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MARCUS WILLIAM HAMBLIN

BACHELOR OF INTERIOR DESIGN

SEGMENT 1 PORTFOLIO

JANUARY 2012


MARCUS WILLIAM HAMBLIN

STUDENT ASID & IIDA

801.597.8399 | marcushamblin@gmail.com | marcushamblindesign.com | 469 Massachusetts Avenue Apartment 3 | Boston, MA 02118

PROFILE

I am passionate about enhancing the human experience through design. With this passion comes a strong desire to connect with people, learn from them, and positively affect the aesthetic of their lives.

EXPERIENCE

Intern Interior Designer, ADD Inc. | Boston, Massachusetts — September 2011 - Current Works with the residential interior design team. Revit modeling, material specification, production, and administrative duties.

Design Consultant, Tile Showcase | Watertown, Massachusetts — August 2010 - September 2011 Provided design services for residential clients, specifying tile and stone. Built a strong clientele base. Owner, Design Consultant, Marcus Hamblin Design, LLC | Draper, Utah — January 2008 - January 2010 Advised clientele with remodel, construction, and redecoration projects. Design Consultant, Contempo Tile | Salt Lake City, Utah — July 2007 - January 2010 Provided design services for residential and commercial clients. Designed aspects of multiple showrooms. Specialized in sustainable products. Drafter, SLR International Corporation | Sandy, Utah — October 2005 - July 2007 Drafted site plans for environmental assessment projects.

EDUCATION

Boston Architectural College, Boston, Massachusetts — Bachelor of Interior Design Candidate, January 2010 - Current

SLCC, Salt Lake City, Utah — Interior Design, August 2006 - May 2009 Received First Place recognition for Portfolio Presentation in the 2009 SLCC Interior Design Student Spring Show.

LEADERSHIP

IIDA New England Fashion Show Project - Project Manager, Boston Architectural College — April - October 2011 Atelier, Vice President, Boston Architectural College — 2011 - 2012 BAC Interior Design Society, Founder & President, Boston Architectural College — 2010 - 2011 IIDA Student Chapter, Vice President, SLCC — 2009

SKILLS

Excellent interpersonal skills | Leadership in a group environment | Space planning | Architectural drafting & rendering Model making Sketch Up | AutoCAD drafting | Revit modeling | Adobe Creative Suite | Graphic design | Photography | Microsoft Windows & Mac OSX


PRACTICE & THE BAC EXPERIENCE

I love that practice is called practice. It is refreshing to be in a field where everyone is constantly learning and building

their skills. I love to learn and have a loved immersing myself in learning about design, then implementing that learning.

I feel that academic and professional practice are a circular process; there is constant reliance on one

or the other. I began inthe design world in the classroom studying about the fundamentals of interior design. I think it is key to have this experience so that ideas can be discussed without worry of consequence. The design field attracts many different and wonderful people, so the ideas can be quite varied.

Learning and having the opportunity to explore built a passion for design within me - enhancing and solidifying my

interest and perhaps innate talent. When I finally had the opportunity to design for the public, it was like uncorking a reservoir. I worked in two tile and stone showrooms designing people’s kitchens and baths.The tile industry is exciting with the constant introduction of new products, making it possible to be very creative. It is such a great experience to use academic learning in a creative way with people. They can tell you have the knowledge and passion if you have it.

Now, working in an office with large expectations, I am learning how to implement design skills quickly, and how to

be bold and confident. Many times I do not feel that I have the necessary skills needed for particular situations, but taking a chance on what I do know pushes me and expands my comfort zone. Ideas and collaboration are appreciated at ADD Inc, and I love adding to and learning in that environment.Thinking in specifics, I utilize my color theory education when thinking of user experience in a space. The analysis I have learned in foundation studios helps me recognize the level of detail in which I need to pay attention to existing condition and client needs. The office environment allows me to use practical skills and creative skills alike.

I chose the Boston Architectural College because of the ability we are given to practice. That real world experience

constantly informs and strengthens my passion for design. It also enhances the way I view the world around me.


A-1 STUDIO 2 DIMENSION TO 3 DIMENSION 8 THE CUBE 12 CONTEMPLATION SPACE 16

THINKING GREEN 50

A-2 STUDIO PASSAGEWAY 28 RITUAL 36

KITCHEN DESIGN (ID STUDIO 1) 68

LIGHTING DESIGN 56 SPACE PLANNING STUDIO (ID STUDIO 1) 62

COMMERCIAL DESIGN (ID STUDIO 2) 76

FREEHAND DRAWING 46

LEARN

INTERIOR DESIGN SOCIETY CREATION AND PROMOTION 88 2011 IIDA FASHION SHOW 89 TILE SHOWCASE BAY VILLAGE BATHROOM 95 CAMBRIDGE KITCHEN BACKSPLASH 97 ADD INC. MIT LINCOLN LABS PRESENTATION 101 AVALON CENTER PLACE 102 EAST PIER 104

PRACTICE

PHOTOGRAPHY ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY 112 MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY 114 GRAPHIC DESIGN 115

CONTENTS

PLAY


LEARN

FOUNDATION

A-1 STUDIO


A-1 STUDIO | 2 DIMENSION TO 3 DIMENSION SPRING 2010 INSTRUCTOR: AMANDA DAVIDSON DURATION: 3 WEEKS

The final presentation required a final model between 8” and 12” square using white and/or black foam core. Three study models were also required, as well as all process work.

HANS HOFFMAN, THE GOLDEN WALL 1961

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This was a three week exploration culminating in the creation of an interpretive model that abstracts a 2 dimensional piece of artwork (shown at left.) The purpose of the project was to engage the 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional dialog, and understand the transition between the two.

ANALYSIS SKETCHES

ANALYSIS SKETCHES

A-1 STUDIO


2 DIMENSIONAL EXPLORATION COLLAGE - GRAYSCALE AND COLOR

Black and white collages were created to abstract the shapes in the piece of artwork. Black paper, newsprint, and white paper were used to create three distinct tones. Color collages with plain colored paper were created to show the contrast that exists in the painting. They were used to distinguish focal points and major shapes that exist within it. Both types of collages were used to help deconstruct the piece of artwork in preparation to delve into three dimension. It also became clear which shapes would have the most impact once abstracted in three dimension.

BLACK AND WHITE COLLAGES

COLOR COLLAGES 9

2 DIMENSION TO 3 DIMENSION

A-1 STUDIO


THE BEGINNINGS OF 3 DIMENSIONAL EXPLORATION Quick bas-relief models made from corrugated cardboard helped take the deconstructed shapes found in collaging. They help the exploration of contrast, and three dimensional context.

The majority of exploration in this project was through the process of creating these models.

Three finished study bas-relief study models and one final bas-relief study model were created to represent the determined most important shapes and contexts. Sketching, collaging, cardboard basrelief all informed these models.These represented what would be created in the three dimensional model.

Design sketches for the final three dimensional model. Ideas from the finish bas-relief models were considered. 4x6” BAS-RELIEF MODELS

11x14” STUDY BAS-RELIEF MODELS

FINAL 11X14” BAS-RELIEF MODEL

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2 DIMENSION TO 3 DIMENSION

A-1 STUDIO


FINAL DESIGN - 3 DIMENSIONAL MODEL

FINAL DRAWINGS

Black and white foam core was used to highlight contrasts that exist in the two dimensional piece of artwork. Raised portion and voids also represented these contrasts, and layers within the painting.

FINAL MODEL

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2 DIMENSION TO 3 DIMENSION

A-1 STUDIO


A-1 STUDIO | THE CUBE INSTRUCTOR: AMANDA DAVIDSON

The purpose of this project was to understand how three dimensional objects and space are defined by exploring, analyzing, and investigating the properties of a fundamental three-dimenional object, the cube. The final design was to show 7 progressive steps that show the creation and destruction of a cube based on a clear concept.

DURATION: 3 WEEKS

The final required a finished 7-step model as well as complete drawings.

SPRING 2010

EXPLORATION AND ANALYSIS

ANALYSIS THROUGH SKETCHING Finding cubes in everyday life; trying to look beyond “the box” and see cubes created in voids and in unconventional spaces.

FINDING CUBES INTHE CITY

ANALYSIS THROUGH SKETCH MODELS 12

A-1 STUDIO


CUBE ANALYSIS FIRST ITERATION OF CREATION AND DESTRUCTION CREATION

DESTRUCTION

This cube creation is inspired by the human form, specifically the action of a gymnast or somone doing yoga. The form begins upright then rolls into a tighter form. There is juxtoposition between the tall, upright figure and the completed cube. It has a natural feeling flow. This was a good start, but making it more organic would be stronger.

