Page 1

Annual Report

09/10


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


1

CONTENTS

PAGE

List of Abbreviations

2

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION & OVERVIEW

3

1.1. Foreword by the Honourable Mayor, Cllr Mike Tarr 1.2. Overview by Municipal Manager (Acting)

3 4

2. CHAPTER TWO: COUNCIL AND THE EXECUTIVE

10

2.1. Overview 2.2. Description of the activity 2.3. Strategic Objectives 2.4. Analysis of the function

11 11 11 11

CHAPTER THREE: REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MUNICIPAL MANAGER-FINANCE

12

3.1. Consolidated Annual Financial Statements

13

SAFE CITY PIETERMARITZBURG - ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 30 June 2010

104

3.1. Background Report of the Independent Auditors Report of the Directors 3.2. Report of the Auditor General 3.3. Report of the Audit Committee 3.4. Summarized Response to the Auditor General Report by Municipal Manager For Council Response to the Report of the Auditor - General

105 113 115 125 133 135 135 135

CHAPTER FOUR: REPORT ON ANNUAL MUNICIPAL PERFORMANCE

145

4.1. 2009/2010 Annual Municipal Performance Report

145

CHAPTER FIVE: FUNCTIONAL AREA SERVICE DELIVERY REPORTING

191

5.1. Organizational Structure 5.2. Finance 5.3. Corporate Services 5.4. Development Services 5.5. Community Services 5.6. Infrastructure Services

191 192 207 220 229 245

CHAPTER SIX: REPORT ON THE MUNICIPAL INFRASTRUCTURE GRANT

267

SAFE CITY ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 2009 / 10

269

Notes

290

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 List of Abbreviations DMM

Deputy Municipal Manager

CoGTA

Cooperative Governance and Tradition Affairs

DPLG

Department of Provincial and Local Government

SBU

Strategic Business Unit

WSP

Workplace Skills Plan

LG SETA

Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority

HDI

Historically Disadvantaged Individual

UNISA

University of South Africa

NQF

National Qualification Framework

MOU

Memorandum of Understanding

IDP

Integrated Development Plan

MFMA

Municipal Finance Management Act

AIPF

Associated Institution Pension Fund

SALAPF

South African Local Authorities Pension Fund

MCPF

Municipal Councillors Pension Fund

CLLR

Councillor

AIDS

Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome

SAPS

South African Police Services

NPA

National Prosecuting Authority

PMB

Pietermaritzburg

SCM

Supply Chain Management

HRM

Human Resource Management

SALGA

South African Local Government Association

VIP

Ventilated Improved Pit Latrine

STATSSA

Statistics South Africa

SDBIP

Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan

MIG

Municipal Infrastructure Grant

WSDP

Water Services Development Plan

SOC

Standard Occupational Category

BBBEE

Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment

SMMES

Small Medium and Micro Enterprises

CFO

Chief Financial Officer

2


3

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION & OVERVIEW 1.1 FOREWORD BY THE HONOURABLE MAYOR, CLLR MIKE TARR The 2009/10 financial year has not been a happy one for our City. Early in the year it became apparent that the City was not in a position to meet its commitments and we were facing bankruptcy. This lead to the Provincial Government intervening in terms of Section 139 of the Constitution where Mr Johann Mettler was appointed as Administrator to take over the role of the Executive and run the affairs of the City. As part of the intervention process I was appointed the new Mayor together with Deputy Mayor, Jabu Ngubo and a new Speaker Babu Baijoo. The situation that we found was dire to say the least. Debt collection was marginally over 50%, wholesale theft of water and electricity was taking place, there was a culture of non-payment of rates, and Indigent Policy was out of control where many individuals who claimed to be indigent were running up huge accounts.

City Mayor Mike Tarr

There were problems relating to service delivery where residents will recall the breakdown in refuse collection and there was no effective implementation of by-laws relating to traffic control and street trading etc. What was of particular concern was non-compliance with various acts such as the Municipal Finance Management Act and no realistic budget or adjustment budget was in place. The new management was left with little option but to take drastic measures to stabilize the situation. A number of senior managers were suspended and acting managers put in their place. All non-essential expenditure had to be curbed and in many cases it was necessary to cut back on essential maintenance matters such as repairing of potholes, as well as measures to collect outstanding debt. The aforegoing resulted in a situation where the City was able to meet its obligations at the end of the financial year. A Turn Around Strategy has been put in place and adopted and this is available on the City website for anyone who wishes to read it. This Turn Around Strategy is a three-year process and will form part of a twenty-five year plan which the City is currently preparing in order that we may receive comments from the public. The current situation is improving but this is clearly a matter that will be dealt with in 2010/11 Annual Report. It is important that I acknowledge the hard work by Mr Mettler and his Intervention Team that has set us on the path to recovery. I also need to thank all the staff, particularly the acting managers in various departments for their commitment to implementing our Turn Around Strategy. As an administration we are determined to deliver the levels of service that our citizens expect and I am confident we are moving in that direction. We have also received strong support from various sectors in our community for the various initiatives that have been taken. I am convinced that with the combined efforts of Council and our community at large, our city will soon be able to claim that we are indeed a city of choice.

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 1.2 OVERVIEW BY MUNICIPAL MANAGER (Acting) During the 2009/10 financial year, the Municipality had unprecedented leadership and financial challenges. A number of the senior management team were suspended and we ended the financial year with a budget deficit of more than R200 million. The City of Choice’s image has been tarnished and the impact was felt in Local, Provincial and National Government and her people lost confidence in the Municipality as service delivery was adversely affected. The Honorable MEC for Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs, Ms Nomusa. Dube, intervened in terms of section 139 (b) of the Constitution by appointing the Provincial Intervention Team lead by the Administrator, Mr. Johann Mettler. The Provincial Intervention Team developed and introduced a Turnaround Strategy in order to stabilize the affairs of the Municipality. A financial recovery, revenue Municipal Manager (Acting) enhancement and cost containment strategy were developed to improve the T Maseko financial affairs of the Municipality at a time when the collection rate of revenue was around fifty percent. The cost containment strategy yielded a quick positive outcome by reducing our initial deficit of R521 million to R200 million without tapping into the R10 million overdraft facility we had. Communities had to pay a high price since most Council funded projects had to be shelved and service delivery programmes were at a very slow pace. We had to prioritize, spend and account for every rand in the account. In the year 2009/10, through storms and turbulent times, the Msunduzi Municipality made some improvements and progress to better the lives of our people by implementing the following service delivery projects and programmes: i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi.

14 169 new VIP toilets were built in mainly in Vulindlela and created 552 jobs, at a project cost of R43 million. 7.4 kilometers of water pipes replaced, at a project cost of R7 million. 3 303 new electricity connections in Edendale and Vulindlela, at a project cost of R17 million. 720 new streetlights and 24 high masts lights in eMbali, Edendale and Vulindlela, at a project cost of R7 million. 19.7 kilometers of gravel roads were upgraded to surfaced roads, at a project cost of R19 million. 1 017 new low-cost houses were built, at a project cost of R55 million.

As the Capital City of the Province of KwaZulu-Natal we have a responsibility to lead and manage the affairs of the City of Choice with the principles of good governance as outlined in the King III Report. The vision, dedication, professionalism, integrity and spirit of excellence of management will ensure sustainable service delivery, not only for us today, but for the next generation. The main focus for 2010/11 will be the implementation of the Turnaround Strategy, with special attention to financial recovery, revenue enhancement and cost containment with a motive to start building financial reserves. Development of policies, proper systems and procedures to ensure sustainability of the Municipality in order to fulfill its obligations. It has been a great honor to serve the City of Choice as the Accounting Officer (Acting), and to be part of a great team undertaking to restore the confidence of our citizens in our City, to rebuild and improve the basic requirements for a functional, accountable, responsive, effective, efficient and socially and economically developmental City.

4


5 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to express my gratitude for the contribution and support received from the following: • • • • • • • • •

The Premier of KwaZulu-Natal, Dr Zweli Mkhize, MEC for Co-operative Government and Traditional Affairs, Ms Nomusa Dube, and MEC for Finance, Mrs. Ina Cronje. The Deputy Minister of Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs, Mr. Yunus Carrim. The Mayor, Cllr Mike Tarr, Deputy Mayor, Cllr Ms Jabu Ngubo, Council Whip, Cllr V T Magubane, Speaker, Cllr Baboo Baijoo and Council. The Administrator, Mr. Johann Mettler, and Provincial Intervention Team for their hard work and leadership. The staff of the Msunduzi Municipality for their tenacious efforts to restore the City beyond its former glory. The Unions at Msunduzi Municipality, SAMWU and IMATU. The Pietermaritzburg Chamber of Business First National Bank, KwaZulu-Natal Standard Bank, KwaZulu-Natal

T MASEKO MUNICIPAL MANAGER: ACTING

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 1.2.1 VISION STATEMENT By 2017 to be a Globally Competitive Metropolitan City of Choice which capitalizes on its Strategic Location, Environment, Cultural Heritage and Educational Facilities Creating a choice Quality of Life for all.

