Departmental Overview and Scope - Visual and Performing Arts

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The Storm K ing

School

21 ST CENTURY TEACHING & LEARNING AT SKS Overview Preparation for Learning in the 21st Century 21st Century Teaching and Learning- what changed?

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SCIENCE DEPARTMENT Overview Advances in the Next Generation Science Standards Sequence Specific Course Notes Science Department Offerings 21st Century Skills

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HISTORY & SOCIAL SCIENCES DEPARTMENT

Overview & Sequence 2019-2020

Methodology Sequence and Description of Core Courses Learning Assessment Areas Areas of Demonstrated Proficiency

MATH DEPARTMENT Overview Sequence

Senior Administration Jonathan W.R. Lamb Headmaster Ray Hecht Assistant Headmaster for Finance; CFO Marek Pramuka Assistant Headmaster for Admissions & Marketing Alan Lewis Assistant Headmaster for Student & Residential Life

Overview Department Philosophy Sequence Scope - Skills and Knowledge for Success Sequence- How these skills are taught at each level

Accreditation & Memberships

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS DEPARTMENT

New York State Association of Independent Schools National Association of College Admission Counseling

Overview Sequence Visual Arts Performing Arts Overview - Skills for Knowledge and Success Visual Arts Sequence Performing Arts Sequence

The College Board

ESL DEPARTMENT

National Honor Society

English as a Second Language Instructional Framework Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency Listening Speaking Reading Writing All School Faculty Support for ESL Students Levels 1 and 2 Levels 3 and 4

Cum Laude Society

The Storm King School 314 Mountain Road Cornwall-on-Hudson NY 12520 Phone: (845) 534-7892 Fax: (845) 534-2709 www.sks.org

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WORLD LANGUAGES DEPARTMENT

Tim Lance Dean of Academics

National Association of Independent Schools

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ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

Overview Sequence Transferable Skills in the SKS World Languages Curriculum Overview and Sequence of Yearly Language Levels

Middle States Association

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21st Century Teaching and Learning at The Storm King School Overview At The Storm King School, the ultimate govl for both teachers and students is the achievement of deeper learning. Our faculty relies on approaches that actively engage students as they master the necessary content in various disciplines while encouraging the perfection and application of academic and life skills through experiential, project-based learning experiences. Discussion and collaboration are active components of virtually all of our classes. During direct instruction, faculty members engage students through frequent checks and questions. Curriculum at Storm King is built to spark creativity, encourage risk-taking, promote critical thinking, and foster collaboration. Broad course offerings and a flexible academic schedule allow students to discover their passions and take a leading role in the creation of their own personal trajectories. Their enthusiastic participation, not only in academics, but in everything the School has to offer, results in a love of learning and sets the foundation for them to become life-long inquirers.

Preparation for Learning in the 21st Century In the traditional classroom, teachers dominate discussions and the delivery of information. They make all decisions regarding instruction, content is the most important aspect of classes, and students are asked to master knowledge through constant drill and practice. In a classroom preparing students for a world where information is ubiquitous and at one’s fingertips, and where students may evolve through many career paths, the classroom becomes a more collaborative place. There, students must take control of their own learning, teachers must function as facilitators and guides, and students must work collaboratively with their teachers and one another to share ideas and learn. As much as possible we ask our teachers to insure that learning grows from authentic, interdisciplinary problems and projects. In addition, we embrace learning that extends beyond the classroom. While content is a necessary focus, the way information is processed, verified, and used is at the forefront. Students need to understand how they learn and evaluate, make decisions, and master knowledge by actually constructing it themselves. What Our Faculty Teach and Our Students Learn:    Necessary Content and skills in the disciplines of Math, Science, Humanities, English, Arts, and Foreign Languages    How to think critically, thoughtfully dissect a subject or issue, ask incisive questions, and solve problems/bring solutions    How to step beyond one’s comfort zone, take risks, fail gracefully, and succeed through persistence and hard work    How to collaborate, be flexible, and be adaptable    An understanding and appreciation for the Arts —music, theater, creative writing, visual arts —as a means of personal and creative expression    Global and cultural awareness    How to be effective leaders and citizens of their local and global communities    How to maximize benefits from using technology, and how to use it responsibly and ethically    How to use information, conduct research, create a hypothesis, acknowledge sources, and present findings While students attend classes daily in our classrooms, we extend learning beyond direct instruction in many ways. Teaching and learning are created with a focus on project-based application, trips, collaborative and interdisciplinary work, and experiential vehicles such as: Community Service, Black Rock Forest, and the surrounding Hudson Valley, extracurricular activities, athletics, and other experiences built in to our program.

21st Century Teaching and Learning – what changed? In any generational period, the goal of education is to prepare young people for their careers and roles as citizens. A focus of independent school education has always been building character and positive traits that will equip individuals, not only for college and careers, but, for meaningful lives in whatever communities they find themselves. Throughout most of the 20th century, this meant teaching students the fundamentals of traditional disciplines and subjects: English, foreign language, mathematics, science, history, the arts, and physical education and health. In most cases, these subjects were taught with the focus of delivering a high level of predetermined content and skills. As the 20th century evolved, key advancements impacted schools. The development of the computer and its increasing portability increased the amount of available information and the ability to share it globally. In the early 1900s, most information was held in books and libraries and the minds of a small number of experts in any given field. As the millennium approached, anyone with a cell phone could carry a large percentage of the world’s information in their pocket. Because of these changes, the priorities of what students need to know have changed rapidly. In the past, schools prepared young people for lives and careers that largely followed the pattern of their parents. Today, it has become increasingly common for individuals to change career paths multiple times during their lives. Therefore, schools must prepare students to be flexible; equipping them to meet our time’s ever-changing parameters and access new careers that may not have existed at the time they started school.

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The Storm K ing School Overview and Sequence 2019-2020 Science Department Overview

Sience Department Faculty Paul Feffer, PhD Science Department Chair Kristen Barbosa Amelia Kolach Gene Murphy, PhD Lindsey Plummer Michael J. Vondras Jonathon Zenz

The Science Department educates students in the scientific process, guides students in the use of technological and mathematical tools, prepares students for higher education and STEM careers, and generally provides personal enrichment to be an informed citizen as many global societal issues revolve around the acquisition and interpretation of scientific data. The program is heavily influenced by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)1, which are based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education developed by the National Research Council. Figure 1 below shows an excerpt from the NGSS Front Matter2 that summarizes its educational philosophy. In addition, AP courses follow syllabi approved by the College Board3 covering established skills and content that prepare students for their respective AP exams. Finally, the Quest mini-term classes provide an opportunity for the students to take a deep dive into specific subjects such as engineering design, biochemistry, forensics and astronomy. Advances in the Next Generation Science Standards Figure 1 Every NGSS standard has three dimensions: disciplinary core ideas (content), scientific and engineering practices, and cross-cutting concepts. Currently, most state and district standards express these dimensions as separate entities, leading to their separation in both instruction and assessment. The integration of rigorous content and application reflects how science and engineering is practiced in the real world.

Mission Statement The Storm King School, a global community, prepares students by inspiring them toward academic success and confidence in an inclusive and diverse learning environment that embraces character, balance, and trust.

Scientific and Engineering Practices and Crosscutting Concepts are designed to be taught in context – not in a vacuum. The NGSS encourage integration with multiple core concepts throughout each year. Science concepts build coherently across K-12. The emphasis of the NGSS is a focused and coherent progression of knowledge from grade band to grade band, allowing for a dynamic process of building knowledge throughout a student’s entire K-12 scientific education.

Core Values Truth, Respect, Responsibility

The NGSS focus on a smaller set of Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCI) that students should know by the time they graduate from high school, focusing on deeper understanding and application of content.

Accreditation & Memberships Middle States Association National Association of Independent Schools

Science and engineering are integrated into science education by raising engineering design to the same level as scientific inquiry in science classroom instruction at all levels, and by emphasizing the core ideas of engineering design and technology applications.

New York State Association of Independent Schools

The NGSS content is focused on preparing students for college and careers. The NGSS are aligned, by grade level and cognitive demand with the English Language Arts and Mathematics Common Core State Standards. This allows an opportunity both for science to be a part of a child’s comprehensive education as well as ensuring an aligned sequence of learning in all content areas. The three sets of standards overlap and are reinforcing in meaningful and substantive ways.

National Association of College Admission Counseling The College Board National Honor Society Cum Laude Society

Figure 1: Excerpt from the NGSS Front Matter that summarizes its educational philosophy.

The Storm King School

Sequence

314 Mountain Road Cornwall-on-Hudson NY 12520 Phone: (845) 534-7892 Fax: (845) 534-2709 www.sks.org

Four-year students are required to take three science classes and a fourth class that is either math or science. Beginning in 2017-18, all freshman take introductory physics; sophomores, chemistry or honors chemistry; and juniors and seniors, their choice of biology, physics, chemistry, environmental science, and/or computer science. At the present time, AP classes are offered in all subjects except environmental science. https://www.nextgenscience.org https://www.nextgenscience.org/get-to-know 3 https://www.collegeboard.org/ 1

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Overview & Sequence • 1


Specific Course Notes 8th Grade Science: Generally informed by standard Earth Science curricula, allowing for instructor preferences and the incorporation of local resources such as Black Rock Forest and the surrounding Hudson Valley. 9th Grade Physics: Generally follows the Modeling Method of instruction and an algebra-based mechanics curriculum developed by the American Modeling Teachers Association (AMTA) as adapted for the typical 9th-grade-level of mathematics.

AP Biology: Follows a College Board approved syllabus. Computer Science Principles: Generally informed by the corresponding AP curriculum. AP Computer Science Principles: Follows a College Board approved syllabus. AP Computer Science A: Follows a College Board approved syllabus.

10th Grade Chemistry: Employs inquiry-based techniques, model development, and collaborative approaches informed by AMTAdeveloped methods and content.

Environmental Science: Generally informed by popular environmental science textbooks as well as by current world events, and allows for significant instructor flexibility in using local resources and project-based instructional methods.

10th Grade Honors Chemistry: Covers course material and extension material at a faster pace than the non-honors course.

Physics: Follows the Modeling Method of instruction and an algebrabased mechanics curriculum developed by and adapted from the AMTA.

Advanced Chemistry: Covers skills and content substantially equivalent to the AP Chemistry curriculum.

AP Physics C Mechanics: Follows a College Board approved syllabus.

Biology: Generally informed by the AP Biology curriculum (abridged), and allows for instructor flexibility in using local resources and projectbased instructional methods.

ASP Science: Offerings are based on, and adapted to the grade level and learning needs of the enrolled students each year. Significant flexibility is given to the instructor.