This cube destruction comes from the idea of growth, but the growth or expansion of infrastructure or society. The pieces break their original suggested mold. The idea is the figure keeps the same amount of sides, but they expand making it a larger form over all. I feel like the third figure in the progression shows a lot of motion. This was much too literal, and did not deconstruct the cube as much as it could.

This cube creation is also naturally inspired, but by a plant or flower - showing growth and maturing. The form begins tight and closed, then spreads its four parts to reveal a fully opened form. It suggests a cube, but does not actually have any of the six sides. This scheme had potential, but needed to be pushed.

This cube destruction is meant to show the contrast between a cube/square and a triangle. Once the cube is finally made of only triangles it still suggests the form of a cube, but is much lighter. This explores the decomposition of a cube in a less conventional looking way - cutting the square sides of the cube at a 45 degree angle. This scheme was on the right track, but still a bit literal.

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THE CUBE

A-1 STUDIO


7 STEP CREATION TO DESTRUCTION SEQUENCES

CREATED CUBE

The concept of natural, human movement and flow were pushed to create two iterations of the 7 step sequences.

CREATED CUBE

FURTHER EXPLORATION 14

THE CUBE

A-1 STUDIO


FINAL DESIGN 7 STEP CREATION AND DESTRUCTION SEQUENCE The final scheme gathers inspiration from the human form, and organic growth and movement. The figure curls into a tighter form creating the cube, then peels away deconstructing the cube. Aspects from all iterations informed the final design. The concise connection with the growth concept informs how the cube can be constructed and destroyed in a meaningful way.

FINAL DRAWINGS FINAL MODEL 15

THE CUBE

A-1 STUDIO


A-1 STUDIO | CONTEMPLATION SPACE SPRING 2010 INSTRUCTOR: AMANDA DAVIDSON DURATION: 5 WEEKS

DEFINING THE CONCEPT

The purpose of this project was to develop an understanding between built-form, landscape, and human presence. The final design would be a contemplation space where inhabitation and human scale combine with abstract composition to create both a private contemplation space as well as a social space. These spaces were to have meaninful relationships with each other, the built form, and the site. The final presentation required scale floor plans, site and building sections, design diagrams, and a scale model.

CLIENT PROFILE This space is being designed for a thirty-five year old Berklee College of Music professor who is a professional, concert pianist. He desires a small gathering place for friends and students, as well as a personal contemplation and composition space. With this is mind, the design will focus on sound.

Primary Program Inspiration was gathered from the beautiful, classic gardens of victorian Back Bay, and from music.

50 sf - private contemplation and reading space with 100 lf of bookshelves 300 sf - social space for up to 6 people Secondary Program 100 sf - open program space for circulation, entry, etc. 100 sf - occupiable outdoor space related to primary program

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A-1 STUDIO


SITE ANALYSIS

The site is urban, and on a noisy retail street. The surface of the site is 12 feet below street level, creating a natural boundary.

SITE PHOTOS 17

CONTEMPLATION SPACE

A-1 STUDIO


SITE ANALYSIS - COLLAGE STUDY & SKETCHES

ANALYSIS OF EXISTING CONDITIONS THROUGH COLLAGE

SITE ANALYSIS THROUGH SKETCHING UNDERSTANDING NOISE, PRIVACY, AND SUNLIGHT 18

CONTEMPLATION SPACE

A-1 STUDIO


SITE ANALYSIS - COLLAGE STUDY & SKETCHES

ANALYSIS OF NOISE CONDITIONS THROUGH COLLAGE

ANALYSIS OF VIEW AND APPROACH

ANALYZING HOW THE PUBLIC SPACE WOULD INTERACT WITH THE PRIVATE SPACE 19

CONTEMPLATION SPACE

A-1 STUDIO


SKETCH MODELS & SKETCHES

SKETCH MODELS OF THE FLOW OF MUSIC

ANALYSIS OF SOUND VS. NOISE

The space and shape that the boundary for the street noise and flow of music creates became integral to the design of the site.

ANALYSIS OF HOW THE STREET NOISE COULD BE FILTERED WITH BOUNDARY

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CONTEMPLATION SPACE

A-1 STUDIO


SITE LAYOUT

PLACEMENT OF THE PRIVATE STRUCTURE - PERSPECTIVE VIEW

In order to create a private space for the musician, the private structure was placed in the rear of the site. A gradual approach down to the surface of the site helps create the necessary boundary from the street noise. The addition of trees filters the noise as well. The larger social space would be placed outside the private structure, and would be a gathering space for music students.

ANALYSIS OF NOISE BOUNDARY, APPROACH, AND PLACEMENT OF PRIVATE STRUCTURE 21

CONTEMPLATION SPACE

A-1 STUDIO


SITE MODEL - FIRST ITERATION

PRIVATE CONTEMPLATION SPACE

CONTEMPLATION SPACE

APPROACH

BOUNDARY

GATHERING SPACE

FIRST ITERATION OF THE SITE MODEL 22

CONTEMPLATION SPACE

A-1 STUDIO


FINALIZING THE DESIGN

A look back at the original site issues and opportunities solidified the final design.

ORIGINAL SITE ISSUES AND SITUATIONS

FINALIZING THE DESIGN FOR THE PRIVATE STRUCTURE. The shape of the upward flow of music informed the design of the site and the trees as the boundary for noise.

SKETCH MODEL THAT DROVE THE DESIGN

ORIGINAL SITE ISSUES AND SITUATIONS 23

CONTEMPLATION SPACE

A-1 STUDIO


FINAL DESIGN - FINAL DRAWINGS, DIAGRAMS AND RENDERINGS

The approach and boundary are controlled by the many trees on the site. They filter the street noise, and allow for privacy. As one enters the space, moments are revealed, and allow for the transition from chaos to calm. The private and gathering spaces compliment one another, yet have their distinct uses feel.

FINAL DIAGRAMS - BOUNDARY AND NOISE VS. SOUND CONTEMPLATION SPACE PLANS , ELEVATIONS, AND SECTIONS

FINAL SITE PLAN AND LONG SECTION

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CONTEMPLATION SPACE

FINAL PERSPECTIVE RENDERINGS

A-1 STUDIO


FINAL DESIGN - FINAL MODEL

CONCEPT STATEMENT Upon encountering this space, one is impressed by the conversion from abrasive to pleasing, in both sight and sound. The harmony of music has inspired a designed sensory experience. A note-like path invites one off the sidewalk into a garden of natural sound. A structure is found at the end of the path. Its angular shape is inspired by and houses a grand piano. The music created here, added to the natural sounds of space, transform noise into desired sound and peace.

FINAL SITE MODEL WITH ABSTRACTED REPRESENTATION

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CONTEMPLATION SPACE

A-1 STUDIO


LEARN

FOUNDATION

A-2 STUDIO


A-2 STUDIO | PASSAGEWAY FALL 2010 INSTRUCTORS: ADELE PARK & KALYN PAVLINIC DURATION: 6 WEEKS

The purpose of this project was to develop an understnading of the connection between emotion and physical space. A passageway was to be created to understand movement through space, and how threshold can be a powerful aspect of design. A memorial space would be designed to bring about rememberance for those who have taken their own lives due to bullying and hardships related to being gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered. The final presentation required one final site model, one first iteration site model, site sections and plan drawings for both iterations.

DEFINING THE CONCEPT

The book Invisible Cities was explored. The city Zaira, which expands because of memory, was chosen as a concept to explore for this project. Memory Concept “Memory is deep and, I believe misunderstood, yet an inherent building block of our humanity. ‘As this wave from memories flows in, the city soaks it up l ike a sponge and expands,’ (p. 10 Invisible Cities). Our minds function and progress becauase of memory. They expand and grow. Likewise, as suggested in Invisible Cities, society (the city Zaira) expands because of memory. The collection of memories of all people shapes o ur relationships and how we function in society. They bring about social and physical change. Memories are felt by us, shared with one another, but only remnants (scars) are left on our physical and emotional landscape -- left behind to remind future generations.”

A collage was created in progression to explore ideas in the city Zaira from Invisible Cities. This began the development of the concept. Through this, the concept of memory was explored. The understanding of the layering of memory and how memories relate to one another was realized. PROGRESSIVE COLLAGE 28

A-2 STUDIO


THE SITE AND CONCEPT ANALYSIS

ANALYSIS OF LAYERING IN MEMORY THROUGH GESSO PAINTING

SITE MODEL The site is a open, grassy, sloped piece of land. ANALYSIS OF MEMORY THROUGH SKETCHING 29

PASSAGEWAY

A-2 STUDIO


CONCEPT ANALYSIS

Concepts of braiding and layering were explored through sketch models.These come directly from the expansion concept from the Invisible Cities analysis.

