specialists and thought leaders in each area of our expertise. This breadth and depth of knowledge and experience combined with local sensitivity ensures that we have the best people, working with the best buildings, for the best results. Award winning service We have achieved considerable acclaim for our work and have won many awards at the highest level including RIBA, Civic Trust, and RICS awards. We have won the National Eisteddfod Gold Medal for Architecture on four separate occasions. 18

Canterbury Cathedral, Landscape Design Competition, EOI, July 2013

BARE, LEANING & BARE Formed in 1904, Bare, Leaning & Bare is the direct forerunner of the current practice which comprised three partners with offices in Bath and Exeter. In April 2008, we joined five other practices forming Synergy Construction and Property Consultants LLP but continue to operate as historic building specialists with the same staff. We undertake all conventional Quantity Surveying activities for all types of construction across the United Kingdom and occasionally overseas. We have developed a particular expertise and skill in repair and alteration work to historic and architecturally important buildings to conserve them, give them a new use or introduce the comforts of 21st century life. Our knowledge of traditional crafts and classical architectural features is invaluable for our projects’ success. Many of our projects are eligible for grant aid from English Heritage, Cadw, the Heritage Lottery Fund, the EEC, the Churches Conservation Trust, the Getty Trust, the Garfield Weston Trust and the Listed Places of Worship Scheme. We are often involved in preparing additional schedules and valuations for grant aid applications and subsequent submissions for draw down of grants as the work proceeds. We can advise on a project’s liability for VAT and identify elements that can be zero-rated under current Customs & Excise rules, showing the financial implications at all stages of the project. Where repair projects require the expertise of conservators, we apply our principles to preparing tender documentation and controlling postcontract costs for these specialist firms. Clients benefit from our experience in preparing programmes that allow time for quality repairs while maximising. We also prepare budgets for work being undertaken by directly employed labour, advise on associated material costs and prepare sub-contract packages of work to be carried out in conjunction with the client’s workforce.


ANNE FLETCHER // FLETCHER TECKMAN CONSULTING LTD With over 20 years’ experience of offering expert advice and support in the field of heritage interpretation, we specialise in creating entertaining and educational interpretation at heritage sites. We have developed visitor experiences at some of the most visited sites in the country, understanding how to appeal to a wide range of visitors, cope with large visitor numbers and all without compromising on authenticity or accuracy. Our excellent working relationships with the UK’s leading interpretative designers means we can draw on their skills as required by the project. We also have strong relationships with conservation architects, researchers, audience developers, marketing professionals and volunteer trainers, all of which may be added to our team if the brief requires it. We have won Interpret Britain Awards and Design Week Awards for our work. We have a proven track record of success with HLF bids, including those for York Minster, Rochester Cathedral, St Martin-in the Fields and Lambeth Palace. Our work has won Interpret Britain Awards and Design Week Awards. Our extensive expertise lies in: • interpretative planning and in developing concepts for visitor experiences that are based on a thorough analysis of market research and audience development profiles, consultations with potential users and interviews with staff and volunteers. • interpreting listed buildings and sensitive heritage sites, particularly cathedrals. We have a thorough understanding of the delicate interface between interpretation and the presentation and conservation of the building and of the necessary consents that lie behind including FAC and CFCE. • developing and implementing interpretative projects and interactive interpretative events including graphic panels, multi media (and audio guides), costumed guides, guide books, and object-based exhibitions.

• producing briefs, commissioning and managing designers and contractors, running budgets and overseeing the creation of concept developments for all RIBA stages. • project management, particularly in an Ecclesiastical setting. We have developed and implemented interpretation on behalf of Dean and Chapter at St Paul’s Cathedral, Rochester Cathedral, St Martin-in-the Fields and also for the Archbishop of Canterbury at Lambeth Palace. In all of these projects we were a part of the client team, advising and working collaboratively with cathedral or church colleagues. We are used to developing budgets and work packages as well as drawing up timetables and milestones for interpretation to sit within wider project timescales. • content development and interpretative layering, working with colleagues in learning, audience development and activity planning to ensure that key stories, message hierarchies and object selection is consistent throughout the interpretative design. All of our HLF projects have focussed on broadening and deepening engagement through interpretation and on increasing visitor numbers from under-represented groups including those with disabilities. This has been facilitated by ongoing consultation with existing and potential audiences. • visitor management and orientation. We have developed wayfinding schemes, orientation, visitor centres and advised on ticketting and other visitor facilities. We are currently consulting with the National Trust on improving the experience offered to visitors.

