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cover photo: Š Artez Photography Corporation


SPIRIT BAY IS MORE THAN A DEVELOPMENT. It’s an authentic seaside village built to foster community, health and happiness among its residents. But what does that exactly mean? What is an authentic seaside village? And how can you build in happiness? To answer all these questions, and more, we thought we’d tell a few stories. We hope they convey a sense of the magic that is Spirit Bay.

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CONTENTS

The Water and the Land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 First Nation Welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Manifesto for Human Happiness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Sustainabilty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Wake Up Here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Pocket Neighbourhoods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Lease. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 House Colours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Features to Note . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Village Square . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Quality Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Diversity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Sunset Point. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Design Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Amenities Nearby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Trust for Sustainable Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Surrounding Area Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Development Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

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T H E WAT E R A N D T H E L A N D

A little Martha Stewart. A little National Geographic. There’s no shortage of good things at Spirit Bay. Every home is beautifully designed and built. Sustainability is considered in every decision, resulting in wonderful features like thermal heating that draws warmth and cooling naturally from the ocean. And the village is laid out at human scale, fostering community and connection. But what makes Spirit Bay truly unique is the natural bounty surrounding us. First, there’s the sea. For thousands of years, First Nation tribes have thrived here, harvesting salmon, crab and halibut - to name just a few. And today, the two most renowned fishing spots on South Vancouver Island are a five-minute boat ride away. Speaking of boats, you can moor yours at the marina located at the base of our village. Of course, you can take a stroll on the marina dock as well - chances are good you’ll come face to face with a curious harbour seal or otter. And don’t forget to look up - there are usually a few eagles overhead.

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Then there’s the diving. Jacques Cousteau named nearby Race Rocks one of his favourite scuba spots on the Northwest Coast. If you’re a kayaker, a hiker, or just love watching the water from your balcony, you’re in for a treat. The local J Pod of orcas pays regular visits. Grey whales swim through the bay. Sea lions, seals and eagles are everywhere. The land surrounding Spirit Bay is no less impressive. There are 60 kilometres of protected hiking and biking trails surrounding our village. Rugged terrain, lush temperate rainforest and fresh clean air abound. Massive cedars tower overhead. And native flora flourishes, thanks in part to the Trust for Sustainable Development’s ongoing efforts at eliminating invasive plant species. Beyond the forest, the rolling farmlands of Metchosin beckon with orchards, sheep, horse paddocks and roadside stalls selling everything from azaleas to zucchini. Some people only experience this sort of incredible natural setting in magazines. That’s because newly-built oceanside communities are nearly impossible to buy into. And Spirit Bay is on federal land that was just recently ‘unlocked’ - a very rare occurrence. Now, you could be living here. And that, we’re certain you’ll agree, would be a very good thing indeed.

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F I R S T N AT I O N W E L C O M E

Welcome to a place where worlds meet. Our people, the Scianew First Nation or ‘Salmon People’, have been fishing and living here for thousands of years. Nature provided us with rich abundance. Pristine forests, seas teeming with fish. As one of our elders put it “When the tide goes out, the table is set for a feast.” To us, feasting is a fundamentally communal act. It pulls us together, and reinforces our values of sharing, family and connection to nature. Becher Bay, the location of Spirit Bay, has always been a natural hub for the convergence of communities. Even today, it is a landing site for Tribal Journey, a celebrated event that pulls together tribes up and down the west coast in massive ocean-going canoes. Inviting newcomers is part of our culture. Our openness to new neighbours brought us together with the Trust for Sustainable Development. Which, in turn, led to the unlocking of our lands for the Spirit Bay project. We believe Spirit Bay will be a partnership in the truest sense. We’ll share our land, resources and natural beauty. And our new neighbours at Spirit Bay will provide opportunities for our people in the form of investment, infrastructure and ongoing revenue. And now, we welcome you here. If you join us at Spirit Bay, you’ll be embraced as a member of our community, as well as the community of homeowners. Some residents have invited our elders to bless their new homes before they moved in. Others have volunteered as mentors for our youth. The process of sharing our cultures enriches all of us, and gives Spirit Bay an authenticity you simply won’t find in other developments.

