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margate winter 2016 - 2017

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MERCURY

Modern-day Seaside Stories

FREE

margate fashion

winter map

behind the curtain

the G-Word

Meet the people helping to put Margate on the fashion map

Our guide to where to eat, drink and be entertained in Margate this winter

From playhouse to bingo club, discover the fascinating past of Margate’s Theatre Royal

Get involved in our gentrification debate


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Margate Mercury

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The Hotlist – The coolest, in-theknow events this winter

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Winter News – The best openings and happenings this season

W E L co m e to our winter issue

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Eggy Dave Encounters – A local’s tips on how to survive a winter in Margate

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Sew Good – We meet the people helping to put Margate on the fashion map

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Wrapping Up Warm for the Cold Sea Breeze – Sam from Samzine interviews Margate locals to get their winter fashion tips

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The G-Word – What people really think about Margate and gentrification

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A Constantly Changing Scene – From Georgian playhouse to wrestling venue and social club, we delve into the history of Margate’s Theatre Royal

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Wonder Wall – Margate wallpaper designers Tracy Kendall and Erica Wakerly invite us into their studios

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The Winter Map – Our definitive guide to where to eat, drink and be pampered and entertained in Margate this winter Meg Reviews – Meg’s favourite places to eat and indulge this winter

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The Gift List – Our pick of the best Margate gifts for Christmas and Valentine’s Day for him, her - or even your dog

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Love Poster by Jacob Love – Pin it, post it, share it. This world needs more love

From the Editor Clare Freeman

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The V-Day Top Ten – Love it? Loathe it? Rachel Bell gives her top tips for how to enjoy Valentine’s Day in Margate Feel Marg-vellous – Insider tips from Margate health and beauty practitioners on how to have a great start to 2017

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A Georgian Gem – Architects Helen and Peter show us their Georgian home on Hawley Square

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Desert Island Dates Give Something Back to Margate Classifieds Corner ‘Seagull Comic #1’ by Sam Bristow

Grey Hutton

As someone who hates the cold, I have been bracing myself for the winter in Margate for quite a while now. In fact, I have been so concerned about it, I’ve been compiling a list for the last month or so of indoor, winterappropriate things to do and see. This list has - with the help of Lizzy’s great illustration skills and tips from others - morphed into a handy map (see page 16) which I hope will help you - and I - survive the darkness, windiness and wetness this season. From ping pong to pottery, you may be surprised by how much indoor merriment Margate has to offer. Continuing in this seasonal vein, blogger Meg of Margate picks out her favourite wintery food spots on page 18, and we’ve also compiled a useful gift guide (see page 20) to help you find that perfect Margate Christmas or Valentine’s present. The issue of gentrification has become a hot topic in Margate in recent months, so I decided to interview a few people to get their thoughts on the issue (see page 10). We’d love to hear your views too so please feel free to share your thoughts and carry on the conversation by joining our Facebook discussion group at facebook.com/groups/ thegwordmargate.

@frances_freerunner

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Photography

@meg_sangster

C O N TAC T @margatemercury margatemercury.com info@margatemercury.com Issue Three, Winter 2016 - 2017 (December to February) Founder & Editor : Clare Freeman Design : Lizzy Tweedale Sub-editor : Ros Anderson Intern : Stefanie Maurer Front cover : Erica Wakerly, wallpaper designer by Gabrielle Hall Print : Mortons Print Advertising and distribution enquiries : info@margatemercury.com

It’s been really exciting over the last few months to see our magazine grow and become more widely known (check out more images from our readers below). As you may have noticed, this issue is bigger with 32 pages, and our team has also grown with the addition of a new intern, Stefanie, who joined us in November. I want to say a big thank you to all our advertisers - old and new - who have enabled us to keep producing this magazine. I also want to thank the team and everyone who has donated their time and skills to support us, including (in this issue) Jade Spranklen, Joel Knight, Annie Nichols, Sam Bristow, Max Hetherington and JP Hevey. Myself and the Margate Mercury team wish you a fantastic festive break and a healthy and happy 2017. Clare x

@saisha_daly

@lottiea

CONTRIBUTORS Writers Dave McKenna Erminia Yardley-Hyde Meg Molloy Jan Ryan Twinkle Troughton Rachel Bell Sam Simmons Jo Bridges

Photographers Gabrielle Hall Carl Hyde Joel Knight Jo Bridges Max Hetherington Illustrators Jade Spranklen Sam Bristow

Published by Margate Mercury © All rights reserved Copyright 2016 Margate Mercury


The Hotlist Dec Dreamland Vintage Market The first Dreamland vintage market selling all things kitsch, retro, funky and fun 3 December Midday - 6 pm Dreamland dreamland.co.uk

Magical Margate: A Colourful Christmas A winter wonderland workshop with real snow, rotating trees and a gingerbread village. Also a pop-up makers market (10 am - 6 pm), carols, and a Christmas lights switch on (5 pm) 3 December 10 am - 6 pm Turner Contemporary turnercontemporary.org

Resort Xmas Fair Buy prints, ceramics, unique artworks and more direct from the artists 3 December 11 am - 4 pm Resort Studios resortstudios.co.uk

AC & OMS Present: Gang AA-side Launch with Fuoco support Launch of the brand new AA-side single from soon-to-be Margate residents Gang, an alternative grunge band 9 December 7.30 pm - late Tom Thumb Theatre tomthumbtheatre.co.uk

Festive fun unfit for all the family with performances from Margate’s trashiest drag queens. Free entry 10 December 9 pm - 1 am Oddfellows Club 14 Hawley Street

Andy C in Dreamland

Edward Aczel: Foreign Policy

The godfather of drum ‘n’ bass Andy C plays at Dreamland with Tonn Piper

A show from stand-up anti-comedian Edward Aczel

10 December 9 pm - 2 am Dreamland dreamland.co.uk

10 December 7.30 pm Tom Thumb Theatre tomthumbtheatre.co.uk

Hannah Lees in Conversation Artist Hannah Lees discusses her new commission for Turner Contemporary which explores the history of the Pudding Pan pots discovered along the coast of Thanet which are now part of the British Museum collection 10 December 2.30 pm Turner Contemporary turnercontemporary.org

Elephant Disco

Hannah Holland

A night with Elephant Disco: dancefloorstomping music combining Electronica, Afro Caribbean and African influences

A night of Baleric, disco and loft style classics from international DJ, producer and record label owner - and new Margate resident Hannah Holland

3 December 7 pm - 2 am Margate Arts Club facebook.com/ margateartsclub

Flashy Christmas!

10 December 7 pm - 2 am Margate Arts Club facebook.com/ margateartsclub

For up-to-date information on events this season please visit our online calendar at: margatemercury.com/#events-calendar

‘Afternoon Tea with Ada’ by Filigree Mask Theatre Company Afternoon cream tea followed by a performance of a new play by Denise Gow which sympathetically chronicles the life of Ada Lovelace, the earliest computer network visionary, through her lifelong friendship with Charles Dickens 11 December 4.30 pm Walpole Bay Hotel Tickets available via Walpole Bay Hotel 01843 221703 walpolebayhotel.co.uk

Margate Wassail Supper Club A multisensory dining experience from chef India Hamilton and Kit Records with music, magical ingredients and seasonal food 17 December 7.30 pm - 9.30 pm Margate Arts Club facebook.com/ margateartsclub

Art’s Cool and Smugglers Records Christmas Weekender Christmas party with bands, DJs, vintage clothing stalls and a raffle, with all proceeds going to Oasis Domestic Abuse Services refuge 17 & 18 December Midday to Midnight The Talking Drum facebook.com/ artscoolclubnight

A Swedish Christmas Feast A traditional Swedish Christmas feast taking place over four consecutive nights, hosted by two Swedish cafés - Mala Kaffe and Cooper & Wolf 17 - 20 December 7 - 11 pm 38 Fort Hill facebook.com/malakaffe

Christmas Market A carefully-curated Christmas market with Margate’s finest makers, artists, designers and crafts people, including Rebecca Gladstone Jewellery, Sprankenstein and Kit Records 18 December 11 am - 5 pm Margate Arts Club facebook.com/ margateartsclub

Moshi Moshi Presents CRIMBO A quiz followed by a disco 21 December 7 pm - 1 am Oddfellows Club facebook.com/ moshimoshimusic