Science Department Offerings A diagram of the Science Department offerings is shown in Figure 2 below. The 8th through 10th grade science courses are typically required. Generally, 11-12th grade electives may be taken in any sequence provided the student satisfies prerequisites and obtains teacher recommendations in the case of advanced courses. With departmental permission, students may take AP courses without taking the corresponding non-AP course. Figure 1

8th Grade 8th Grade Science

9th Grade

10th Grade

11-12th Grade

Advanced/Electives

9th Grade Physics

Chemistry

Biology

AP Biology

Honors Chemistry

Physics

AP Physics C Mechanics1,2

Computer Science Principles

AP Computer Science Principles1

Environmental Science

AP Computer Science A

ASP Science4

Advanced Chemistry

Figure 2: Course offerings by grade Outstanding achievement in prior science class & teacher recommendation suggested.

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Prior successful completion or concurrent registration in calculus required. In the event there is an insufficient number of students with the calculus prerequisite in a given year, AP Physics 1 may be offered in lieu of AP Physics C Mechanics.

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Prior experience in computer programming recommended.

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Academic Support Program courses based on enrollment.

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Figure 2: Excerpt from the NGSS Front Matter that summarizes its educational philosophy.

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21st Century Skills The courses in the Science Department are taught with 21st Century Skills in mind (Figure 3). In general, content is presented with an emphasis on critical thinking and problem solving in lieu of rote memorization. Communication and collaboration are promoted through group work and presentation. Creativity and innovation are developed whenever the engineering-design cycle is employed, typically within a single unit of a curriculum. Digital literacy skills are promoted through research projects in all courses, and treated most extensively in the Computer Science Principles classes. And career and life skills are developed throughout the Storm King School experience, both in and out of classes. Figure 3 Learning and innovation skills critical thinking and problem solving communication and collaboration creativity and innovation Digital literacy skills information literacy media literacy information and communication technologies (ICT) literacy Career and life skills flexibility and adaptability initiative and self-direction social and cross-cultural interaction productivity and accountability

Figure 3: Skills commonly referred to as “21st Century Skills”

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The Storm K ing School Overview and Sequence 2019-2020 History & Social Science Department Methodology

Department Faculty Michael Hauser Department Chair Dennis Costello Martha Kwon Alan Lewis Laura Mowat Madeleine Schade Lisa Shrem

Mission Statement The Storm King School, a global community, prepares students by inspiring them toward academic success and confidence in an inclusive and diverse learning environment that embraces character, balance, and trust.

In developing the overview and sequence for each grade level of History and Social Science courses, Learning Assessment Areas shape the skills, projects, activities and methods used in the course. Areas of demonstrated proficiency assess the student’s ability to progress through the sequence of department courses by focusing on the student’s mastery of the critical developing skills of analysis, knowledge, organization, and communication.

Sequence and Description of Core Courses 8th Grade Middle School History: A course that complements courses for the 8th grade in Science and English. The class focuses on local history (e.g. Native Americans in New York, Revolutionary War in New York, History of the Environmental movement and Storm King Mountain) and advances on to other current and classical topics in history.

9th Grade: Global History: (interdisciplinary with Global Art) A course that combines study in Art and History to better understand the achievements and shortcomings of civilizations and cultures of the past and present. Instead of studying history chronologically, we study civilizations and cultures by focusing on a select group of regions of the world. By studying the art of those civilizations and cultures at the same time we study their history, we learn far more than the history those peoples chronicled in their writing and archives. Rather, we will gain unique insights into how people viewed and interpreted the world around them. ESL and ASP Global History are offered as needed.

Core Values Truth, Respect, Responsibility

Accreditation & Memberships Middle States Association National Association of Independent Schools New York State Association of Independent Schools National Association of College Admission Counseling

10th Grade: U.S. Studies/History: (interdisciplinary with American Literature) This course reviews the main events and issues of U.S. History. We gain a greater understanding of the impact of events and select people in U.S. History as well as the influence those events and people have on the U.S. and the world today. We start the course by examining the birth of the new nation and the ideals and values so important to its founders. Quickly, we will see how the Civil War so fundamentally challenged the union and still affects the U.S. today. We study the unique melting pot of cultures, ethnicities, faiths, and nationalities that continue to characterize the United States. We then focus on new challenges related to two world wars and economic depression and the boom of technology and globalization. We conclude with examinations of the race and gender in the United States as well as contemporary conflict, security, and war.

The College Board

ESL, ASP, and Honors U.S. Studies/History are offered as needed.

National Honor Society

Department Elective Courses:

Cum Laude Society

These courses are primarily offered to 11th and 12th grade students and normally offered in at least one of the two semesters each year.

The Storm King School 314 Mountain Road Cornwall-on-Hudson NY 12520 Phone: (845) 534-7892 Fax: (845) 534-2709 www.sks.org

Comparative Government     International Relations     Advanced Macroeconomics     Advanced Microeconomics      Personal Finance anv Business     Psychology     AP Psychology      Advanced Topics in History

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Learning Assessment Areas Knowledgeable Person: A knowledgeable person has a solid information base and understands the fundamental principles, skills, and processes of a discipline. Complex Thinker: A complex thinker makes connections between concepts and information, thinks critically and creatively, is an informed decision maker, flexible problem solver, and considers multiple perspectives. Information Processor: A skilled information processor is persistent and inquisitive, searches for a variety of information sources, interprets data with an awareness or possible bias, and understands the need to support conclusions with verifiable confidence. Effective Communicator: An effective communicator expresses ideas clearly, accurately and gracefully, is an active listener, successfully uses multiple modes of communication, presents quality products, and is respectful. Self-directed Learner: A self-directed learner is curious and selfreflective, takes responsibility for his/her own learning, applies learning strategies, and challenges him/herself. Collaborative Worker: A collaborative worker is invested in the success of the group, works cooperatively and compassionately with others, negotiates conflicting interests peacefully, and is both self-aware and attuned to group dynamics.

Areas of Demonstrated Proficiency Analysis: How well you demonstrated an understanding of all parts of the assigned task through class and individual study. A. You fully explained all parts of the assigned task with specific details. You included an in-depth analysis of ideas and relationships related to the task. Historical facts, events, and concepts were fully developed. All of your ideas were focused on the assigned task. B. You explained all parts of the assigned task with specific details. Parts may have been more or less developed than others. You included an effective analysis of ideas and relationships related to the task. Historical facts, events, and concepts were well developed. Most of your ideas were focused on the assigned task. C You explained most parts of the assigned task with some details. You included analysis of some ideas and relationships related to the task. Historical facts, events, and concepts were developed. Most of your ideas were focused on the assigned task. D You addressed the assigned task, but the explanations were incomplete. Ideas and relationships related to the task were only partially addressed. Historical facts, events, and concepts were minimally developed. Some of your ideas were focused on the assigned task. F Your attempts to address the assigned task were unclear or incorrect. Ideas and relationships related to the task were not addressed. Your ideas were unclear, irrelevant, or incorrect. You did not write enough to demonstrate an understanding of the assigned task.

Knowledge: How much relevant, correct prior knowledge and social studies vocabulary and concepts you included in your writing. A Your paper contained extensive correct historical information. You used extensive social studies vocabulary throughout your paper. You effectively used the provided documents. B Your paper contained relevant and correct historical information.. You consistently used relevant social studies vocabulary in your paper. You used the provided documents appropriately. C Your paper contained generally relevant and correct historical information. You generally used appropriate social studies vocabulary in most of your paper. You generally used the provided documents appropriately. D Your paper contained a mixture of correct and incorrect historical information. You support was limited to information in the class provided documents. You used a mixture of appropriate and inappropriate social studies vocabulary. Sometimes you used the documents appropriately. At times, you simply copied information from the documents. F Your paper did not contain correct historical information. You did not use appropriate social studies vocabulary. You did not use the provided documents appropriately. You did not write enough to demonstrate prior knowledge. Organization: How well you organized your ideas in writing or speaking. A All parts of your organizational plan were effective and appropriate. Your ideas were effectively sequenced. Your introduction and conclusion were effective for the assigned task and appropriate to the scientific purpose. You used an extensive variety of transition words and phrases. All of your ideas are logically linked to the ideas that precede and follow it. B Most parts of your organizational plan were effective and appropriate. Your ideas were appropriately sequenced. Your introduction and conclusion are effective for the assigned task. You used extensive variety of transition words and phrases. C Your organizational plan is generally appropriate. Your ideas were clearly sequenced. Your introduction and conclusion were clear. You used some transition words. D You demonstrated little evidence of an organizational plan or organizational plan. Your ideas were not clearly sequenced in parts of the paper. Your paper lacked an introduction or conclusion or contained an ineffective introduction or conclusion. Your transitions were ineffective. F Your attempts at organization were not effective. Your ideas were not sequenced in a clear order. Your paper lacked an introduction and/or conclusion. You did not use transitions. There is not enough written to demonstrate an organizational plan

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Communication: How well you demonstrated control of sentence formation, usage, and mechanics (citations, punctuation, spelling, capitalization, and paragraph breaks) in both writing and speaking. A Your sentences were extensively varied, clear, and effective. All elements of usage were consistently correct (subject-verb agreement, standard word forms, pronoun-antecedent agreement, tense). All elements of mechanics were consistently correct (citation of original sources, internal punctuation, spelling, capitalization, paragraph breaks). There were very few errors in your paper. B Your sentences were varied, clear and generally effective. Most elements of usage and mechanics were consistently correct. There were few errors in your paper. C Your sentences were generally correct. There were occasional fragments and run-ons. Usage and mechanics are generally effective. Errors did not prevent the reader from understanding your ideas. D Your sentences were generally correct. There were occasional fragments and run-ons. Your paper contained a mixture of correct and incorrect usage and mechanics. Some errors interfered with the reader’s understanding of your ideas. F Your sentences were incorrect, inappropriate, or unclear. Usage and mechanics were incorrect, inappropriate, or unclear.

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The Storm K ing School Overview and Sequence 2019-2020 Math Department Overview

Math Department Faculty Timothy Lance, PhD Math Department Chair James Bennett Joseph Graziosi Jeanette McMahon Laura Mowat Gene Murphy, PhD Lindsey Plummer Jonathon Zenz

Mission Statement The Storm King School, a global community, prepares students by inspiring them toward academic success and confidence in an inclusive and diverse learning environment that embraces character, balance, and trust.