CONCEPTUAL SKETCH MODELS

ANALYSIS OF MEMORY THROUGH SKETCHING 30

PASSAGEWAY

A-2 STUDIO


EXPLORATION OF CONTEXT AND SCALE Concepts explored through sketching and sketch models were applied to the site to begin to understand context and scale.

EXPLORATION SITE MODEL

ANALYSIS OF MEMORY THROUGH SKETCHING 31

PASSAGEWAY

A-2 STUDIO


CONCEPT AND SITE DEVELOPMENT

The concepts of braiding and layering informed the design for the memorial. Watercolor and sketching were used to begin creating the design for this space.

EXPLORATION THROUGH WATERCOLOR

SITE DEVELOPMENT THROUGH SKETCHING 32

PASSAGEWAY

A-2 STUDIO


SITE MODEL - FIRST ITERATION

The memorial space incorporates both layering and braiding. It brings to memory the loss of LGBT individuals who have taken their lives, and pays respect to them. At the time of this project, there were many of these individuals talked about in the media. This subject is something I feel needed to be addressed to bring about awareness and change.

In this design, the swirling elements (deconstructed braiding) represent the people visiting the memorial. The layered elements represent the collective memory of the individuals being remembered.

SITE MODEL

SITE SECTIONS 33

PASSAGEWAY

A-2 STUDIO


FINAL DESIGN - DRAWINGS The first iteration accomplished much of what I wanted the memorial to do except the individuals being remembered were not represented appropriately.The layered pieces were turned upright to represent these individuals and surrounded by the ends of the swooping elements which represent the collective emotion and memories of those visiting the memorial. This connection creates important moments that evoke emotion and would hopefully bring clarity to the emotion around this situation. The importance of using section drawings was realized during this project. Moments and human scale are understood better through sections.

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PASSAGEWAY

A-2 STUDIO


FINAL DESIGN - MODEL

The final model shows the important moments of memory created by this design. The addition of lights reference “a light of hope.” They illuminate the swooping pieces and the memories of those visiting the memorial.

CONCEPT STATEMENT Memory is the subconscious ruler of our consciousness. Memories build upon one another, framing our view of our conscious world. This site will explore human memory in the context of healing and forginvess -- remembering LGBT individuals who have chosen to take their own lives. Their memory is represented by a clustered element at the top of the site. Memories and thoughts of those visiting the memorial are represented by the large ribbon elements which weave together becoming one embrace surrounding the memory of these individuals. The memories and mourning of the people who were in the lives of those remembered on this site come together to hopefully create understanding, and alleviate anger and fear. “A free man is one who lives under the guidance of reason, who is not led by fear, but who directly desires that which is good... wherefore such an one thinks nothing less than of death, but his wisdom is the meditation of life.” - Baruch Spinoza

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PASSAGEWAY

A-2 STUDIO


A-2 STUDIO | RITUAL INSTRUCTORS: ADELE PARK & KALYN PAVLINIC

The purpose of this project was to understand how to take abstract concepts, from a ritual in this case, and translate them into physical, designed space.There are emotional, religious, cultural, and ethnic aspects tied to many rituals. How are these translated in an appropriate, abstract way?

DURATION: 5 WEEKS

The final presentation required a scale site model, plans, sections, elevations, and perspectives.

FALL 2010

RETAIL AND OFFICES 6 Storeys

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SEC

HOUSING 5 Storeys

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VIC

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SITE - EXISTING PARKING LOT NG RKI

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RESTAURANT AND HOUSING 3 Storeys RETAIL AND OFFICES 4 Storeys

IL ETA IN R

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RESTAURANT AND HOUSING 3 Storeys

RITUAL SITE Boston Architectural College

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NORTH

1/32”=1’-0”

Tai Chi was my chosen ritual for this project. It involves both physical activity and mental focus. I distilled three distinct aspects from it - health (stability) meditation (centeredness), and martial art (fluidity.) All of these concepts could be used to create a space of health and well-being. The site was very urban, so a place of refuge would be desired in such a place.

A-2 STUDIO


CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

The three aspects of meditation, health, and martial art were explored in order to further distill what those meant for the project. During this process I decided to create a spa facility - a place of health and well being.

ANALYSIS THROUGH SKETCHING AND MODELS

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RITUAL

A-2 STUDIO


TRANSLATION OF CONCEPT INTO PHYSICAL SPACE

STRUCTURAL MODEL - FIRST ITERATION

SKETCHING

As a structure developed, it proved difficult to combine the three aspects of the concept in a pleasing way. The structure became too monstrous, and did while it combine the elements, it did not evoke feelings of calm that a spa should. SECTION AND DIAGRAM 38

RITUAL

A-2 STUDIO


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

SKETCH MODELS

Through sketching and model making, it became apparent that going upward with the structure would not work. The fluidity, stability, and centeredness would do better to be anchored to the ground. A “fluid” installation of windows could wrap the structure, and a view from entry to rear could center it.

SKETCHING 39

RITUAL

A-2 STUDIO


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

As the design was taken toward its final stages, I realized that one could not design a spa without also selecting the materials. Materiality would set the tone, and strengthen the experience of the user. As this was a place of refuge, it would need to have a different tactile quality to the urban environment in which it was placed. I visited the High Line park in New York City. This is a place of refuge in the big city. It takes natural elements and combines them with urban elements to create a calm, peaceful space. I also used my practice experience to inform these material decisions. Tile, stone, wood, and glass would be used to create the desired experience.

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RITUAL

A-2 STUDIO


FINAL DRAWINGS - PLAN, SECTIONS AND ELEVATIONS

EXPERIENTIAL SECTIONS

PLAN

ELEVATION AND SECTIONS 41

RITUAL

A-2 STUDIO


FINAL RENDERINGS AND MATERIALS Watercolor renderings reveal the moments of the centralized view in the space. Materials were chosen to create a luxurious, natural, and unique experience.

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RITUAL

A-2 STUDIO


FINAL SITE MODEL (1/16” = 1’-0”) CONCEPT DIAGRAMS

The final design allows for a calming experience, yet completely takes the user out of the urban environment. The view upon entry centers ones gaze on a rear waterfall.The water flows underfoot to drown out exterior noise. The fluidity of the windows on the structure and the trees on the site blur away the busy environment outside. There is no change in elevation besides a gradual slope to allow for the water to flow. This establishes stability.

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RITUAL

A-2 STUDIO


LEARN

FREEHAND DRAWING


FREEHAND DRAWING | NUDE SKETCHING FALL 2010 INSTRUCTOR: KARINA KADIYSKA DURATION: 1 CLASS SESSION

Nude sketching informs us of the human scale. It helps us understand how the human body sits, stands, and moves. It also creates a better appreciation for detail.

46

FREEHAND DRAWING


CHARCOAL SKETCHING

47

NUDE SKETCHING

FREEHAND DRAWING


LEARN

THINKING GREEN


THINKING GREEN | FINAL PROJECT SPRING 2011 INSTRUCTORS: KATIE KAISER & TRACY DUPONT DURATION: 16 WEEKS

The Thinking Green final project was a full semester long exploration of how to change a space to make it more sustainable. The purpose of the project was to help us as designers understand what can be done to alleviate design that is harmful to the environment. Through this exploration, innovative ways of changing function and adding elements were discovered. I chose to analyze my then place of work, Tile Showcase in Watertown, MA. The building is about fifty years old, and has only had minor, incremental renovations over the years.

Initial analysis discovered opportunities with lighting. Existing skylights and windows create a nicely lit area, while those areas without these were very dim and unpleasant.

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THINKING GREEN


PRESENTATION

While compiling further research for the final presentation it was realized that the exterior of the building also had a great potential for major environmental improvements. A permeable material would be installed to alleviate major runoff problems.

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FINAL PROJECT

THINKING GREEN


PRESENTATION

The introduction of natural light into the interior of the space was also focused on. This would create a more pleasant interior, lower lighting energy costs, as well as make the product being sold look better.

There are also major issues with accessibility of this building. The main showroom is on the second level, only accessible by stairway. This would be corrected in order to create a safer and more sustainable business.

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FINAL PROJECT

THINKING GREEN


PRESENTATION The addition of an elevator and new rear entry would make the showroom accessible as well as let in more natural light.

Daylight would be controlled by industrial louvered blinds.