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This meeting of worlds benefits more than just the members of Spirit Bay and the Scianew First Nation - it benefits the natural world that surrounds us. For example, one of our foundational beliefs is to leave nature undisrupted. Spirit Bay’s ‘light on the land’ building philosophy mirrors that belief. The result is spectacular: homes positioned to accommodate ancient trees, or to incorporate majestic rock outcroppings. To truly appreciate the myriad ways that Spirit Bay has become part of our community, you simply need to see it. If you’re in luck, a Scianew First Nation community representative will show you around, and perhaps even tell you a few ancestral stories. So join us. We look forward to welcoming you to our community, and our world.

Multi-comm

unity Tribal Jo

urney

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M A N I F E S T O F OR H U M A N H A P P I N E S S

How to build a happy community? On a strong foundation of beliefs. Any developer can develop. But it takes more to build an authentic village and cohesive community. It takes beliefs. At Spirit Bay, our beliefs guide our actions. And the goal of creating a happier planet with happier people guides our beliefs. So what are these beliefs? For a start, we believe that living in small, close-knit communities promotes both health and happiness. It isn’t hard to see why. Humans are naturally social. We thrive in settings where we’re surrounded by people who know, and care about us. We believe beauty is essential to well-being – unspoiled natural beauty, and the man-made beauty that comes with thoughtful human-scale architecture and infrastructure. This can range from simple details like framing windows to provide morning light to the breakfast area, to narrowing a road so it can pass between two ancient trees. We believe human settlement can provide a net benefit to the natural ecosystem. If that sounds a bit incongruous with the idea of development, ask us about our ‘light on the land’ methodology for locating homes and infrastructure. We believe in creating renewable energy, more biodiversity and more resilience than existed before our arrival. Our heating, for example, draws sustainably on the thermal powers of the ocean. And each time we need to clear the native plants to build a home, we relocate that vegetation to another spot in the community.

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We believe in a true community of diversity by every measure. And we’re putting our belief into action. By constructing a broad range of homes, we’re inviting buyers of every age group and level of affluence. And finally, we believe in happiness by design. That it actually is possible to build a village that feels like a village, not a faceless subdivision. A place where people know each other, support one another, and thrive in community with one another. We’ve built each of our villages and towns on this foundation of beliefs. And each time, they have not only succeeded as great investments for home buyers, but as places of spiritual and physical well-being. Happy places. That’s what we’re building in Spirit Bay. And we’d be happy to show you around.

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S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y

How fewer restrictions actually led to more responsibility. Spirit Bay is a special place, right down to the ground it was built on. That’s because the land we’re developing is under federal jurisdiction, and was ‘unlocked’ for the first time to allow our village to happen. This unique opportunity was made possible by our partnership with the Scianew First Nation. Being on federal land, we can build without prohibitive local zoning and municipal codes. That doesn’t mean we can cut corners, though. Quite the opposite. Guided by the Trust for Sustainable Development, Spirit Bay is raising the bar for social, environmental and fiscal responsibility. Here’s how we’re doing it. SOCIAL SUSTAINABILITY

Spirit Bay is an authentic seaside village. And like all traditional villages, it is built in harmony with its topography. Homes aren’t laid out in a strict grid, but follow the flow of hills, valleys and rock outcroppings. The same applies to our roads. They aren’t set geometrically, and vary in width depending on the land. It may sound surprising, but these measures all contribute to creating a healthier, more social community. Simply put, this ‘human scale architecture’ encourages residents to walk more, visit more, and engage in social activities more. All of which makes them physically healthier and happier. We’re also fostering strong community with the Scianew First Nation. Spirit Bay provides the Band with sustainable revenue Our architect Paul Merrick brought the Spirit Bay vision to life including sustainability elements that surprise and delight!

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(tax and energy generation dollars, for example) to strengthen their education, housing and health programs, while building pride and independence. Band members are also forging strong bonds with our residents. Some residents have had their homes blessed by Band elders before moving in. And others have also stepped forward to volunteer as mentors for Band youth. ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

Thermal heating. Native flora reintroduction. Energy efficiency. Light footprint construction. 200 year homes. The list goes on and on. Our goal is to build a community that creates renewable energy, biodiversity and ecological resilience. A place which provides a net benefit to the ecosystem, and safeguards nature as much as humanly possible. These are measures you won’t find in a typical development. Many of them took considerable effort and resources. For example, clearing invasive plant species to reintroduce native vegetation has taken us years, and cost more than the average development spends on its entire landscaping. If all these measures sound challenging to implement, they are. Creating a village with social and environmental sustainability at its core isn’t easy. But it’s our way of ensuring Spirit Bay will be a thriving village for generations to come.