Core Values Truth, Respect, Responsibility

Accreditation & Memberships Middle States Association National Association of Independent Schools New York State Association of Independent Schools National Association of College Admission Counseling The College Board National Honor Society Cum Laude Society

The Storm King School 314 Mountain Road Cornwall-on-Hudson NY 12520 Phone: (845) 534-7892 Fax: (845) 534-2709 www.sks.org

The Department of Mathematics offers a wide variety of courses to all skill levels, starting with eighth grade pre-algebra, all the way to advanced calculus and advanced topics in mathematics. Rather than paint a picture of what a ‘typical’ grade level student is capable of, we have a number of possible sequences, based upon ability level. If a student begins at SKS in the eighth grade, they would likely take pre-algebra, followed by Algebra 1 in ninth grade, then geometry, algebra 2 and ending their Storm King career with precalculus. This is by no means the only route, however. Based on current students, the path could also follow: pre-algebra

algebra 1

geometry

algebra 2

precalculus

pre-algebra

algebra 1

geometry & algebra 2

precalculus

pre-algebra

algebra 1

geometry & algebra 2

honors precalculus

Algebra 1

geometry & algebra 2

precalculus

Algebra 1

geometry & algebra 2

honors precalculus

Algebra 2

precalculus

calculus

AP calculus

Algebra 2

precalculus

calculus

AP Statistics

Algebra 2

honors precalculus

precalculus

calculus

AP calculus

Advanced calculus

AP calculus

AP calculus

calculus AP calculus

calculus AP calculus

advanced topics

AP statistics

advanced topics

This is by no means an exhaustive list, with thousands of permutations possible. The only typical feature of an SKS graduate in mathematics is the ability to be exposed to as much math as they desire. Certainly, a successful student has developed and honed 21st Century skills. 1. Communicate Clearly: Math has the virtue of having clearly correct and incorrect answers. Every math class requires students to present problems at the board, offering justification. This helps students not only gain comfort with public speaking, but comfort and experience with what is needed for the right answer as well as comfort with being wrong. The formal math argument is first introduced to students in Geometry, and occupies all subsequent classes. 2. Identify and Solve Problems: One of the most difficult aspects of real world math is determining what the actual problem is and formulating a plan of attack. The lower level classes, including pre-algebra, algebra 1, algebra 2, geometry and precalculus instill the building blocks needed for problem solving. In addition to these building blocks, every class incorporates hands-on, problem based learning, such as developing a tool to accurately estimate unknown heights, using rudimentary objects like protractors and right triangle geometry. The students develop a plan of attack as well as the ability to criticize their own results and identify flaws. The problems get more complicated as the courses progress, including the extraneous information typical in calculus and statistics and developing the ability to identify the ‘real’ issues. With the introduction to proof and real world problems, students learn to think creatively within the constructs of mathematics, identifying and testing rigidity of those constructs. 3. Access and Utilize Information Critically: Every math class utilizes both ‘classical’ mathematics and contemporary problems. Technology is a fact of life and not incorporating it does a disservice to the student. However, appropriate use is stressed. Calculators are a powerful tool, but are at their most useful when they are an aid and not a crutch. Many classes, such as

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geometry, algebra, calculus and AP Statistics incorporate research projects, which rely heavily on developing a students ability to harvest, process and interpret technology and information. 4. Acquire Knowledge in Core Disciplines Through Various Strategies: The Storm King School counts among its constituents citizens from all over the United States and around the world. As such, everyone is coming to campus with different learning approaches, at all different levels. Thus, every math class, as a necessity, draws on many sources, from classical approaches from all over the world, to studying math in nature in Black Rock to utilizing the internet. We also instill both respect and identification of limitations of all approaches. We are building students who can educate themselves and evolve as learners throughout their lives, in an ever-changing world. 5. Engage in All That The School Offers Beyond The Classroom: All classes take advantage of the rich natural and cultural environment that The Storm King School is located in the middle of. Some previous classes have done trips into Black Rock studying geometry and infinite series in nature, from leaves to ice and attended the Math museum in New York City. Faculty are open-minded and actively engage with students to harness interests and educate most effectively. 6. Approach The Work With The Understanding That It Is Preparation For College and Life: Starting at the lowest level, each math class provides and teaches building blocks in preparation for higher levels. The higher level classes in turn teach students to interpret, manipulate and sometimes invent tools to solve real world problems, from college application to navigation throughout life.

Sequence 8th Grade Pre-Algebra Expectations: 1. Innate comfort with basic number systems Scientific notation word problems Arithmetic with numbers in scientific notation Scientific notation Comfort with powers of ten Exponential properties Negative exponents Approximating irrational numbers Irrational numbers Subsets of the real numbers The real numbers Square roots and cube roots Repeating decimals 2. Comfort with equations of one variable Two sided equations Equations with parentheses Cardinality of solution sets Equations and word problems Equations and geometry Linear function graphing Graphing proportional relationships Solutions to linear equations Slope Intercept Form Properties of slope Slope Intercepts Functions and Function notation Linear models Recognizing functions Non-linear functions Systems of equations Solving systems Elimination Substitution Graphing Systems of equations word problems

3. Solid introduction to Geometry Triangle geometry Triangle angles Pythagorean theorem proofs Pythagorean theorem Congruence and similarity Volume Translations Rotations Reflections

Algebra 1 Expectations: 1. Comfort with basic math Manipulation of expressions Introduction to functions and expressions Introduction of variables Basic operations: Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division 2. Comfort with basic algebra Solving inequalities algebraically Solving equalities Graphing inequalities Graphing equalities Basic linear graphs including absolute value Solving systems Solving graphically Linear graphs Solving algebraically Substitution Elimination Algebraic manipulation 3. Comfort with basic functions Linear equations Polynomial functions Factoring Working with exponents Radicals Overview & Sequence • 10


Graphing roots Manipulating radical equations

Geometry Entirely Proof Based Course Expectations: 1. Lines Parallel and perpendicular Angles 2. Triangle Triangle congruence Points of concurrency in triangles Polygons and quadrilateral proofs Similarity proofs 3. Trigonometry (start with SOHCAHTOA and finish with trig identity proofs) Triangle trigonometry Laws of Sines and Cosines SOHCAHTOA and trigonometric functions Trigonometric identity proofs 4. Coordinate Geometry and Conics Coordinate systems Euclidean Polar Circles Plane algebraic manipulation Surface Area Volume

Algebra 2 Expectations: 1. Comfort with equations and inequalities Identifying patterns and writing expressions Algebraic expressions Absolute value equations and inequalities Solving equations and inequalities 2. Ability to identify and manipulate functions and graphs Linear models and correlation -slope-intercept form -standard form -point-slope form Vertical line test Domain and range Vertical line test Direct variation Linear functions Graphing on a calculator and by hand Entering data into calculator Linear regression on calculator Graphical transformations Absolute value equations Transformations Inequalities 3. Solving, Graphing and Manipulating Functions and Systems Linear Systems

Solving algebraically Substitution Elimination Solving graphically Systems with three variables Quadratic Equations Quadratic functions and transformations Graphing Quadratics Vertex and axis of symmetry Standard form Vertex form Modeling with quadratic functions - quad reg on calculator Factoring Solving quadratic equations The quadratic formula Completing the Square Complex numbers Quadratic systems Polynomial Functions Zeros and multiplicity Solving polynomial equations Rational root theorem Conjugate root theorem Descartes’ Rule of Sign The fundamental theorem of algebra Binomial Theorem Pascal’s Triangle Transforming polynomials Modeling with polynomials Roots and Rational Exponents Properties of exponents Multiplying and dividing Rational exponents Solving radical equations Graphing radical functions Function operations Composition of Functions Inverse Functions Rational Functions Direct and inverse variation Reciprocal function Graphing and solving Discontinuity Vertical and horizontal asymptotes Adding, subtracting, multiplying, dividing 4. Comfort with exponential and logarithmic functions Exponential models and logarithmic scale Properties of exponential functions Transformations of exponential functions

Regular Precalculus Expectations: 1. Working understanding of functions and their graphs Trigonometric functions and graphs Exponential functions and graphs Logarithmic functions and graphs Rational functions and graphs Polynomial functions and graphs Overview & Sequence • 11


Graph shifts Graph symmetry Inverse functions and graphs Horizontal and Vertical Line Tests Domain and Range Definition of function 2. Problem solving Trigonometric functions Sines and Cosines Sinusoidal graphs Polynomial functions Interest function and growth/decay Exponential graphs and logarithmic graphs Properties of logs Exponentials and logs 3. Familiarity and Comfort with Trigonometric Functions Problem solving with trigonometric functions Free use and manipulation of the unit circle Proving trigonometric identities Application of formulas Sum, difference and multiple angle formulae Knowledge and use of law of sines and cosines Vector analysis and parametric equations 4. Relationships between calculus and geometry Understanding the relationship between systems of equations and their graphs Matrix manipulation and problem solving Back substitution Conics 5. Basic Understanding of Discrete Mathematics Basic probability Combinatorics Permutations and combinations Basic understanding of series Partial Sums Geometric and arithmetic Sigma notation Sequences

Honors Precalculus Expectations: 1. Comfort with functions and graphs Modeling with functions Graphical transformations Parametric equations Building functions and composition Basic functions and their graphs Functions and properties Definition of a function Review of factoring, quadratic formula and absolute value 2. Fluency with polynomials, power functions, rational functions, exponentials and logarithms Graphs of rational functions Graphs of polynomials Complex zeros and the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra Real zeros of polynomial functions

Asymptotes and eventual behavior Polynomial functions of higher degree Power functions and monomials Linear and quadratic functions and modeling Mathematics of finance Solving using exponentials and logarithms Properties of logs Exponential graphs Exponential functions 3. Fluency with Triangle Trigonometry Solving problems with trigonometry Inverse trigonometric functions and graphs Graphs of Sinusoids Sines and cosines Graphs of composite trigonometric functions Basic trigonometric functions Circular trigonometric functions and values Trigonometric functions of acute angles Angles and measure Law of Cosines Law of Sines Multiple angle identities Sum and difference identities Proving trigonometric identities Fundamental identities

Regular Calculus Expectations: 1. Understand what a continuous function is Need to understand the difference between essential and removable singularities Need intermediate Value Theorem Need practical definition of continuity Need understanding of handed limits Need and understanding of limits Need an understanding of what a function is 2. Understand what a derivative is and how to find it Need exponential and logarithmic derivatives. Need logarithmic differentiation Need implicit differentiation Need product, quotient, chain and trig derivatives Need to see the difference between continuity and differentiability and counterexamples Need limit definition of derivative to both understand derivatives graphically and to appreciate shortcuts. 3. Understand graphic and practical applications of the derivative Need to know how to graph functions using first and second derivatives Need Optimization Principle from first derivative Need to be able to handle optimization problems Need Optimization Principle from first derivative Need Rolle’s Theorem and Mean Value Theorem Need Optimization Principle from first derivative Need to see Newton’s Method Need to be able to handle related rates

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4. Understand what in integral is and how it relates to derivatives Need to get the area picture Need Fundamental Theorem of Calculus

4. Understand what in integral is and how it relates to derivatives Need to get the area picture Need Fundamental Theorem of Calculus

5. Be able to handle a number of types of integrals Be able to correctly interpret which method of integration is appropriate Be able to handle rationalizing substitutions Be able to handle partial fraction decomposition Be able to integrate by parts Be able to trigonometric powers integrals, most especially powers of sine and cosine Be able to handle u-substitutions

5. Be able to handle a number of types of integrals Be able to correctly interpret which method of integration is appropriate Be able to handle rationalizing substitutions Be able to handle partial fraction decomposition Be able to integrate by parts Be able to trigonometric powers integrals, most especially powers of sine and cosine Be able to handle u-substitutions Be able to handle inverse trigonometric integrals Need to handle trigonometric substitutions

6. Understand definite integrals and area Understand surface area of solids of revolution Understand and use arc length Understand volumes of solids of revolution, and application of disks, washers and shells, as appropriate Understand the difference between a definite integral and area under a curve Computational understanding area using integrals Computational understanding of definite integrals Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Part 2

Advanced Calculus Expectations: 1. Understand what a continuous function is Need to understand the difference between essential and removable singularities Need intermediate Value Theorem Need practical definition of continuity Need understanding of handed limits Need and understanding of limits Need formal definition of limit Need an understanding of what a function is 2. Understand what a derivative is and how to find it Need exponential and logarithmic derivatives. Need logarithmic differentiation Need implicit differentiation Need product, quotient, chain and trig derivatives Need to see the difference between continuity and differentiability and counterexamples Need limit definition of derivative to both understand derivatives graphically and to appreciate shortcuts.