1.2.2 MISSION STATEMENT The mission of Msunduzi Municipality is to facilitate the provision of service by: • • • • • • •

Community Participation Social and Economic Development Growth Safety, Security and caring for those infected and affected by HIV and AIDS and promoting an HIV and Aids free generation Sustainable Service Delivery Sound Finance Sound Governance Sustainable Environment Management

1.2.3 LOCALITY With 649sq km in size, Msunduzi municipality commonly known as the “City of Choice” is located along the N3 corridor at a junction from Durban and Pietermaritzburg and an agro-industrial corridor stretching from Pietermaritzburg to Escourt. It is located at the cross section of the N3 and Greytown Road corridor to the north, a tourist route to the Drakensburg and Kokstad Road to the South. It is the second largest city in Kwazulu-Natal, a capital city of the Province, and one of the ninth largest Cities in South Africa that are contributing almost 80% of the country’s GDP, and it is the main economic hub within the Umgungundlovu District. Its location has strong influence on regional channels of investment, movement and structuring of the provincial spatial framework for economic development and growth.

1.2.4 THE POPULATION OF MSUNDUZI: SOURCE STATSSA COMMUNITY SERVE 2007 Total Population: 616 733 Population by Gender: 700000

616733

600000 500000 400000 300000

298423

318310

Male

Female

200000 100000 0

6

Total


7 Population by Race: 700000

616733

600000 478451

500000 400000 300000 200000 100000

34760

68215

35307

0 Coloured

African

White

Indian or Asian

Total

Population by Age: 700000

616733

600000 500000 400000 300000 200000

176853

195905 125742

100000

72990

32501

12742

60-74

75-85+

0 0-14

15-29

30-44

45-59

Total

1.2.5 HOUSEHOLD & HOUSEHOLD SERVICES Total Number of Households Community Survey 2007

108227

Water Service level: Community survey 2007 Inside Dwelling Inside Yard

48% 27.8%

Piped water from access point outside the yard

13%

Borehole/Spring

3.3%

Dam/Pool/River/stream Other

6% 1.9%

Toilet Facilities: Community Survey 2007 Flush toilet (with septic tank)

65.4%

Pit toilet with ventilation (VIP)

21.4%

Chemical/dry toilet

11.8%

None

1.3%

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Electricity Service Level Electricity

117 051

Gas

2 088

Paraffin

10 209

Wood

4 592

Coal

250

Animal dung

69

Solar

59

Other

71

1.2.6. Total Number of Voters Total number of voters

276 451

1.2.7. Indigent Population & Definition Indigent Population

3336 Applied + 26,833 Automatic

Definition of “Indigent” & Qualification for Concessions “Indigents” - means a owner/occupier of a property as defined in the qualification for concessions. Qualification for concessions 1. Owners and/or occupiers of residential property : • Where the electricity lifeline tariff is requested and a circuit breaker of 20Amp is fitted and/or where there is no electricity distribution by Council, where the water consumption is less than 6kl, will qualify as an Indigent. • Concessions set out below, and as reflected in the Council’s Tariffs, shall automatically qualify for such concessions, subject to the conditions set out hereunder: • Property Rates - Indigents will qualify automatically like all domestic consumers for a reduction in the market value of the property as approved from time to time by Council and as reflected in the applicable Tariff Register. • Electricity - Free kWh as determined from time to time by Council and as reflected in the applicable Tariff Register. • Electricity MCB - Free amperage as determined by Council from time to time and as reflected in the applicable Tariff Register. • Water - Consumption of water as determined from time to time by Council and as reflected in the applicable Tariff Register. • Refuse - Free refuse as determined by Council from time to time and as reflected in the applicable Tariff Register. • Sewerage - Free sewerage as determined by Council from time to time and as reflected in the applicable Tariff Register. 2. In the event that the consumption of water on a property that qualifies for the concessions referred to in Section 1, exceeds the maximum volume determined by the Council as free basic water for whatever reason, the owner or occupier shall be billed for the total consumption of water as determined by the Council at the tariffs ordinarily applicable within the municipality, and the amount billed shall be deemed as payable. This provision is in line with the Water Act. 3. A customer who is resident in a Flat, Simplex, Duplex, Town House, Retirement Complex and the like, where bulk metering is used for the calculation of water consumption, such consumption will be divided by the number of units, and where such consumption is in line with the definition of free basic water, qualifies and will automatically qualify for free basic sewerage and refuse.

8


9 1.2.8. Household income: Monthly income category by Population group African

Coloured

Indian or Asian

White

176071

7518

18789

5898

R1 - R400

8302

184

423

70

R401 - R800

16758

406

738

611

R801 - R1 600

41877

1910

6283

1477

R1 601 - R3 200

17325

1943

4025

2441

R3 201 - R6 400

14335

4605

6305

3677

R6 401 - R12 800

10586

2775

5451

4040

R12 801 - R25 600

1893

562

1137

2376

R25 601 - R51 200

941

323

654

1168

No income

R51 201 - R102 400

132

-

62

267

R102 401 - R204 800

377

-

-

204

-

-

-

-

R204 801 or more Source

Statistics South Africa Web page: www.statssa.gov.za

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 2. CHAPTER TWO: COUNCIL AND THE

EXECUTIVE

Msunduzi Municipality - Executive Commitee

Deputy Mayor Jabu Ngubo

S. Madondo

E. Majola

T. Dlamini

G. Meyer

N. Ahmed

B. Lambert

R. Ashe

D. Zondi

City Mayor Mike Tarr

Msunduzi Municipality Councillors Speaker B. Baijoo

10

Chief Whip T. Magubane

D. Ngubane

P. Moon

D. Buthelezi

B. Ndlovu

S. Lyne

E. Mzila

R. Khanyile

R. Singh

H. Ngubane

B. Sokhela

N. Atwaru

B. Mazibuko

M. Msimang

M. Thebolla

M. Chetty

D. Hlongwane

M. Zungu

H. Kader

T. Zuma

Z. Dlamini

M.M. Mlaba

V. Ntshangase

J. Lawrence

M. Dladla

A. Shelembe

M. Ngcobo

M. Maphumulo

M. Inderjit

P. Jaca

S. Mkhize

L. Ngcobo

F. Zuma

S. Radebe

P. Chetty

C. Seymour

S. Mkhize

B. Shozi

S. Ngubane

P. Green

T. Zondi

B. Zuma

K Olivier

L. Naidoo

S Ntuli

N. Mbatha

S Majola

B Singh

M. Mkhize

M. Mchunu

N. Duze

K. Khambule

S. Gabela

G. McArthur

N. Bhengu

H. Zondi

S. Majola

T. Ntombela

D. Ryder

C. Bradley


11 2.1 OVERVIEW The function of the Executive and Council within the Municipality is to govern the policy-making process and oversee the implementation thereof within Council. The Executive Committee is involved in the approval of operational matters and provides assurance to Council that the Vision, Mission and objectives of Council, as contained in the Integrated Development Plan (IDP), are being met.

2.2 DESCRIPTION OF THE ACTIVITY The Full Council (consisting of 73 Councillors) meetings are held once per month and the Executive Committee (EXCO) (consisting of 10 Councillors) meetings are held every two weeks. The agenda and minutes are compiled by the City Secretariat and are circulated prior to each meeting. The Council and EXCO meetings are attended by the Municipal Manager, Senior Management (Deputy Municipal Managers – DMMs) and other officials who may be required to give background and / or explanation in respect of certain items on the agenda from time to time.

2.3 STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES The Strategic Objectives of the Executive and Council is to ensure that the Municipality fulfills its legal obligations in terms of s152 of the Constitution and that the Council is focused on ensuring that the Municipality delivers on this mandate in the most cost effective and sustainable manner.

2.4 ANALYSIS OF THE FUNCTION 1. Council details:

Number

Total number of Councillors

73

Number of Councillors on Executive Committee

10

2. Ward details

Number

Total number of Wards

37

Number of Ward Meetings

175

3. Number and type of Council and Committee meetings

Number

Full Council

18

Executive Committee

42

Finance Committee / Financial Service Committee

10

Sound Governance and Human Resources / Corporate Services Committee

3

Corporate Services and Planning

7

Community Services and Social Equity Committee

8

Economic Development and Growth Committee

2

Infrastructure, Services and Facilities Committee

3

Oversight Committee

4

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 CHAPTER THREE: REPORT OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER (ACTING) I present the report on the financial results of the Msunduzi Municipality for the financial year ended 30th June 2010. During the financial year the city was placed under administration in terms of S139b of the Constitution. This had an impact on the municipality in trying to meet its ever increasing service delivery challenges. This is evident by reviewing the expenditure of the Capital Budget for the financial year. The municipality managed to achieve an overall 66% expenditure rate on the overall capital budget. When compared to the previous financial year, it achieved an almost 100% expenditure rate. Despite the collection levels being as low as 55%, the municipality had met all its financial obligations throughout the year.

CFO (Acting) Mahendra B. Sahibdeen

The statement of financial performance for the financial year indicates a deficit of R235.9 million. This deficit can be attributed to the increase in the provision of doubtful debts of R240 million for the financial year. The municipality still needs to achieve full compliance with the Generally Recognized Accounting Standards (GRAP). There are still challenges with regards to property plant and equipment issues and the recognition of investment property. Once we have addressed these challenges, we should be able to achieve the targets set by operation clean audit 2014. I wish to express my thanks to all my valued staff members, fellow colleagues and councilors for all their assistance and support during my appointment as the Chief Financial Officer (Acting). Together we can face these challenges and achieve the desired positive outcomes.