19


Gary Newton // stone mason kent Arup is a global firm providing engineering design, planning and project management services in all areas of the built environment. We aim to help our clients meet their business needs by adding value through technical excellence, efficient organisation and personal service. We provide the engineering and related consultancy services necessary for every stage of a project, from inception to completion and after. These are available to clients singly or in combination, to suit their particular circumstance. Throughout the world we provide a consistently excellent multi-disciplinary service, which also incorporates our concern for the environment. Arup is committed to sustainable design, to its increasing incorporation in our projects and to industrywide sustainability initiatives. Formed in 1946, the firm has over 10,000 staff working in more than 90 offices in over 30 countries and our projects have taken us to more than 160 countries. The firm, which is wholly owned in trust for the benefit of its employees, enjoys total financial independence and has an annual turnover in excess of £700 million. All profits, after provision for prudent reserves, are distributed to the staff. A substantial proportion of the firm’s income is devoted to improving its technical standards through the continuing professional development of its members and by developing new techniques of engineering design and management.

20

Great importance is placed in individual and local responsibility, which is reflected in the management of the firm. Policy is developed by the Group Board who are advised by four geographically-focused operational boards and three sectorfocused strategic boards. Operational decisions are in the hands of approximately 80 operating groups, which vary in size from a dozen to 200 or more, and which represent specific areas of technical or geographic activity. Each group is responsible to one of four regional boards, and these in turn report to the Group Board. Each project is the responsibility of a Project Director who has access to specialist skills within the firm, whether those skills are in the project office or elsewhere. We work in multi-disciplinary teams to ensure co-ordination between the disciplines. We operate formal quality management systems, routinely reviewing and auditing our work. We structure our project teams to achieve clear lines of responsibility and communication with the client and other consultants. By these measures, we add value to our clients’ projects and achieve quality on which they can rely.

Canterbury Cathedral, Landscape Design Competition, EOI, July 2013

As a Building Engineer with over 20 years practical experience in the heritage stone industry, Gary and his small team are able to offer a unique range of design and technical skills. Underpinning Gary’s work are the problem-solving skills of a designer, combined with 20 years experience as a practicing craftsman. Work ranges from small-scale design and carving work for memorials in stone and wood to the restoration of marble chimneypieces with painstaking research, attention to detail and the use of genuine, authentic materials. Gary offers a comprehensive and sensitive approach to the repair, restoration and conservation of all types of stonework.


Process Stratigraphy

5. Our aim is to provide a rich experiential environment that engages and inspires, and reveals the Cathedral’s rich past and exciting future to each and every visitor.

4. Within this orientation device we will place various spatial and material propositions inspired by the site’s social, cultural, religious and geographical context.

3. We will take elements from this drawing to provide a means for orientation, both for us as designers and for the visitor.

2. Prior Wibert’s Waterworks Drawing of c. 1165 is one fruit of our extensive historic research.

1. Purcell’s rigorous knowledge of the Cathedral and its Close provides a solid base against which the team can test new ideas and fresh approaches.

21


Asking, Looking, Playing, Making Published in 1999, Asking Looking Playing Making is a design methodology that underpins all of Tonkin Liu’s projects, from public art, public space, to architectural projects. The process yields archetypal stories, specific to each project, that can be simply told and create a memorable experience.

1. Asking

3. Playing

What is it? A threshold between the gate and the Cathedral

Invent it turn the Cathedral inside out

What was it? The end and the beginning of a very long journey

Identify it rarefied objects and skills

What could it be? Inscribed Ground of stories Canterbury Cathedral’s Precinct is witness to countless epic journeys of faith. Can an Inscribed Ground, articulated and sloping, slow down the feet and tell these stories?

Intensify it Craftsmen’s Close and Cathedral’s Forecourt

2. Looking It is a vessel of collective memory

Canterbury Cathedral contains a wealth of artisans and artefacts. Can a Craftsmen’s Close showcase glaziers, stonemasons, and everyday objects, to tell their stories?

4. Making

It was a vision in pilgrims’ dreams

Convey it rhythm of construction expresses movements and activities

It could be Pilgrims’ Gardens of Contemplation Rome, Iona, and Santiago, are spaces of grand devotion.

Control it multiple materials in an unified whole

Can a series of Pilgrims’ Gardens in the Precinct evoke rich colours, sound, smells, from these distant places?