6. Understand definite integrals and area Understand surface area of solids of revolution Understand and use arc length Understand volumes of solids of revolution, and application of disks, washers and shells, as appropriate Understand the difference between a definite integral and area under a curve Computational understanding area using integrals Computational understanding of definite integrals Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Part 2 Need to see and understand some basic ordinary differential equations Need Euler’s method Need slope fields Need separable differential equations Need u-substitutions 7. Understand sequences and series Need to have a working appreciation for different sequences Need to be able to apply Taylor and Maclaurin series Need to understand and be able to find radius and interval of convergence Need to see power series Need to be able to determine convergence for a variety of series Need some reference series like geometric, harmonic, pNeed nth term test Need Integral Test Need methods of integration Need alternating series test Need alternating series Need ratio and root tests

3. Understand graphic and practical applications of the derivative Need to know how to graph functions using first and second derivatives Need Optimization Principle from first derivative Need to be able to handle optimization problems Need Optimization Principle from first derivative Need Rolle’s Theorem and Mean Value Theorem Need Optimization Principle from first derivative Need to see Newton’s Method Need to see linearization Need to be able to handle related rates

Overview & Sequence • 13


The Storm K ing School Overview and Sequence 2019-2020 English Department Overview

English Department Faculty Jeremy Freeman English Department Chair Carolyn Mendlewski Peter Rowe Lisa Shrem

Mission Statement The Storm King School, a global community, prepares students by inspiring them toward academic success and confidence in an inclusive and diverse learning environment that embraces character, balance, and trust.

It is our goal at SKS to provide our students with the opportunity to master English language skills that will develop effective critical thinking, writing, and speaking skills while reading a variety of works of established literary merit. No matter the discipline students pursue beyond SKS, students who learn how to critically engage a text and respond with their own original thinking, analysis and commentary will be better equipped to meet the demands of higher education and career pursuits with a deep understanding of the value of humanistic and holistic approaches. 1. Commit to the discipline of reading on a daily basis 2. Understand great works of fiction and non-fiction through various methods of literary interpretation 3. Demonstrate a working knowledge of terms related to literature and literary criticism 4. Produce writing that is creative, insightful, original, logical and organized; to produce compositions in non-textual modalities i.e. aural essays, video essays, public speaking 5. Apply an effective personal writing process to a variety of writing requirements 6. To learn creative problem solving and innovative techniques that enrich the ability to do extended projects in all disciplines. 7. Prepare for project based learning in college and beyond. 8. Prepare for a project based, collaborative, and global workforce.

Department Philosophy Core Values Truth, Respect, Responsibility

Accreditation & Memberships Middle States Association National Association of Independent Schools New York State Association of Independent Schools National Association of College Admission Counseling The College Board National Honor Society Cum Laude Society

The Storm King School 314 Mountain Road Cornwall-on-Hudson NY 12520 Phone: (845) 534-7892 Fax: (845) 534-2709 www.sks.org

The goal of teaching students to read, write, and think is central to the SKS English department. Writing is a thinking tool. In a lecture on the topic of “Teaching Writing in a Digital Age”, Cynthia Selfe, Humanities Distinguished Professor in the English Department at Ohio State University, points out how since the mid 1800’s the so called ‘poor writing ability’ of the teenage, high school generation has always been a great concern, especially in times of cultural flux. Today, older generations fear that the ‘digital natives’ will graduate high school or college without having learned to write properly and without having cultivated the attention span necessary to digest the texts previous generations held so dear. This is an ongoing debate, and English teachers more than most are aware of the challenges of teaching college level reading and writing in a college preparatory environment. But to say that older generations are better equipped and skilled in writing and composition is to ignore the fact that the current generation of high school and college students is actually quite literate but in a different, non text biased way. Selfe argues that teenagers are capable of digesting large amounts of data and when pursuing topics of their own interest and curiosity, they are able to produce innovative compositions (through different modalities) that go beyond text-centered traditional literacy approaches You can read more about this in Selfe and Hawisher’s article “Globalism and Modality in a Digitized World”. What this work reinforces is that the current high school generation’s ways of digesting text, image and audio though their near constant connection to the internet is something to be taken quite seriously. When given a chance to organize their thinking, to follow their curiosity, and to mix creativity with critical thinking, high school students have a lot to say and are in many ways, as Selfe argues, the leaders in a new type of literacy. The role of an English teacher at SKS is to provide an arena for students to hone their powers of thinking and to become more aware of what moves their thinking and what piques their curiosity. The content within a course, the subject matter, literary works, articles, resources, become the grist for the mill. Thus the cannon and traditional modes of writing are still necessary, but if English Overview & Sequence • 14


teachers are to evoke writing that is thoughtful, interesting to read and original then students have to find their voice; students have to discover to write for themselves, and they have to begin to care about what they write about. They must begin to see themselves as writers, humans with a unique perspective and with a set of experiences that equip them with knowledge they can use to engage in a dialogue with texts and other media. Moreover we can aid them in the neverending work of sifting through the enormous amounts of information authentic and teach them to value authentic sources in their pursuits.

Genres, Modern American Fiction. Juniors are offered an Honors section in British Literature for those students who demonstrate an exceptional aptitude for reading and writing and who are on track to take English Composition and Literature during their Senior year.

In short, the goal of an English teacher at SKS is to engage students with great works and awaken in students the belief that they are writers and that what they have to say is worth saying and striving to say. Additionally teachers must render available a number of approaches and contexts.

The skills listed below are general to the Department as a whole, and are further defined by courses of study within grade level and specific class.

SCOPE - Skills and Knowledge for Success Each student that takes courses in the English Department will be prepared for college life and beyond by learning these specific skills.

Sequence 8th grade English: Introduction to World Literature 9th grade English: World Literature 10th grade English: U.S Studies Literature 11th grade: Honors British Literature 11th/12th grade: Electives SKS students are required to take one English course credit each year. SKS English courses focus increasingly on close reading and writing about literature. Writing skills will focus on developing substance and style. All courses will teach the fundamentals of grammar and also pursue a vocabulary study that supports SAT preparation. Eighth Grade andFreshman English will introduce literary genres and critical thinking about literature. Sophomore classes focus on American Literature. Junior and Senior level electives range from the following rotating courses: Mythology and Literature, Philosophy, Film and Literature, Studies in

Research, critical and expository writing Generative writing and Formal Writing Active reading and annotating Active listening and discussion Peer editing Inquiry based analysis of texts Knowledge of Literary terms Rhetorical Devices Knowledge of various Critical Approaches to Literature Creativity through poetry, prose, and multimodal compositions Innovation Critical thinking/problem solving Metacognitive inquiry of individual students’ reading and writing processes Collaboration Social and cross-cultural skills Flexibility/adaptability Leadership Responsibility Oral Presentation Fundamentals of Grammar, Mechanics and the conventions of academic writing Fluency in MLA and APA style

SEQUENCE- How these skills are taught at each level 8th grade English: Introduction to World Literature Curriculum Course Objectives

Grade 8 and 9 Gain an awareness of basic sentence and paragraph structure Gain an introduction to Diane Hacker’s A Pocket Style Manual as a tool and writer’s reference Able to engage in the editing process in a meaningful way in editing writing for grammatical errors

Grammar, mechanics, and Usage

Gain a working knowledge of basic grammatical conventions and take an interest and ownership of written work and compositions Know the basics of punctuation Attempt peer editing exercises Engage in composition of multiple drafts for each writing assignment

Overview & Sequence • 15


Curriculum Course Objectives

Grade 8 and 9 Through class discussions, projects, activities and examinations, demonstrate appropriate knowledge, comprehension, analysis and evaluation of assigned reading

Literature and Reading

Able to demonstrate a knowledge with the basic literary genres and a working knowledge of how the setting, plot-structure, character, theme, point of view, imagery and symbols work within a text Learn the value of active reading and marginalia and annotations Begin to build a working knowledge of literary terms Read and participate effectively in academic activities related to at least one Shakespeare play Able to apply an effective, personal writing process to a variety of writing requirements Able to produce a multi-paragraph essay Participate in generative writing

Composition and modes of discourse

Make use of a writing notebook Experiment with Memoir writing Be familiar with basic modes of discourse (description, narration, exposition, classification, comparison and contrast, persuasion /argument Attempt an aural and/or video essay project related to a work of literature being studied in the class

Research and documentation

Satisfactorily complete a research and writing requirement focused on some aspect of literature 2-4 pages in length quoting from 2-3 sources Demonstrate the ability to use MLA documentation Able to define, recognize and avoid plagiarism Demonstrate appropriate vocabulary proficiency at the grade 9 level (Level E)

Vocabulary

Able to use context and appropriate references to understand denotations, connotations, and correct pronunciation of unfamiliar words encountered in reading Completely recite from memory worthwhile passages from literature

Speaking and listening

Effectively participate in class discussions both as speaker and listener Gain an ease in sharing work produced inside and outside of class Collaborate with others in dialectical notebook sessions and blogging

Student responsibility and miscellaneous

Practice basic organizational skills and maintain a ‘writing notebook’ (maintaining assignments, note taking, organizing notes and handouts, following oral and written instructions, timely submission of work, and effective study habits)

Sophomore English: U.S. Studies Curriculum Course Objectives

Grade 10 Improve in the mastery of basic sentence and paragraph structure Gain a working knowledge of the grammatical conventions outlined in Dian Hackers A Pocket Style Manual as a tool and writer’s reference Able to engage in the editing process in a meaningful way in editing writing for grammatical errors

Grammar, mechanics, and Usage

Gain a working knowledge of basic grammatical conventions and take an interest and ownership of written work and compositions Master the basics of punctuation Improve in peer editing effectiveness Engage in composition of multiple drafts for each writing assignment