Jan Kaffe Matthews talk Short introduction and film by Kaffe Matthews, an electro-acoustic musician, followed by her performance of Love Shark, a piece based upon underwater recordings and footage of hammerhead sharks 8 January 2.30 pm - 4.30 pm Turner Contemporary turnercontemporary.org

The Vanishing Man The story of Edwardian magician Hugo Cedar who created the greatest magic trick ever performed and then disappeared 21 January 7.30 pm Theatre Royal theatreroyalmargate.com

Feb Cool, Fun and Uncomplicated

Tintype Portrait Studio with Rob Ball

A new night from Sam Bristow (Kit Club / NTS) with new artists, dancing and fun

Watch photographer Rob Ball using one of the earliest photographic processes, tintype, which involves creating a direct positive image on metal

4 February 7 pm - 2 am Margate Arts Club facebook.com/ margateartsclub

Geek

14 January 11 am - 5 pm Turner Contemporary turnercontemporary.org

A festival of play and games with challenges, talks, workshops and hundreds of games

The Simon & Garfunkel Story

17 - 19 February 11 am - 6 pm Dreamland dreamland.co.uk

A London West End hit theatre show comes to Margate for one night only with huge projection photos, original film footage and a full live band 20 January 7.30 pm Theatre Royal theatreroyalmargate.com

Jump Start Yoga workshops An afternoon of yoga to kick-start your energy for 2017 with Mounira Almenoar and local Margate yoga teachers 21 January 1 pm - 6 pm Cliffs facebook.com/ YogaHealthWellness

Topophobia A collection of artists using a range of practices and mediums including performance, sound, film and dance 25 February 7 pm - 2 am Margate Arts Club facebook.com/ margateartsclub

David Holmes A charity event with a four-hour DJ set from film score legend David Holmes 25 February 7 pm Ramsgate Music Hall ramsgatemusichall.com


Margate Mercury

winter N ews & o p enin g s Writer

Clare Freeman

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he days of wind, darkness and wooly hats are upon us, which gives us a great excuse to stay indoors and enjoy Margate’s many culinary offerings. If you’re a fan of cheese, two of my favourite places in town have delightfully cheesy offerings every Monday: two-for-one cheese toasties at Cheesy Tiger (facebook.com/ cheesytigermargate) and a free glass of wine in return for bringing your own cheese at Urchin Wines’ weekly ‘Chunk of Cheese’ night (urchinwines.com), on until the end of December. For breakfast, Cliffs - a must-visit café / record store / yoga studio on Northdown Road - is launching

a dose of margate life from a local with an egg-shaped head Writer

Dave McKenna

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Illustration

Jade Spranklen

he sun may have finally set on the summer. Goodbye to Looking Round Corners at Turner Contemporary, and to looking round corners in Margate - to be greeted with tourists, performers, dancers, and fashionable sorts all merry, sun-soaked and in agreement in their admiration of our affable little town. It’s actually getting a bit sickening, all this positivity, isn’t it?

winter news

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a breakfast and brunch menu in December with porridge, sandwiches and salads (cliffsmargate.com) or head to The Bus Café at weekends for their ‘Hashed Mounds’ breakfast or their new ‘Saucy Balls’ winter menu of falafal balls with soup or a salad (thebuscafe. co.uk). To help you find the perfect Christmas present, two markets on 3 December are here to help; Dreamland’s Vintage Market with kitsch, retro and funky items (dreamland. co.uk), and Turner Contemporary’s Pop Up Makers Market (turnercontemporary.org). There’s also a month-long Christmas Pop Up at Margate Arts Club in December, on two to three days per week until 23 December, with mulled wine, mince pies and lovely bespoke gifts from independent Margate makers (facebook.com/margateartsclub). To keep you entertained during the chilly winter months, head to 101 Social Club on Northdown Road - opening on 20 December - for film screenings, vegetarian food, talks and parties (facebook.com/101socialclub), or to the new Marine Studios Society, an evening activity club for adults in Margate (facebook.com/ TheMarineStudiosSociety). Or if you like colouring in (it’s definitely not just for kids anymore) Margate Art in the Old Town is launching a new activity in December, ‘Colour Your Own Margate’ in which you can visit the store to colour-in pictures of Margate anytime

at weekends between 1 and 4 pm (margateart. uk). As we head into 2017, keep an eye out for Plinth’s new pop-up art shows and live events - launching in January - which will replace its permanent shop that closes at the end of this year (plinthspace.com). Or head to Urchin Wines’ new permanent wine shop and bar on Northdown Road, open every evening until 10 pm from 3 February (urchinwines. com), or the new Vietnamese restaurant I hear is opening in the former Kalli’s restaurant at Marine Gardens in February. Finally, for those who want a healthy and warm start to the new year, Hotpod Yoga will be launching on 7 January with hot yoga inside a dimly-lit inflatable cocoon-like pod (facebook.com/ hotpodyogamargate). See you there.

With that in mind, let’s have a bit of doom and gloom for a change. To quote a particularly murderous TV show and many a ‘unfunny’ meme ‘WINTER IS COMING’. I understand that it may be the first winter on the Isle of Thanet for many of you reading this. “Oh fab. How recently did you move down darling?” is a question which seems to be compulsory at any art event which has taken place here in the last year. I was a mere pre-pubescent thirteen year-old boy when I was first exposed to winter on the, then, sombre out-of-season shores of Margate. This puts me in ample stead, dear reader, to shed light on Margate’s winter joys and give you a few pointers on how to survive it. Firstly, resist the temptation to get that oneway ticket back to London. Sure, in London you’ll have hustle and bustle, nightclubs, and even shops that are open on Mondays and past five o’clock. However, what the capital can’t offer is battering winds so brutal that there’s no need for botox. That’s just one of the many free thrills to enjoy this winter. Of course it’s dark, early. It’s cold, always. To describe the coming months as “utterly unbearable and morbidly miserable” wouldn’t be an exaggeration. Thankfully though, ‘wet’ isn’t a word you have to associate with winter

here. That’s because Thanet - the former Roman island of Tanatos, meaning ‘Bright Island’ - has a micro-climate which boasts very little rainfall compared to rival seaside towns. Hence the old Thanet farmer who used to say “when England wrings, the island sings.” These days, there’s still plenty of singing to be enjoyed in Margate to help warm up those cold nights. Jazz nights at the Sands Hotel - if you can afford such luxury - are said to be blissful. The Lifeboat offers fine folk music from local and up-and-coming bands. But if you fancy a sing-a-long yourself head to karaoke at Sheldons on a Thursday night. It’s usually filled with a melange of locals - who belt out songs with assured experience - and overseas language students who stretch their limited vocabulary and fluency to stutter through the big ballads. The atmosphere and audience is positive and welcoming, turning the whole thing into a surreal kind of pissed-up Eurovision Song Contest. Plus if you want to converse with a European one last time before article 50 is triggered then this is a fantastic way to do so.

Hotpod Yoga

“To describe the coming months as utterly unbearable and morbidly miserable wouldn’t be an exaggeration”


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Margate Mercury

fashion

SEW GOOD Writer

Erminia Yardley-Hyde

E M RY S P L A N T

crowther/plant Our Margate fashion tour’s first stop is the co-working space and creative hub Resort Studios in Cliftonville. Emrys Plant, one half of the menswear label Crowther/Plant, opens the main door and takes us up to their studio. It’s small, but with a creative vibe that permeates the entire room. There are pieces of clothing hanging from the racks and a large table where Emrys shows us some of Crowther/Plant’s work. Both Emrys and Cat (Crowther) are from an art, design and fashion background, with Cat being the ‘brains of the operation’. “The process is who we are,” Emrys says, a fact important to understanding the Crowther/Plant ethos. They work with organic cotton and are passionate about sustainability principles. “Cotton is the biggest polluter, so we ought to be doing something about it,” Emrys explains.