12


13 3.1 CONSOLIDATED ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS General Information Legal form of entity Municipality Executive Committee Mayor -

MA Tarr Deputy Mayor - JJ Ngubo Member - G Meyer Member - TI Dlamini Member - RP Ashe Member - WF Lambert Member - DP Zondi Member - SI Madonda Member - N Ahmed Member - NE Majola

Councillors

Speaker - B Baijoo Whip - VT Magubane RS Ntuli RT Zuma PB Shozi SEM Ngcobo EB Zuma TD Ntombela Z Magubane M Mchunu TS Majola VS Radebe AS Mkhize CS Gabela BF Zuma A Shelembe KV Khambule BR Mazibuko BM Mkhize VP Jaca SA Sibisi LM Msimang D Ryder GR McArthur MJ Lawrence SN Naidoo HD Ngubane M Chetty I Manilal PW Moon JEP Green MJ Dladla I Ngubane SP Lyne H Zondi D Buthelezi TU Zondi V Ntshangase L Ngcobo N Duze MEZ Dlamini

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10

Z Mbatha FR Zungu R Singh B Ndlovu S Mkhize S Ngubane K Chetty MM Thebola AH Kadir S Majola C Bradley N Atwaru K Oliver P Bengu ND Hlongwane PT Kanyile M Maphumulo SJ Seymour BS Sokhela E Mzila RB Singh M Mlaba

Accounting Officer (Acting)

TS Maseko

Chief Finance Officer (CFO) (Acting)

MB Sahibdeen

Grading of local authority

Category - B

Registered office

The City Hall 260 Church Street Pietermaritzburg 3201

Business address

The City Hall 260 Church Street Pietermaritzburg 3201

Postal address

The City Hall Private Bag x321 Pietermaritzburg 3200

Controlling entity Bankers Auditors Telephone number: Facsimile: Website:

Municipality Safe City Pietermaritzburg First National Bank The Auditor General (033) 392 2006 (033) 392 2208 www.msunduzi.gov.za

14


15 Index Content

Page

Accounting Officer’s Approval Statement of Financial Position Statement of Financial Performance Statement of Changes in Net Assets Cash Flow Statement Accounting policies Notes to Consolidated Annual Financial Statements

16 17 18 19 - 20 21 22 - 40 41 - 79

Appendixes: Appendix A: Statement of comparative and actual information Appendix B: Schedule of External Loans Appendix C: Analysis of Property, Plant and Equipment Appendix D: Segmental Statement of Financial Performance Appendix E: Actual versus Budget (Revenue and Expenditure) Appendix F: Actual versus Budget (Acquisition of Property, plant and Equipment) Appendix G: Details of Conditional Grants and Receipts Appendix H: Conditional grants and Receipts Appendix I: Disclosure of grants and receipts Appendix J: Schedule of contingent liabilities

80 - 82 83 - 85 86 - 91 92 93 - 94 95 96 - 97 98 99 - 101 102 - 103

Abbreviations ASB CBD COID CPI CRR DBSA DSB FNB GRAP HDF IAS IPSAS KZN ME’s MFMA MIG NATIS NCT NJMPF NPA PAYE RMB UIF VAT

Accounting Standards Board Central Business District Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Consumer Price Index Capital Replacement Reserve Development Bank of South Africa Development Services Board First National Bank Generally Recognised Accounting Practice Housing Development Fund International Accounting Standards International Public Sector Accounting Standards Kwazulu-Natal Municipal Entities Municipal Finance Management Act Municipal Infrastructure Grant National Traffic Information System Natal Co-operative Timber Tree Farming (Pty) Ltd Natal Joint Municipal Pension Fund Natal Provincial Administration Pay As You Earn Rand Merchant Bank Unemployment Insurance Fund Value Added Taxation

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 The Msunduzi Municipality and its Municipal Entity Consolidated Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2010 I am responsible for the preparation of these consolidated annual financial statements, which are set out on pages 17 of 124, in terms of Section 126(1) of the Municipal Finance Act and which I have signed on behalf of the Municipality. I certify that the salaries, allowances and benefits of Councillors, as disclosed in note 28 of these annual financial statements are within the upper limits of the framework envisaged in Section 219 of the Constitution, read with the remuneration of Public Officer Bearer s Act and the Minister of Provincial and Local Government’s determination in accordance with this Act.

TS. Maseko Municipal Manager (Acting)

16


17 Consolidated Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2010 - Statement of Financial Position Figures in Rand Assets Current Assets Inventories Current portion - other financial assets Trade and other receivables from non exchange transactions VAT receivable Consumer debtors Current portion of long - term receivables Cash and cash equivalents Non-Current Assets Investment property Property, plant and equipment Intangible assets Long - term receivables Current portion - other financial assets

Note(s)

Non-Current Liabilities Long - term liabilities Finance lease obligation Retirement benefit obligation Provisions

2009 Restated

63,567,100 1,860,000 28,689,626

64,304,960 1,860,000 18,935,560

63,567,100 1,860,000 28,689,626

64,304,960 1,860,000 18,935,560

5 10 6

8,332 214,803,637 1,444,570 138,810,885 449,184,150

27,080 320,310,480 1,492,047 113,666,687 520,596,814

214,803,639 1,444,570 138,024,193 448,389,128

320,310,484 1,492,047 112,867,232 519,770,283

9 7 8 10 11

12 14 15 16 17 18

534,167,000 534,167,000 534,167,000 534,167,000 6,221,807,029 6,193,149,884 6,221,718,502 6,193,098,558 6,465,292 3,770,102 6,465,292 3,770,102 4,190,414 4,686,392 4,190,414 4,686,392 64,051 70,842 64,051 70,842 6,766,693,786 6,735,844,220 6,766,605,259 6,735,792,894 7,215,877,936 7,256,441,034 7,214,994,387 7,255,563,177

47,969,108 325,953,689 22,512,954 35,793,963 140,882,033 760,739 573,872,486

47,105,411 301,975,340 5,040,704 34,808,038 113,470,182 50,000,000 625,167 553,024,842

47,969,108 325,924,128 22,512,954 35,793,963 140,882,033 760,739 573,842,925

47,105,411 301,965,906 5,040,704 34,808,038 113,470,182 50,000,000 625,167 553,015,408

12 13 19 20

562,978,504 371,716,196 562,978,504 371,716,196 7,150,234 10,670,399 7,150,234 10,670,399 151,097,282 98,089,800 151,097,282 98,089,800 3,623,648 16,871,166 3,623,648 16,871,166 724,849,668 497,347,561 724,849,668 497,347,561 1,298,722,154 1,050,372,403 1,298,692,593 1,050,362,969 5,917,155,782 6,206,068,631 5,916,301,794 6,205,200,208

21

52,480,002 52,002,719 52,480,002 52,002,719 5,864,675,780 6,154,065,912 5,863,821,792 6,153,197,489 5,917,155,782 6,206,068,631 5,916,301,794 6,205,200,208

Total Liabilities Net Assets Net Assets Housing development fund Accumulated surplus Total Net Assets

2009 Restated

Municipality 2010

3 11 4

Total Assets Liabilities Current Liabilities Long - term liabilities Trade and other payables VAT payable Consumer deposits Unspent conditional grants and receipts Short term - liability Current provision

Group 2010

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Consolidated Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2010 - Statement of Financial Performance Figures in Rand Revenue Property rates Service charges Property rates - penalties imposed and collection charges Public contributions,donated and contributed property, plant and equipment Rental received Fees from agency services Fines Licences and permits Government grants & subsidies Other revenue Interest received Total Revenue Expenditure Employee related costs Remuneration of councillors Depreciation and amortisation Impairment loss assets Finance costs Debt impairment Collection costs Repairs and maintenance Bulk purchases Grants and subsidies paid General expenses Total Expenditure Gain or loss on disposal of assets Financial liability amortised cost Financial asset amortised cost (Deficit) surplus for the year

18

Note(s)

23 24

25 26 27

28 29 30 31 32 33

34 35 36

37

Group 2010

2009

Municipality 2010

2009

420,030,161 1,159,281,895 20,284,950

378,556,015 952,422,683 20,581,029

420,030,161 1,159,300,660 20,284,950

378,556,015 952,438,874 20,581,029

60,000

10,000

-

-

15,571,328 1,435,383 7,084,343 72,254 355,033,160 496,550,663 28,029,311 2,503,433,448

16,684,449 689,431 14,299,020 53,988 324,440,359 338,999,138 35,573,954 2,082,310,066

15,571,328 1,435,383 7,084,343 72,254 355,033,160 496,526,273 27,918,013 2,503,256,525

16,684,449 689,431 14,299,020 53,988 324,440,359 338,998,135 35,510,494 2,082,251,794

(633,708,157) (582,395,778) (631,560,165) (580,172,076) (19,383,701) (19,164,676) (19,383,701) (19,164,676) (123,669,181) (96,651,653) (123,646,386) (96,625,686) (397,381) (397,381) (73,753,994) (57,421,591) (73,753,994) (57,421,392) (250,539,606) (10,000,000) (250,539,606) (10,000,000) (2,460,768) (1,401,737) (2,460,768) (1,401,737) (66,284,690) (77,933,252) (65,924,285) (77,379,164) (804,979,363) (636,770,849) (804,979,363) (636,770,849) (1,710,637) (2,346,757) (4,342,216) (4,978,336) (764,679,694) (602,601,989) (764,387,949) (602,728,333) (2,741,567,172) (2,086,688,282) (2,741,375,814) (2,086,642,249) 1,937,411 793,323 (531,635) (235,934,625)