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FINAL PROJECT

THINKING GREEN


LEARN

LIGHTING DESIGN

LIGHT FIXTURE


INTERIOR DESIGN LIGHTING DESIGN | LIGHT FIXTURE SPRING 2011 INSTRUCTOR: LUKAS STURM DURATION: 3 WEEKS

This project was an opportunity to create a custom, fully functional light fixture. Essentially, the main requirement was that it did not blow up upon presentation. The assigned concept would be focused on water. The final presentation required the functional fixture and final drawings.

with inspiration from italo calvino's

INVISIBLE CITIES The City Armilla "...it has no walls, no ceilings, no floors: it has nothing that makes it seem a city except the water pipes that rise vertically where the houses should be and spread out horizontally where the floors should be: a forest of pipes that end in taps, showers, spouts, overflows."

marcus hamblin spring 2011 custom fixture design

Taking the concept on water and turning toward the book, Invisible Cities, I focused on the city of Armilla. It ARMILLA was created of nothing by water pipes. I thought this would be an incredible sight, and something not often thought of - the infrastructure of water. 56

INTERIOR DESIGN LIGHTING DESIGN


PROCESS SKETCHES AND CONCEPT EXPLORATION

During the design process, intersection and direction were analyzed.

design thoughts - hanging fixture, abstract design, multi-layered, represent water infrastructure

CHAOTIC VS. STRUCTURED INDIVIDUAL TRANSLUCENT RAW CONCEPT

LIGHT FIXTURE

ELEGANT

MATERIALS ACRYLIC RODS ACRYLIC SHEET 24 GAUGE WIRE ASSORTED METAL HARDWARE COMPACT FLUORESCENT BULB

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INTERIOR DESIGN LIGHTING DESIGN


FINAL DRAWINGS AND DIAGRAMS

58

LIGHT FIXTURE

INTERIOR DESIGN LIGHTING DESIGN


FINAL WORKING LIGHT FIXTURE MODEL

The Armilla fixture is a pendant piece. It was created so it can be installed alone, but could be used in a series in a large enough space. It is a decorative fixture, but has the ability to supply ample general light when necessary. The fixture is approximately 24 inches high and 12 inches wide. It emits very little heat as it uses a low-wattage compact fluorescent bulb.

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LIGHT FIXTURE

INTERIOR DESIGN LIGHTING DESIGN


LEARN

INTERIOR DESIGN 1

SPACE PLANNING


INTERIOR DESIGN 1 | SPACE PLANNING | LIVE/WORK SPACE TRANSFER MATERIAL FROM SALT LAKE COMMUNITY COLLEGE INSTRUCTOR: JERI EASTMAN

The purpose of this project was to begin to understand how to space plan for human use. Drafting by hand was utilized to help develop a good, steady hand, and architectural lettering. There would be no color used in the final, so line weights would be properly focused on. ADA guidelines would be utilized in the commercial space.

DURATION: 4 WEEKS

UNDERSTANDING THE BASICS OF SPACE PLANNING

The final presentation required floor plans, a reflected ceiling plan of the commercial space, an electrical plan of the residential space, an electrical and lighting scale, and 3 to 4 elevations.

Requirements: Floor plans must be 1/4” = 1’-0” scale Sheets must be properly boardered All rooms must be labeled Architectural lettering must be used Properly dimension floor plans ADA requirement must be used in the commercial space Think about adjacency importance

The provided floor plan (approximately 3000 sf on two levels) was an existing commercial building in the city. The exterior walls and stairs could not be altered, however windows could be added where necessary. The space given was two levels. The bottom level would represent a commercial space. I decided to create an interior design firm. The upper level would represent the residential space for the individual(s) who owned the commercial space.

Space planning exercises were done in preparation for this project. Guidelines for proper hand drafting were also taught. THE PROVIDED SHELL 62

SPACE PLANNING


DIAGRAMS AND SPACE PLANNING

Through bubble and block diagrams, a proper space plan for each space was designed. Proper relationships between private and public spaces, the scale of each space, and ADA requirements were achieved.

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LIVE/WORK SPACE DESIGN

SPACE PLANNING


FINAL DRAWINGS AND MATERIALS - INTERIOR DESIGN FIRM FIRST LEVEL

The final design reflects a successful relationship between each level in the program. Serious attention to detail was important as I built hand drafting skills, as well as created spaces that would suffice project requirements and be successful.

Materials and finishes were later chosen to further realize the spaces created in this project. Each space would come alive with modern finishes and color schemes. 64

LIVE/WORK SPACE DESIGN

SPACE PLANNING


FINAL DRAWINGS AND MATERIALS - APARTMENT SECOND LEVEL

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LIVE/WORK SPACE DESIGN

SPACE PLANNING


LEARN

INTERIOR DESIGN 1

KITCHEN DESIGN


INTERIOR DESIGN 1 | KITCHEN DESIGN | KITCHEN REMODEL TRANSFER MATERIAL FROM SALT LAKE COMMUNITY COLLEGE INSTRUCTOR: ROSINE OLIVER DURATION: 5 WEEKS

EXISTING CONDITIONS

This project required the redesign of a current kitchen and living space. The goal of this project was to understand how to create an up-to-date kitchen design with modern functionality. How does a family truly use a space? This project delved deeper into space planning and human use. The den and office would need to stay, but could be relocated.The dining could not be touched, and a new rear entry would need to be added. The final presentation required demo plan, new floor plan, new elevations, and new material specifications.

Cabinet Inventory List (Needed Storage) Food Items 15 bottles of wine to be stored in convenient location 35 small spice bottles olive oil multiple pastas multiple cereals dry storage for 2 lbs of flour dry storage for 2 lbs of sugar dry storage for 2 lbs of powdered sugar dry storage for 1 lb of brown sugar area for snacks - chips, dried fruits, some candy 20 bottled waters (in dry storage) 2 bottles of maple syrup other oils, vinegar (approx. 6 bottles) baking supplies - sprinkles, cake decorating items, etc. soda, water bottles, Gatorade, juice boxes (cold storage) miscellaneous cooking items (1 cabinet) Appliances pancake griddle toaster coffee maker juicer kitchenaid mixer (probably left on counter) blender bread maker

Serving and Dishes, Misc. 15 pots and pans (5 large) 7 serving dishes - largest 24" diameter 3 9x13" Pyrex glass 2 9x13" metal 2 8" round metal 1 9" Pyrex glass 6 mixing bowls 2 cullenders 64 piece flatware set serving flatware 64 piece silverware measuring cups and spoons knife set (want to be stored away) 2 12 place setting dish sets 1 16 place setting china set 16 piece white wine 16 piece red wine 12 brandy glasses 20 beer mugs (slender) 20 drinking glasses (tall) 20 plastic storage containers (medium to small size) 4 plastic storage containers (large) 5 cookie sheets (largest 20x24") 2 cutting boards (largest 18x24") miscellaneous items/dishes (1 cabinet) Plastic wrap, aluminum foil, wax paper, sandwich bags (1 drawer)

EXISTING FLOOR PLAN 1/8” = 1’-0”

An inventory spreadsheet was developed to help understand the client’s needs for storage and function.

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INTERIOR DESIGN 1 - KITCHEN DESIGN


UNDERSTANDING THE CLIENT’S NEEDS THE CONCEPT

KITCHEN QUESTIONAIRE: WHAT TYPE OF STYLE IS DESIRED? TRADITIONAL STYLING, SIMPLE, “NOT BORING COLORS”, LIKE “SUBWAY TILE” WHAT COLORS ARE DESIRED? WARM, BUT NOT TOO BRIGHT. REDS, YELLOWS ENTERTAIN? WHAT TYPE? ENTERTAIN LARGE FAMILY GATHERINGS AND FORMAL ADULT PARTIES HOW MANY CHILDREN? AGES? 3 CHILDREN, 15, 8, & 6 (YOUNGER NEED SUPERVISION) WHAT OTHER SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES ARE DONE IN CURRENT KITCHEN, DESIRED? LIKE TO BAKE, BUT HAVE A HARD TIME WITH SMALL KITCHEN. WOULD LIKE FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY TO BE ABLE TO BE INVOLVED IN MEALS. SPECIFIC LAYOUT REQUESTS? ISLAND, EXTRA IN-KITCHEN SEATING, HIGH-END APPLIANCES (STAINLESS STEEL), OPEN AND AIRY (ADD WINDOWS), GREAT-ROOM FEEL. ADD A MUDROOM WITH STORAGE FOR COATS. WOULD ALSO LIKE A PANTRY. SPECIFIC STORAGE ITEMS (SEE INVENTORY LIST) MANY SMALL APPLIANCES, WIDE VARITEY OF SPICES, SUGAR, FLOUR (EXTRA STORAGE), 3 DISH SETS, WINE COLLECTION, STEMWARE, BAKING SHEETS, POTS, PANS WHAT FLOOR MATERIAL IS DESIRED? HARD SURFACE THAT IS EASY TO CLEAN AND DURABLE (TILE, LAMINATE, WOOD) MEDIA? NEED PHONE ACCESS, BUT T.V. CAN BE IN DEN. INTERNET, BUT NOT NECESSARILY IN THE KITCHEN ITSELF (OFFICE TO HOLD COMPUTER) LIGHTING? WOULD LIKE A LOT OF NATURAL LIGHT, UNDERCABINET LIGHTING, MOSTLY CAN LIGHTING EXCEPT WOULD LIKE SOME DECORATIVE PENDANTS.