Overview & Sequence • 16


Curriculum Course Objectives

Grade 10 Through class discussions, projects, activities and examinations, demonstrate appropriate knowledge, comprehension, analysis and evaluation of assigned reading Able to do all 9th grade analysis tasks plus be introduced to analysis of syntax and style of a passage

Literature and Reading

Able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the significant ideas, periods and authors of American literature Continue to practice active reading and refine marginalia practices Build on a working knowledge of literary terms Read and participate effectively in academic activities related to at least one Shakespeare play Able to apply an effective, personal writing process to a variety of writing requirements Gain ease with production of multi-paragraphed essays 3-5 pages in length Participate in generative writing’

Composition and modes of discourse

Make use of a writing notebook Continue practice of memoir writing Be familiar with basic modes of discourse (description, narration, exposition, classification, comparison and contrast, persuasion /argument Attempt an aural and/or video essay project related to a work of literature being studied in the class

Research and documentation

Satisfactorily complete a research and writing requirement focused on some aspect of literature 4-6 pages in length quoting from 3-5 sources Demonstrate the ability to use MLA documentation Able to define, recognize and avoid plagiarism Demonstrate appropriate vocabulary proficiency at the grade 10 level (Level F)

Vocabulary

Able to use context and appropriate references to understand denotations, connotations, and correct pronunciation of unfamiliar words encountered in reading Completely recite from memory worthwhile passages from literature Effectively participate in class discussions both as speaker and listener

Speaking and listening

Gain an ease in sharing work produced inside and outside of class Collaborate with others in dialectical notebook sessions and blogging Practice leading class discussions and presentations Able to analyze an assertion, determine its validity, prepare an appropriate response (written and/or oral), and communicate that response clearly

Student responsibility and miscellaneous

Practice basic organizational skills and maintain a ‘writing notebook’ (maintaining assignments, note taking, organizing notes and handouts, following oral and written instructions, timely submission of work, and effective study habits) Achieve a passing score at the end of the year Achieve a useful verbal score on the PSAT

Overview & Sequence • 17


Junior English: Honors British Literature Senior English: AP Literature and Composition Curriculum Course Objectives

Grades 11 and 12 Demonstrate the ability to produce writing that is stylistically competent and generally free of most major grammatical errors Able to demonstrate basic proficiency in editing writing for grammatical and stylistic errors Break Master a variety of sentence structures and manage effective paragraph transitions

Grammar, mechanics, and Usage

Master a working knowledge of the grammatical conventions outlined in Dian Hackers A Pocket Style Manual as a tool and writer’s reference Able to engage in the editing process in a meaningful way in editing writing for grammatical errors Take an interest and ownership of written work and compositions Master the basics of punctuation Continue improvement in peer editing effectiveness Engage in composition of multiple drafts for each writing assignment Through class discussions, projects, activities and examinations, demonstrate appropriate knowledge, comprehension, analysis and evaluation of assigned reading Continue to develop a working knowledge of literary terms Able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the significant ideas, periods and authors

Literature and Reading

Read and participate effectively in academic activities related to at least one Shakespeare play Able to do all 10th grade analysis tasks plus be introduced to tone and diction Continue to practice active reading and refine marginalia practices Build on a working knowledge of literary terms Build of working knowledge of some critical approaches to literature Read and participate effectively in academic activities related to at least one Shakespeare play Be familiar with basic modes of discourse (description, narration, exposition, classification, comparison and contrast, persuasion /argument Build a writing portfolio Able to apply an effective, personal writing process to a variety of writing requirements

Composition and modes of discourse

Gain ease with production of multi-paragraphed essays 3-5 pages in length Participate in generative writing Make use of a writing notebook Continue practice of memoir writing Attempt 2-3 aural and/or video essay projects related to a work of literature being studied in the class Submit and have accepted at least composition to the school publication “The Voice”

Research and documentation

Satisfactorily complete a research and writing requirement focused on some aspect of literature 5-7 pages in length quoting from 3-5 sources Demonstrate the ability to use MLA documentation Able to define, recognize and avoid plagiarism Demonstrate appropriate vocabulary proficiency at the grade 11/12 level (Level G)

Vocabulary

Able to use context and appropriate references to understand denotations, connotations, and correct pronunciation of unfamiliar words encountered in reading

Overview & Sequence • 18


Curriculum Course Objectives

Grades 11 and 12 Completely recite from memory worthwhile passages from literature

Speaking and listening

Effectively participate in class discussions both as speaker and listener Practice basic organizational skills (maintaining assignments, note taking, organizing notes and handouts, following oral and written instructions, timely submission of work, and effective study habits)

Student responsibility and miscellaneous

Achieve a passing score at the end of the year Achieve a useful verbal score on the PSAT/NMSQT (record) Have initiated testing and administrative requirements for college acceptance

Junior and Senior English Electives: Curriculum Course Objectives

Grade 11/12 Electives Demonstrate the ability to produce writing that is stylistically competent and generally free of most major grammatical errors Able to demonstrate basic proficiency in editing writing for grammatical and stylistic errors Master a variety of sentence structures and manage effective paragraph transitions

Grammar, mechanics, and Usage

Master a working knowledge of the grammatical conventions outlined in Diane Hackers A Pocket Style Manual as a tool and writer’s reference Able to engage in the editing process in a meaningful way in editing writing for grammatical errors Take an interest and ownership of written work and compositions Master the basics of punctuation Continue improvement in peer editing effectiveness Engage in composition of multiple drafts for each writing assignment Through class discussions, projects, activities and examinations, demonstrate appropriate knowledge, comprehension, analysis and evaluation of assigned reading Continue to develop a working knowledge of literary terms Able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the significant ideas, periods and authors

Literature and Reading

Read and participate effectively in academic activities related to at least one Shakespeare play Able to do all 10th grade analysis tasks plus be introduced to tone and diction Continue to practice active reading and refine marginalia practices Build on a working knowledge of literary terms Build of working knowledge of some critical approaches to literature Read and participate effectively in academic activities related to at least one Shakespeare play Be familiar with basic modes of discourse (description, narration, exposition, classification, comparison and contrast, persuasion /argument Build a writing portfolio Able to apply an effective, personal writing process to a variety of writing requirements

Composition and modes of discourse

Gain ease with production of multi-paragraphed essays 3-5 pages in length Participate in generative writing Make use of a writing notebook Continue practice of memoir writing Attempt 2-3 aural and/or video essay projects related to a work of literature being studied in the class Submit and have accepted at least composition to the school publication “The Voice”

Overview & Sequence • 19


Curriculum Course Objectives

Research and documentation

Grade 11/12 Electives Satisfactorily complete a research and writing requirement focused on some aspect of literature 5-7 pages in length quoting from 3-5 sources Demonstrate the ability to use MLA documentation Able to define, recognize and avoid plagiarism Demonstrate appropriate vocabulary proficiency at the grade 11/12 level (Level G)

Vocabulary

Speaking and listening

Able to use context and appropriate references to understand denotations, connotations, and correct pronunciation of unfamiliar words encountered in reading

Completely recite from memory worthwhile passages from literature Effectively participate in class discussions both as speaker and listener Practice basic organizational skills (maintaining assignments, note taking, organizing notes and handouts, following oral and written instructions, timely submission of work, and effective study habits)

Student responsibility and miscellaneous

Achieve a passing score at the end of the year Achieve a useful verbal score on the PSAT/NMSQT (record) Have initiated testing and administrative requirements for college acceptance

Overview & Sequence • 20


The Storm K ing School Overview and Sequence 2019-2020 World Lanuages Department Overview

World Languages Department Faculty Angelica Centeno Catherine Hecht Ellen VanDunk

Mission Statement The Storm King School, a global community, prepares students by inspiring them toward academic success and confidence in an inclusive and diverse learning environment that embraces character, balance, and trust.

Core Values Truth, Respect, Responsibility

The basic skills of language can be divided up into the four major components of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Each of these is valuable in its own right, and acts as a foundation and sounding board for the other skills as well. The goal of the SKS World Languages curriculum is to help students develop strength in each of these areas in order to create a well-rounded language student. Our belief is that language engenders new and complex thinking skills which develop young minds and bring them closer to an understanding of the diversity of cultures and practices around the world. Language is, in a sense, humanity. What better way is there to approach language learning than to feel you are at home whenever you can communicate with others? In addition, SKS also strives to imbue each language student with Transferable Skills, which, in and of themselves, each contain the skills which teach students how to employ a real world understanding of language. Far too often is language studied as a passive look at what has come before, rather than an exploration of the modern language and the results of its multifaceted growth and application. The goal of the World Languages Department is to instill a sense of languages as entities that are truly alive and functional. To that end, teachers are asked to practice teaching that emphasize an engaged experience of learning which demonstrates to students that languages are meant to be used. The Transferable Skills are as follows: I. Clear and Effective Communicators and Collaborators II. Self-Directed Learners: appropriate issue of technology in academic and campus life III. Creative and Practical Problem Solvers IV. Integrative and Informed Thinkers V. Responsible and Involved Citizens

Accreditation & Memberships Middle States Association National Association of Independent Schools New York State Association of Independent Schools National Association of College Admission Counseling The College Board National Honor Society Cum Laude Society

Sequence In regard to the sequencing of the World Languages program at SKS, there is, as usual, a standard progression of students moving from the first level of the language up to the final offering. In the case of Spanish four years of study is possible. In Chinese and ASL students may take up to three years. In some cases students are also capable of addition sections beyond the general curriculum in advanced or individual classes. Besides this normal sequence, SKS now also offers an 8th Grade curriculum that exposes students to each of our three language offerings in one year. The goal of the program is to allow students to get a taste of our different options and also inform them of cultures with which they may have had little or no contact.