3,369,276 5,434,385 (385,314) 4,040,131

1,937,411 793,323 (531,635) (235,920,190)

3,369,276 5,434,385 (385,314) 4,027,892


19 Consolidated Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2010 - Statement of Changes in Net Assets Figures in Rand

Group Opening balance - municipality Opening balance - municipal entity Balance at 01 July 2008 as restated Changes in acounting policies Correction of prior period error Net income (losses) recognised directly in net assets Deficit for the year Total recognised income and expenses for the year Transfer to HDF Net difference of adjustments Additional other property plant and equipment - biological assets Transfer to/from provisions Transfer to/from creditors (leave pay) Net take on of infrastructure assets as at 30 June 2009 Insurance claim processed Total changes Balance at 01 July 2009 Correction of prior period error Net income (losses) recognised directly in net assets Deficit for the year Total recognised income and expenses for the year Transfer to / from reserves Net difference on adjustments Transfer to / from provisions Transactions HDF Take on of additional servitudes Contribution to leave pay Off set depreciation Contribution from accumlated surplus Total changes Balance at 30 June 2010 Note(s)

Housing Development fund

54,756,079 54,756,079 (2,753,360) (2,753,360) 52,002,719 477,283 477,283 52,480,002

Accumulated surplus

903,047,196 856,184 903,903,380 (146,559) (5,610,494) (5,757,053) 4,040,135 (1,716,918) 6,116,773 (31,010,576) 85,716 (21,593,591) (2,520,716) 5,294,381,500 6,420,344 5,250,162,532 6,154,065,912 (29,919,144) (29,919,144) (235,934,625) (265,853,769) 1,865,658 (8,446,120) (2,585,766) 627,160 (7,772,891) 11,175,878 (18,400,282) (289,390,132) 5,864,675,780

Total net assets

957,803,275 856,184 958,659,459 (146,559) (5,610,494) (5,757,053) 4,040,135 (1,716,918) 3,363,413 (31,010,576) 85,716 (21,593,591) (2,520,716) 5,294,381,500 6,420,344 5,247,409,172 6,206,068,631 (29,919,144) (29,919,144) (235,934,625) (265,853,769) 1,865,658 (8,446,120) (2,585,766) 477,283 627,160 (7,772,891) 11,175,878 (18,400,282) (288,912,849) 5,917,155,782

21

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Consolidated Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2010 - Statement of Changes in Net Assets Figures in Rand

Municipality Balance at 01 July 2008 Changes in acounting policies Correction of prior period error Net income (losses) recognised directly in net assets Surplus for the year Total recognised income and expenses for the year Transfer to HDF Net difference of adjustments Additional other property plant and equipment - biological assets Transfer to / from provisions Transfer to / from creditors (leave pay) Insurance claim processed Net take on of infrastructure assets as at 30 June 2009 Total changes Balance at 01 July 2009 Changes in acounting policies Net income (losses) recognised directly in net assets Deficit for the year Total recognised income and expenses for the year Transfer to / from reserves Net difference of adjustments Transfer to / from provisions Take on of additional servitudes Contribution to leave pay Off set depreciation Contribution from accumlated surplus Transactions to HDF Total changes Balance at 30 June 2010 Note(s)

20

Housing Development fund

54,756,079 (2,753,360) (2,753,360) 52,002,719 477,283 477,283 52,480,002 21

Accumulated surplus

903,047,196 (146,559) (5,610,494) (5,757,053) 4,027,896 (1,729,157) 6,116,773 (31,010,576) 85,716 (21,593,591) (2,520,716) 6,420,344 5,294,381,500 5,250,150,293 6,153,197,489 (29,919,144) (29,919,144) (235,920,190) (265,839,334) 1,865,658 (8,446,120) (2,585,766) 627,160 (7,772,891) 11,175,878 (18,400,282) (289,375,697) 5,863,821,792

Total net assets

957,803,275 (146,559) (5,610,494) (5,757,053) 4,027,896 (1,729,157) 3,363,413 (31,010,576) 85,716 (21,593,591) (2,520,716) 6,420,344 5,294,381,500 5,247,396,933 6,205,200,208 (29,919,144) (29,919,144) (235,920,190) (265,839,334) 1,865,658 (8,446,120) (2,585,766) 627,160 (7,772,891) 11,175,878 (18,400,282) 477,283 (288,898,414) 5,916,301,794


21 Consolidated Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2010 - Cash Flow Statement Figures in Rand

Note(s)

Group 2010

2009

Municipality 2010

2009

Cash flows from operating activities Receipts Sale of goods and services Interest income

1,899,729,460 28,029,311 1,927,758,771

Payments Suppliers Finance costs Net cash flows from operating activities

38

1,908,680,804 35,573,954 1,944,254,758

1,897,054,743 27,918,013 1,924,972,756

1,905,997,342 35,510,494 1,941,507,836

(1,819,586,743) (1,836,909,938) (1,816,787,965) (1,833,918,292) (73,753,994) (57,421,591) (73,753,994) (57,421,392) (1,893,340,737) (1,894,331,529) (1,890,541,959) (1,891,339,684) 34,418,034 49,923,229 34,430,797 50,168,152

Cash flows from investing activities Purchase of property, plant and equipment Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment Movement in non current receivables Net cash flows from investing activities

(154,961,519) 1,937,411

(298,093,138) 3,369,276

(154,961,519) 1,937,411

(298,093,138) 3,369,276

502,770 (152,521,338)

666,953 (294,064,107)

502,770 (152,521,338)

666,953 (294,056,909)

(33,969,416)

44,510,125

(33,969,416)

44,510,125

(50,000,000) 135,572 985,925 226,095,421 143,247,502

50,000,000 (236,098) (1,363,464) 92,910,563

(50,000,000) 135,572 985,925 226,095,421 143,247,502

50,000,000 (236,098) (1,363,464) 92,910,563

25,144,198

(151,230,315)

25,156,961

(150,978,194)

113,666,687

264,897,001

112,867,232

263,845,427

138,810,885

113,666,686

138,024,193

112,867,233

Cash flows from financing activities Net movement in long - term liabilities/ financial leases Movement in short term liability Movement in current provisions Movement in consumer deposits Long term loan received Net cash flows from financing activities Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the year Cash and cash equivalents at the end of 6 the year

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Consolidated Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2010 - Accounting Policies 1.

Presentation of Consolidated Annual Financial Statements

The consolidated annual financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the Standards of Generally Recognised Accounting Practices (GRAP) prescribed by the Minister of Finance in terms of General Notice 991 and 992 of 2005. The standards are summarised as follows: Standard of GRAP GRAP 1 GRAP 2 GRAP 3 GRAP 4 GRAP 5 GRAP 6 GRAP 7 GRAP 8 GRAP 9 GRAP 11 GRAP 12 GRAP 13 GRAP 14 GRAP 16 GRAP 17 GRAP 19 GRAP 100 GRAP 101 GRAP 102

Presentation of financial statements Cash flow statements Accounting policies, changes in accounting estimates and errors The effects of changes in foreign exchange rates Borrowings Consolidated financial statements and accounting for controlled entities Accounting for investments in associates Financial reporting of interests in joint ventures Revenue from exchange transactions Construction Contracts Inventories Leases Events after the reporting date Investment Property Property, plant and equipment Provisions, contingent liabilities and contingent asset Non-current Assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations Agriculture Intangible Assets

GRAP 6, 7 and 8 have been complied with to the extent that the requirements in these standards relate to the municipality’s separate financial statements. Accounting policies for material transactions, events or conditions not covered by the above GRAP and GAMAP Standards have been developed in accordance with paragraphs 7, 11 and 12 of GRAP 3. These accounting policies and the applicable disclosures have been based on the South African Statements of Generally Accepted Accounting Practices (SA GAAP) including any interpretations of such Statements issued by the Accounting Practices Board. Directives issued and effective: Directive 1: Directive 2: Directive 3: Directive 4: Directive 5: Directive 7:

Repeal of Existing Transitional Provisions in, and Consequential Amendments to, Standards of GRAP Transitional Provisions for the adoption of Standards of GRAP by entities, Municipal Entities and constitutional Institutions Transitional Provisions for the adoption of Standards of GRAP by High Capacity Municipalities Transitional Provisions for the adoption of Standards of GRAP by Medium and Low Capacity Municipalities Determining the GRAP reporting Framework The adoption of Deemed Cost on the Adoption of Standards of GRAP

Approved Guidelines of Standards of GRAP: Guide 1 Guideline on Accounting for Public Private Partnerships