Crowther/Plant’s style is androgynous and their collection is growing fast as well as their inspiration. We discuss what ‘fashion’ is for Crowther/Plant and it becomes clear that it’s not all about the aesthetic. Instead their credo is that “clothing is a wonderful expression of self. The world doesn’t need another t-shirt, but what it does need is clothing produced in a sustainable manner,” Emrys says. “It has to have a positive impact on people and the planet.” With this in mind Cat has learnt how to indigo-dye (so that there are no nasty chemicals in the process) and the duo display an instinctive willingness to re-use and recycle (they also take on any reclaimed material, like leather for example). This is designing with a conscience at its best. crowtherplant.com

DEBORAH ELLIS

MADAM POPOFF VINTAGE It goes without saying that Madam Popoff Vintage is a must-stop when visiting Margate, not least because its glamorous owner and stylist Deborah Ellis is fun and entertaining to talk with. Her backstory is a hard one: from a poor background, since childhood, and also when she became a mother herself, she found herself visiting jumble sales and charity shops to make do and to feed her ‘fashion habit’. This turned out to be life-changing: Deborah sold her first item on eBay at a friend’s suggestion, and thirteen years later she is the proud owner of one of Margate’s most beautifully-stocked vintage clothing stores. As Deborah’s reputation has grown she no

longer has to search jumble sales to source material. Instead, people come to her to sell their vintage items. She says that she doesn’t like being dictated to by the high street, preferring an eclectic mix of old and new, a firm believer in the ‘language of clothes’ and that what you wear says a lot about you. A fan of the thirties and vintage underwear, Deborah is keen to expand this side of the business and branch into manufacturing, an exciting prospect for this hard working Margate fashionista. Madam Popoff Vintage is at 4 King Street. madampopoff.com

Photographers

Carl Hyde Max Hetherington

With its natural beauty, affordability and creative community it’s no wonder Margate is becoming a haven for the fashion-conscious entrepreneur, with vintage fashion shops, homegrown fashion labels and boutiques opening across the town. Here Erminia Yardley-Hyde meets the people helping to put Margate on the fashion map


Margate Mercury

fashion

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“With all due respect to Sir Philip Green, they don’t make suits like this anymore”

D AV E W E L L S

just jane vintage Dave Wells greets us in his vintage Aladdin’s Cave that is Just Jane, and straight away we are drawn into a world that spans from 1900 to the 1980s. Owned with his business partner Jane this is one amazing place: there’s not just clothing, but homewares, furniture and toys too. Dave explains that they opened Just Jane only a few years ago, needing to expand from their other shop in the Old Town because “there are so many things that we have stacked away and want to show, but also because we could give more space to certain eras.” Dave used to work in Camden years ago, then an opportunity came up to move to Margate and he took it. On asking him why Margate, Dave simply replies “it’s the vibe!” He has a true passion for the place and he speaks enthusiastically about the Old Town’s independence and the real sense of revitalization. The idea of ‘fashion’ is not something that interests Dave; for him, fashion is wearing something comfortable - creating rather than following trends. There are so many interesting pieces in the store, but I ask Dave whether he has a favourite item and he directs us toward a fabulous well-preserved 1950s Burton suit. It’s remarkable to see how the quality has endured and how well it was cut. “With all due respect to Sir Philip Green, they don’t make them like this anymore” Dave says. And he’s right. It’s clear that Just Jane Vintage is a million miles away from the throw-away society we are now cocooned in. Just Jane Vintage is at 7 Market Place. facebook.com/JustJaneVintage

LAURENCE CLIF TON

RAT RACE

The fashions of Punks, Mods, Teddy Boys and more can be found all under one roof at Rat Race Margate. Here we meet Laurence Clifton, co-owner - together with his fiancée Bonnie Roswel - of this essential one-stop style shop. Laurence is a proud owner and that shows: Rat Race opened in 2010 and it’s been growing ever since. Laurence says this style of clothing works really well in the town as it references the south coast’s style and history and is also embraced by a new generation who really appreciate it. When asked about why he chose Margate, Laurence’s face lights up as he explains that

it’s a town with some rough edges, but with fantastic people. It’s clear that fashion for him is something more, a way of life. The Rat Race clientele, ranging from 15 to 70 in age, wear the brands every day. It’s clear that Rat Race isn’t just a clothing shop but a place where a truly British style can be kept alive for multiple future generations to appreciate. Rat Race Margate is at 34-36 High Street. ratracemargate.co.uk

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Margate Mercury

fashion

G E O RG I E RO B E RTO N

PEONY VINTAGE

A recent opening in Margate Old Town, Peony Vintage is a small shop run by Georgie Roberton, a young woman who, apart from her work in adult social care, is now involved in selling beautiful vintage pieces. She has always been interested in vintage - colours, prints and fabric in particular - preferring the comfort and style of vintage clothes to today’s ‘one-size-fits-all’ fashions. Georgie points out that although vintage is a niche market, all the pieces are a one-off so there is no real competition, even in a town with a number of vintage shops. Georgie has a vision and her idea of fashion is very simple. To her, aesthetics don’t matter much, but what counts is the feeling,the sense of belonging which clothes can provide. “You want to put something on that says ‘do you know world, I don't care about anything, but I do feel great today!’” Peony Vintage is at 12 King Street. facebook.com/peonyvintage

ALEXANDRA Patey - C ochrane

FREE TINKER

After leaving behind her life and career as a music manager in north London, Alexandra Patey-Cochrane set her sights on the Kentish town of Faversham, moving with her husband and six-month old daughter Edie in tow. Her first fashion forays were into the world of toddler and baby clothes, hand painting designs onto Oshkosh jeans and denim jackets to sell in Faversham Market. It was painting a design on a leather jacket for a little girl that inspired her current distinctive work, moving her from the slightly constraining medium of kids clothing to express herself on adult biker jackets. “My jackets are crazy, expressive statement pieces and each one seems to be getting more weird and more wonderful,” she says. “I design jackets for street walkers, free-thinking cheeky people who have something to say and something to hide.” Now based in Margate, her rebel style is perfectly in tune with the town’s arty, adventurous fashion scene. “Fashion means so much to me,” she enthuses. “It gives people the chance to express their inner-most feelings, make a statement and truly be themselves, if only for just one night.” freetinker.weebly.com


Compiled by

Clare Freeman

Edited by

Ros Anderson

Illustration

Jade Spranklen

Gentrification - that’s the displacement of local people by affluent or middle class residents - has become a hot topic in Margate in recent months. Here Editor Clare Freeman speaks to a variety of locals to get their opinion on the issue

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What’s iew? your v ssion at e discu th margate in Join eg word th s/ p u ro /g ook.com

Rachel Ella Taylor | Public Artist, Arts Programmer and Arts Educator & Emily Peasgood | Composer, Sound Artist and Musical Director “In our opinion Margate doesn’t need gentrifying. It needs more people who genuinely care about and understand the complex relationships between communities of people who live and work in the area. Socially engaged artists have a responsibility to consult and collaborate with communities, and to view their new home not only through their own eyes, but also through the eyes of those who preceded them. Margate has so much potential, we just hope it is sensitively realised by people whose heart is in the right place.”

emrys plant | crowther/plant “Gentrification is a double-edged sword - it displaces some but provides opportunity for others. Margate has always been a place that’s dealt with dynamic periods of change, and whether it’s good or not depends on which side of the fence you’re falling on. There needs to be a higher level strategy to help those who need help, but it’s also not the answer to make those who are moving in feel bad about it when they’re trying to have a positive impact too. Unless there is a central government social housing plan then there will be social cleansing. Why is gentrification not being dealt with so we can still have mixed communities?”

jemma morgan | occupational therapist “Gentrification is an issue globally. What interests me in Margate is that people are discussing it so openly and that gives me hope. The effects of gentrification are wide reaching, displacement of the have-nots has a lasting impact on their quality of life, health and wellbeing. But I’m not interested in blaming artists or hipsters - it’s a global issue and one that can be challenged only by people coming together. Regeneration does not have to socially and spatially isolate us. If we change the narrative, we can change the outcome.”

ray thompson | unemployed “I was fostered here and I was once employed at Dreamland and I had a flat, but businesses are tightening up and rents are rising. I’m temporarily living with a guy who is making his place an Airbnb. Our experiences with the council are very different: he’s getting budgets and grants for art installations, and I’m getting nowhere and might be sleeping on the street. I take my hat off to people in the arts scene, they’re trying their best. They’re bringing a different set of people down here, but they’re also unfairly taking the hit of ‘white guilt’. But it’s a problem that many people are not being included and are being ignored by the authorities. This vision of Margate, it needs to be inclusive. You don’t have to run into the future and leave the past behind.”