Transferable Skills in the SKS World Languages Curriculum I. Clear and Effective Communicators and Collaborators

The Storm King School 314 Mountain Road Cornwall-on-Hudson NY 12520 Phone: (845) 534-7892 Fax: (845) 534-2709 www.sks.org

A. Speaking 1. Oral Presentations 2. Conversational Skills 3. Using “modern” language a) The real vernacular of target language b) Professional vs. Informal settings 4. Issuing Commands 5. Explaining meaning B. Writing 1. Students learn correct grammar to effectively create sentences 2. Learning how to convey proper meaning Overview & Sequence • 21


3. Creating formal paragraphs, dialogues, short stories 4. Use of writing to convey ideas, discuss arguments, and analyze literature C Reading 1. Recognizing vocabulary (roots, affixes, origins, radicals, etc.) a) Daily Living - Vocab Statements and Questions b) World Vocab – Short Stories, Articles, Newspapers c) Complex – Short Novels, Plays 2. Skimming and In-Depth analysis 3. Interpreting Language Idioms 4. Comprehend the text in order to discuss D. Listening 1. Memorization and Repetition for fluency 2. Recognizing speaking cues such as questions, signal words, comparisons, etc. 3. Understands directions 4. Can identify major ideas and meanings II. Self-Directed Learners: appropriate issue of technology in academic and campus life A. Media 1. Students creating videos with different sharing capacities 2. Reaching out to other classes for interactive lessons 3. Sharing on Google Drive 4. Making movies 5. Cross Curriculum enterprises that show an application of language in other classes 6. Expressing unique ideas about language B. Constructing 1. Using prior learning to build new ways of approaching language 2. Building own language learning tools through experience and experiment C. International Fair 1. Effectively sharing various customs with the school 2. Bringing history and the present together 3. Organizing presentations that demonstrate insight into culture III. Creative and Practical Problem Solvers A. Project Based Learning 1. Classrooms (backward) designed to allow students to develop their own learning 2. Essential questions that lead to deeper criticism and applicable solutions 3. Combinations of answerable (and unanswerable) problems that face humanity in the form of countries and communities. B. Global Issues 1. How do cultures interact at home and abroad 2. How does language separate us and bring us together 3. What is the importance of understanding other cultures

3. Working with others to better understand various perspectives/ viewpoints 4. Finding solutions that benefit everyone involved IV. Integrative and Informed Thinkers A. History 1. Origins and formation of language 2. How languages have spread over the globe 3. The future of language B. Current News 1. Language use across the globe 2. Interpreting cultural intent through their media 3. Identifying topics of importance around the world C. Global Connections 1. Where are languages are spoken and why 2. Looking at different forms of media and production of information 3. Relating non-local issues to a wider audience 4. Reevaluating values based on experience V. Responsible and Involved Citizens A. Cultural Knowledge/Understandings 1. Connecting with the diverse community and cultures of the school 2. Learning about important differences in cultural practice 3. Promoting similarities between ideas within nations, cultures, and communities B. Cultural Sensitivity 1. Experiencing empathy and sympathy 2. Locating similarities and differences C. Community Involvement 1. Disseminating knowledge about different languages and cultures throughout the community 2. Building centers for learning and understanding 3. Aligning positive cross cultural values for the common good

Overview and Sequence of Yearly Language Levels 8th Grade / Exposure The 8th Grade survey course seeks to share the various languages that SKS has to offer and gives students a sense of what course of study they might be most drawn to and succeed in. Content: The content of the 8th grade curriculum is aimed at introducing basic concepts of pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. Students also learn and review the fundamentals of sentence construction including parts of speech, phrases, and types of sentences.

C. Outside the Box 1. Using language in new ways to describe modern phenomena 2. Applying language beyond the classroom (cross-classroom/culture)

Knowledge: Students begin to recognize patterns within their target language, and also learn to compare certain features of language that are common to all people. Whereas the difference may be obvious, there are often times when connections became more apparent as students recognize how language is a tool for communicating similar ideas, requests, and commands in every part of the world.

D. Collaboration 1. Using multiple resources to address issues 2. Finding like-minded individuals to support and promote ideas

Culture: Students are given insight into how language has developed side by side with culture and what that entails in regard to how different people interpret the world around them.

Overview & Sequence • 22


11th Grade / Level 3: 9th Grade / Level 1 The 9th Grade program begins the sequence of formal instruction in language learning. Reading: • understand basic structure of alphabet, or character system • recognize similarities between parts and pieces of written language • understand basic sentences of greeting, introduction, and daily life • read using authentic materials, e.g., menus, photos, posters, schedules, charts, signs and short narratives • understand short texts enhanced by visual clues. Writing:

Reading: • clarify and ask for and comprehend clarification; • express and understand opinions • narrate and understand narration in the present, past, and future • identify, state, and understand feelings and emotions. • able to read advanced material including short stories Writing: • create multi-paragraph pieces of writing • can write personal letters • can keep open communications with a pen-pal Speaking:

• use short sentences, learned words and phrases, and simple questions and commands • writing notes, lists, poems, postcards, and short letters

• use strings of related sentences • engage in debates • prepare presentations of complicated topics • discuss with peers and teacher with relative ease

Speaking:

Listening:

• greet and respond to greetings • introduce and respond to introductions • engage in conversations • express likes and dislikes • make requests • obtain information • understand some ideas and familiar details • begin to provide information.

• understand most spoken language when the message is deliberately and carefully conveyed by a speaker accustomed to dealing with learners when listening

Listening: • understand some ideas and familiar details presented in clear, uncomplicated speech when listening • understand when using audio or video texts 10th Grade / Level 2: Reading: • understand important ideas and some detail • when reading, using authentic materials • use and understand expressions indicating emotion. Writing: • short narratives, advertisements, tickets, brochures, and other media • writing letters and short guided compositions. • create simple paragraphs • describe and compare Speaking: • use and understand learned expressions, sentences, and strings of sentences, questions, and polite commands • make requests • express their needs • participate in group conversations • ask and answer questions using the 5 Ws (Who, What, Where, When, Why) • give simple presentations on general topics

12th Grade / Level 4: Reading: • able to read advanced material including newspapers, novels, poems, etc. • acquire knowledge and new information from comprehensive, authentic texts when reading. • recognizes subtitles in foreign language Writing: • use simple discourse in a series of coherent paragraphs • give and understand advice and suggestions • compare and contrast • explain and support an opinion • analyze and critique Speaking: • initiate, engage in, and close a conversation • conduct transactions and negotiations • substantiate and elaborate opinions • convince and persuade • engage in fluid back and forth with instructor and peers Listening: • understand most authentic spoken language • recognizes song lyrics • can watch movies and television • can have phone conversations

Listening: • understand important ideas and some details in highly contextualized authentic texts when reading.

Overview & Sequence • 23


The Storm K ing School Overview and Sequence 2019-2020 Visual & Performing Arts Department Overview

Department Faculty John Carruthers Visual Arts Department Chair Lindsay Brown Anne Fulton Performing Arts Department Chair Benjamin Harnick Jeanette Jacobson Zhenya Kiperman Megan Liggett Alva Nelson

Mission Statement The Storm King School, a global community, prepares students by inspiring them toward academic success and confidence in an inclusive and diverse learning environment that embraces character, balance, and trust.

Core Values Truth, Respect, Responsibility

Accreditation & Memberships Middle States Association National Association of Independent Schools New York State Association of Independent Schools National Association of College Admission Counseling The College Board National Honor Society Cum Laude Society

The Storm King School 314 Mountain Road Cornwall-on-Hudson NY 12520 Phone: (845) 534-7892 Fax: (845) 534-2709 www.sks.org

The Visual and Performing Arts Department prepares students for higher education, creative careers, and personal enrichment. The program is based on experiential, project based learning that maximizes the school’s expanded schedule. The Quest terms and Cornerstone projects are where students in the Arts program delve deeply into personal and career based projects that prepares them for today’s “Creative Economy”. At each level of study in the Visual and Performing Arts Department, students master techniques that are built on sequentially for four important outcomes1. To learn creative problem solving and innovative techniques that enrich the ability to do extended projects in all disciplines. 2. Prepare for project based learning in college and beyond. 3. Prepare for a project based, collaborative, and global workforce. 4. Prepare an in-depth, wide-ranging, and technically accomplished arts portfolio if the student is pursuing acceptance to an arts-based college.

Sequence Four year students are required to have one Visual Arts credit and one Performing Arts credit. Two year students are required to have either a Visual or Performing Arts credit. These students can take any level 1 class to fulfill that requirement. To take a higher level course to fulfill the requirement, students need to submit a portfolio of work to assess that the level of the class is appropriate for that student.

Visual Arts Students interested in pursuing art at the college level are required to follow a specific sequence of classes. The skills gained at each level help students succeed at the higher level courses. This maximizes their ability to be prepared for college level work and to build a portfolio that gives them the best chance to get into the college of their choice. That Specific Sequence of Classes - Visual Arts said, these students should take as many courses at the 8th Gradefirst two levels that they may   Interdisciplinary Arts course need to expand their specific portfolios and augment college 9th through 12th Gradeready skills. Because of other Level 1 courses academic requirements, not all   Introduction to Visual Art of these courses may fit into their   Digital Art schedules each year, therefore,   Global Cultures (Art/Global History) students can fill in level 1 and 2   Video Production courses throughout their time at   Fashion SKS according to their portfolio Level coursesneeds and a portfolio review. The   Drawing/Painting/Sculpture portfolio review is necessary to   Digital Art make sure students are in the Level 3 coursesappropriate class for their skill   Advanced Art level.   Individual Study AP level classes should be only Level 4 coursestaken at the third or fourth    AP Studio Art level (with approval by the    AP Art History Department Chair). Overview & Sequence • 24


Performing Arts Music- At the introductory level, students may take piano, guitar, or chorus. Individual lessons are also available for virtually any instrument. After the first level, students wishing to pursue further study arrange private lessons with the music teacher (instrument or vocal). Dance- Students are able to take Dance and then proceed to Advanced Dance. Students who have taken Advanced Dance may continue to take it each year they are at SKS. Students in both dance classes perform in two dance recitals that are not open for other students to perform in. They also perform in Parents’ Weekend, International Fair, and other events on campus. Theatre- Students are able to take Acting as a course and if they wish, proceed through higher levels of this discipline each year they take the course. These students have their own performance schedule, as well as take part in the overall student productions. Any student at SKS can audition for the school-wide productions (drama and musical).

Specific Sequence of Classes - Performing Arts

OVERVIEW- Skills and Knowledge for Success Each student that takes courses in the Visual and Performing Arts Department will be prepared for college life and beyond by learning these specific skills. The skills listed below are general to the Department as a whole, and are then delineated by Visual Arts, Performing Arts, and further defined by courses of study within each department. • • • • • •

Creativity Innovation Critical thinking/problem solving Collaboration Social and cross-cultural skills Flexibility/adaptability

Level 1 courses   Piano   Guitar    Individual Instruments (including voice)   Chorus   Dance   Acting    Stagecraft (½ credit, after academic day, one trimester course)    Theatre Production (½ credit, after academic day, one trimester course) Level 2 courses    Private lessons for Piano, guitar, instrument, voice   Advanced Dance Level 3 and 4 courses    Advanced Dance, Acting, and Individual Instrument lessons continue through the third and fourth levels.

• Leadership • Responsibility • Research, critical and expository writing • Presentation • Peer critiques

Visual Arts Sequence - by Level

Level 1 courses Introduction to Visual Art Methodology:   Introduce the methods of creativity and innovation by exploring how these skills were used in different cultures throughout time.   Introduce the materials and methods artists have used to express themselves and mirror their culture. Some of these methods and materials include drawing, painting, 3-D, printmaking with both traditional materials (pencil, paint, paper, canvas, etc) and non-traditional, local, or era specific materials (cardboard, brush and ink, handmade pigments, etc)   Introduce critical thinking, writing and research by writing weekly critiques of well known art historical work, and by oral class critiques of peer art work. • Think about the context- how, when, and where the artwork was created. • Make a claim about the work- what is your idea about the artwork, and explain your logic. • Understand and use the correct arts-based vocab.   Students in Introductory classes frequently collaborate on projects working in teams that promote Flexibility/adaptability, leadership, and responsibility.