22


23 Effective accrual based IPSAS’s considering the provisions in paragraphs 15 to 19 of the Directive: IPSAS 20 IPSAS 21

Related Party Disclosure Impairment of Non-Cash-Generating Assets

Effective IFRS’s and IFRIC’s that are applied considering the provisions in paragraphs 20 to 26 of the Directive: IFRS 3 (AC 140) Business Combinations IFRS 4 (AC 141) Insurance Contracts IFRS 6 (AC 143) Exploration for and Evaluation of Mineral Resources IFRS 7 (AC 144) Financial Instruments: Disclosure IAS 12 (AC 102) Income Taxes IAS 19 (AC 116) Employees Benefits IAS 32 (AC 132) Financial Instruments: Presentation IAS 36 (AC 128) Impairment of Assets IAS 39 (AC 133) Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurements SIC 21 (AC 421) Income Taxes – Recovery of revaluated Non- Depreciable Assets SIC 25 (AC 425) Income Taxes – Changes in the Tax Status of an entity or its Shareholders SIC 29 (AC 429) Service Concession Arrangements: Disclosure IFRIC 2 (AC 435) Members Shares in Co-operative Entities and Similar Instruments IFRIC 4 (AC 437) Determining whether an Arrangement contains a lease IFRIC 9 (AC 442) Reassessment of Embedded Derivatives IFRIC 12 (AC 445) Service Concession Arrangements IFRIC 13 (AC 446) Customer Loyalty Programmes IFRIC 14 (AC447) IAS 19 – The limit on a Defined Benefit Asset, Minimum Funding Requirements and their interaction 1.1 Consolidation Basis of consolidation The consolidated annual financial statements incorporate the annual financial statements of the municipality and the municipalentity. The consolidated annual financial statements of the municipality and its municipal entity are used in the preparation of the consolidated consolidated annual financial statements and are prepared as of the same reporting date. On acquisition the economic entity recognises the municipal entity’s identifiable assets, liabilities and contingent liabilities at fairvalue, except for assets classified as held-for-sale, which are recognised at fair value less costs to sell. The results of the municipal entity are included from the effective date of acquisition. Where neccessary adjustments are made to the consolidated annual financial statements of the municipal entity to bring their accounting policies used in line with those of the municipality. All intra-entity transactions, balances, revenues and expenses are eliminated in full on consolidation. 1.2 Presentation of currency These consolidated annual financial statements are presented in South African Rand.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 1.3 Going concern assumption In terms of the accounting standard GRAP 1 paragraphs 27 to 30 the consolidated annual financial statements are prepared on a going concern basis. The assumption is based on the fact that the municipality may invoke its power to levy additional rates or taxes to enable the municipality to be considered as a going concern even though the municipality will be operational for extended periods with negative net assets. However based on the current solvency and liquidity ratio’s tests performed, the municipality’s ability to operate as a going concern is under serious threat. To address the threat under which the municipality find’s itself, the Provincial MEC for Department of Corporate Governance and Traditional Affairs, in terms of Section 139 (1) (c) of the Constitution, intervened and appointed an administrator together with a Provincial Intervention Team to ensure that the financial and administrative turn-around of the municipality is put in place and sustained. It is estimated that it may take more than one financial period to bring the municipality’s financial position to a favourable position. 1.4 Housing development fund The Housing Development Fund was established in terms of the Housing Act, (Act No. 107 of 1997). Loans from national and provincial government used to finance housing selling schemes undertaken by the municipality were extinguished on 1 April 1998 and transferred to a Housing Development Fund. Housing selling schemes, both complete and in progress as at 1 April 1998, were also transferred to the Housing Development Fund. In terms of the Housing Act, all proceeds from housing developments, which include rental income and sales of houses, must be paid into the Housing Development Fund. Monies standing to the credit of the Housing Development Fund can be used only to finance housing developments within the municipal area subject to the approval of the Provincial MEC responsible for housing. 1.5 Investment property Initial Recognition Investment property includes property (land or a building, or part of a building, or both land or buildings held under a finance lease) held to earn rentals and/or for capital appreciation, rather than held to meet service delivery objectives, the production or supply of goods or services, or the sale of an asset in the ordinary course of operations. At initial recognition, the Municipality and its municipal entity measures investment property at cost including transaction costs once it meets the definition of investment property. However, where an investment property was acquired through a non-exchange transaction (i.e. where it acquired the investment property for no or a nominal value), its cost is its fair value as at the date of acquisition. The cost of self-constructed investment property is the cost at date of completion. Subsequent Measurement Investment property is measured using the cost model. Under the cost model, investment property is carried at cost less any accumulated depreciation and any accumulated impairment losses. Depreciation is calculated on the depreciable amount, using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets. Components of assets that are significant in relation to the whole asset and that have different useful lives are depreciated separately. The annual depreciation rates are based on the following estimated average asset lives: Item Useful life Property - land indefinite Property - buildings 30 years

24


25 1.6 Property, plant and equipment Initial Recognition Property plant and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation. Heritage assets, which are culturally significant resources and which are shown at cost, are not depreciated owing to the uncertainty regarding their estimated useful live. Land is not depreciated as it is deemed to have an indefinite life. When significant components of an item of property, plant and equipment have different useful lives, they are accounted for as separate items (major components) of property, plant and equipment. Where an asset is acquired by the Municipality and its municipal entity for no or nominal consideration (i.e. a nonexchange transaction), the cost is deemed to be equal to the fair value of that asset on the date acquired. Subsequent Measurement Subsequent to initial recognition, items of property, plant and equipment are measured at cost less accumulated depreciation and impairment losses. Land is not depreciated as it is deemed to have an indefinite useful life. Where the Municipality and its municipal entity replaces parts of an asset, it derecognises the part of the asset being replaced and capitalises the new component. Subsequent expenditure on an asset is capitalised when it increases the capacity or future economic benefits associated with the asset. Depreciation commences when the assets are ready for their intended use. Depreciation and Impairment:Depreciation is calculated on cost, using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets. The annual depreciation rates are based on the following estimated asset lives :Item Land Furniture and fixtures Other items of plant and equipment Office equipment

Average useful life Infinite 7 - 10 years 2 - 5 years 3 - 7 years

Infrastructure • Roads and paving • Pedestrian malls • Electricity • Sewerage • Water • Housing • Storm Water

5 - 100 years 30 years 10 - 50 years 10 - 100 years 10 - 100 years 3 - 30 years 20 years

Community • Buildings • Recreational facilities • Security • Watercraft

10 - 50 years 10 - 100 years 5 years 15 years

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Other • Other vehicles Bins and containers Landfill Sites Specialised vehicles Specialised property, plant and equipment

5 years 5 years 15 years 10 years 10 - 15 years

The residual value, and the useful life and depreciation method of each asset are reviewed at the end of each reporting date. If the expectations differ from previous estimates, the change is accounted for as a change in accounting estimate. Each part of an item of property, plant and equipment with a cost that is significant in relation to the total cost of the item is depreciated separately. The depreciation charge for each period is recognised in surplus or deficit unless it is included in the carrying amount of another asset. Items of property, plant and equipment are derecognised when the asset is disposed of or when there are no further economic benefits or service potential expected from the use of the asset. The gain or loss arising from the derecognition of an item of property, plant and equipment is included in surplus or deficit when the item is derecognised. The gain or loss arising from the derecognition of an item of property, plant and equipment is determined as the difference between the net disposal proceeds, if any, and the carrying amount of the item. Assets which the group holds for rentals to others and subsequently routinely sell as part of the ordinary course of activities, are transferred to inventories when the rentals end and the assets are available-for-sale. These assets are not accounted for as non-current assets held for sale. Proceeds from sales of these assets are recognised as revenue. All cash flows on these assets are included in cash flows from operating activities in the cash flow statement. 1.7 Inventories Inventories are measured at the lower of cost and net realisable value. The cost at reporting date comprises of all costs of purchase, costs of conversion and other costs incurred in bringing the inventories to their present location and condition. The cost of inventories is assigned using the first-in, first-out (FIFO) formula. The same cost formula is used for all inventories having a similar nature and use to the entity. When inventories are sold, the carrying amount of those inventories are recognised as an expense in the period in which the related revenue is recognised. The amount of any write-down of inventories to net realisable value and all losses of inventories are recognised as an expense in the period the write-down or loss occurs. The amount of any reversal of any write-down of inventories, arising from an increase in net realisable value, are recognised as a reduction in the amount of inventories recognised as an expense in the period in which the reversal occurs. Redundant and slow-moving inventories are identified and written down from cost to net realisable value with regard to their estimated economic or realisable values. Unsold properties are at the lower cost and net realisable value on a weighted average cost basis. Direct cost are accumulated for each separately identifiable development. Cost also includes a portion of the overhead costs.