Dan Thompson | writer “Margate wouldn’t be here without gentrification. Historically it existed literally to attract the gentry here. Foreigners have always been in Margate, and Margate has always welcomed and accepted them. Fish and chips is a Portuguese Jewish food! Anything that has come since this town was a fishing hovel, that’s gentrification. The things that come with gentrification - buildings done up, places better maintained, more people spending money locally - those are actually things that in regeneration terms you want to happen.”

alex munn | miles & Barr “Gentrification is now at a point of no denial throughout Margate. It is both abundantly evident, and still widely embraced by the majority of locals. At this stage, the outcome for us Margatonians, from my perspective at least, can only be positive. Run-down spaces become creatively transformed, empty shops become born again. With all of this change, people can be forgiven for assuming there to be a level of rejection to it as well; however it is clear that what all of these changes really mean to the average Margate home owner, is that they are much better off when selling their property.”

dean samed | illustrator “I’ve got two views on gentrification. Thanet is a much nicer place to go out now, there are art shows, new studios, new talent. But I’m concerned for my parents, that they will be displaced, particularly my mum who is in private rented accommodation. This area has been socially deprived, under-funded, dilapidated, mis-managed for many years, so it’s great to see it turn into something positive. Most of the people who have been here for a few generations have family who came from London anyway. As long as the local working class population aren’t frog marched out of the area and there is a cultural mish-mash, then that’s good for me.”

kevin mcquade | schoolteacher “Gentrification has always happened and I think there’s a small minority of people who are just shouting very loudly about the exclusion of local communities and honestly it’s rubbish. People who have moved to the area are contributing to the local community in a really positive way. They are employing local people, not bringing builders in from somewhere else. New businesses need staff, and again they hire local people. Honestly, ten years ago people were crying out for the changes happening now.”

Nick Dermott | Heritage Advisor, Thanet District Council “Gentrification is what happens when well-off people from outside Margate displace the local population. Such people can then have an inbuilt sense of entitlement about what should happen in Margate. I think it’s a way of getting over their embarrassment about displacing the natives. You can then get an odd situation where the people complaining about gentrification are probably fairly new to the town themselves. They often complain of ‘those bloody hipsters in Margate’ but I don’t think I know any. It may be that they’re worried that people will attempt to steal their crown for changing the town, but they are surely wrong. They should let Margate get on with it. The town has managed change all by itself. It hated itself when I first came here twenty years ago, and now it loves itself. It’s a town looking in the mirror saying ‘oh you’re so beautiful.’”


Margate Mercury Writer

Jan Ryan

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history

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Photographer Ian Grundy

heatre Royal Margate is used to change. It’s the second oldest theatre in the country, preceded only by Bristol Old Vic. It opened in June 1787, when Margate was emerging as England’s first coastal resort, with a production of She Stoops to Conquer. For a time, a Royal Charter resulting from a 900-strong petition from local people, gave it a monopoly on entertainment in this newlyestablished seaside town. At this time, the seating in the pit and gallery consisted of bare wooden benches. As stated in Malcolm Morley’s 1966 book Margate and Its Theatres, “prices of admission were: 4s to the boxes, 2s to the pit and 1s to the gallery. Altogether the place held some seven hundred people and, at capacity, prices represented £60 per night.” This was no small sum in the late eighteenth century, and given that the theatre could operate from the beginning of May through to the end of October each year, and sell alcohol round the clock, it must have made a significant contribution to the local economy. In 1874, it was modernised and expanded by J T Robinson, father-in-law of architect Frank Matcham, who designed many of the country’s finest theatre buildings and interiors, including Hackney Empire, the London Coliseum and the London Palladium. Much of the original structure was demolished to accommodate this transformation. A proscenium arch was built, gallery fronts were decorated, boxes were installed on three levels and an ornate ceiling was created. Much of what we see today dates back to this rebuild. But it wasn’t only the fabric of the theatre that changed. With its increased capacity, it also changed from being a Georgian playhouse to a Victorian music hall. Records claim that nearly 2,000 people attended the opening night of the refurbished space. It’s hard to imagine this given that the theatre’s current seating capacity is under 500! Building work also took place in 1904, and in 1930 further work was done on the theatre, after which it finally re-opened after a closure of sixteen years. The bar at the rear of the stalls, which had contributed so much to its success as a music hall, was removed, as were some of the boxes. New but necessary fire escapes (thankfully now removed) zigzagged across the original front of the building. Despite having attracted some of the most high profile theatre artists of the time, such as Sarah Siddons, Sarah Thorne (who also established a theatre school in Hawley Square), Charles Dickens and Ellen Terry, the Theatre Royal’s history has not been without its challenges. Only two years after opening, the building caught fire. In 1799, Bensons Assembly Rooms opened in Cecil Square providing an enticing alternative with gambling, billiards, coffee drinking, concerts and masquerade balls in its Grand Ballroom.

A C onstantly C han g in g S cene

In 1803, during the Napoleonic wars, the Royal has been a survivor. From that first theatre was used as an auxiliary barracks and petition which led to its Royal Charter, to a then it became a chapel for a short time in the demonstration in Cliftonville in the 1950s 1840s. In 1918, it nearly became a warehouse to save it from closure, Margate’s theatre for Bobby’s, a local department store, and in has been embraced by local people. Earlier the 1930s, was briefly a cinema and then a this year, Thanet District Council invited wrestling venue. Paul Raymond opened his proposals from organisations interested in popular “Folies Parisienne” at the theatre in taking on Theatre Royal Margate, which the 1950s and, after yet another dark period, has been managed by Your Leisure Kent Ltd the theatre re-opened since 2012. The offer as the New Royal includes the theatre Bingo and Social offices at 16a Hawley “ T here have been Club in the sixties. Square as well as In 1988, planning 19 Hawley Square fires and floods , permission was on the opposite closures and granted to turn it corner, which was into a nightclub. built as a hotel to re - o p enin g s , but There have been serve the theatre. fires and floods, with all the chan g es Despite a number closures and reof expressions of in its fortunes , openings, but with interest, its future all the changes in had not been T heatre R oyal has its fortunes, Theatre decided at the time of writing. No one been a survivor ” knows what the next chapter will bring but hopefully, like Margate itself, Theatre Royal will adapt to the town’s changing demographic. One thing is certain, though – its new management will herald a new era for the theatre and for the town and will contribute to reestablishing Hawley Square and Addington Street as Margate’s cultural heart.

With huge thanks to Conservation Architect Nick Dermott for his support and generosity in putting this article together.


14

Margate Mercury

art & Culture

wonder wall Writer

Twinkle Troughton

Photographer Gabrielle Hall

Hidden behind the faded grand walls of Cliftonville lie the studios of two internationally-acclaimed wallpaper designers who bring new life to interiors with their unique bespoke creations. As well as working individually, last year the two designers set up the website www.modern-wallpaper.com, an online retail store for their collections

E rica W a k erly Wallpaper Designer

W

ith her label established in 2006, Erica Wakerly describes her wallpaper as ‘modern and delicate’. Featuring metallic shades, illustration and geometric lines, Erica’s designs have achieved notable recognition from the likes of Elle Decoration. She also won ‘Young Designer of the Year’ at the Homes & Gardens Classic Design Awards in 2007. ericawakerly.co.uk What does wallpaper bring to an interior? “In essence I think pattern can enhance or alter a feeling within an interior. This may be through a line and composition of pattern, or the use of metallics which softly reflect ambient or natural light and colour within a room.” What inspires your designs? “About 14 years ago I was lucky to house-sit in a David Chipperfield house. Living in a very pure, composed concrete and glass interior made me think about the challenge

of how a minimal space could work with decoration, without compromising the vision of the architecture. My wallpapers are intended to compose a space alongside the architecture. My products use traditional methods of wallpaper printing dating back to about 1900. The pattern repeats are engraved onto rollers. The pigments are mixed by eye in a bucket, so it’s a skilled human process. This combination of process, materials and graphic design is essential for the character of the finished wallpaper.” What past projects stand out, and where in the world have your designs ended up? “I have supplied to many fashion retailers and last year my Fan design was used in Le Bon Marche department store in Paris. My wallpapers have also decorated the YouTube offices in California, a number of boutique hotels, lingerie stores, and I licensed my Teepee pattern to Apple for use as an iPhone wallpaper.”

“For me Margate has the romance of an English Havana, with the faded grandeur of the Victorian architecture, iconic weather-worn Art Deco and Brutalist buildings” What led you to relocate to Margate? “I was initially drawn by Margate’s unusual atmosphere, that of its urban/coastal environment and the practical space. For me Margate has the romance of an English Havana, with the faded grandeur of the Victorian architecture, iconic weatherworn Art Deco and Brutalist buildings. Also the Turner Contemporary gallery with its international reach gave me confidence that Margate was not only an inspiration but would be a cultural magnet for years to come.”