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WA K E U P H E R E

Would you like to wake up here?

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Would you like to wake up to the sound of waves lapping at the rocks just below your balcony? Would you like to stretch as you breathe in the fresh air that’s wafting off the deck and up through your home’s cupola? Would you like to take a quick stroll up to the village square for an artisan coffee and croissant, picking up some flowers, butter and milk while you’re at it? Would you like a few friendly neighbours along for the stroll home? Would you like to roll your kayak down to the marina for a quick paddle, dropping a few crab traps on the way? Then paddle home with crabs for tonight’s dinner? Would you like to settle in for a morning’s work, connecting with your business partners through fibre optic internet? Would you like to meet friends for a picnic at a secluded beach? Or maybe just have a quick bite at the spa restaurant overlooking the bay? Would you like to invite a few folks for dinner as you stroll past them back to your home? Even better, ask them to bring some of that salmon they just caught, and some veg from the stand just down the road. Would you like to entertain outside, as your kids play ball hockey in the road out front? Would you like to watch the stars come out in all their glory, undimmed by the glare of street lights? Would you? Then we would love to chat with you about joining us at Spirit Bay.

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P O C K E T N E IG H B OU R HO OD S

When most city planners look at this, they see red. What you’re looking at is another unique feature of Spirit Bay. A pocket neighbourhood. Built on traditional, time-proven principles, pocket neighbourhoods (or hamlets, as they’re sometimes known) are a cluster of about a dozen homes that circle a shared piece of green space. The homes’ social spaces (living rooms, and family rooms) face toward the tranquil natural ‘courtyard’, conveying a sense of togetherness. At the same time, all-important privacy is maintained through the strategic location of shrubs and small fences. Residents of pocket neighbourhoods say they build a sense of security and identity. Residents become neighbours, and neighbours become friends. Children can roam under the watchful eye of all. Strangers are immediately identified and greeted with a “Hello, can we help you?” Pocket neighbourhoods are terrific for building community and empathy. They also happen to be next to impossible in conventionally-zoned areas. There is no way a city planner would allow a pocket neighbourhood. So how did we do it? Spirit Bay is located on federal land owned by the Scianew First Nation. Our partnership with the Scianew enabled us to unlock this magical place. It also enabled us to develop it without the constraints of often arcane local zoning laws.

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That’s why, in addition to a pocket neighbourhood, we could create homes at the water’s edge, much like you see in traditional fishing villages. We could also build homes to accommodate ancient trees and a rocky topography, creating a sense of organic growth, not rigid, cookiecutter homogeneity. Of course, there are many more features we built into Spirit Bay that you won’t see in any other community. The only way to get a true sense is by taking a stroll through the village with us. And while we’re on the subject of strolls, our streets aren’t the locally mandated 35 foot width. They’re far narrower, slowing traffic and encouraging our residents to take leisurely, stress-free walks. By the end of a walking tour, most visitors see the light. Shame the city planners won’t.

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LEASE

Concerned about leasehold? The residents of Palm Springs would like to have a word.

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Spirit Bay was developed in partnership with the Scianew First Nation on federal land. That means homeowners sign a leasehold agreement, instead of a freehold agreement. For many potential buyers, this distinction is new. It shouldn’t be. Building and buying homes on leasehold land is common practice. Half of Palm Springs, California, is built on leasehold land. All the multimillion dollar homes on the UBC Endowment Lands are leasehold. Half of False Creek in Vancouver is leasehold. All of West Bank Kelowna is leasehold. In each case, the homeowner’s investment is, and always has been, entirely secure. There are many advantages to the leasehold arrangement. First, the land for Spirit Bay simply couldn’t have been ‘unlocked’ any other way for development. Also appealing is the fact that homes on a 99 year lease sell for approximately 5% less than freehold land, until the lease term becomes shorter than the typical mortgage amortization term (usually around the 74 year mark of a leasehold property). That means buying at Spirit Bay gives you considerably more purchasing power. Finally, because this is federal land, your purchase is GST exempt. Title insurance is provided to protect your investment, as it is on freehold land. The property is also CMHC insured. The most meaningful insurance, however, is the structure of our partnership with the Scianew First Nation. They benefit from our yearly property tax, and collect revenue for energy generation. This steady cash flow enables them to build their infrastructure and tribal resources. It’s revenue they won’t jeopardize. A beautiful location. Attractive pricing and tax breaks. Insurance. The case for leasehold is open and shut. As it is, frankly, with a growing number of similar partnerships across North America. So if the leasehold agreement is a worry, take it from us that it shouldn’t be. And, of course, you can take it from the residents of Palm Springs, False Creek, the Endowment Lands and West Bank Kelowna, too.