Footsteps to the Cathedral A gentle ramp with broad steps, scaled to pilgrims’ feet and increasing in scale as they approach the Cathedral A legible route from the Christchurch Gate through the South Porch and into the Cathedral A water course that follows the people’s journey to the entrance and refreshes the senses A stone ground that is inscribed and activated with textured paving, inlaid interpretation, craftsmen’s drawings, articulating rhythm and time

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Canterbury Cathedral, Landscape Design Competition, EOI, July 2013

Complete it a timeless story built with countless hands We would like to create a landscape of permanence and expressiveness, crafted in intimate, hand-scaled pieces, creating an experience that is both personal and collective.


Making the silent wall speak of what it has seen A living museum on the ground, revealing the living heritage of the Cathedral. Like an advent calendar the ground hosts windows that exhibit back of house craft, mirroring apertures on the low buildings. An educational marketplace, displaying rarefied skills and everyday objects A Craftsmen’s Close, showcasing, at scheduled times, glaziers and stonemasons’ at work. Facades of the low buildings could be greened with climbers growing up out of the ground.

The Cathedral Reaches Out A Forecourt that interprets and inspires A landscape created by bringing stories of the Cathedral out into the light A Resting Mound shields the Forecourt from the exit corridor, improving way-finding and referencing the old burial mound A field of history and contemplation

Pilgrims Gardens A landscape of vignettes from Rome, Santiago, and Iona. Sensuous gardens of delight replace the cars and the road with plants A place to sit and refresh in the shade of exotic plants Plants with rich colours, sound, textures evoke connection to distant places Perimeter historic Close Wall reinstated and forms a backdrop to the gardens

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3.0 relevant experience The following Purcell projects have particular aspects and challenges which are relevant to the Canterbury Cathedral landscape design, which include: •

• •

• • • •

Creating strong connections between urgent fabric conservation and the interpretative story for the place Skilfully balancing the sacred heritage of the place with its modern purpose Producing exemplary, original and sustainable design, relating to the high-quality historic setting Improving facilities to enhance the experience of visitors and users alike Improving physical and interpretative access to the place Ensuring that the needs of both client and its community are met Strengthening links between the place and the wider community

Client: Dean & Chapter of Wells Cathedral Contact name: The Very Reverend John Clarke - Dean Email: None. Phone: 01749 674483 Completed: October 2008 Anticipated & final budget: £7m Anticipated & final project duration: 9 years Award: Somerset Building Award for the Friends’ Building, Wells Cathedral 2008

WELL’S CATHEDRAL // SOMERSET Purcell

Critical evaluation of the 3-dimensional form of the cloistral buildings and open spaces guided proposals for new intervention

Wells Cathedral is a complex, busy and much-visited place. Purcell prepared a masterplan for the building and its precincts to reconcile competing objectives to enhance the Cathedral’s daily mission, provide facilities for its departments, increase visitor access and improve welcome facilities. Following detailed negotiation with the Local Authority, the CFCE and EH, we gained approval for four new buildings within the heart of the historic precinct. The awardwinning buildings have enhanced the daily life of the Cathedral, rationalising its spaces to improve visitor experience. Working within a historic context Understanding the typical patterns of buildings in the locality, together with the opportunity lent by the existing cathedral and precincts buildings, informed the arrangement of the new buildings and how they connected with existing features. This ensured new buildings made a positive contribution to, and enhanced the setting of the listed buildings. Working with key stakeholders Consultation with the local and national bodies was critical to the design development process and our understanding of Wells enabled us to win collective community, consultative and approving body support. Those with Left: A new point of arrival to the south of the Great West Front sits sympathetically within the character of its surroundings.

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Canterbury Cathedral, Landscape Design Competition, EOI, July 2013

specialist site and buildings knowledge were consulted to help develop a clear and viable design strategy. Working closely with the archaeologists led to design opportunities. Design solution We strategically resolved existing complex spatial issues in a single plan:: • A new accessible visitor circulation route seamlessly flows, enabling the visitor to enjoy all the spaces and facilities of the cathedral and precinct without compromising the ambience and character of the Cathedral Church. • Intrusive interventions within the cloisters were removed to reveal their splendour and use as circulatory walks. • The disruptive visitor reception in the nave was relocated. • An appropriate palate of materials for the new buildings was selected by studying the hierarchy of building material use of the site and the city of Wells A subtle detailing provides an evident contemporary character to ensure the new buildings take their place in the long history of development at Wells Cathedral. Maximising value for client & end users We looked carefully at townscape issues and understood the views and flows of people to best position the new visitor entrances and exits..We also allowed previously inaccessible areas, such as the magnificent octagonal Chapter House Undercroft, to be opened to visitors for the first time.