Margate Mercury

art & Culture

15

T racy k endall Wallpaper Designer

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inner of Elle Decoration’s 2014 ‘Wall Covering Award’ Tracy Kendall has been designing for 40 years. As well as using screen print and intricate stitch work, her custommade wallpapers are often full of texture with pleats, layers and even thousands of sequins. Clients include the BBC and Christie’s. tracykendall.com

What is it about wallpaper that led you to specialise in that area of design? “Like many people who end up with the label of ‘designer’ I wanted a product, wallpaper in my case, which I couldn’t find so I made some for myself to use at home. This was 20 years ago and is where one of my bestselling designs, Cutlery, originated from. I was fortunate that my education and working life at the time were within fine art and design, so it was technically something I was able to do. Once I had done the first set of wallpaper designs I was hooked.”

You use lots of unconventional materials in your designs. What inspires your ideas? “I don’t think of them as unconventional, most of them are common and everyday objects just re-purposed for a new use. I find inspiration everywhere; often the designs are a mix of conversation, film, imagery, reading and physical materials and production methods all merged together over time with a design finally stripped out and formed from the mix.”

“I enjoy having an unknown or unpredictable element in the work. I never know where my wallpaper will be going, who lives with it or what room it’s in”

Some of your designs are very ambitious. What is your approach to accomplishing these projects? “I like to be challenged when I design and produce new work or variations of my wallpapers for clients. I enjoy having an unknown or unpredictable element in the work. I never know where my wallpaper will be going, who lives with it or what room it’s in. So I always design wallpaper to be strong as a design but also useable within a room, so that everything in the space can then work together as the interior designer or client planned.” What does Margate provide for you as a wallpaper designer? “That’s easy: an easy place to get a quality of work/life balance. It may not happen every day or every week but it does happen in Margate.”


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the winter map

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Our definitive guide to where to eat, drink and be pampered and entertained in margate this winter

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hawley square

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margate train station

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Batchelor’s patisserie

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fORT’S CAFÉ

17

Seaside cake parlour*

25

The Lifeboat

Cake | Bread | Pastries | Tea

Breakfast | Brunch | Milkshake

Vegan cupcakes | Cake | Tea

Cider | Live music

246 Northdown Road

8 Cliff Terrace

24 Hawley Street

1 Market Street

BeBeacheD*

10

GB Pizza

18

the ambrette*

26

The London Tavern*

Sunday roast | Brunch

Pizza | Hot chocolate

Indian food | Exotic roast dinner

Hearty food | Sunday roast | Beer

Harbour Arm

14a Marine Drive

44 King Street

Addington Street

Bernie’s chocolate bar

11

good food store*

19

The Bus CafÉ*

27

the Old Kent Market

Waffles | Hot chocolate | Child-friendly

Soup | Toastie | Juice

Falafel balls | Soup | Breakfast | Child-friendly

Fresh bread | Food | Britain’s smallest pub

2 - 14 High Street

52 Canterbury Road

16 Fort Road, Fort Road Yard

8 Fort Hill

Buoy and oyster*

12

Hantverk & Found*

20

The cupcake cafÉ

28

The riz

Hearty food | Live music | Cocktails

Sea food | Art exhibitions

Cupcakes | Cake | Tea

Indian & Sri Lankan food

44 High Street

18 King Street

4 Market Place

49 Northdown Road

CafÉ G

13

L’Olivo*

21

the Dalby CafÉ

29

The Tap Room

Coffee | Soup | Hot panini | Open early

Italian food | Pizza

English breakfast | Budget Sunday roast

Cider | Beer | Party

1 High Street

20 Market Place

4 - 6 Dalby Road

4 Northdown Parade

Cheesy Tiger*

14

Melting Pot*

22

The Grain Grocer

30

The Two Halves

Cheese toastie | Wine | Cosy dinner

Fondue

Coffee | Organic food | Fresh bread

Cider | Beer

Unit 7 - 8, Harbour Arm

14 Buenos Ayres

95 - 97 Northdown Road

2 Marine Drive

Cliffs

15

Proper Coffee house*

23

The greedy Cow

31

walpole bay hotel

Yoga | Coffee | Records | Hair-cut | Child-friendly

Coffee | Cake | Open early

Breakfast | Burger | Brownie

Sunday roast | Cream tea

172 Northdown Road

37 High Sreet

3 Market Place

Fifth Avenue

fez

16

Sands Hotel

24

The Hoy

32

Yama’s

Beer | Cider | Gin tasting

Jazz | Cocktails | Cream tea

Sunday roast

Thai food

40 High Street

16 Marine Drive

10 Fort Hill

121 High Street

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walpole bay

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northdown road

EASTERN ESPLENADE

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trinity square

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the oval gardens

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fifth ave

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Beautiville*

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marine studios society

49

pie factory*

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Shell labyrinth | Tea

82 Harold Road

17 Albert Terrace

5 Broad Street

Grotto Hill

Margate House*

50

Resort Studios*

58

The lido and cliff bar

Pottery classes & workshops

Exhibitions | Events

Drawing club | Printmaking | Workshops

Pool | Snooker | Party

61 Northdown Road

39 - 41 High Street

50 Athelstan Road

Ethelbert Terrace

43

Margate Museum*

51

roost*

59

The talking drum*

Rollerskating | Events | Child-friendly

History exhibits | Victorian prison cells

Table tennis | Roast chicken | Child-friendly

Live music | Vegetarian food

49 - 51 Marine Terrace

Market Place

19 Cliff Terrace

3 Cliff Terrace

Jerome Hillion hair salon*

44

Morgan’s*

52

Scotts*

60

theatre royal*

Hair cut | Hair treatment

Dance Classes | Live music | Cocktails

Antiques and furniture shopping

Theatre

Walpole Bay Hotel, Fifth Avenue

46 High Street

The Old Iceworks, Bath Place

Addington Street

Lombard Street gallery*

45

ad

The Shell Grotto*

Art exhibition

dreamland

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*Closed one or more days a week

Activity club for adults

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to broadstairs

Facial | Massage | Beauty treatments

clayspace*

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activities 33

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mr simms olde sweet shoppe

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Stirling hair

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tom thumb theatre*

Art exhibition

Sweets | Chocolate | Child-friendly

Hair cut | Hair treatment

Cinema | Theatre | Music | Comedy

2 Lombard Street

3 Market Street

Cliffs, 172 Northdown Road

2 Eastern Esplenade

lovelys*

46

olby’s soul cafÉ*

54

Sundowners

62

Transmission*

Art exhibition | Art supplies | Framing

Music | Food | Party

Party | Karaoke | Gay-friendly

Record shopping

248 Northdown Road

3 - 5 King Street

1 Albert Terrace

105 Northdown Road

margate arts club*

47

Phases*

55

thanet indoor bowls centre*

63

turner contemporary*

Party | Events

Pole dancing | Aerobics | Burlesque classes

Bowls

Art exhibition | Activity | Chlid-friendly | Café

276 Northdown Road

49 Marine Terrace

Eastern Esplenade

Rendezvous

Margate Art

48

Pick 'n Paint a Pot*

56

the Chamomile Clinic

64

Winter Gardens*

Colouring in | Art | Child-friendly

Pottery painting | Willow weaving | Child-friendly

Massage | Reiki | Herbal medicine

Shows | Events | Live music

6 Duke Street

68 Northdown Road

60 Harold Road

Fort Crescent


18

Margate Mercury

food & drink

Bernie’s Chocolate Bar waffles and chocolate

I

meg

f you fancy a sweet treat then head to Bernie’s, a family-friendly chocolate bar on the seafront. I’m a big fan of their fresh waffles which you can load with your choice of melted chocolate, ice cream, marshmallows, chocolate buttons and more. It’s a friendly, cheery spot with great views of the sea and affordable indulgent treats that really hit the spot for those with a sweet tooth. facebook.com/bernieschocbar

rev i ew s

Writer & Photographer Meg of Margate

Need an incentive to stop binge-watching Netflix this winter (nothing wrong with that by the way) and get out of your cosy and warm house? Here blogger Meg of Margate reveals her favourite places in town to grab a warming treat to defrost, relax and indulge in