These banks are just some of the corporate partners that enthusiastically support Spirit Bay.

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HOU S E C OL OU R S

Fishermen know you don’t paint a lure beige. In traditional fishing villages like Lunenburg, bright, colourful houses dot the waterfront. As the fishermen say, they’re like beacons beckoning them home after long months at sea. Spirit Bay was consciously designed to be a true village. And it has strong fishing credentials – our bay has been a Scianew First Nation fishing hub for millennia. So it seemed only natural that we add a burst of colour to give our homes a cheerfully authentic feel. But our colours are just one of the things that make Spirit Bay stand out. Our homes aren’t built on a checkerboard grid, like a beige subdivision. Instead, each of them is thoughtfully situated in a way that respects the topography and forest. They’re angled, pushed forward or back, even built on rocky outcrops. Naturally, you can’t connect these homes with straight streets. Our roads meander and wind. Sometimes they’re barely wide enough to fit a single car. This makes them pedestrian-friendly, and slows traffic to a neighbourly pace. Like every true village in the world, our streets lead to a central square. There, you’ll find meeting space, artisanal shops, community activity rooms, and businesses (like local coffee roasteries) that beckon you to slow down, meet and chat.

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One final feature bears mentioning. Villages are filled with a diverse population. By offering a range of homes in a range of prices, we’re working to attract people at all stages of life to Spirit Bay. And we’re building in amenities that will attract visitors from around the region to fish, shop, hike and paddle. The result will be the sort of village life that never grows dull. Sounds alluring?

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F E AT U R E S T O N O T E

Skinny roads. Tiny fences. And other signs of a well-proportioned community.

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When you size up Spirit Bay, you see things you simply wouldn’t in a common subdivision. The fences between homes aren’t the standard six foot ‘good neighbour’ variety. We believe good neighbours like to chat, borrow a cup of sugar, or even pop by for a glass of wine. Hard to do when you can’t see one another. That’s why our fences are small enough to step over. The feeling of separate property is undiminished. But the sense of social isolation is gone. Then there’s our roads. Most neighbourhoods feature straight 35 foot wide streets that encourage drivers to speed up and children to stay inside. Our roads, on the other hand, twist and turn to follow topography, and vary in width to accommodate things like ancient trees. In fact, one of our roads narrows to twelve feet wide in one spot. There’s ample room for emergency services (two local fire departments confirmed it). But it’s narrow enough to slow traffic to a neighbourly pace, and bring our residents outside for a stroll. A leisurely tour reveals plenty of other unique features. Like gutterless roofs that allow for natural runoff, preserving the vegetation. Thermal heating that draws energy from the ocean. An absence of streetlamps, so we can see the stars at night and wildlife isn’t disrupted by glare. The list goes on. Most people who visit Spirit Bay say it reminds them of villages in the ‘old country’ – the sort of places you love to visit because they just feel welcoming and human. The sort of places you always secretly dreamed you could live in when you returned back home. We managed to accurately replicate that magic with thoughtful design. If you’d like to get the skinny on how we did it, we’d be happy to chat. 26


V I L L A G E S Q UA R E

Imagine your favourite European towns. What do they have in common? The village square. Village squares are natural gathering places you’ll find in towns across the world. They date back to the dawn of human settlements, some 6,000 years ago. But like many good things we developed to make us feel more at home in our community, they were sacrificed on the altar of efficiency in the rush to anonymous subdivisions. Spirit Bay is an authentic seaside village. That means we’re bringing the authentic village square back. Our square will provide all the staples of modern life, from artisan baking to organic produce and fine wines. Naturally, there will be a café where our residents can meet and share news. Of course, visitors will be welcomed. Spirit Bay is the furthest thing from a gated community, and new faces strolling through the square will keep the atmosphere lively (not to mention providing café visitors with endless people watching). There will be attractions aplenty for both outsiders and residents. We’ll be working

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with First Nation entrepreneurs to provide everything from just-caught salmon and halibut, to beautiful artworks. We’re exploring partnerships with outdoor adventure companies, which will use the square as departure points for everything from kayaking and hiking trips to rock climbing classes on the cliffs behind the square. We’ll also have community meeting space and perhaps even offices, for residents who want to work where they live. In short, our village square will be a hub of human activity. Why is this so important to us? It comes down to social sustainability. For a community to be sustainable, it needs to be built by people who share a sense of identity. They need to know each other, and support one another. A vibrant village square is the glue that makes this happen. Lets face it, a village without a square is just another boring subdivision.