south churchyard, st paul’s Cathedral London Purcell

The form of the medieval chapter house in its surrounding cloister is represented through the paving layout and low walls. Inserts of contrasting purbeck limestone in the tops of the low walls describes the masonry footprint of the pre-fire cloister

Purcell identified opportunities and carried out improvements to make the entry to St Paul’s Cathedral a more interesting and meaningful one for all visitors. The project • Provided appropriate access for mobility impaired visitors to the only entry point to the cathedral at ground level. • Enclosed the churchyard,re-erecting of the original railings from the Wren period. • Provided a gathering area that is secluded from the heavily trafficked roadway for visitors approaching the Cathedral from the south • Removing trees from close to the walls of the cathedral. Approach The proposals were greatly informed by the important archaeology that lies beneath the south churchyard; the archaeological evaluation and conservation plan, and consultation with architectural historians have underpinned proposals. The works preserve what limited archaeology remains of the pre-fire masonry, by proper protection beneath the ground. Exposing the original cloister walk would have resulted in a much lower ground level that previously existed, preventing a level approach to

the accessible door. By creating a new higher level, gentle slopes provide a more appropriate route for disabled visitors. Maximising value for client & end users The archaeological remains tell an important story about the continuing presence of the cathedral on this site, and of the devastation caused by the Great Fire of 1666. Re-enclosing the churchyard presented the opportunity to expound this story to visitors by displaying the form of the medieval Chapter House in its surrounding cloister through the paving layout.. Design solution Careful consideration was given as to which stone to use. The excavation carried out preceding this project revealed that the paving of the cloister was in Purbeck marble, which was not used in our due to its poor weathering characteristics. Alternatively the new cloister paving uses blue Purbeck Feather,the closest match available to the original. The remainder of the new paved areas use pale Purbeck Whetson. The cloister wall and buttresses use Purbeck Whetson for the upstand, Purbeck Thornback for the cap, which is inlaid with Purbeck Grubb. Portland Basebed stone is used to create seating areas, which reinforce the other side of the medieval cloister walk

Client: The Dean & Chapter of St. Paul’s Cathedral Contact name: The Registrar Nicholas Cottam CB OBE Email: registrar@stpaulscathedral.org.uk Phone: 0207 246 8312 Completed: 2008 Anticipated & final budget: £1.3m Anticipated & final project duration: 3 years Awards Natural Stone Award for Landscaping 2008 The stone sizes and joint widths were designed to reflect the historic character and archaeology of the associated spaces. The area of existing Purbeck paving opposite to the Dean’s Door was retained in situ and careful conservation repairs were carried out to form an accessible level surface. To aid the interpretation of the stonework in the churchyard, an inlaid stone plaque was commissioned from Richard Kindersley showing the differing and overlapping alignments of the pre-fire and present day Cathedrals.

Inlaid stone interpretation showing the differing & overlapping alignments of the pre-fire & present day cathedrals 25


arnos vale cemetery // bristol Purcell

Arnos Vale is one of Britain’s most important and beautiful early 19th century cemeteries. The site was abandoned in the1990s, by which time, its monuments, five Grade II* listed cemetery buildings and Arcadian landscape were derelict. Purcell undertook a £5m scheme of repairs, adaptations and landscaping improvements to bring the cemetery back into use. Design solution Our ambitious scheme emerged from a sensitive response to context and sense of place and allows the cemetery to retain its romantic, overgrown charm. Sensitive conservation work and judicious modern interventions re-enlived the place. Maximising value for client and end usersWhen it’s private owner locked the gates and walked away, the Cemetery was the centre of major public concern, highlighted by a petition with over 20,000 names.We identified future use for the cemetery and its listed buildings to be implemented at the least cost to ratepayers. Over two years we ran monthly consultation groups with local community members to discuss the progress of our studies, research into solutions to similar 26

issues seen elsewhere, and to review options for the site’s future use. These culminated in a public exhibition held at the cemetery. We brought both sides together on an informal coach trip to see how other cemeteries operated successfully, which lead to an “in principle” agreement between the council and the community representatives on how to proceed under a joint development agreement. Delivery and funding We steered proposals to establish a charitable trust to take responsibility for the cemetery and its conservation and use, and form a partnership arrangement with the Council. This achieved maximum community engagement and reduced actual running costs, allowing the best access to capital grants from other sources and assuring the funders that the Council would underpin the project. The project was awarded a major HLF grant of £4.8 million for the conservation and construction works. Other funding and resources totalling £9m were sourced for ongoing maintenance, including free labour offered by skilled volunteers

Canterbury Cathedral, Landscape Design Competition, EOI, July 2013

Above left: Over 2 years we worked with the local community to discuss what options were available for the future use of the site.. Above: Within the cemetery itself, we have restored the Grade II* listed Chattri tomb of Rajah Rammohun Roy, an important Indian reformer.