26


27 1.8 Financial instruments Classification The group classifies financial assets and financial liabilities into the following categories: • •

Financial assets at fair value through surplus or deficit - held for trading Loans and receivables

Classification depends on the purpose for which the financial instruments were obtained / incurred and takes place at initial recognition. Classification is re-assessed on an annual basis, except for derivatives and financial assets designated as at fair value through surplus or deficit, which shall not be classified out of the fair value through surplus or deficit category. Initial recognition and measurement Financial instruments are recognised initially when the group becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instruments. The group classifies financial instruments, or their component parts, on initial recognition as a financial asset, a financial liability or an equity instrument in accordance with the substance of the contractual arrangement. Financial instruments are measured initially at fair value, except for equity investments for which a fair value is not determinable, which are measured at cost and are classified as available for sale financial assets. For financial instruments which are not at fair value through surplus or deficit, transaction costs are included in the initial measurement of the instrument. Transaction costs on financial instruments at fair value through surplus or deficit are recognised in profit or loss. Subsequent measurement Financial instruments at fair value through surplus or deficit are subsequently measured at fair value, with gains and losses arising from changes in fair value being included in surplus or deficit for the period. Net gains or losses on the financial instruments at fair value through surplus or deficit dividends and interest. Loans and receivables are subsequently measured at amortised cost, using the effective interest method, less accumulated impairment losses. Financial liabilities at amortised cost are subsequently measured at amortised cost, using the effective interest method. Fair value determination The fair values of quoted investments are based on current bid prices. If the market for a financial asset is not active (and for unlisted securities), the group establishes fair value by using valuation techniques. These include the use of recent arm’s length transactions, reference to other instruments that are substantially the same, discounted cash flow analysis, and option pricing models making maximum use of market inputs and relying as little as possible on entity-specific inputs. Impairment of financial assets At each end of the reporting period the group assesses all financial assets, other than those at fair value through surplus or deficit, to determine whether there is objective evidence that a financial asset or group of financial assets has been impaired.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 For amounts due to the group, significant financial difficulties of the debtor, probability that the debtor will enter bankruptcy and default of payments are all considered indicators of impairment. Impairment losses are recognised in surplus or deficit. Impairment losses are reversed when an increase in the financial asset’s recoverable amount can be related objectively to an event occurring after the impairment was recognised, subject to the restriction that the carrying amount of the financial asset at the date that the impairment is is reversed shall not exceed what the carrying amount would have been had the impairment not been recognised. Where financial assets are impaired through use of an allowance account, the amount of the loss is recognised in surplus or deficit within operating expenses. When such assets are written off, the write off is made against the relevant allowance account. Subsequent recoveries of amounts previously written off are credited against operating expenses. Trade and other receivables Trade receivables are measured at initial recognition at fair value, and are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest rate method if material. Appropriate allowances for estimated irrecoverable amounts are recognised in surplus or deficit. The carrying amount of the asset is reduced through the use of an allowance account, and the amount of the deficit is recognised in surplus or deficit within operating expenses. When a trade receivable is uncollectible, it is written off against the allowance account for trade receivables. Subsequent recoveries of amounts previously written off are credited against operating expenses in surplus or deficit. Trade and other receivables are classified as loans and receivables. Trade and other payables Trade payables are initially measured at fair value, and are subsequently measured at amortised cost, using the effective interest rate method. Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash on hand and demand deposits, and other short-term highly liquid investments that are readily convertible to a known amount of cash and are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value. These are initially and subsequently recorded at fair value. For the purposes of the cash flow statement, cash and cash equivalents comprise cash on hand, deposits held on call with banks and investments in financial instruments, net of bank overdrafts. Bank overdrafts are recorded based on the facility utilised. Finance charges on bank overdrafts are expensed as incurred. Cash and cash equivalents are classified as loans and receivables Bank overdraft and borrowings Bank overdrafts and borrowings are initially measured at fair value, and are subsequently measured at amortised cost, using the effective interest rate method. Any difference between the proceeds (net of transaction costs) and the settlement or redemption of borrowings is recognised over the term of the borrowings in accordance with the group’s accounting policy for borrowing costs.

28


29 Derivatives Derivative financial instruments, which are not designated as hedging instruments, consisting of foreign exchange contracts and interest rate swaps, are initially measured at fair value on the contract date, and are re-measured to fair value at subsequent reporting dates. Derivatives embedded in other financial instruments or other non-financial host contracts are treated as separate derivatives when their risks and characteristics are not closely related to those of the host contract and the host contract is not carried at fair value with unrealised gains or losses reported in surplus or deficit. Changes in the fair value of derivative financial instruments are recognised in surplus or deficit as they arise. Derivatives are classified as financial assets at fair value through surplus or deficit - held for trading. Held to maturity These financial assets are initially measured at fair value plus direct transaction costs. At subsequent reporting dates these are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest rate method, less any impairment loss recognised to reflect irrecoverable amounts. An impairment loss is recognised in surplus or deficit when there is objective evidence that the asset is impaired, and is measured as the difference between the investment’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted at the effective interest rate computed at initial recognition. Impairment losses are reversed in subsequent periods when an increase in the investment’s recoverable amount can be related objectively to an event occurring after the impairment was recognised, subject to the restriction that the carrying amount of the investment at the date the impairment is reversed shall not exceed what the amortised cost would have been had the impairment not been recognised. Financial assets that the group has the positive intention and ability to hold to maturity are classified as held to maturity. Gains and losses A gain or loss arising from a change in a financial asset or financial liability is recognised as follows: • •

A gain or loss on a financial asset or financial liability classified as at fair value through surplus or deficit is recognised in surplus or deficit, For financial assets and financial liabilities carried at amortised cost, a gain or loss is recognised in surplus or deficit when the financial asset or financial liability is derecognised or impaired, and through the amortisation process.

Derecognition Financial assets A financial asset (or, where applicable a part of a financial asset or part of a group of similar financial assets) is derecognised where: • • •

the rights to receive cash flows from the asset have expired; the group retains the right to receive cash flows from the asset, but has assumed an obligation to pay them in full without material delay to a third party under a ‘pass-through’ arrangement; or the group has transferred its rights to receive cash flows from the asset and either • has transferred substantially all the risks and rewards of the asset, or • has neither transferred nor retained substantially all the risks and rewards of the asset, but has transferred control of the asset.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Where the group has transferred its rights to receive cash flows from an asset and has neither transferred nor retained substantially all the risks and rewards of the asset nor transferred control of the asset, the asset is recognised to the extent of the group’s continuing involvement in the asset. Continuing involvement that takes the form of a guarantee over the transferred asset is measured at the lower of the original carrying amount of the asset and the maximum amount of consideration that the group could be required to repay. Where continuing involvement takes the form of a written and/or purchased option (including a cash-settled option or similar provision) on the transferred asset, the extent of the group’s continuing involvement is the amount of the transferred asset that the group may repurchase, except that in the case of a written put option (including a cash-settled option or similar provision) on an asset measured at fair value, the extent of the group’s continuing involvement is limited to the lower of the fair value of the transferred asset and the option exercise price. Financial liabilities A financial liability is derecognised when the obligation under the liability is discharged, cancelled or expires. Where an existing financial liability is replaced by another from the same lender on substantially different terms, or the terms of an existing liability are substantially modified, such an exchange or modification is treated as a derecognition of the original liability and the recognition of a new liability, and the difference in the respective carrying amounts is recognised in surplus or deficit. Impairment of financial assets The group assesses at each statement of financial position date whether a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired. Assets are carried at amortised cost. If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss on loans and receivables carried at amortised cost has been incurred, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows (excluding future credit losses that have not been incurred) discounted at the financial asset’s original effective interest rate (i.e. the effective interest rate computed at initial recognition). The carrying amount of the asset shall be reduced either directly or through the use of an allowance account. The amount of the loss shall be recognised in surplus or deficit. The group first assesses whether objective evidence of impairment exists individually for financial assets that are individually significant, and individually or collectively for financial assets that are not individually significant. If it is determined that no objective evidence of impairment exists for an individually assessed financial asset, whether significant or not, the asset is included in a group of financial assets with similar credit risk characteristics and that group of financial assets is collectively assessed for impairment. Assets that are individually assessed for impairment and for which an impairment loss is or continues to be recognised are not included in a collective assessment of impairment. 1.9 Revenue from exchange transactions Revenue is the gross inflow of economic benefits or service potential during the reporting period when those inflows result in an increase in net assets, other than increases relating to contributions from owners. An exchange transaction is one in which the municipality receives assets or services, or has liabilities extinguished, and directly gives approximately equal value (primarily in the form of goods, services or use of assets) to the other party in exchange. Fair value is the amount for which an asset could be exchanged, or a liability settled, between knowledgeable, willing parties in an arm’s length transaction. 1.10 Revenue from non-exchange transactions Non-exchange transactions are defined as transactions where the entity receives value from another entity without directly giving approximately equal value in exchange.

30


31 Revenue is the gross inflow of economic benefits or service potential during the reporting period when those inflows result in an increase in net assets, other than increases relating to contributions from owners. Fair value is the amount for which an asset could be exchanged, or a liability settled, between knowledgeable, willing parties in an arm’s length transaction. 1.11 Conditional grants and receipts Revenue received from conditional grants, donations and funding are recognised as revenue to the extent that the municipality and its municipal entity has complied with any of the criteria, conditions or obligations embodied in the agreement. To the extent that the criteria, conditions or obligations have not been met a liability is recognised. 1.12 Provisions and contingencies Provisions are recognised when: • • •

the group has a present obligation as a result of a past event; it is probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits or service potential will be required to settle the obligation; and a reliable estimate can be made of the obligation.

The amount of a provision is the best estimate of the expenditure expected to be required to settle the present obligation at the reporting date. Where the effect of time value of money is material, the amount of a provision is the present value of the expenditures expected to be required to settle the obligation. The discount rate is a pre-tax rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the liability. Where some or all of the expenditure required to settle a provision is expected to be reimbursed by another party, the reimbursement is recognised when, and only when, it is virtually certain that reimbursement will be received if the group settles the obligation. The reimbursement is treated as a separate asset. The amount recognised for the reimbursement does not exceed the amount of the provision. Provisions are reviewed at each reporting date and adjusted to reflect the current best estimate. Provisions are reversed if it is no longer probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits or service potential will be required, to settle the obligation. Where discounting is used, the carrying amount of a provision increases in each period to reflect the passage of time. This increase is recognised as an interest expense. A provision is used only for expenditure for which the provision was originally recognised. Provisions are not recognised for future operating deficits. If an entity has a contract that is onerous, the present obligation (net of recoveries) under the contract is recognised and measured as a provision. No obligation arises as a consequence of the sale or transfer of an operation until the group is committed to the sale or transfer, that is, there is a binding agreement.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 After their initial recognition contingent liabilities recognised in business combinations that are recognised separately are subsequently measured at the higher of: • •

the amount that would be recognised as a provision; and the amount initially recognised less cumulative amortisation.