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Q UA L I T Y C O N S T RU C T I O N

Sure it’s grey on top, but it’ll be around a long, long time.

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Spirit Bay homes are built to last for more than a century.

Rainstorm

We know that sounds a bit quirky, given our throwaway culture. Which is precisely why we did it. We wanted this development to be as sustainable as humanly possible. So that your children, and their children, will have a beautiful home to live in – as well as a healthy, happy planet to live on.

Golden Rule

Cloudburst

How did we do it? Let’s start at the top. Steel roofs cover each home. Yes, they’re expensive, and eat a bit into our margins. But the sea air won’t eat through them, like a tar shingle or cedar shake roof. Our siding is hardie board, a concrete fibre material that’s virtually indestructible. It also holds colour extremely well. So your cheerful red, yellow, purple or blue home won’t resemble a drab subdivision abode anytime soon.

Dewberry

Fired Brick

Dignity Blue

Then there are the details. Marine plywood construction throughout, not particle board. Windows properly cased in wood – a feature unheard of except in expensive custom homes. Geothermal heating and air conditioning. And let’s not forget the cupola, a design feature that has cooled homes naturally for millennia. Speaking of design, our floor plans use every square foot wisely. That means no dead zones or clumsy corners, and windows strategically located to light every room perfectly.

Leapfrog

Bracing Blue

We stand behind our construction, with a 2/5/10 warranty. More important, we live here, in homes identically constructed to the ones we sell.

Butterfield

Of course, the only way to appreciate our construction is to take a closer look. So come by for a tour. We’re certain you’ll only need a few minutes to appreciate why we built for a century.

Fiery Brown

Hearty Orange

Our home colours are vibrant, cheerful, and inviting...definitely not something you’ll find in your average subdivision!

Poinsetta

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DI V E R S I T Y

To build for diversity, we built diversely. You’re probably a terrific person. But the last thing you want is a community filled with people like yourself. Because, let’s face it, being surrounded by people with the same thoughts, feelings and opinions tends to get a bit boring. You need diversity to make things interesting. At Spirit Bay, our intent was to build a lively seaside village. That meant attracting a diverse group of residents. It’s easier said than done. Especially with the restrictive zoning laws most new developments face – laws that lead to cookie cutter subdivisions. We didn’t start that way. Instead, Spirit Bay began with a land partnership between the Trust for Sustainable Development – our Developer – and the Scianew First Nation. Because of this partnership, Spirit Bay was developed on Federal land, free of local zoning restrictions. Our homes didn’t need to be built to sit squarely on their lot, side by side. Instead, they could be situated to respect local topography and ancient trees. There wasn’t a single universal home. Instead, we offer broad spectrum of floor plans, a full palette of bright, seaside village exterior colours, even customized cupolas to go on the roof. The homes come in all sizes. There’s even a pocket neighbourhood with a shared green space for young families. As we built in individuality, we also fostered community with our construction. For example, our roads are designed for pedestrians – they’re narrow and meander to follow natural topographical lines. That means neighbours are encouraged to get out, stroll, and chat.

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Speaking of chatting, the fences between homes are built at waist height. Perfect for stepping over with a bottle of wine and a cheese platter. Finally, as the natural hub of community, we have a village square. The square has all the staples our residents need, from artisan bread to fine wine. More important, there are plenty of seats at the cafÊ to sit down, people watch and catch up on news and views. As Spirit Bay takes shape, we’re seeing the fruit of our labours. Our inexpensive homes are selling as well as our larger homes to a range of buyers, from twenty-somethings to retirees. Suppose you could say our success comes down to a diversity of reasons.

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S U N S E T P OI N T

Are these the first steps to your oceanfront home?

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What do you see? A deck over the Salish Sea - literally close enough to the water to cast a fishing line from? A view from virtually every window over pristine ocean, snow-capped mountains and ancient forests? A community built around human scale architecture, much like the charming towns of Europe?

Innovation and sustainability are built into each home by Paul Merrick, architect.