Client: Bristol City Council and Arnos Vale Cemetery Trust Contact name: Richard Goldthorpe Email: Richard.Goldthorpe@bristol. gov.uk Phone: 0117 922 4647 Completed: 2010 Anticipated & final budget: £5m Anticipated & final project duration: This was an unusual and unique project due to the long consultation period. There was no anticipated duration at the outset, but its completion was achieved 11 years later. Awards: • Landscape Institute Award for Heritage and Conservation 2010 • Bristol Civic Society Environmental Award 2010 • RIBA South West Town and Country Design Awards 2010


three waves, dover esplanade regeneration // London tonkin liu

Left: The Esplanade harnesses the architectural language of Dover’s identity; the gentle nautre of waves on the sheltered beach. Above: The Resting Wave runs the length of the Esplanade providing bays with sheltered seating.

Relevance to the Canterbury Cathedral landscape design project The Dover Esplanade was an important amenity for residents but was difficult to access, lacked a sense of place and failed to make an attraction of the seafront. The brief was to develop the area into a major attraction, a place to see and be seen, could as a key setting for creative activities, temporary and permanent. Similarly the landscaping for the Canterbury Precincts should befit its unique heritage, reinforcing its sense of place, and making a vital community space as well as an international attraction for generations to come. Approach The project was conceived as three artworks grown out of their social and environmental context. The Esplanade harnesses the architectural language of Dover’s identity; the gentle nature of waves on the sheltered beach, the rhythmical sweep of the Georgian Seafront Terrace and the undulating topography of the White Cliffs of Dover. Design solution The metaphorical ‘waves’ have turned the Esplanade into a major attraction, provided pedestrian connectivity and commercial amenities, and regenerated vacant ground floor spaces along the esplanade. The Lifting Wave is a repeated formation of ramps and staircases made of precast white concrete that rise and fall to connect the Esplanade to the lower shingle beach. Layered miniature steps are arrayed like a fan of cards to create a lightcatching textured surface.

The Resting Wave is a retaining wall along the Esplanade, providing bays of sheltered seating . The shifting system of precast white concrete blocks tilt back and forth in convex and concave forms, creating a textured surface referencing the sedimentary strata layers of the White Cliffs. The Lighting Wave is a line of white columns with artwork that complements the sweeping form of the sea wall. Along the Esplanade the columns rise and fall like the froth on the bubbling crest of a wave. At night he interactive low-energy LED lights create a dynamic wave movement, bringing a sense of delight to the seafront. Maximising value for client & end users Tonkin Liu invented a formwork system for the Resting Wave, to minimise the cost and waste of mould materials and maximise the diversity of social spaces. The Resting Wave’s undulating raised lawns’ form follow the curving line of the wall providing a setting for picnics, with trees bringing seasonal colour and shelter from the sun. We used advanced digital technology to maximise material and energy efficiency, during fabrication process and in its wholelife costs. Challenges The project took less than a year, which was only possible with a committed and informed client, design, and delivery team. The construction was fast-tracked by commencing the main works while the three wave artworks were fabricated

in specialist artisan sub-contractors’ workshops. This ensured both speed and quality.. Longevity The diversity and scale of the bays in the Resting Wave were formed by observing the existing and potential user groups. The Lifting Wave creates shingle gardens that bring local identity, educational interest and reinforce the shingles that are continually moving and changing in configuration. Dover Arts Development and Tonkin Liu organised a community planting event where 50 volunteers planted 1400 plug plants in the shingle gardens. Dover residents have become the guardians of these shingle plants, which will in a few years look as if they’d always been there, bringing Dover Esplanade its own life and an ever stronger sense of place.