Digital Art Methodology:   Recognize that working within an arts discipline involves the understanding and use of both abstract and representational elements of the art form.   Reflect on repeated outcomes when engaging in arts processes; self-assess and self-correct as they work within an arts discipline.   Know to look for and discern a basic structure in a work of art and understand how structure was interpreted, altered, or challenged by the artist; apply this knowledge in art making.   Use electronic media to express their visual ideas and demonstrate a variety of approaches to artistic creation Overview & Sequence • 25


Digital Art Methodology:   Create artworks in which they use and evaluate different kinds of mediums, subjects, themes, symbols, metaphors, and images   Demonstrate an increasing level of competence in using the elements and principles of art to create art works for public exhibition   Technological attainment of skills, especially innovative approaches to available software.   The use of electronic media to express their visual ideas and demonstrate a variety of approaches to artistic creation

Art/Global History Methodology:   Introduce creativity by focusing on how cultures and individual artists within those cultures expressed themselves with the traditional arts (drawing, painting, sculpture), and more specifically, the applied arts (architecture, design, fashion, culinary arts, urban planning, etc.).   Introduce Problem solving by using non-traditional materials to create new artwork, or recreate famous works of art.   Introduce Social and Cross-Cultural skills by exploring how different cultures express their ideals through the arts and architecture with a specific look at the applied arts-fashion, design, culinary arts, etc. Students learn to make connections between cultures, explore the influences over time, and connections to their own culture.   Students learn flexibility/adaptability, and leadership by having the opportunity to lead the class by creating presentations and activities for the class to do.

Film and Video Production Methodology:   This hands-on course puts the students in the collaborative environment of the low-budget fictional and documentary filmmaking that requires creative, innovative and critical thinking in combination with the strong problem solving and multitasking skills.   Throughout the course, every student performs at least one key pre-production /production and/or post-production task (writing, directing, acting, producing, cinematography, or editing) thus developing both leadership and social/collaborative skills.   The project-based focus of the course in combination with the demands and limitations of low-budget filmmaking allows the students to develop strong flexibility and adaptability skills.

Level 2 coursesDrawing/Painting/Sculpture Methodology:   This course teaches creativity by focusing on the three foundational techniques of visual art- drawing, painting, and sculpture.   This course teaches innovation by encouraging students to respond to technical challenges with personal responses to material use and subject matter. The lessons teach traditional techniques, but the student may choose how to demonstrate mastery of that technique. As the lessons progress, the students are required to introduce personal approaches to the material and subject matter while staying in the parameters of the lesson’s objective.   Critical thinking, Social/Cultural skills, and leadership are taught during the oral peer critiques and the weekly written critiques of well known work. At this level, students are expected to make a deeper analysis of peer and famous artists techniques, and more nuanced interpretation of peer and famous work by making cultural and art historical connections.   Research- Students research weekly critiques of famous artwork and write a persuasive essay about the student’s interpretation of the art.

Level 4 coursesAdvanced Placement Studio Art Methodology:   This course teaches creativity at the highest levels as each student needs twelve pieces of artwork to show the breadth of their abilities, and 12 pieces of work that show a concentration of study in one specific subject matter or technical pursuit. Students need to create an original and personal body of work that focuses on a particular technical or cultural concern of the student.   Innovation/Problem Solving-In order to achieve the highest grade in this course, students must find an innovative approach to their personal expressions. Either they delve into new or forgotten techniques to create images, find new ways to create images, or explore personal and macrocultural connections that are unique and resonant.   Flexibility/Adaptability/Leadership/Responsibility- Students may have to change their concentration more than once throughout the course as they find that their original concentration is too narrow or broad, or has technical challenges that can’t be solved within the scope of the course. Students must also be able to adapt their working process according to the teacher and peer critiques. Because the work is encouraged to be personal, adapting a deeply held assumption teaches maturity, cultural connections, and the ability to rise above technical limitations. Overview & Sequence • 26


Leadership/Responsibility- Students have an area of their own to work in, but the overall space is shared by all and needs to be kept clean and organized by all the students.   Critical Thinking- Students need to write artist statements, essays about their work, and technical descriptions of their work for the AP portfolio. Students develop critical thinking skills in order to write concise, but in-depth essays and descriptions.

Advanced Placement Art HistoryMethodology:   This course teaches Social and Cross Cultural skills by looking in depth at the vast history of art creation throughout all cultures and eras of mankind. The emphasis of the course is to make connections between cultures and time periods exploring commonalities and uniquenesses of cultures and time periods   This course teaches Critical Thinking at the highest level by introducing professional level journal writing and research. Students learn how to write different types of essays (expository, analytical, and persuasive) as well as identify dated facts and nuanced differences in art styles.   Responsibility- because of the huge amount of material the course covers, students learn essential time management skills in order to read, research and write the assigned essays   Creativity/Innovation- Students in this course will learn how creativity and innovation changed the course of events throughout time causing cultures to rise and fall.   Research- students research all aspects of an art object- technical, cultural, personal, comparative and write essays based on prompts that show students how to approach an idea from various angles.

Performing Arts Sequence - by Level

Dance and Advanced Dance Methodology:   Creativity • In both dance and advanced dance, the students are given the opportunity to create their own dances. They are allowed to choose the style of dance and music (as long as it is approved by Mrs. Jacobson). • Each week the students present to the class what they have created on their own. Then Mrs. Jacobson offers suggestions, changes, compliments, and critiques. • This process allows the students to express themselves in creative ways that are unique to them. It gives them the opportunity to dig deeper into a select style of dance and challenge themselves to come up with something new and original.   Collaboration • These courses teaches collaboration by giving the students the opportunity to create dances together. Through this process the students learn to work as a team, listen to each other’s ideas, and ultimately create a dance that represents them as a group. • Collaboration is also taught in dance by using “peer teaching” strategies. After the students learn a dance, they will be asked to go over it with each other. During this time they must listen to each other and work together to make sure they are all doing the correct steps.   Social and Cross-Cultural Skills • Each week when the students present their own pieces to the class, they are instructed to give each person positive feedback. Answers such as “good job” and “I liked it” are not enough. They students must find specific parts of their classmates’ dances that they enjoyed and explain why they think those parts were successful. • Mrs. Jacobson is the only one in the room allowed to give constructive criticism. Listening to the constructive criticism, whether about their own dance, or their classmates, is very important, because it shows them the correct ways to deliver critiques, and teaches them how to respond to them. • In dance class the students become a community very quickly. Anytime dancers perform a piece they created, it is a very personal and vulnerable experience. In order for the presentation day to be successful, the students must first become comfortable with their classmates -The way dance creates a trusting environment so quickly is through group work, positive feedback from their teacher and peers, and group numbers where they learn and perform as a team. • During performances the dance students support each other tremendously. The loudest applause for each student’s solo performance always comes from backstage. They recognize how hard it is to create a dance, and how difficult it is to perform that dance in front of their peers.   Flexibility and Adaptability • One way dance class teaches flexibility and adaptability is spacing. The dance studio is a completely different shape then the stage. The week before a show, when practicing in the theatre, the spacing is changed drastically. The students have to be ready to make those changes. Overview & Sequence • 27


• An unfortunate way flexibility and adaptability is taught, is when students become injured after a dance is choreographed to include them. Students may need to fill in for other students, parts and spacing may need to be changed, and the dance can end up completely different than it was intended.   Responsibility • Dance is the only academic course where a change of clothes is required to actively participate in the class. The students must be responsible and remember the correct attire in order to get credit. • The students also have to be responsible for: -Remembering and creating their own pieces -Remember the group dances they are involved in -Being present for all after school rehearsals -Requesting extra time during tutorial or after school if there is a dance they need help with -Requesting extra time during tutorial or after school if they miss a class or rehearsal to learn what they missed   Leadership • Students are often given the task to help other students in dance, by reviewing choreography with them. The students helping must be confident in their knowledge of the dances, and kind towards the students who are struggling.   Critical Thinking/Problem Solving/Innovation • All of these methods directly relate to learning how to choreograph. Knowing the jumps and turns you want to do in a dance is just the beginning; the students have to find innovative and creative ways to get from one movement to the next. • Problem solving is a major part of creating a dance with a group. When creating and working on a group dance you have to find different ways to deal with the limited space, and the different ability levels of each dance.

Music   Private lessons, various legacy and student driven ensembles provide musical opportunity defined by a range, from inclusion to excellence.   Individuals are assessed and placed, weighted by skill, talent & experience.   Private music lessons: • Weekly classes. • All orchestral and band instruments, drums, guitar, voice & technology. • Instrument rentals provided by SKS.   Ensembles: • Choir: Open to all students (including instrumental), vocally driven. • Bands & Ensembles: Varied, based on student interest and availability.   Balance encouraged: • Technique & Theory. • Reading, history & context. • Student driven performances.   Outside assessment: • NYSSMA, All-State, All-County. • Adjunct music teacher program.   Community service & outreach: • Cornwall senior lunch provision center; Munger Cottage luncheon concerts. • Interaction with local public school musicians via socials, concerts & events.

Acting Methodology:   This course teaches creativity and innovation through improvisation activities. Students are required to create scenarios and characters and interpret them for the audience. Improvisation requires problem solving as the actors work through their narratives and resolve them. Flexibility and adaptability are needed as there is no script in improv and situations change at the will of the actors and the audience. Overview & Sequence • 28


As Acting students progress to interpreting established scripts and characters, they utilize all of the “Skills for Knowledge and Success,” as they not only memorize text, but apply their own human experience to character interpretation and to developing techniques for a successful performance. Collaboration is a key element of any acting class, as students rely on those with whom they perform to complete the necessary steps to presenting a scene or play. Students must be flexible as they develop and revise plans to meet deadlines and accomplish goals.

Theatre production (participating in plays and stagecraft) Stagecraft Methodology:   Introduce the methods of creativity by learning to adapt play text to visual elements.   This course encourages innovation by teaching students how to plan and execute the production of a play.   This course is heavily rooted in critical thinking and problem solving. Students will use skills based in math, literature, art, and science to create work and see how visual representation can affect audience experience.   Students in Introductory classes frequently collaborate on projects working in teams that promote Flexibility/adaptability, leadership, and responsibility.