Buoy and Oyster

Cheesy Tiger

The Dalby Café

meat dishes

Grilled cheese sandwich

english Breakfast

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T

his independent family-owned restaurant and cocktail bar has prepped themselves for the colder temperatures with an exciting autumn/winter menu, full of top-quality Kentish produce. As the name suggests, the restaurant specialises in seafood, but it also offers fantastic meat dishes. I recommend the cod cheek goujons with homemade smoked garlic aioli as a starter, and the hearty Kent lamb rump is a winning main course. The cocktails are made well and importantly, are a decent size! Top tip: go on a Wednesday night to enjoy live music with your meal. buoyandoyster.com

alking down the Harbour Arm in the winter may be a challenge, but it’s definitely worth it to dine at this tiny, popular restaurant, a must-visit for all those who love wine and cheese. The grilled cheese sandwiches are known as the best in Margate, and it’s not hard to see why. Accompanied by fennel and apple slaw and pickles, and oozing with melted cheese, eating one is an absolute pleasure and will definitely fill you up. Visit on a Monday evening for their two-for-one cheese toastie deal. facebook.com/cheesytigermargate

T

his much-loved greasy spoon is a true gem and visiting it is a family tradition. I think it’s easily the best place to get a fry-up in Margate. Surpassing the standard of your average greasy spoon, The Dalby Café uses local produce and is very affordable. There’s even a special ‘Mega Breakfast’ which only the very hungry - and brave - dare to try (so far the record to eat it is 17 minutes). Go there on a hangover and you’ll be back to normal in no time. Their Sunday roast lunch - with a choice of meats and a great Yorkshire pudding - is a good option too, especially if you’re on a budget as it’s only £6. facebook.com/thebestbreakkie


Margate Mercury

GB Pizza hot chocolate & pizza

I

t might seem strange recommending hot chocolate at an amazing, well-respected pizza place, but trust me, it’s good! Drinking hot chocolate is one of the only occasions where I feel I can have an obscene amount of cream and marshmallows and get away with it. GB Pizza’s hot chocolate is made with a rich African cocoa that complements the sweet toppings. There’s also of course - a great selection of pizzas and friendly service, so pop in for something different when it’s cold and get warmed up in style. greatbritishpizza.com

Licenced activity cafe for all the family A range of hot and cold snacks including fresh waffles and warm chocolate sauce Hot chocolate, tea and coffee Stunning sea views 2-14 High street Margate CT11 1AT

The Ambrette Exotic Roast

I

f you’re looking for a tasty alternative to the traditional Sunday dinner, why not try the exotic roast menu at The Ambrette? This restaurant is a firm favourite of mine as I love the unique flavour combinations that chef Dev Biswal and his team create. His exciting twist on the British roast involves a main course selection with meats ranging from pork to zebra. The usual accompaniments are there, but with aromatic spice infusions that will knock your socks off. theambrette.co.uk

Events diary increasing weekly, Food menu coming soon, Stirling Hair now open, Loads more records now in stock...

Visit our website for full details:

www.cliffsmargate.com


20

Margate Mercury

the gift list

The

Gift List Our pick of the best Margate gifts for Christmas and Valentine’s day for him, her - or even your dog 1

The Parker cushion | £50 By : Kate Jones Knitwear Available at : Môr Margate mormargate.com

2

Plant pots, 6 cm | £6.50 / £7.50 each Available at : This Way to the Circus thiswaytothecircus.co.uk

3

“Damn Fine Cherry Pie” book | £25 By : Lindsey Bowden | Published by Mitchell Beazley | Styled and recipes developed by Margate local Annie Nichols Available at : Octopus Books octopusbooks.co.uk

4

Twin Peaks vinyl | £26.99 By : Death Waltz / Mondo Available at : Transmission Records transmissionrecords.co.uk

10 Astrograph necklace & bangle £120 and £60 By : Billie M Vigne Available at : Plinth plinthspace.com / billiemvigne.co.uk

5

Spaghetti Tube earrings | £149 By : Billie M Vigne Available at : Plinth plinthspace.com / billiemvigne.co.uk

11 Walpole Champneys Circo and Playa coasters | £5.95 each By : Jenny Duff Available at : Jenny Duff jennyduff.co.uk

6

Dreamlands book | £24 By : Rob Ball Available at : Turner Contemporary / Dewi Lewis Publishing dewilewis.com

7

Seaweed / Geranium hand balm | £18 Available at : Haeckels haeckels.co.uk

8

Red enamel Margate plate | £18 By : Kate Samuels Available at : Lombard Street Gallery lombardstreetgallery.co.uk

9

Pearl open bracelet, pearl bar earrings and floating pearl ring in gold | £90, £55 & £40 By : Rebecca Gladstone Available at : Rebecca Gladstone rebeccagladstone.com

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Margate Mercury

the gift list

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12 Winged Heart Necklace | £64 By : Rosita Bonita Available at : Rosita Bonita rositabonita.com

20 The Bar bottle opener | £15 By : Guerillacast Available at : Môr Margate mormargate.com

13 Things and Stuff Alphabet pouch | £16 By : Alphabet Bags Available at : Fox & Spindle facebook.com/foxandspindle

21

14 Unique tintype portrait 10 x 8'' | £250 By : Rob Ball Available at : Turner Contemporary Portrait Studio Event on 14 January 2017 turnercontemporary.org / thephotographersgallery.org.uk/rob-ball 15

14

Pen and inks box set | £26.50 By : La Petite Papeterie Paris Available at : Etcetera etcetera-online.co.uk

Joel Knight

Compiled by

Clare Freeman

Styled by JP Hevey

22 Artemis Full Moon necklace | £60 By : Laura Reynolds Available at : Fox & Spindle or Godessa Jewellery godessajewellery.com 23 "Late Style" Limited Edition vinyl | £14 By : Drömloch Available at : Kit Records kitrecs.bandcamp.com

16 The Lambswool Dot scarf | £45 By : Wallace Sewell Available at : Môr Margate mormargate.com

24 The Sprinkle coasters (set of four) | £8 By : Ding Ding Things Available at : Môr Margate mormargate.com

17

25 Red wood and silver earrings | £32 By : Billie M Vigne Available at : Plinth plinthspace.com / billiemvigne.co.uk

Sheriff Shield earrings | £44 By : Rosita Bonita Available at : Rosita Bonita rositabonita.com

18 Triangular hammered silver bangle pairs £45 By : Billie M Vigne Available at : Plinth plinthspace.com / billiemvigne.co.uk

Photography

Diana Crescent Moon necklace | £60 By : Laura Reynolds Available at : Fox & Spindle or Godessa Jewellery godessajewellery.com

19 Ball and hook Hollow Solid earrings £230 By : Billie M Vigne Available at : Plinth plinthspace.com / billiemvigne.co.uk

26 Plaid Wool lead | £16 By : Doggie Apparel Available at : Doggie Apparel doggieapparel.co.uk

21


Margate Mercury

1

the v-day top ten

You don’t need a romantic partner to enjoy a champagne cocktailfuelled dance at vintage dance hall Morgan’s (morgansmargate.co.uk). Word is, they’re planning an Argentine tango workshop this Valentine’s, a great excuse to get close with your partner, a friend or someone new.

frolic outdoors

2

It may be February but with the beach and the sea close by, why stay indoors? Convince your friends that a game of something on Margate Main Sands is a totally marvellous and fun idea, especially as you’ve booked a table at the London Tavern (facebook.com/thelondontavern) to warm up again with their tasty comfort food.

3

make time to play

The seafront arcades, the rides, rollerdisco and photo booth at Dreamland (dreamland.co.uk) – classic seaside fun can take on a new dimension with a bunch of your favourite people. Set yourselves up with a good English breakfast at The Dalby Café (facebook.com/thebestbreakkie), have fun playing around town and finish with a nightcap at the Tap Room (facebook.com/ TapRoomAleHouse).

go for dinner

4

The Sands Hotel, a luxury, boutique hotel overlooking Margate’s Main Sands, (sandshotelmargate.co.uk) will be offering a candle-lit dinner in their seafront restaurant with live music and beautifully-dressed tables. Book a room with a luxury sea view for you and your loved one to make your visit all the more memorable. Or head to popular restaurants GB Pizza (greatbritishpizza.com) or the more cosy Hantverk & Found (hantverk-found.co.uk) to mingle with the locals, or - if you're single perhaps meet someone new.