Or do you simply see the opportunity to build the home of your dreams, working with world-renowned architect Paul Merrick? Whatever you’re seeking, you’ll find it at Sunset Point, Spirit Bay. Sunset Point is a collection of seaside lots reserved for clients who want to design and build a dream seaside home - for a surprisingly low, sub-$2 million price. What it’s not is an isolated seaside enclave. In fact, a short stroll away you’ll find homes for everyone from families to retirees. There’s even a pocket neighbourhood built for young families who want to share a common green space. This ageold ‘innovation’ has been proven around the world as a way to build stronger community, caring and interdependence - an incredible asset for those with busy family schedules. Every home, no matter how large or small, is as individual as its owner. There’s a variety of floor plans and an entire palette of bright exterior colours to choose from. And none of the homes are located in the middle of their lot. Instead, each one is placed in a way that respects the local topography, patterns of sunlight, and the ancient trees growing around it. The end effect is wonderfully eclectic, much like a village you might see in Europe. Which is precisely our intent. By building for diversity and encouraging a sense of common identity, we’re constructing a community that will last, and thrive, for a very long time.

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D E S I G N F E AT U R E S

If you want an interesting home, you need to start a bit off centre. Most homes have a front yard, a back yard, and two narrow strips of land that run along either side of the house. Why? In actual fact, it comes down to going with the status quo. Homes are placed on lots according to arcane codes that, more often than not, create phenomenal waste of land – and a feeling of souldestroying sameness. Not so at Spirit Bay. We place our homes on their lots to take advantage of factors like topography, exposure to sunlight, and ancient trees. That means your home may be set back from the street, or angled to incorporate a magnificent stone outcropping. It’s 180º from cookie cutter. That isn’t the only home feature that’s a cut above. If you look up, you’ll see each home has a unique cupola on its roof. Cupolas date back to the 8th century, when they were a design feature on churches and minarets. More than ornate, they enabled efficient ventilation – much like chimneys. Closer to home, you’ll see cupolas on traditional First Nation longhouses. The Scianew longhouse features two cupolas that inspired the feature in our home design. 37


Blue dots are Douglas fir trees and red dots are arbutus. This drawing by Paul Merrick illustrates how we work with nature, not bulldoze over it.

Our home cupolas aren’t merely decorative. Their windows work as skylights, and when opened create a cooling draft on hot summer days. Speaking of windows, they’re another feature worth looking into. To enhance each home’s authentic fishing village appearance, each window is divided into several smaller, individually cased panes. Among other reasons (and yes, there are several), it’s to give our windows a unique sparkle when they’re hit by the sun. There are many more features that make our homes stand out. Features that reflect our commitment to design, sustainability and attention to detail. Taken together, they leave you with the impression that our homes stand out from the crowd. Even as they stand slightly off centre on their lots.

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A M E N I T I E S N E A R BY

Away from it all, yet in the middle of everything.

Courtesy

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of Victori

a Tourism


Spirit Bay is 180º from your typical mall-centric subdivision. It’s an authentic seaside village encircled by pristine waters and ancient forests. But even nature lovers want to go downtown once in a while. So let’s explore the retail, restaurants and entertainment that are just a short drive away. 20 minutes down the road is Langford, where you’ll find all the major home and lifestyle retailers. Not to mention entertainment galore, and enough family dining and sports bars to leave you a few belt notches happier. Then there’s Colwood, on the Langford border. Colwood is the home of Royal Roads University, Victoria’s most picturesque post-secondary institution. As well, there’s the sparkling new Elements Casino, for players and entertainment lovers alike. For theatre, the symphony, and a dizzying array of restaurants and bars, you can drive 40 minutes to Victoria. Built on tech and tourism, Victoria has the highest number of restaurants and microbreweries per capita in Canada. The symphony and opera are nationally renowned. Festivals (including Bluesfest, Skafest and the Folk Fest) are on the calendar all summer. Now that we’ve covered what’s just around the proverbial corner, let’s venture a bit further afield. Vancouver is just across the Georgia Strait, 30 minutes by floatplane or 90 minutes by ferry. And Whistler, one of the world’s most well-loved four season resorts, is literally up the hill from Vancouver. Finally, if you’re looking for a retail and dining experience south of the border, Victoria Airport runs daily nonstops to Seattle, Portland, San Francisco and LA. At the end of the day, when you’re shopped out, dined out and well entertained, it’s nice to know your peaceful, serene home awaits at Spirit Bay. Who said you can’t have it all?