Overview & Sequence • 29


The Storm K ing School Overview and Sequence 2019-2020 ESL Department English as a Second Language Instructional Framework The SKS ESL Framework includes the following components: 1. Development of Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills, including:

ESL Department Faculty Catherine Hecht ESL Department Chair Angelica Centeno Dennis Costello Timothy Gillett Stacy Graziosi Ellen VanDunk

Mission Statement The Storm King School, a global community, prepares students by inspiring them toward academic success and confidence in an inclusive and diverse learning environment that embraces character, balance, and trust.

A. Daily speaking and listening skills B. Appropriate social interactions C. Integration of new cultural norms and values 2. Development of Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency, including: A. Development of receptive (reading and listening) and productive (writing and speaking) language skills B. Development of language acquisition and content learning strategies C. The transfer of background knowledge and skills learned/ acquired in the primary language(s) to English. D. Development of enabling (vocabulary and grammar) skills.

Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills Description:      Develop speaking and listening skills to appropriately interact socially with others      Facilitate an understanding of new cultural norms and values Proficiency Levels:

Truth, Respect, Responsibility

Level 1: Entering – Much of instruction focuses on high utility vocabulary, basic conversational skills, and procedural language.

Accreditation & Memberships

Level 2: Beginning – Instruction continues daily with integration of complex conversational skills.

Core Values

Middle States Association National Association of Independent Schools New York State Association of Independent Schools National Association of College Admission Counseling The College Board National Honor Society Cum Laude Society

Level 3: Developing - Instruction focuses on more figurative language skills such as idioms and culturally specific language. Instruction also focuses on understanding the difference between slang and formal language. Focus on developing language through thematic organization. Level 4: Expanding – Instruction focuses on developing and practicing specific language, focusing on academic language development. Resources and materials:    ESL texts and related teaching texts/ Grade-level content-specific texts and supplemental materials (fiction and non-fiction)   Professional Development

The Storm King School 314 Mountain Road Cornwall-on-Hudson NY 12520 Phone: (845) 534-7892 Fax: (845) 534-2709 www.sks.org

Technology, including e-books   PBL learning   Design Thinking   Inter-disciplinary classes

Overview & Sequence • 30


ESL Teacher is... Continually assessing student development in listening, speaking, reading, writing and comprehension using formal and informal measures and aiming instruction at student’s current instructional level

ESL Student is... Actively engaging in listening, speaking, reading, writing and comprehension as they develop English proficiency.

Modeling appropriate social conversation

Evaluating their own listening, speaking, reading, writing and comprehension skills

Observing students and their use of social language and developing instructional opportunities based on those observations.

Sharing their strategies for developing appropriate conversational skills in English.

Assisting students in developing meta-cognitive skills to improve language learning

Actively engaging in self-advocacy in all school environments

Providing formal and informal opportunities for students to have social conversations

Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency Proficiency Levels: Level 1: Entering - Pictorial or graphic representation of the language of the content areas; words, phrases, or chunks of language when presented with one-step commands, directions, WH-, choice or yes/no questions, or statements with sensory, graphic or interactive support Level 2: Beginning – General language related to the content areas, phrases or short sentences, oral or written language with phonological, syntactic, or semantic errors that often impede the meaning of the communication when presented with one to multiple-step commands, directions, questions, or a series of statements with sensory, graphic, or interactive support. Level 3: Developing - General and some specific language of the content areas; expanded sentences in oral interaction or written paragraphs; oral or written language with phonological, syntactic, or semantic errors that may impede the communication, but retain much of its meaning, when presented with oral or written, narrative or expository descriptions with sensory, graphic, or interactive support Level 4: Expanding – Specific language of the content areas; a variety of sentence lengths of varying linguistic complexity in oral discourse or multiple, related sentences or paragraphs; oral or written language with minimal phonological, syntactic, or semantic errors that do not impede the overall meaning of the communication when presented with oral or written connected discourse with sensory, graphic, or interactive support Resources and materials:    ESL texts and related teaching texts/ Grade-level content-specific texts and supplemental materials (fiction and non-fiction)   Professional Development    Technology, including e-books   PBL learning   Design Thinking   Inter-disciplinary classes ESL Teacher is...

ESL Student is...

Continually assessing student development in listening, speaking, reading, writing and comprehension using formal and informal measures.

Continually participating in both formal and informal speaking, listening, reading and writing activities

Providing direct instruction in academic literacy skills

Connecting L1 knowledge to English

Planning lessons based on students’ English language proficiency levels

Demonstrating through speaking, listening, reading, and writing acquisition of language strategies

Planning lessons based on eligible content Modeling correct usage of academic language in content areas Modeling and providing learners with meta-cognitive strategies for independent language learning.

Investigating, questioning, discovering and forming generalizations about language

Overview & Sequence • 31


Listening - Description: Process, understand, interpret and evaluate spoken language in a variety of situations. LISTENING ESL Teacher is... Providing many varied opportunities for students to listen to English at their listening competency

LISTENING ESL Student is.. Engaging in active listening Attaching meaning to spoken English

Providing comprehensible input to increase listening competency Working with content teachers to scaffold instruction and provide comprehensible input into their lessons Teaching learning strategies that enable students to listen and comprehend academic lectures Teaching and modeling active listening skills

Speaking- Description:

Process, understand, interpret and evaluate spoken language in a variety of situations.

SPEAKING ESL Teacher is...

SPEAKING ESL Student is..

Providing many varied opportunities for students to speak in English at their proficiency level

Engaging in speaking activities

Providing comprehensible input to increase speaking level

Producing sentences using sentence frames and sentence prompts

Using academic sentence frames to enhance oral academic language

Participating in group discussion using academic vocabulary

Producing authentic English dialogue

Working with content teachers to scaffold instruction that facilitates proper

Reading - Description: Process, understand, interpret and evaluate written language, symbols and text with understanding and fluency READING ESL Teacher is... Providing instruction based on English language proficiency levels Providing direct instruction and modeling in whole group, small group, and individual instructional sessions

READING ESL Student is.. Engaging in guided, shared, and independent reading based on English language proficiency levels Reading a variety of genres

Conferring with students to assess reading levels and strategies used

Applying modeled reading strategies

Monitoring students’ independent reading, shared reading and guided reading groups

Conferring with teacher about strategies used and reading material

Modeling before, during and after reading strategies Modeling meta-cognitive reading strategies Working with content teachers to scaffold instruction

Writing - Description: Engage in written communication in a variety of situations for a variety of purposes and audiences WRITING ESL Teacher is...

WRITING ESL Student is..

Providing instruction based on English language proficiency levels

Actively engaging in a variety of writing activities

Modeling writing for various purposes

Self- and peer-editing

Conferring with students individually with focus on students’ needs

Observing teacher during modeling of writing

Reading, editing and revising student writing

Conferring with teacher about writing ability and methods of improvement

Engaging students in self and peer editing and revising Continuously advancing expected depth, length and quality of assignments

Overview & Sequence • 32


ALL SCHOOL FACULTY Support for ESL Students Levels 1 and 2: Entering/Beginning Instruction should:    Be based on student’s current levels of English language proficiency    Encourage higher order thinking skills    Include differentiated rubrics    Allow for silent period and nonverbal responses    Connect to background knowledge    Identify and assist with cultural differences and school procedures    Provide repeated opportunities to learn the same information    Provide repeated opportunities to practice oral language    Provide accessible texts and materials    Build a basic vocabulary of English words and conversational terms and phrases   Emphasize cognates    Use non-verbal clues, e.g., gestures and universal facial expressions, to provide meaning    Write (print) important concepts on the board    Increase “wait” time    Provide direct instruction in literacy    Incorporate graphic organizers    Provide real life examples for instruction    Provide an effective environment that is positive and secure to practice oral language and listening skills

Levels 3 and 4: Developing/Expanding Instruction should:    Be based on student’s current levels of English language proficiency    Encourage higher order thinking skills    Include differentiated rubrics    Provide direct instruction on story elements and structure    Provide direct instruction on parts of speech, roots, prefixes, and suffixes    Provide direct instruction on the Internet and various types of media for research    Provide direct instruction on cause and effect relationships    Teach explicit reading and comprehension strategies    Provide visual clues and explicit meanings of idiomatic expressions and figurative language    Provide accessible reading selections    Incorporate graphic organizers    Allow for individualized oral or written reading responses    Give direct instruction on identifying semantic clues related to fact and opinion    Provide direct instruction and model basic reading strategies for specific genres    Provide an environment that is positive and secure to practice oral language: listening and speaking skills, and literacy skills    Identify and assist with cultural differences and school procedures    Provide multiple and different opportunities to learn new language skills    Continue to increase academic vocabulary    Provide reading materials at the students’ reading level    Connect to background knowledge

Overview & Sequence • 33


META- COGNITIVE STRATEGY NAME

STRATEGY DESCRIPTION

STRATEGY DEFINITION

Advance Organization

Preview Skim Gist

Preview the main ideas and concepts of a text; identifying the organizing elements

Organizational Planning

Plan what to do

Planning how to accomplish the learning task; planning the parts and sequence of ideas to express

Selective Attention

Listen or read selectively Scan Find specific information

Attending to key words, phrases, ideas, linguistic markers, types of information

Self-Management

Plan when, where, and how to study

Seeking or arranging the conditions that help one learn

Monitoring Comprehension

Think while listening Think while reading

Checking one’s comprehension while reading or listening

Monitoring Production

Think while speaking Think while writing

Checking one’s oral or written production while it takes place

Self-Assessment

Check back Keep a learning log Reflect on what you learned

Judging how well one has accomplished a learning task

Resourcing

Use reference materials

Using reference materials such as dictionaries, encyclopedias, and/or textbooks

Grouping

Classify Construct graphic organizers

Classifying words, terminology, quantities, or concepts according to their attributes

Note taking

Take notes on idea maps, T-lists, etcetera

Writing down key words and concepts in abbreviated verbal, graphic, or numerical form

Elaboration of prior knowledge

Use what you know Use background knowledge Make analogies

Relating new to known information and making personal association

Summarizing

Say or write the main idea

Making a mental, oral, or written summary of information gained from listening or reading

Deduction/Induction

Use a rule/Make a rule

Applying or figuring out rules to understand a concept or complete a learning task

Imagery

Visualize Make a picture

Using mental or real [pictures to learn new information or solve a problem

Auditory Representation

Use your mental audio-recorder Hear it again

Replaying mentally a word, phrase, or piece of information

Overview & Sequence • 34


META- COGNITIVE STRATEGY NAME

STRATEGY DESCRIPTION

STRATEGY DEFINITION

Making Inferences

Use context clues Guess from context Predict

Using information in the text to guess meanings of new items or predict upcoming information

Questioning for Clarification

Ask a question

Getting additional explanation or verification from a teacher or other expert

Cooperation

Cooperate Work with classmates Coach each other

Working with peers to complete a task, pool information, solve a problem, get feedback

Self-Talk

Think positively!

Reducing anxiety by increasing one’s sense of competence

Overview & Sequence • 35