Client: Kent County Council, Sea Change, CABE, Dover Harbour Board, Dover District Council Contact name: Dave Hughes Email: Dave.Hughes@kent.gov.uk Phone: 01622 221362 Completed: August 2010 Anticipated & final budget: £2m Anticipated & final project duration: 18 months Awards: • RIBA Award • Pre-Cast Creativity in Concrete Award • Sustain Award finalist 27


singing ringing tree // burnley tonkin liu

Relevance to Canterbury Cathedral The architectural competition brief asked for “all-seeing” structures that provided a landmark and a shelter: a place from which the public can enjoy the landscape, to be located on a number of derelict, high-point sites for the regeneration of the Lancashire Regional Park. Finding a simple, memorable story for the landscape within the Cathedral Close at Canterbury is key to sustaining the project through the complexities of its delivery to its enjoyment by people in generations to come. Approach Wind is the primary characteristic of the site and we celebrate it by transforming it into sound. From Burnley the tree’s profile is visible on the hilltop, appearing and disappearing in the mist. As the wind blows the tree begins to sing. Stories of its song pass from mouth to ear. In cars and on foot people make their way from

the city and up the hill. Journeys are made to hear the wind make music with the Singing Ringing Tree. Maximising value for client & end users The Singing Ringing Tree has been embraced by Burnley as part of its identity, attracting many visitors to the beautiful landscape of Lancashire. The tremendous impact of a tiny project has been gauged by the 3,000,000 YouTube visits of the film about the project. Budget & Quality The tree was prefabricated in South London under careful budget and quality control enabling the continual refinement of details by the architect, the engineers, and the fabricators. Mild steel comes in a variety of sizes with walls of variable thickness and can be relatively cheaply welded. This gave us the variability to develop the structure and sound. The steel was galvanised to prevent rusting, reflecting the changing colour of the sky.

Client: Mid-Pennine Arts Contact name: Helen Jones Email: HJones@burnley.gov.uk Phone: 01282 425 011 Completed: December 2006 Anticipated & final budget: £70,000 Anticipated & final project duration: 18 months Awards: • RIBA Award • Stirling Prize long list • Structural Steel Design Awardsinging • Hot-Dip Galvanising Award Design solution The tree is constructed of stacked pipes of varying lengths. Each layer differs from the next by 15 degrees to respond to the changing wind directions. As the wind passes different length pipes in different layers it plays different chords. The design was a journey of discovery involving Burnley’s school children at various points during the process. A flag-flying contest was hosted to determine the height required for visibility from the town centre, story-writing contests were held for stories about the tree, and mock-ups, made in grey plastic plumbing pipes, were made in different lengths and tested with school children, holding them against the wind and with different flute attachments, holes, slots, at various angles.

glowing orchard // kingston ancient market place tonkin liu Relevance to Canterbury Cathedral envisioned the development of a longThe Ancient Market Place, situated between three areas: Kingston’s day-time shopping streets, the night-time river-side restaurant areas, and the cultural hub of the new Rose Theatre, is cut off from all three. It is difficult to attract visitors to an undefined space with little evening activity. Being centrally located in Kingston, and having a strong character grown out of the market stalls, the place has potential to become a key attraction, reinstating its role as the heart of Kingston. Overall Design Coherence The design process has had close participation with a complex client team. This client-design team have steered the delivery of the Ancient Market Place and

term overall strategy for Kingston Town Centre. Tonkin Liu produced concept designs for four areas with cohesive characters using the rich spirit of place, history and culture, the design intends to make the Ancient Market Place into an artistic cultural attraction in its own right, focusing on education, recreation, and the community. Client: Royal Borough of Kingstonupon-Thames Contact name: Mark Teasdale Email: mark.teasdale@rbk.kingston.gov.uk Phone: 020 8547 5996 Completed: Construction begins October 2013 Anticipated budget: £70,000


4.0 press information

Purcell, who has a long association with Canterbury Cathedral and its Close, has collaborated with Tonkin Liu to prepare a successful Stage 1 submission for the Cathedral’s landscape design competition, founded on an inspired response to special qualities of the place. Their support team of experts comprises interpretation consultant Anne Fletcher, quantity surveyor Synergy - Bare Leaning and Bare, multidisciplinary engineer Arup and stonemason Gary Newton. The team’s unique approach to the project is anchored in an understanding of the context and its significance overlaid by Tonkin Liu's design methodology 'Asking Looking Playing Making'. Their observations - which may become propositions in the next stage of the competition - are rich in metaphor yet grounded by materiality, practical necessity and sustainability. Emergent from the team's initial design workshop are a series of vignettes which seek to capture the experiential quality of the journey to the Cathedral by evoking its historical, religious and geographical context. Clockwise from top right: Vignette example from competition bid; Purcell’s work on the South Churchyard at St Paul’s Cathedral won a Natural Stone Award; Tonkin Liu’s multi-award winning Singing RingingTree in Burnley..

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