Contingent assets and contingent liabilities are not recognised. Contingencies are disclosed in note 42. 1.13 Unauthorised expenditure Unauthorised expenditure means: • •

overspending of a vote or a main division within a vote; and expenditure not in accordance with the purpose of a vote or, in the case of a main division, not in accordance with thepurpose of the main division.

All expenditure relating to unauthorised expenditure is recognised as an expense in the restatement of expenditure iro 2007/08 during 2009/10 in the year that the expenditure was incurred. The expenditure is classified in accordance with the nature of the expense, and where recovered, it is subsequently accounted for as revenue in the restatement of expenditure iro 2007/08 during 2009/10. 1.14 Irregular expenditure Irregular expenditure is expenditure that is contrary to the Municipal Finance Management Act (Act No.56 of 2003), the Municipal Systems Act (Act No.32 of 2000), The Public Office Bearers Act (Act No. 20 of 1998) or is in contravention of the Municipality’s supply chain management policy. Irregular expenditure excludes unauthorised expenditure. Irregular expenditure is accounted for as expenditure in the Statement of Financial Performance and where recovered, it is subsequently accounted for as revenue in the Statement of Financial Performance. 1.15 Fruitless and wasteful expenditure Fruitless expenditure means expenditure which was made in vain and would have been avoided had reasonable care been exercised. All expenditure relating to fruitless and wasteful expenditure is recognised as an expense in the restatement of expenditure iro 2007/08 during 2009/10 in the year that the expenditure was incurred. The expenditure is classified in accordance with the nature of the expense, and where recovered, it is subsequently accounted for as revenue in the restatement of expenditure iro 2007/08 during 2009/10. 1.16 Translation of foreign currencies Foreign currency transactions A foreign currency transaction is recorded, on initial recognition in Rands, by applying to the foreign currency amount the spot exchange rate between the functional currency and the foreign currency at the date of the transaction. Exchange differences arising on the settlement of monetary items or on translating monetary items at rates different from those at which they were translated on initial recognition during the period or in previous consolidated annual financial statements are recognised in surplus or deficit in the period in which they arise. When a gain or loss on a non-monetary item is recognised directly in net assets, any exchange component of that gain or loss is recognised directly in net assets. When a gain or loss on a non-monetary item is recognised in surplus or deficit, any exchange component of that gain or loss is recognised in surplus or deficit.

32


33 Cash flows arising from transactions in a foreign currency are recorded in Rands by applying to the foreign currency amount the exchange rate between the Rand and the foreign currency at the date of the cash flow. 1.17 Comparative figures Current year comparatives Budgeted amounts have been included in an annexure to these statements for the current financial year only. Prior year comparatives When presentation or classification of items in the consolidated annual financial statements is amended, prior period comparative amounts are restated. The nature and reason for the reclassification is disclosed. Where there has been a change in accounting policy in the current year, the adjustment is made retrospectively as far as is practicable, and the prior year comparatives are restated accordingly. 1.18 Leases A lease is classified as a finance lease if it transfers substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership. A lease is classified as an operating lease if it does not transfer substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership. Finance leases - lessee Finance leases are recognised as assets and liabilities in the statement of financial position at amounts equal to the fair value of the leased property or, if lower, the present value of the minimum lease payments. The corresponding liability to the lessor is included in the statement of financial position as a finance lease obligation. The discount rate used in calculating the present value of the minimum lease payments is the interest rate implicit in the lease. The lease payments are apportioned between the finance charge and reduction of the outstanding liability. The finance charge is allocated to each period during the lease term so as to produce a constant periodic rate of on the remaining balance of the liability. Operating leases - lessee Operating lease payments are recognised as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term. The difference between the amounts recognised as an expense and the contractual payments are recognised as an operating lease asset. This liability is not discounted. Any contingent rents are expensed in the period in which they are incurred. 1.19 Value Added Taxation/TAX The Msunduzi Municipality accounts for Value Added Tax on the payment basis. The municipality is exempted from Tax in terms of Section 10(1)(a) of the Income Tax Act. 1.20 Significant judgements and sources of estimation uncertainty In preparing the consolidated annual financial statements, management is required to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts represented in the consolidated annual financial statements and related disclosures. Use of available information and the application of judgement is inherent in the formation of estimates. Actual results in the future could differ from these estimates which may be material to the consolidated annual financial statements. Significant judgements include:

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Trade receivables / Held to maturity investments and/or loans and receivables The group assesses its trade receivables for impairment at each statement of financial position date. In determining whether an impairment loss should be recorded in the statement of financial performance, the group makes judgements as to whether there is observable data indicating a measurable decrease in the estimated future cash flows from a financial asset. Allowance for slow moving, damaged and obsolete stock An allowance for stock to write stock down to the lower of cost or net realisable value. Management have made estimates of the selling price and direct cost to sell on certain inventory items. The write down is included in the impairment of assets note. Fair value estimation The fair value of financial instruments traded in active markets (such as trading and available-for-sale securities) is based on quoted market prices at the statement of financial position date. The quoted market price used for financial assets held by the group is the current bid price. The carrying value less impairment provision of trade receivables and payables are assumed to approximate their fair values. The fair value of financial liabilities for disclosure purposes is estimated by discounting the future contractual cash flows at the current market interest rate that is available to the group for similar financial instruments. Provisions Provisions were raised and management determined an estimate based on the information available. Additional disclosure of these estimates of provisions are included in note 20 - Provisions. Post retirement benefits The present value of the post retirement obligation depends on a number of factors that are determined on an actuarial basis using a number of assumptions. The assumptions used in determining the net cost (income) include the discount rate. Any changes in these assumptions will impact on the carrying amount of post retirement obligations. Other key assumptions for pension obligations are based on current market conditions. Additional information is disclosed in Note 19. Effective interest rate The group used the prime interest rate to discount future cash flows. 1.21 Intangible assets An asset is identified as an intangible asset when it: • •

is capable of being separated or divided from an entity and sold, transferred, licensed, rented or exchanged, either individually or together with a related contract, assets or liability; or arises from contractual rights or other legal rights, regardless whether those rights are transferable or separate from the group or from other rights and obligations.

An intangible asset is recognised when: • •

34

it is probable that the expected future economic benefits that are attributable to the asset will flow to the entity; and the cost of the asset can be measured reliably.


35 An intangible asset arising from development (or from the development phase of an internal project) is recognised when: • • • • • •

it is technically feasible to complete the asset so that it will be available for use or sale. there is an intention to complete and use or sell it. there is an ability to use or sell it. it will generate probable future economic benefits. there are available technical, financial and other resources to complete the development and to use or sell the asset. the expenditure attributable to the asset during its development can be measured reliably.

Intangible assets are carried at cost less any accumulated amortisation and any impairment losses. Amortisation is provided to write down the intangible assets, on a straight line basis, to their residual values as follows: Item Computer software, internally generated Computer software, other

Useful life 3 years 3 years

Intangible assets are derecognised: • •

on disposal; or when no future economic benefits or service potential are expected from its use or disposal.

1.22 Non-current assets held for sale Non-current assets are classified as “held for sale assets” if their carrying amount will be recovered through a sale transaction rather than through continuing use. This condition is regarded as met only when the sale is highly probable and the asset is available for immediate sale in its present condition. Management must be committed to the sale, which should be expected to qualify for recognition as a completed sale within one year from the date of classification. Non-current assets held for sale are measured at the lower of its carrying amount and fair value less costs to sell. A non-current asset is not depreciated (or amortised) while it is classified as “held for sale” asset. Interest and other expenses attributable to the liabilities of the “held for sale” assets are recognised in surplus or deficit. 1.23 Impairment of cash-generating assets Cash-generating assets are those assets held by the group with the primary objective of generating a commercial return. When an asset is deployed in a manner consistent with that adopted by a profit-orientated entity, it generates a commercial return. Impairment is a loss in the future economic benefits or service potential of an asset, over and above the systematic recognition of the loss of the asset’s future economic benefits or service potential through depreciation (amortisation). Carrying amount is the amount at which an asset is recognised in the statement of financial position after deducting any accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses thereon. A cash-generating unit is the smallest identifiable group of assets held with the primary objective of generating a commercial return that generates cash inflows from continuing use that are largely independent of the cash inflows from other assets or groups of assets.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Costs of disposal are incremental costs directly attributable to the disposal of an asset, excluding finance costs and income tax expense. Depreciation (Amortisation) is the systematic allocation of the depreciable amount of an asset over its useful life. Fair value less costs to sell is the amount obtainable from the sale of an asset in an arm’s length transaction between knowledgeable, willing parties, less the costs of disposal. Recoverable amount of an asset or a cash-generating unit is the higher its fair value less costs to sell and its value in use. Useful life is either: • •

(a) the period of time over which an asset is expected to be used by the group; or (b) the number of production or similar units expected to be obtained from the asset by the group.