A questionaire was developed to help understand the client’s needs and desires.

WARMTH ITALIAN FOOD Based upon the client interview, the concept focused on the warmth of italian food. The client wanted to bring the entire family into the kitchen, and have it be full of life with warm colors and textures

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KITCHEN REMODEL

INTERIOR DESIGN 1 - KITCHEN DESIGN


BUBBLE DIAGRAMS AND SPACE PLANNING

It was important that relationships and adjacencies were understood during this design process. This design was solving a major problem that a family had, and a new way of life was desired by the client. Sketches and bubble diagrams were created to help with this understanding during the design process. Through these, it became apparent that the kitchen should be centered within the space.

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KITCHEN REMODEL

INTERIOR DESIGN 1 - KITCHEN DESIGN


UNDERSTANDING THE CHANGES AND NEW MOVEMENT PATTERNS The new floor plan creates a centralized pathway of movement through the space. The rooms are no longer segmented and closed off. There is also a greater amount of storage, and additions that solve the problems of the former space. Diagrams were created to understand the change in the floor plan and function of the spaces. These would also be used to help the client understand the changes.

MAJOR CHANGES DIAGRAM

DEMO PLAN WITH NEW MOVEMENT PATTERNS

BLOCKING DIAGRAM

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KITCHEN REMODEL

INTERIOR DESIGN 1 - KITCHEN DESIGN


FINAL DRAWINGS AND MATERIALS

PAINT COLORS

KITCHEN FLOORING

DEN & OFFICE FLOORING FINAL MATERIALS

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KITCHEN REMODEL

INTERIOR DESIGN 1 - KITCHEN DESIGN


FINAL DRAWINGS AND MATERIALS

GRANITE COUNTERTOPS

MAIN BACKSPLASH MAPLE CABINETRY

BACKSPLASH BEHIND STOVE FINAL MATERIALS 73

KITCHEN REMODEL

INTERIOR DESIGN 1 - KITCHEN DESIGN


LEARN

INTERIOR DESIGN 2

COMMERCIAL DESIGN


INTERIOR DESIGN 2 | COMMERCIAL DESIGN | LEED RESTAURANT TRANSFER MATERIAL FROM SALT LAKE COMMUNITY COLLEGE | FALL 2008 INSTRUCTOR: ZACHARY TAYLOR DURATION: 8 WEEKS

THE RESTAURANT CONCEPT

This interior design studio was centered around commerical design, as well as the understanding of LEED design. This project required the design of a restaurant including proper site selection, an understanding how to create a space that would attract the type of customer the client desired, the programmatic elements necessary for a restaurant design, floor and ceiling plans, and interior finishes.This was all to be done while achieving as many LEED points as possible and practical. A site plan, floor plan, reflected ceiling plan, lighting plan, finish boards, renderings, and LEED Certification details were required for the final presentation.

URBAN

UTAH

elegant

open

eclectic MODERN

The client, Latitudes Corp., desired a high-end bar and restaurant located in Downtown, Salt Lake City. Public transportation was to be within close proximity, and a minimum LEED Silver level was desired. The facility needed to host an office for an onsite manager, as well as the regional manager for the restaurant company. The concept was centered on the melding of urban Salt Lake City with the beautiful landscape of Utah. Rustic elegance became the constant reference. The name ALTITUDE was established as it represents cosmopolitan elegance and the grand landscape of Utah.The concept was realized by collecting images and creating a work cloud. 76

INTERIOR DESIGN 2 - COMMERCIAL DESIGN


37 W. 300 S. Salt Lake City - Google Maps

Address

Site 1 Pros:

-Around the corner from Gallivan Center Trax Station (Both the Univer sity and Downtown/Sandy Trax lines stop there) -On major road with a lot of parking and a focus on pedestrian traffic -Near residential and business space -Near theaters, performing arts centers, and nightlife entertainment

9/23/08 10:45 PM

SITE SELECTION AND EXPLORATION

SITE 3

Cons: -Relatively far from shopping center -Limited street parking -No existing building that could be renovated (more LEED points) SITE 2

Site 2 Pros:

-Located across the street from a Trax Station (2 stops from Energy Solutions Arena) -2 Blocks from a Front Runner Station -Next to Gateway Mall (high traffic volume & parking)

Cons:

-No existing building that could be renovated (more LEED points) -Little street parking -Area near location is still “up and coming” -Located near a lot of homeless shelters which may not be appealing to patrons -Far from Downtown core

Site 3 Pros:

-1 Block from Trax Station -Next to Gateway Mall (potential high traffic volume & parking) -3 Blocks from a Front Runner Station -1 Block from Energy Solutions Arena -500 West is a well groomed street

Cons:

-Near industrial/dilapidated area -Little street parking -Not located in normal traffic pattern of the Gateway Mall -Far from Downtown core -No existing building that could be renovated (more LEED points)

FRONTRUNNER SITE 1

N^ Based upon the client’s desires, LEED considerations, and the established concept, Site 1 was chosen.

http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&tab=wl

Page 1 of 2

Exploration of chosen site. 77

LEED CERTIFIED RESTAURANT DESIGN

INTERIOR DESIGN 2 - COMMERCIAL DESIGN


BUILDING SHELL PLACEMENT AND SHAPE

Once the concept was established, exploration of the orientation and shape of the restaurant shell took place. The site is narrow and deep, and to the restaurant needed to have a “store front� feel so it could be easily seen from surrounding venues and streets. A variation of shell 3 was chosen to accomodate onsite parking and a store front design.

Shell 3 was adjusted to accomodate outdoor seating, and to create a natural division between dining space and the ktichen. It was quickly realized that the restaurant should be two levels. This would allow for a grand entry, an elevated bar, private dining, and a more secluded kitchen. In addition to a two level design, parking was put underground to accomplish a cleaner look from the street, as well as achieve LEED points for containing the parking.

SHELL 1

SHELL 2

SHELL 3

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LEED CERTIFIED RESTAURANT DESIGN

INTERIOR DESIGN 2 - COMMERCIAL DESIGN


ADJACENCIES AND FLOOR PLAN PROCESS Dining was split on both levels so there would be dining where one could be seen and private dining. The bar was centrally placed, visible through the grand entry, so one could be seen. This also creates the desired chic vibe upon entering the restaurant. 1

A water feature and plantings were also placed in a central location to strengthen the connection with the outdoors.

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BLOCKING DIAGRAM AND EGRESS NOTATION 1 ENTRY 2 PIANO/ENTERTAINMENT 3 WATER FEATURE/PLANTINGS 4 DINING 5 OUTDOOR DINING 6 RESTROOMS

7 BACK OF HOUSE/KITCHEN 8 BACK OF HOUSE 9 OUTDOOR TERRACE 10 PRIVATE DINING 11 BAR

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LEED CERTIFIED RESTAURANT DESIGN

INTERIOR DESIGN 2 - COMMERCIAL DESIGN


LEED ACCREDITATION DETAILS Sustainable Sites 1 Site Selection - No Development near listed areas 1 Development Density & Community Connectivity - Previously developed site and within 1/2 mile of residential, basic services 1 Alternative Transportation - 1/2 block from Trax 1 Alternative Transportation - Bike storage and changing rooms for employees 1 Alternative Transportation - Parking Capacity - Limited Valet available, underground 1 Innovation - reduce personal car use by financially compensating those who ride Trax to the restaurant 1 Storm Water Design - Quality control - living roof and storage to prevent run-off 1 Heat Island Effect - Underground Parking and shade (living roof and height of building) 1 Heat Island Effect - 50% + vegetated roof 1 Light Pollution Reduction - Automatically turn off non-emergency lights after hours

The process of determining LEED accredidation involved both the design process and the assumption that certain things would take place during and after construction. With the considerations of the site, the design requirements of the space, installation of fixtures and materials, and the aesthetic, a LEED Gold Accreditation was achieved. (42 credits in total.)