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T R U S T F O R S U S TA I N A B L E D E V E L O P M E N T

When we developed Spirit Bay, we were thinking big picture.

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Developers have developed a reputation for unsustainable practices. Our founder, David Butterfield, changed that. He founded the Trust for Sustainable Development in 1994 to sponsor, plan and create sustainable villages. Headed by leading thinkers in urban development, sustainability experts and scientists, the Trust drafted a formula for a world where more people were accommodated on less land while still enjoying higher quality of life. If successful, the equation would create profound change. Happiness, even. One high profile proving ground for the Trust’s thinking was Loreto Bay, a series of romantic villages along the Sea of Cortez in Mexico. Loreto Bay was created to produce more potable water than it used, produce more renewable energy than it consumed, and improve the ecosystem it was part of. It also helped the Mexican government alleviate poverty in the central Baja. Loreto Bay was the best-selling development in Mexico, and by many accounts one of the most sustainable developments in North America. Several projects across North America have been completed, proving the Trust model. And today, the Trust, now headed by Kris Obrigewitsch, is developing Spirit Bay. A village with a light footprint and innovative sustainability features. A partnership with the Scianew First Nation that will bring sustainable prosperity, independence and pride to their community. And a philosophy of living that will create a sense of happiness and well-being for its residents. Happiness by design is a big goal, we agree. But big thinking is the only way we’re going to create a better world.

The Trust for Sustainable Development ensures sustainability is a top priority at Spirit Bay.

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Where is Spirit Bay? Home Depot

To Nanaimo

Costco

Langford Lake Walmart Supercentre

Sooke Potholes Provincial Park

ad Ro

Happy Valley Lavender & Herbs Lato ri a

METCHOSI

17 Mile Pub

Gillespie Road

M

ad

Metchosin Golf Course

Eisenhawer Organic Produce

ad

Metchosin Fire Department

Ro

Sooke Basin

My Chosen Café

Ro

ck

yP

oi

Galloping Goose Regional Trail

Hans Helgesen Elementary School

Matheson Lake and Park Glenrosa Farm Restaurant E a st

Sooke Harbour House

Pearson College

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Ro

ad

Cheanuh Marina

EAST SOOKE PARK 3500 Acre Wilderness Park

as Co

tT rail

Spirit Bay Smokin’ Tuna Café

Fishing

Bentinck Island Fishing

Fishing

Race Rocks Ecological Reserve Whale Watching

43

Ro chosin et Westmont Montessori

Karen & Don’s Blueberry Patch

nt

SOOKE

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Olympic View Golf Course

Galloping Goose Regional Trail

Sooke Harbour

Vet e r ans Mem ori a l P k wy

So ok e

Westshore Town Centre


Thetis Lake Regional Park Victoria General Hospital

Galloping Goose Regional Trail Royal Colwood Golf Club

West Shore Parks and Recreation Centre

Galloping Goose Regional Trail

Victoria International Airport Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal Butchart Gardens

Royal Roads University

Esquimalt Lagoon

ESQUIMALT

VICTORIA

Royal Bay Senior Secondary

IN

Ferry to Port Angeles

Fast Ferry to Seattle

Fast Ferry to Vancouver

44


Lots at Spirit Bay MEDICAL CENTRE

TOWN CENTRE

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT

PLAYING FIELD TENNIS COURT

H8

H1

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT

COMMUNITY GARDENS

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT

BOTANICAL GARDENS

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT

SALISH POOLS SPA AND WELLNESS RESORT

45


109

CHEANUH MARINA

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Marina

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CIVIC RESERVE

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Spirit

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785

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VISITOR CENTRE

17

16

H3

MARINA PARKING

11 11

H5

113

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1101

1100

2101

H6

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AISEMAHT PARK

825

SUNSET POINT PARK

46


For more information about Spirit Bay please contact our Visitor Centre: 1.855.744.6888 info@spiritbay.ca

www.spiritbay.ca This is not an offering for sale. Any such offering can only be made with a disclosure statement. The developer reserves the right to make changes and modifications.

Spirit Bay, An Authentic Seaside Village  

Spirit Bay is an authentic seaside village on the Pacific Northwest Coast of British Columbia. It is located where a pristine ancient forest...

Spirit Bay, An Authentic Seaside Village  

Spirit Bay is an authentic seaside village on the Pacific Northwest Coast of British Columbia. It is located where a pristine ancient forest...

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