5

eat in

Pick up some delicious ingredients at The Grain Grocer (thegraingrocer. co.uk) or The Good Food Store (facebook.com/goodfoodmargate) (make sure to get a bar of Conscious organic raw chocolate, it’s really worth the money!) and make a meal for yourself or invite a friend. Buy a second-hand DVD at a charity shop and then enjoy a binge movie or TV night.

9

make pots

Dance at Morgan’s

The V-Day Top Ten

Writer

Rachel Bell

It’s all too easy to fall out of love with Valentine’s Day. If you’re single, you feel like you’re made to question why, and if you’re in a relationship, you can’t go out for fear of being seen as all coupley and smug. Whatever your relationship status, Rachel Bell gives her ten tips for how to celebrate the day – Margate style

6

take afternoon tea

Treat a friend or a loved one to afternoon tea at The Sands Hotel (sandshotelmargate.co.uk), served from 3 to 5pm, with its locallysourced loose-leaf teas, scones, luxury finger sandwiches and optional champagne. Or head to Walpole Bay Hotel (walpolebayhotel.co.uk), a long-standing grand hotel on the seafront in Cliftonville, to enjoy a delicious cream tea from midday to 5pm followed by a peruse of their eclectic ‘napery’ napkin art collection.

discover your love destiny

7

Head to The Grain Grocer – a health food shop and café on Northdown Road (thegraingrocer. co.uk) – for their ‘Tarot Tuesday’ and have a £10 tarot reading from Nabila Yakub.

8

give love

This is a day to celebrate love, so don’t just give it to those who you know, give it to all. Buy flowers or a plant from The Secret Garden florist (thesecretgardenflorist.co.uk) or Old Kent Market (theoldkentmarket.com) and give it to a neighbour; send a card to brighten the day of a person living alone near you, offer your help to someone – in your social circle, at work or someone on your street. Take your second hand clothes to the Oasis charity shop (oasisdaservice.org) or bake a cake and have your neighbours round for tea. Let’s make this a day to celebrate love, not just a day of consumerism and cheesy romance.

23

I can’t promise you’ll end up as Demi Moore in Ghost, but head to Clayspace (clayspace.org.uk) on Northdown Road for their Tuesday morning drop-in session for £9 and express your creativity on a nice pot for someone special.

10

love you!

Valentine’s Day may seem like a day for lovers and obligatory gifts but it was born of an ancient Roman fertility festival with no association to romantic love. So, subvert the day by loving yourself. Make yourself your dream breakfast in bed and devote time to that book, film, or writing you can never make time for. Write a gratitude list - as many thank yous as you can muster. Take yourself on a date – a walk, lunch at Cheesy Tiger (facebook.com/ cheesytigermargate), a mooch around Turner Contemporary (turnercontemporary.org). Order a delivery from your favourite eaterie – a curry from The Riz (therizrestaurant. com) is real feel-good food. Go for a treatment at Beautiville (beautiville.co.uk) in Cliftonville, get a haircut with a coffee at Stirling (stirlingmargate.com) or get a luxury shave at Margate Barber (margatebarber.co). Take a yoga class with Mounira Almenoar of Openspace Yoga at Hawley House (facebook.com/YogaHealthWellness), or head to Proudfoot Pilates (facebook.com/ catproudfootpilates) for Cat’s Tuesday evening Pilates class.

The art of

Self-Love Having experienced the process of destressing and taking some time out to perform acts of self-love for healing, I can now see that it is a necessary part of life and everyone should make more time for it. Self-love is something we need to consciously practice – and you don’t need to travel to the ends of the earth or spend lots of money to do it. It can be done in small ways at home and all that’s required is commitment. It could mean saying no to yet another social arrangement so that you can have a quiet evening to yourself to connect inside, taking the time to research and buy healing nutritious food or creating some social time with a good friend. Self-love is about being in the moment, about being in love with you and about connecting to and honouring your higher self and its needs, whatever they may be.

Self-love Reading List Zen and the Art of Falling in Love by Brenda Shoshanna The Art of Loving by Erich Fromm The Mastery of Love by Don Miguel Ruiz Love Yourself Like Your Life Depends On It by Kamal Ravikant


Margate Mercury Want a healthy and happy start to 2017? We ask five Margate-based health and beauty practitioners for their top tips for how to look and feel great in the New Year

Feel

Mounira Almenoar | OpenSpace Yoga “Consciously sculpt space for yourself. Spend time visualising your dreams into being; quietly focus on what matters. Other than that, eat well and enjoy it. Move your body daily and experience a bit of Margate nature whenever you can. A little bit of what you fancy does you good.” facebook.com/YogaHealthWellness

Health

Compiled by

Clare Freeman

feel

“We all know summer sun can be detrimental to your hair’s condition but winter can be just as bad. It can become dehydrated from the continuous switch between cold weather outdoors and the warm, dry heating indoors. Not forgetting the extra blow drying and heat styling from all those seasonal parties. Use a moisturising shampoo to keep the scalp nourished and a leave-in conditioner to help protect and strengthen the ends.” stirlingmargate.com Cat Proudfoot | proudfoot pilates “We abuse our bodies in the run up to Christmas: eating, drinking, partying, deadlines, shopping, more partying. Where do we find the time to breathe? Full and deep breaths help flush the body of toxins, relieve muscles of stress and tension, and help co-ordinate the body and mind. Count to five as you inhale, and six as you exhale - see how you feel.” facebook.com/catproudfootpilates

NOW OPEN FOR BOOKINGS 01843 571888 stirlingmargate.com @stirlingmargate

@Cliffs 172 Northdown Rd Margate, CT9 2QN

Sorrell Robbins | the Chamomile Clinic

Marg-vellous!

Sally Rowlands | stirling hair salon

HAIR SALON

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“I have three favourite herbs for a healthy body in the New Year: milk thistle to protect and detoxify the liver from toxins, chamomile to soothe the stomach and nerves and detoxify the liver (it’s a great hangover herb) and eucalyptus which boosts immunity and clears the mind. For a very happy New Year try Damiana - an aphrodisiac that increases confidence and relieves anxiety. To improve your mental agility and keep the grumps at bay, I use rosemary and peppermint tea. Both stimulate circulation in the brain, improving clarity of mind and memory.” chamomileclinic.co.uk

Sian Forrest | complementary therapist “My best advice for health and happiness for 2017 is to follow your heart. Situations and relationships that do not nurture you need to be changed. Look for ways to do this and, even if they seem too radical, follow them up to see if they are right for you. Open up your heart and your mind and explore new possibilities. There are therapies which help to clear old patterns and set you free to achieve new goals, such as Reiki and other forms of healing, soul response therapy, kinesiology, shamanic healing and journeys. Meditation helps us to find the power within, and act on our own truth, and the universal truth. Once you feel happier and more at peace then this has a positive influence on those around you.” chamomileclinic.co.uk


Margate Mercury

a georgian gem Photography and interview Jo Bridges

F

lanked on one side by a busy road and the Theatre Royal on the other, Hawley Square is a hidden gem in the heart of Margate, a Georgian garden square built in the late 1700s. Little wonder then that the handsome houses around this tranquil green space are now home to a number of architects. We took the opportunity to step inside one owned by a pair of them - Peter Thomas and Helen Leask - who run Studio Gray and Leask Architecture respectively. We asked them about their stylish and sensitive restoration. “We drew inspiration for the interiors from an array of projects and sources, starting with the original listed Georgian architecture of the house, which we were keen to respect and conserve. We both like to work with a palette of natural materials, in both authentic and unfamiliar ways. Colour is added through the furniture and artwork: we have become avid collectors of work by the enormous talent pool of Margate-based artists. Our favourite area of the house is probably the reworked lower ground floor: it is where everyone hangs out when they come over. The kitchen, pantry and dining area and their relationship to the garden has been really successful. We have also really enjoyed being in the garden this summer: it is somewhere between a small English walled garden and a New York roof terrace. Our favourite thing about Margate? The people, being so close to the beach, ‘Margate Moments’ and those Turner skies. We have such fantastic neighbours around the square and so many wonderful new friends all around Margate. We have never felt so welcome or part of a community anywhere else. Literally the day we moved to the town our neighbours knocked on the door and invited us over for a drink: it is just like that here. The proactive ‘can do’ energy we sensed in the town has gained momentum and it is infectious. Everything feels possible. Moving to Margate is the best decision we have ever made!” leaskarchitecture.com studiogray.co.uk

property & interiors

27


Oakwood homes

®

putting people first

What Makes A Good Letting Agent? ...this is a good question which can have any number of answers. Firstly, ask yourself what is most important to you; is it speed, honesty, clarity, prompt rental payments, attention to detail or knowing your property is in the hands of someone who looks afterit like it were their own? It is hard to separate out what is and isn’t important and probably there isn’t a single answer that stands out above the others. As an Agency Oakwood prides itself on all of the above and every property is as important as the next, size, as they say, is not important! Most of our Landlords have mortgages to service from their rental income and void periods or non-payment of rent makes for a stressful situation all round. Knowing that your rent is paid regularly and on time, takes the headache away from you. Rents are monitored on a daily basis and contact is made with the tenant within 24 hours of non-receipt of the anticipated rent date. Rest assured we have nothing to gain by your rent not being paid as we don’t get paid either until it comes in! The most important part of setting up any tenancy is finding the right tenant for not just your property but for the neighbouring properties. Living in harmony in a block of flats can be challenging if you have inconsiderate neighbours playing loud music to all hours or crashing around above or below you. Our tenants are bound by their agreements to not cause noise nuisance to neighbouring properties.