Water Efficiency 1 Landscaping - Low water plant, capture rain water 1 Reduce potable irrigation consumption by 100% Energy and Atmosphere 5 (possibly more) Optimize Energy Performance 3 On-Site Renewable Energy - Active Solar (Roof Panels) 1 Enhance Commissioning 1 Measurement and Verification of Building Energy Consumption over time 1 Green Power (Unless fully self-sufficient) Materials and Resources Storage and Collection of Recyclables (required) 1 Construction Waste Management - Waste Diversion 50% 1 Constructcion Waste Management - Waste Diversion 75% 1 Materials Reuse - 5% (use of refurbished brick) 1 Recycled Content - 10% 1 Recycled Content - 20% 1 Innovation - Recycled Content - 30% Indoor Environmental Quality Minimum IAQ Performance (required) Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control (required) 1 Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring - permanent ventillation 1 Increased Ventillation 1 Construction IAQ Management Plan - During Construction 1 Construction IAQ Management Plan - Before Occupancy 1 Low-Emitting Materials - Adhesives and Sealants 1 Low-Emitting Materials - Paints and Coatings 1 Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control - Exhause in kitchen/cleaning area, floor grates at entry 1 Controllability of Systems - Lighting

1 Controllability of Systems - Thermal Comfort 1 Thermal Comfort - Design 1 Thermal Comfort - Verification 1 Daylight and Views - 75% of spaces 1 Innovation - Daylight 95% of spaces

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LEED CERTIFIED RESTAURANT DESIGN

INTERIOR DESIGN 2 - COMMERCIAL DESIGN


FURNITURE AND FIXTURES

CHANDELIERS IN ENTRY

RESTROOM SCONCES

DINING CHAIRS

DINING TABLES

All furniture and fixtures comply with LEED standards to achieve accredidation. The materiality of the fixures and furniture help achieve the style of rustic elegance.

FIXTURE ABOVE TABLES

WOMEN’S RESTROOM FIXTURE WATERSENSE TOILETS

WATERLESS URINAL

LOW FLOW FAUCETS

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LEED CERTIFIED RESTAURANT DESIGN

INTERIOR DESIGN 2 - COMMERCIAL DESIGN


FINAL DRAWINGS - SITE PLAN AND FLOOR PLANS All plans created in AutoCAD.

SITE PLAN

UNDERGROUND PARKING, LEVEL ONE & TWO FLOOR PLANS

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LEED CERTIFIED RESTAURANT DESIGN

INTERIOR DESIGN 2 - COMMERCIAL DESIGN


FINAL DRAWINGS - LIGHTING AND REFLECTED CEILING PLANS All plans created in AutoCAD.

LEVEL ONE & TWO LIGHTING PLANS

LEVEL ONE & TWO REFLECTED CEILING PLANS

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LEED CERTIFIED RESTAURANT DESIGN

INTERIOR DESIGN 2 - COMMERCIAL DESIGN


FINAL FINISHES & RENDERINGS The finishes specified bring the concept even further to life. Each material has its own richness in its color and its materiality. The collection of natural finishes with refined, modern finishes brings about the “rustic elegance.”

DINING ROOM RENDERING PRISMACOLOR MARKER AND PENCIL DINING ROOM FINISHES

RESTROOM RENDERING PRISMACOLOR MARKER AND PENCIL RESTROOM FINISHES

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LEED CERTIFIED RESTAURANT DESIGN

INTERIOR DESIGN 2 - COMMERCIAL DESIGN


FINAL SKETCH UP RENDERINGS To take this project further, a Sketch Up model was created during the creation of this portfolio to be able to further understand the 3 dimensional space that was designed, as well as materiality.

ENTRY & DINING ROOM

ALTITUDE BAR

GRAND ENTRY

ALTITUDE BAR & UPPER DINING

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LEED CERTIFIED RESTAURANT DESIGN

INTERIOR DESIGN 2 - COMMERCIAL DESIGN


PRACTICE

STUDENT LEADERSHIP

INTERIOR DESIGN SOCIETY


INTERIOR DESIGN SOCIETY | FOUNDER OF A STUDENT ORGANIZATION FOUNDER | FALL 2010 PRESIDENT | FALL 2010 - SPRING 2011

The BAC Interior Design Society was founded by me and Nancy Santorelli in 2010. We saw the need to combine the efforts of ASID and IIDA at the BAC.To unite these efforts would help to further unite the Interior Design students. With the oversight Student Development, I planned events, wrote official organizational documents, attended Student Development Committee meetings, communicated with ASID and IIDA, and successfully recruited more leadership.

Organization Mission Statement: “The BAC Interior Design Society facilitates the needs of BAC Interior Design students by enhancing their educational experience and networking opportunities. It also functions as a bridge and network between ASID (American Society of Interior Designers), IIDA (International Interior Design Association), the BAC, and the students. It provides interior design students at the BAC a community in which to find creative and professional support, offering opportunities for education outside the classroom and interaction with other designers. In addition, it returns the support to the community through volunteer events. To join the BAC Interior Design Society, students must become a student member of ASID and/or IIDA.”

INTERIOR DESIGN SOCIAL | APRIL 8, 2011 MAX & DYLAN’S “Attendees dined on delicious appetizers while learning how BAC students were involved with the IIDA NE Fashion Show Benefit Gala 2010.” - BAC Student Development Blog

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INTERIOR DESIGN SOCIETY


IIDA NEW ENGLAND 2011 FASHION SHOW PROJECT PROJECT MANAGER | APRIL - OCTOBER 2011

Overview | The Process The BAC Interior Design Society organized and managed a team of interior design and architecture students to create the Boston Architectural College’s first entry to the IIDA New England Fashion Show. I served as Project Manager for the entire project, managing the teams, resolving any conflicts, and fascilitating communication. Major recruitment efforts were made to bring together as many students as possible for this unique opportunity. The theme we were to base our concept on was Iconography. The process began with a forum on fashion and interior design & architecture. The students were then organized into four groups headed by the Interior Design Society board, with the charge to define Iconography. This process was to be a deep exploration of concept. The process continued with a group concensus of the way we would define Iconography. The Making of a Hero concept then, and each group then went to the drawing board to fashion a collection to showcase it. With weeks of concept development, we created a solid and deeply rooted collection. Upon the presenation of the collection each of us were proud to call it ours.

Process | Concept Evolution Collaboration was key throughout design development. Multiple group meetings were held where the ideas from each smaller group were presented.This was an opportunity to build presentation skills, and get excited about one another’s ideas.The layering of individual and group work thoroughly enrichened our process.

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INTERIOR DESIGN SOCIETY


PROCESS | CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT AND CONSTRUCTION Process | Concept Development

Process | Construction

The process of coming up with a final design was long and complicated. The four group leaders and myself gathered the layers of individual work to combine it into one cohesive collection. With our understanding of concept gained in studio, we refined iteration after iteration. Our consideration of concept became something we would fall back on during construction.

The construction process proved to be filled with collaboration and reiteration. At times the materials did not function as we anticipated. Other times our skills were lacking. However, the greatest inspiration to me in this whole project was the sacrifice made by each student who helped create our collection. Nothing was too daunting because we were doing it with the support of one another. Collaboration made this project a success. There is not one piece of the collection that was touched by only one person. At every moment through the design development and construction processes, teamwork was thoroughly utilized - hundreds of hours of teamwork.

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IIDA NEW ENGLAN FASHION SHOW PROJECT

INTERIOR DESIGN SOCIETY


FINAL DESIGNS AND PRESENTATION

ON THE RUNWAY

Presentation The Making of a Hero concept final design consisted of four outfits and models. The color scheme was inspired by a study of the impact and meaning of red. The symbolism was inspired by our connection to heroic figures throughout history. One model respresented Loss, another Strength, another Sacrifice, and the final Bravery.

LOSS

STRENGTH

SACRIFICE

BRAVERY

On the runway, the first three models entered representing their individual aspect of the concept. The final model, representing Bravery, entered in raw form and proceeded to receive an object from each of the other models - a shroud from Sacrifice, a shield from Strength, and a headress from Loss. The hero was made by the sacrifice of the other individuals - a powerful statement. “The Heroic Soldier is representative of all that is courageous, selfless, determined, and unified. Together we feel the LOSS brought by tragedies of war. Together we are STRONG to support one another. Together we SACRIFICE to give and serve one another. Together we are BRAVE. Together we are Heroes.” 91

IIDA NEW ENGLAN FASHION SHOW PROJECT

INTERIOR DESIGN SOCIETY


PRACTICE

DESIGN CONSULTANT

TILE SHOWCASE


TILE SHOWCASE | DESIGN CONSULTANT AUGUST 2010 - SEPTEMBER 2011 WATERTOWN, MA

I was hired as a design consultant at Tile Showcase, Watertown in August of 2010. It was about a four month interview process as the company had not hired for quite a few years, so they really wanted to find the right person. I came to them with 3 years of tile experience as well as interior design experience. In the end, I was able to prove to them that I was right for the job.

