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“We declare that the splendor of the world has been enriched by a new beauty: the beauty of speed. A racing automobile with its bonnet adorned with great tubes like serpents with explosive breath ... a roaring motor car which seems to run on machine-gun fire, is more beautiful than the Victory of Samothrace.”

“We are on the extreme promontory of the centuries! What is the use of looking behind at the moment when we must open the mysterious shutters of the impossible? Time

and Space

died yesterday. We are already living in the absolute, since we have already created eternal, omnipresent speed.”

--from the “Manifesto of Futurism” written by Marinetti, 1909.


Futurama, General Motors Pavilion, 1939 New York World‘s Fair


utopia


utopia


dystopia


dystopia


"If we cannot demonstrate to students that they can initiate meaningful change – then, as educators, we have failed.” “On the other hand, we want to help industry to harness this creative energy and direct it into commercially successful business infrastructures and outcomes. In this respect, we are committed to an active leadership role – one of collaboratively developing industry, rather than the traditional role of simply serving industry by following its directives.” --DLF course coordinator Ross Stevens


final research paper [tips for a successful assignment]

+ plan ahead [be strategic] + simplify [be specific] + maximise your resources [tutor, library, notes, time, etc.]


Basic elements of a research paper

+ introduction [thesis statement] + body of essay + illustrations + conclusion + bibliography [references—sources cited in essay]

plan ahead [be strategic]


Basic elements of a research paper

+ introduction [thesis statement] › gains the reader’s attention › provides brief background material about the meaning, context & significance of the topic › includes definitions of keywords if necessary › identifies the 'gap', problem or issue outlined in the question › gives the reader some understanding of the order in which the ideas in the essay will be presented › clearly identifies the author's point of view in a thesis statement › 300 – 500 words [max]

plan ahead [be strategic]


Basic elements of a research paper

+ the body of an essay › your argument is developed through paragraphs › each paragraph should contain only one main idea, as stated by the topic sentence › each paragraph supports the main idea by explaining the issue, and providing evidence e.g. quotes, statistics, facts, examples, case studies › decide how many points you wish to make and in what order › link the paragraphs together › make sure paragraphs follow in logical sequence [as promised in the Introduction] so that the essay flows towards the conclusion. › two or three case studies: 400 - 500 words each [1200-1500 words max] plan ahead [be strategic]


Basic elements of a research paper

+ illustrations › back to this in a moment [evidence]‌.

plan ahead [be strategic]


Basic elements of a research paper

+ the conclusion › › › › › ›

sum up your main points tie these back to the thesis statement avoid adding new material or using quotes. possibly comment or make recommendations your opportunity to reassert your opinion 300 - 500 words [max]

plan ahead [be strategic]


refining your argument [thesis statement]

+ have a unique point of view + an argument is an opinion (not a fact) + collect evidence to convince your reader

simplify [be specific]


refining your argument [thesis statement]

+ e.g. an argument [thesis statement] ―In this essay I will argue that in the latter 1930s streamlining was applied to a variety of objects to express a sense of speed and innovation, which often had more to do with a hopefulness about the future than actual design improvements.‖

simplify [be specific]


refining your argument [thesis statement]

+ the breakdown › what+when: streamlining, 1930s › why: to express speed, innovation, and sense of the future › twist [argument/thesis]: not about design innovation, but optimism

simplify [be specific]


building a convincing argument [research paper]

+ collect your evidence › › › ›

quotes supporting text, ideas images: illustrations, photos, visualisations other supporting data ????

[evidence will help convince your reader]

simplify [be specific]


building a convincing argument [research paper]

+ visual evidence

[photos, graphs, illustrations, renderings, visualisations, etc.]

simplify [be specific]


when and how to include illustrations

+ if the image supports, illustrates, or advances your argument + If it illustrates something specifically addressed in your writing + always describe the image or illustration + describe what is it that you want your reader to ―see‖ [let your reader know why the image is important]

+ locate your illustration with in-text reference, e.g. (Figure 1) or (Figures 1, 2)

simplify [be specific]


building a convincing argument [research paper]

+ textual evidence [direct quote,

primary source, secondary source, other written materials] "It would seem that more than function itself, simplicity is the deciding factor in the aesthetic equation. One might call the process beauty through function and simplification.‖ (Lowey, 2000, p.127).

simplify [be specific]


building a convincing argument [research paper]

+ textual evidence [direct quote,

primary source, secondary source, other written materials] ―The futuristic stands the modernist dictum of ‗form follows function‘ on its head: form does not follow function, form pretends to follow function but is actually an aesthetic end in itself, a decorative feature that ostentatiously proposes itself as a useful one.‖ (Harris, 2000, p.163).

simplify [be specific]


building a convincing argument [research paper]

+ when to use quotes › support your own (original) argument › when the quoted author‘s words are unique to such a degree that meaning is lost in paraphrasing › always introduce or contextualize your quote--never include a quote without reference to author or original context › do not use quotes for long passages of historical or otherwise unremarkable information or data › use ―‖ on either side of the quote followed by a citation

simplify [be specific]


building a convincing argument [research paper]

+ a convincing argument needs ―proof‖ + readers expect to be convinced with MORE than opinions + the better your evidence, the better [and more interesting your paper] will be

maximise your resources


When to use citations

+ when you are paraphrasing an author‘s ideas, concepts, or words

+ if you are using factual information from another source + when you are directly quoting a source--any source + when in doubt--cite your source!!!

maximise your resources


in-text citations in APA style

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/02/

maximise your resources


bibliographic citations in APA style http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/02/

Aitkens, S; Jackson, W.R., & Green, B. T. (2001). Perceptions of reality: Virtual versus ‗real‘. Adolescence 103 (2): 159163. Chen, P.Y. (2007, May 15). Unlimited potential for online capacity. Dominion Post, p. B4. Erricsen, P. (2006). Surfing the net. In D. Faber (ed.). Trends in twentieth century youth culture (4551), Oxford: Oxford University Press. Holby, G.A. (1999). Caught in the worldwideweb. New York, NY: Wheatsheaf. Samson, A.J. (2004). Teaching online. Retrieved July 11, 2007, from http://www.educationdebate.com. Shaw, P. & Reid, W.D. (2000). In a world of their own? A survey of 1,000 US college students‘ online gaming patterns. Cyberworld 23 (2): 6671. Williams, C.R. Jackson, P, Howell, B. R, Thompson, A.S. & Brown, D. (Eds.) (2003). Accounting through the ages. London: McMillan

maximise your resources


building a convincing argument [research paper]

+ IDENTIFY: Who, what, where, when + CONTEXTUALIZE your evidence + ALWAYS, always cite your sources

maximise your resources


final reminders

+ be specific – as much as possible [always] + define all new terminology—introduce all new people + make sure your evidence supports/expands your argument + a simple, well-written, logical argument is always better than a complicated/confused claim

+ read your paper carefully: do you understand and believe your argument and evidence?

maximise your resources


create an outline

+

introduction [300-500 words] + thesis statement/argument + how [scope/ method] + why [what‘s at stake/ why should we care]

+ body of essay [900-1500 words]

+ 2 or 3 case studies [specific examples/evidence ] + illustrations, visual evidence

+ conclusion [200-300 words] + bibliography

for tutorial [Friday]


Week 14: Futurologist