A good Letting Agent will carry out full profile referencing against all tenants and will advise you of the result once this is received. At Oakwoods we outsource this to a professional referencing company to ensure there is no bias in approving the tenant. Credit history is checked, income verification (affordability is king), previous rental history and right to rent in the UK (for non-British passport holders). Once your property is tenanted make sure you are either prepared for those maintenance calls at 2am to say you have water coming through the ceiling or have a managing Agent who will take care of it for you. Does your Agent use small local contractors who are easily accessible or do they use large corporates who will send someone between 8am and 6pm forcing your tenant to take the day off work? Oakwood use all local trades and are members of Thanet Business Network. The relationship between a Landlord and their Agent is usually one that is ongoing for, potentially, many years so it is important for both parties to have full confidence in the other. Being a good Landlord is about thinking what would be acceptable as your own living standards and applying that to your rental property; being a good Managing Agent is about dealing with the tenant’s expectations versus the Landlord’s and still complying within the legal boundaries whilst keeping everyone happy! Oakwood lettings has been built up on recommendation and a solid reputation over the last 8 years, why not call us to find out why, not only our Landlords like using us, but why our tenants like to stay with us too when they do move on.

Teresa Bartlett

Lettings Manager | Oakwood homes


THREE LEGENDARY DAYS OF PLAY

17th – 19th FEB 2017

fAcEBook: @geekmargate

www.GEEK-Play.com

Twitter: @GEEK__Play

TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW!


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Margate Mercury

De s e rt I s lan d Date s Men seeking women \ Women seeking men

Illustration : Jade Spranklen

Looking for a date ? We’ve found the most eligible single people in Margate and asked them what they would take to a desert island. If you like their answers then email desertislanddates @ gmail.com stating their number and we’ll set you up on a date ! ( O Age / z Song / 3 Book / G Luxury Item)

Oasis, a domestic abuse service, is seeking donations for its Room at the Refuge appeal, a home for women and children in Margate this Christmas who have fled their homes for their own protection and want to rebuild their lives free from abuse. To donate visit oasisdaservice.org/roomattherefuge or text ODAS12 and the amount to 70070

O 30 to 40 z This Must Be the Place by Talking Heads  3 Tales of the Unexpected by Roald Dahl G A bot1 tomless bottle of Malbec

organisations seeking

O 30 to 40 z 4th Symphony by Shostakovich 3 The Diary of a Nobody by George and Weedon Grossmith G A tame grizzly bear

5

6 O 40 to 50 z Take a Run at the Sun by Dinosaur Jr 3 Keep the Aspidistra Flying by George Orwell G A hammock to lie in and read O 30 to 40 z What my book whilst listening to my song a Wonderful World O 30 to 40 z Pictures of O 40 to 50 z Harby Louis ArmstYou by The Cure 3 Any vest Moon by Neil rong 3 Escape EverHuman Heart by William Young 3 The ything ! by Robert Boyd G Vichy Ideal Sound of Waves Wringham  Soleil Face and Body by Yukio Mishima G A speed boat to go Factor 60 G Whisky exploring 3 4 2

 «

O 20 to 30 z Fantastix by Machinedrum 3 Sudoku or a super-hard book of puzzles G A nice soap

Want to meet any of these people or submit a post for the next issue ? email desertislanddates @ gmail.com

7

«

CLASSIFIEDs corner

Desert_Island_Dates.indd 1

POW! Thanet 2017, a Thanet-wide celebration of International Women’s Day, is looking for volunteers and support for their exciting, innovative and challenging festival in 2017. Find out more at powthanet.com or on Facebook or Twitter. A+C Studios, a stop-motion animation production studio based in Margate, is looking for funding to help produce a stop-motion film in Margate. All donations will be gratefully received and rewarded through Kickstarter. Full details can be found at huslabfilm.com

Locals offering Clare Freeman is offering free help to elderly people living in Margate (befriending, buying groceries etc.) Contact clare.freeman@hotmail.co.uk Bea Belicza is offering help beach cleaning and can also make street furniture using your old plastic bottles. Contact beliczab@gmail.com Gemma Pearson is offering free fashion/stylist advice to women living in Margate who are going through a difficult period of change e.g. divorce, illness, bereavement, to help them feel more confident and empowered. Contact gemmalouisepearson@gmail.com For the latest opportunities please visit: margatemercury.com/#help-margate

22.11.16 16:12

services Murray & Jones Electrical Contractors. Light, power and data for grand design and refurb projects: murrayandjones.co.uk. Call 01843 861380 Mambo Gardens. Gardener bringing over ten years of landscaping and garden design to Margate, from leafy Richmond. Working on all elements of outdoor spaces from the smallest corner to the highest bow. For a free quote or consultation see mambogardens.co.uk Ladies - When was the last time you bought a makeup item and got it home and thought, ‘What on EARTH did I buy that for?’, or, ‘How do I use this eyebrow pencil?’ Professional makeup Artist Lucy Baker runs personal makeup shopping and lesson sessions for women with busy lives to show women how to use and love makeup in an effortless and beautiful way. makeupmastery.co.uk / hello@ makeupmastery.co.uk

Mobile hairdresser in Margate and Thanet. 13 years experience working in London. Toni & Guy educated. Nadinehairdresser.co.uk Get your Airbnb listing written by a professional travel writer with Airspruce airspruce.me / info@ airspruce.me. Save time and get more bookings!

items Brand new Belfast kitchen sink and a toilet for sale! Only £50 for both or can be sold separately. For pick up in Cliftonville. Email clare.freeman@ hotmail.co.uk for images / more info.

other Good Food Store. Passionate about juicing. Coffee, fresh fruit wand vegetable juices, smoothies, hot soups, hearty salads, organic grocery. Happy to accommodate small exhibitions too! 52 Canterbury Road, Westbrook, CT9 5BG. 07776444049 @goodfoodmargate


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Margate Mercury

THAN ET’S FI RST PIZZA PARLO U R

Delicious pizzas, burgers and chicken for delivery or takeaway. Fast and friendly service. Open every day from 5 pm. 88 Northdown Road, Margate 01843294294

www.crowtherplant.com @crowtherplant shop online using discount code ‘margate friends’

Margate Mercury   Small  ad  –  The  Palace  Cinema,  Broadstairs  Weekly exhibitions

Pop in to see what's on or hire the space yourself

Dec 16-­‐Feb  17  issue  

Find us at 5-9 Broad Street Margate Old Town CT9 1EW

£50.00 56mm  x  71mm.   Black  and  White     Minimum  300dpi     Logo  /  image  and  text  

hello@piefactorymargate.co.uk 01843 294 175 www.piefactorymargate.co.uk

   THE  PALACE  CINEMA              

-­‐BROADSTAIRS  

   For  people  who  love  independent  film      

   

LA LA  LAND,  MANCHESTER  BY  THE  SEA,   ELLE,  PATERSON,  TONI  ERDMANN…   Harbour  St,  Broadstairs  CT10  1ET   01843  865726        thepalacecinema.co.uk   @PalaceCinemaBroadstairs  


Margate Mercury – Winter 2016/17  
Margate Mercury – Winter 2016/17  

The Margate Mercury is a new, free quarterly magazine about modern-day life and culture in the up-and-coming British seaside town of Margate...

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