I jumped right in, and was ready to help customers right away. My previous experience and eagerness to connect with others made it fairly easy to get acclimated. In the tile industry, there are many factors to consider upon specification - existing conditions, installation in a wet area, size of the space being tiled, use of the space, exterior vs. interior, etc. Also, most customers do not have a lot of knowledge about tile. So, having the knowledge needed to be of help, and correctly specify material became valuable right away.

My interpersonal skills and passion for design helped me quickly gain a strong and consistent clientele base. I was able to work on a diverse number of projects, mostly remodels. It was a great opportunity to design and meet many people.

CONCEPTUAL TILE DESIGN SKETCHES 94

TILE SHOWCASE


ROONEY MASTER BATHROOM | REMODEL SEPTEMBER 2010 - MARCH 2011 BAY VILLIAGE, BOSTON, MA

When asked what to do about a dark, fairly small, subterranean city bathroom I thought immediately, “Go light and go large!”This meant large scale porcelain tile for the walls and floors in white and cream. With the accents of watery blue and dark wood, this space is now rich and inviting. I did sketches for the client, specified the tile finishes, and consulted with them and the contractors throughout the installation process.

WALL TILE - PORCELANOSA QATAR NACAR 13x40”

ACCENT & SHOWER FLOORS AKDO ICELANDIC BLUE CLEAR 2x2” FLOOR TILE - PORCELANOSA SILK BLANCO 17x26”

FLOOR PATTERN

MATERIALS

CONCEPTUAL IDEAS

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TILE SHOWCASE


FINISHED INSTALLATION

The finished result is quite a transformation. This bathroom went from dark and dreary to light and sophisticated. The modern feel of the finishes makes the space feel clean, and the mix of materials makes the space warm and inviting. The clients are thrilled with their new bathroom, and are glad they went with the large scale porcelain tiles accented with glass tile. I learned a great deal from this project about how to communicate with clients, and read what they might not be saying about their desires. I also communicated installation instructions to the contractors, and did on the spot problem solving for a few issues. All in all, I am pleased with the outcome, and am grateful for all that I learned.

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ROONEY MASTER BATHROOM | REMODEL

TILE SHOWCASE


McCANNON BACKSPLASH | NEW KITCHEN NOVEMBER 2010 - MAY 2011 This client owns a beautifully historic craftsman home just outside of Harvard Square in Cambridge, MA. They built a large addition to the rear of the home to create a new, large kitchen, dining room, and family room. The new kitchen was to be an expression of the client’s love for arts and crafts design, as well as her love for tile. She grew up with original ceramic tilework in her parents’ bathrooms and kitchen, and wanted to recreate that for herself.

CAMBRIDGE, MA

After months of decision making, dozens of bring-home samples, suggestions of multiple classic tile patterns, and a leap of faith on her part, the client decided on a gorgeous 1 1/2” x 3” handcrafted ceramic tile. The color is warm and rich, and pattern scaled perfectly for the space. I suggested tiling the entire walls behind and around the cabinetry for a seamless look, capturing the historic charm on the new kitchen, and enhancing the mission-style cabinets and soapstone countertops.

SUGGESTED TILE PATTERNS 97

TILE SHOWCASE


PRACTICE

INTERN INTERIOR DESIGNER

ADD INC.


ADD INC | INTERN INTERIOR DESIGNER SEPTEMBER 2011 - CURRENT BOSTON, MA

I have enjoyed watching ADD Inc’s work for quite a while, and when I got the opportunity to interview for an interior design position I was thrilled. Upon being hired, I knew this would be a new and challenging experience as this would be my first experience working in a firm, and a large firm at that. Challenging as it is, I have learned incredible things as I have applied my academic learning and previous experience to this practice opportunity.

I have been able to work on many projects, and do many different things as a full time intern. I have learned Revit, and used it quite a bit. I have gone have gone on an installation of furniture and accessories. I have flexed graphic design and Sketch Up skills. I have specified finishes and furniture. And, I have connected with and learned from some really great interior designers and architects. ADD Inc has a completely open office structure, and with this, as well as the environment of relying on one another, I have had a great experience so far. I look forward to years with this firm.

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TILE SHOWCASE


MIT | LINCOLN LABORATORY COMPETITION MIT / Lincoln Laboratory

SEPTEMBER 2011 BeaverWorks Presentation

LEXINGTON, MA

Original Plan Presented

ADD Inc was participating in a competition with MIT & Lincoln Laboratory to create a state of the art collaboration space to attract new talent to the company. I was asked to quickly create a Sketch Up model for the team, so they could better show thier concept upon presentation of their entry. I took their AutoCAD drawing and created the model in two days, as well as added detailing in Photoshop.

MIT / Lincoln Laboratory

BeaverWorks Presentation

THE TEAM’S FLOOR PLAN

SKETCH UP MODEL VIEWS

COMPLETED RENDERING

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ADD INC


AVALON CENTER PLACE | REMODEL WORK OCTOBER - NOVEMBER 2011 PROVIDENCE, RI

ON SITE INSTALLATION AND STAGING

Avalon, Center Place is located in downtown Providence. Prior to me joining ADD Inc, the residential team had been working on updating the property. I had the opportunity to go with my manager to install and stage the furniture, accessories, and art in the recently remodeled resident lounge. We worked out an appropriate space plan, as well as accessorized the space to meet the client’s desired style and feel.

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ADD INC


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REVIT MODEL - FIRST FLOOR PLAN GARAGE REFURBISHING PROPOSAL

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Avalon, Center Place desired to continue remodeling portions of the building. I created a Revit model from scratch so that it could be used for future renovation purposes. I also did hand perspectives and Photoshop rendering to create layouts for a proposal to renovate the garage levels.

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AVALON CENTER PLACE

ADD INC


LAND MEETS WATER

EAST PIER | BUILDING 7 SEPTEMBER 2011 - CURRENT EAST BOSTON, MA

FINISH SPECIFICATION AND DOCUMENTATION

This project consists of the design for the corridors and amenities spaces in a new apartment building in East Boston, MA. I worked with my manager to select finished and design the space to capture the established concept of “Land Meets Water” which relates to the context in which this project is located in East Boston.

VESTIBULE

FIRE ROOM

LOBBY

MAILROOM

LOBBY

LEASING OFFICE

RB

PACKAGES

LEASING MANAGER

FILE ROOM

YOGA

RESTROOM

FITNESS CENTER

RESTROOM

KITCHEN ENTERTAINMENT ROOM

SPECIFICATION SPREADSHEET

© 2007 ADD Inc

CONFERENCE ROOM

11137.00

SCHEMATIC FURNITURE PLAN EAST PIER BUILDING 7 0'

4'

8'

16'

09/06/11

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ADD INC


FINISH SPECIFICATION All finishes were presented to the client directly.

LOBBY

RECEPTION DESK

ELEVATOR LOBBY & MAIL ROOM

CONFERENCE ROOM ENTERTAINMENT ROOM

RESTROOMS 105

EAST PIER BUILDING 7

ADD INC


FITNESS CENTER DESIGN

CORK AND RUBBER FLOORING

CUSTOM GRAPHIC WALLCOVERING CREATED IN PHOTOSHOP

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EAST PIER BUILDING 7

ADD INC


ELEVATOR DESIGN PROPOSAL

This proposal was presented to the client directly.

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EAST PIER BUILDING 7

ADD INC


REFLECTED CEILING PLANS AND REDLINES

South Bremen Street East Boston Ma 02128

South Bremen Street East Boston Ma 02128

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EAST PIER BUILDING 7

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LT-P 11' - 0" GWB

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EXIT SIGN ARROWS INDICATE DIRECTION

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SPRINKLER - "C" INDICATES CONCEALED HEAD

CEILING MOUNTED DUPLEX

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EMERGENCY LIGHT BATTERY POWERED WALL MOUNTED

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G.2

SPRINKLER - DELUGE

LT-K 10" ROUND CEILING MOUNT

LT-N

LT-P

LT-A

LT-P

GWB

LT-C6 LT-P

LT-G6

EQ

LT-P

EQ

LT-P

LT-P RECESSED WALL WASHER

9' - 0"

LT-P

LT-C6 LT-G6

H

G.7

LT-M LT-K

9' - 0"

LT-A

LT-A

GWB

LT-N

LT-M

LT-N

9' - 0"

LT-H

LT-N

LT-G4

GWB

LT-A

LT-G DIRECTIONAL FLUORESCENT STRIP, LENGTH VARIES

LT-H UNDERCOUNTER LIGHTING

F

LT-N

LT-G2

8' - 9"

LT-H

F.3

LT-K

LT-M

8' - 0"

LT-G3

LT-N

LT-N GWB

LT-G4

LT-A LT-G6

10' - 0"

LT-K 9' - 0"

GWB

LT-A LT-G6

?

8' - 7"

LT-F

H.5

HEAT DETECTOR

C

LT-K LT-F LADDER SCONCE

LT-K

GWB

LT-A

LT-A

SPRINKLER

LT-D DIRECTIONAL RECESSED DOWNLIGHT

10' - 0"

LT-N

LT-G6

GWB

SPEAKER

LT-C : UPLIGHT FLUORESCENT STRIP, LENGTH VARIES

LT-E RECESSED DOWNLIGHT WITH DECORATIVE TRIM

LT-F

LT-G6

9' - 0"

G.6

HD

8' - 9"

LT-N

LT-F

LT-G6

LT-B : DECORATIVE PENDANT

F.9

LT-F

LT-A

LT-G6

EXIT SIGN - WALL MOUNTED ARROWS INDICATE DIRECTION

CEILING HEIGHT KEY CEILING HEIGHT - AFF CEILING TYPE

LT-A : RECESSED DOWNLIGHT

LT-A

G

LT-J

LT-F

2 X 2 SUSPENDED CEILING GRID SYSTEM

G.2

LT-F

LT-F

SMOKE DETECTOR

GWB

LT-A

LT-K

LT-F

11' - 0"

LT-A

9' - 0" ACT-1

LT-F

10'-0"

LT-A LT-C2

LT-M

LT-F LT-S

I

G.7 G.6

11' - 0"

LT-C4

LT-A

LT-J

LT-F

LT-S

LT-S LT-S

REFLECTED CEILING PLAN LEGEND

GWB

LT-A

LT-C4

LT-A

GWB

9' - 0" ACT-1

LT-F

LT-S

LT-S

LT-G6

LT-A

LT-A

LT-A

LT-A

LT-A

LT-S

LT-S

GWB

LT-A

GWB

LT-A

LT-F

LT-S

LT-S LT-S

H.5 LT-C4

13' - 5"

GWB

LT-S LT-S

11' - 5"

LT-C4 LT-C4

13' - 5"

LT-A

10' - 0"

LT-S

LT-G6

GWB

LT-A

LT-G6

LT-D

LT-D 11' - 0"

LT-E LT-G6

LT-D

LT-A

LT-T

LT-C4

13' - 5"

GWB

LT-A

LT-S

GWB

LT-A

I

LT-D LT-C4

LT-E

LT-A

LT-C6

LT-C4

LT-D

11' - 0"

EQ

LT-Q DECORATIVE PENDANT

10' - 0"

311 SUMMER STREET BOSTON, MA 02210 617.234.3100

E.1

E LT-C6

LT-C6

GWB

311 SUMMER STREET BOSTON, MA 02210 617.234.3100

E.1 LT-R DECORATIVE PENDANT

LT-P

LT-C6

LT-S WALL MOUNTED SCONCE

LT-G6

ISSUANCES

No. Description 1 COORDINATION 2 COORINATION

ISSUANCES

Date 10/21/2011 11/10/2011

E

No.

Description

Date

LT-T DECORATIVE PENDANT

LT-C6

LT-G6

LT-G3

LT-C6

LT-C6 LT-Q

LT-Q

REFLECTED CEILING PLAN NOTES

LT-F LT-S

LT-F

D.1 LT-S

LT-S

LT-A

LT-A

LT-A

GWB

LT-R LT-A

LT-F

LT-F

LT-F

LT-F

LT-F

1. ALL WORK TO BE NEW U.O.N.

D

8' - 0"

LT-S

2. ALL DOWN LIGHTS, WALL WASHERS, SMOKE DETECTORS, EXIT SIGNS, ETC. TO BE CENTERED IN CEILING TILE, U.O.N. SPRINKLER HEADS TO BE CENTERED IN ONE DIRECTION U.O.N.

LT-S

LT-S

LT-S

LT-S

D.1 D

3. WALL WASHERS AND DOWN LIGHTS TO BE CENTERED, IN BOTH DIRECTIONS, IN ALL GWB SOFFITS, U.O.N.

LT-A

4. ALL DIMENSIONS OF FIXTURES, DEVICES, ETC. ARE TO CENTERLINE OF FIXTURE, U.O.N. WHERE ITEMS ARE IN LINE, CENTERLINE OF ITEMS OR GROUP OF ITEMS TO ALIGN, U.O.N. 5. ACT CEILING TO BE CENTERED IN ALL ROOMS, U.O.N. REFER TO CEILING LAYOUT FOR GRID LINE OR TILE TO BE CENTERED. CUT CEILING TILES TO BE 6" MINIMUM (NOTIFY ARCHITECT/DESIGNER IF LESS, PRIOR TO CONSTRUCTION).

Checked By:

Checked By:

Checker

Checker

6. ALL WORK SHALL COMPLY WITH FEDERAL, STATE AND LOCAL BUILDING CODES AND REGULATIONS.

C B

7. ALL MEP-FP DEVICE LOCATIONS NOT SHOWN ON DRAWINGS, OR IN CONFLICT WITH MEP-FP DRAWINGS, ARE TO BE COORDINATED WITH ARCHITECT PRIOR TO INSTALLATION. 8. CONTRACTOR TO COORDINATE LOCATIONS OF ALL CEILING ELEMENTS AND PROVIDE COMPLETE COORDINATION DRAWINGS FOR THE ARCHITECT AND ENGINEER'S REVIEW FOR APPROVAL.

C

LEVEL 1 NORTH REFLECTED CEILING KEY PLAN

B

A

A

11/11/2011 12:30:31 PM

Job No.

© 2008 ADD Inc

LEVEL 1 - RCP NORTH 1/8" = 1'-0"

As indicated

Drawing Scale: Job No.

11137.00

IA-201

11/11/2011 12:31:24 PM

Drawing Scale:

1

LEVEL 1 SOUTH REFLECTED CEILING PLAN

1

LEVEL 1 - RCP SOUTH 1/8" = 1'-0"

1/8" = 1'-0" 11137.00

IA-202

© 2008 ADD Inc

REFLECTED CEILING PLANS

All drawings created using Revit.

REDLINE CORRECTIONS 108

EAST PIER BUILDING 7

ADD INC


RESTROOM DESIGN

SCONCE

PLUMBING FIXTURES

FINISHES DESIGN SKETCHES

DETAILED RESTROOM FLOOR PLANS

109

EAST PIER BUILDING 7

ADD INC


PLAY


ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY

THE VIKING SHIP SCULPTURE REYKJAVIK, ICELAND

112

THE LUTHERAN CHURCH REYKJAVIK, ICELAND

THE OSLO OPERA HOUSE OSLO, NORWAY

PHOTOGRAPHY


ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY The art of photography refines the ability to see and appreciate detail.

THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE CENTER BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS

THE BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE MURAL BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS

THE FLATIRON BUILDING NEW YORK, NEW YORK

PHOTOGRAPHY

113


MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY

114

THE BOTANICAL GARDEN GOTHENBERG, SWEDEN

PHOTOGRAPHY


GRAPHIC AND PRINT DESIGN

sponsored by:

SEPT 9

FIRST [2ND]

FRIDAY date

9/9/11

location

THE LOFT > CHARLEY’S

time

6:30 PM

photo credit: Marcus Hamblin

Come meet your Student Organizations in the Loft, then to Charley’s [284 Newbury] for free appetizers.

FIRST FRIDAY

PERSONAL AND STUDENT ORGANIZATION WORK

photo of Ames Hotel lobby by cumbu.com

Ames Hotel Friday, April 1, 2011 @ 6:00 PM Woodward Restaurant at the Ames Hotel 1 Court Street, Boston Come for free appetizers and a good time with the BAC Interior Design Society, fellow BAC students and friends. Sponsored by Atelier and the BAC Interior Design Society

Bringing ASID and IIDA to you.

115

GRAPHIC DESIGN


Portfolio