1.24 Employee benefits Short-term employee benefits The cost of short-term employee benefits, (those payable within 12 months after the service is rendered, such as paid vacation leave and sick leave, bonuses, and non-monetary benefits such as medical care), are recognised in the period in which the service is rendered and are not discounted. The expected cost of compensated absences is recognised as an expense as the employees render services that increase their entitlement or, in the case of non-accumulating absences, when the absence occurs. Defined contribution plans The municipality and its municipal entity provides retirement benefits for its employees and councillors. The contributions to fund obligations for the payment of retirement benefits are charged against revenue in the year they become payable. The defined benefit funds, which are administered on a provincial basis, are actuarially valued triennially on the projected unit credit method basis. Deficits identified are recognised as a liability and are recovered through lump sum payments or increased future contributions on a proportional basis to all participating municipalities. Defined benefit plans For defined benefit plans the cost of providing the benefits is determined using the projected credit method. Actuarial valuations are conducted on a three year basis by independent actuaries separately for each plan. Consideration is given to any event that could impact the funds up to statement of financial position date where the interim valuation is performed at an earlier date. Past service costs are recognised immediately to the extent that the benefits are already vested, and are otherwise amortised on a straight line basis over the average period until the amended benefits become vested. Gains or losses on the curtailment or settlement of a defined benefit plan is recognised when the group is demonstrably committed to curtailment or settlement. When it is virtually certain that another party will reimburse some or all of the expenditure required to settle a defined benefit obligation, the right to reimbursement is recognised as a separate asset. The asset is measured at fair value. In all other respects, the asset is treated in the same way as planned assets. In the restatement of expenditure iro 2007/08 during 2009/10, the expense relating to a defined benefit plan is presented as the net of the amount recognised for a reimbursement.

36


37 The amount recognised in the statement of financial position represents the present value of the defined benefit obligation as adjusted for unrecognised actuarial gains and losses and unrecognised past service costs, and reduces by the fair value of plan assets. Any asset is limited to unrecognised actuarial losses, plus the present value of available refunds and reduction in future contributions to the plan. The municipality and its municipal entity does not apply the “Corridor method� and recognise all actuarial gains or losses in the statement of financial performance as they occur. Retirement benefits The municipality and its municipal entity and its employees contribute to seven pension funds of which the Natal Joint Municipal Pension Fund cater for the majority of the staff. The Pension Funds has a combination of a defined contribution fund and defined benefit plan. The contributions to fund obligations for the payment of retirement benefits are charged against income in the year they become payable. Pension Obligations The municipality and its employees contribute to 7 different Pension Funds, of which 2 (The Natal Joint Provident and Retirement Pension Fund) cater for the majority of the staff. Natal Joint Retirement Funds, Government Employee Pension Fund and Associated Institution Pension Fund are defined benefit funds. The Natal Joint Provident Fund, Pietermaritzburg and South African Local Authority are defined contribution funds. The schemes are funded through payments to financial consultant companies or trustee-administered funds, determined by periodic actuarial calculations. The Municipality has both defined benefit and defined contribution plans. A defined benefit plan is a pension plan that defines an amount of pension benefit that an employee will receive on retirement, usually dependent on one or more factors such as age, years of service and compensation. A defined contribution plan is a pension plan under which the Municipality pays fixed contributions into a separate entity. The Municipality has no legal or constructive obligations to pay further contributions if the fund does not hold sufficient assets to pay all employees the benefits relating to employee service in the current and prior periods. For defined contribution plans, the Municipality pays contributions to publicly or privately administered pension insurance plans on a mandatory, contractual or voluntary basis. The Municipality has no further payment obligations once the contributions have been paid. The contributions are recognized as employee benefit expense when they are due. Prepaid contributions are recognised as an asset to the extent that a cash refund or a reduction in the future payments is available. 1.25 Investment income Investment income is recognised on a time-proportion basis using the effective interest method.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 1.26 Borrowing costs Borrowing costs that are directly attributable to the acquisition, construction or production of a qualifying asset are capitalised as part of the cost of that asset until such time as the asset is ready for its intended use. The amount of borrowing costs eligible for capitalisation is determined as follows: • •

Actual borrowing costs on funds specifically borrowed for the purpose of obtaining a qualifying asset less any investment income on the temporary investment of those borrowings. Weighted average of the borrowing costs applicable to the group on funds generally borrowed for the purpose of obtaining a qualifying asset. The borrowing costs capitalised do not exceed the total borrowing costs incurred.

The capitalisation of borrowing costs commences when all the following conditions have been met: • • •

expenditures for the asset have been incurred; borrowing costs have been incurred; and activities that are necessary to prepare the asset for its intended use or sale are undertaken.

When the carrying amount or the expected ultimate cost of the qualifying asset exceeds its recoverable amount or recoverable service amount or net realisable value, the carrying amount is written down or written off in accordance with the accounting policy on Impairment of Assets as per accounting policy number 1.23 . In certain circumstances, the amount of the write-down or write-off is written back in accordance with the same accounting policy. Capitalisation is suspended during extended periods in which active development is interrupted. Capitalisation ceases when substantially all the activities necessary to prepare the qualifying asset for its intended use or sale are complete. All other borrowing costs are recognised as an expense in the period in which they are incurred. 1.27 Use of estimates The preparation of consolidated annual financial statements in conformity with Standards of GRAP requires the use of certain critical accounting estimates. It also requires management to exercise its judgement in the process of applying the group’s accounting policies. The areas involving a higher degree of judgement or complexity, or areas where assumptions and estimates are significant to the consolidated annual financial statements are disclosed in the relevant sections of the consolidated annual financial statements. Although these estimates are based on management’s best knowledge of current events and actions they may undertake in the future, actual results ultimately may differ from those estimates. 1.28 Offsetting Assets, liabilities, revenue and expenses have not been offset except when offsetting is required or permitted by a Standard of GRAP, GAAP or IPSAS. 1.29 Investments Where the carrying amount of an investment is greater than the estimated recoverable amount, it is written down immediately to its recoverable amount and an impairment loss is charged to the statement of financial performance. 1.30 Grants in aid The Msunduzi Municipality and its municipal entity transfers money to individuals, institutions and organisations. When making these transfers, The Municipality does not:

38


39 Receive any goods or services directly in return, as would be expected in a purchase or sale transaction Expect to be repaid in future; or Expect a financial return, as would be expected from an investment These transfers are recognised in the consolidated annual financial statements as expenses in the period that the events giving rise to the transfer occurred. 1.31 Unspent conditional grants Unspent conditional grants are reflected on the Statement of Financial Position as a Creditor - Unspent Conditional Grants. They represent unspent government grants, subsidies and contributions from the public. The following conditions are set for the creation and utilisation of these creditors. The unspent portion of the grant is invested until utilised. Interest earned on the investment is treated in accordance with grant conditions. If it is payable to the funder it is recorded as part of the creditor. If it is The Msunduzi Municipality’s and its municipal entity’s interest it is recognised as interest earned in the Statement of Financial Performance. Whenever an item of property, plant and equipment is purchased from a Creditor – Unspent Conditional Grant, an amount equal to the purchase price is transferred from the Creditor - Unspent Conditional Grant to the operating account on the Statement of Financial Performance as revenue. Whenever an item of property, plant and equipment is purchased from a Creditor - Unspent Conditional Grant, an amount equal to the purchase price is transferred from the accumulated surplus to the Deferred Income - Government Grants or the Accumulated Surplus account in the case of non government grants. The deferred income account is used to offset depreciation charged on the property, plant and equipment financed from unspent government grant capital receipts and equals the remaining depreciable value (carrying value) of property, plant and equipment financed from unspent government grant capital receipts. Whenever a non-asset is purchased from a Creditor - Unspent Conditional Grant an amount equal to the purchase price is transferred from the Creditor - Unspent Conditional Grant to the operating account on the Statement of Financial Performance to offset the expenditure which was expensed through the operating account. 2.

New standards and interpretations

2.1 Standards and Interpretations early adopted The group has not applied the following standards and interpretations, which have been issued but are not yet effective GRAP 18: Segment Reporting Compliance with this standard would have had an effect on the presentation only. Financial information would have been reported by segments. The disclosure of this information will assist users of the financial statements to better understand the entity’s past performance and to identify the resources allocated to support the major activities of the municipality and its municipal entity. GRAP 23: Revenue from Non-exchange Transactions Non-exchange transactions in which the entity receives services without directly giving equal value in exchange, has not been accounted for as revenue. The reason being is that this type of transaction is presently non applicable and therefore considered immaterial.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 GRAP 24: Presentation of Budget Information in the Financial Statements Compliance with this standard would have had an effect on the presentation only. The budget information is disclosed in the appendices of the consolidated annual financial statements. GRAP 103: Heritage Assets Compliance to the standard would have no impact on the current information due to the fact that there are no heritage assets disclosed in the consolidated annual financial statements. Notwithstanding the above are the recognition and measurements requirements of the standards already adopted. GRAP 25: Employee benefits Compliance to the standard would have an effect on the presentation only. Financial information has been reported in the notes to the consolidated annual financial statements and statement of performance. The disclosure of this information will assist users of the financial statements to evaluate the nature of the entity defined plans and the financial effect in those plans during the reporting period.

40


41 Consolidated Annual Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2010 - Notes to the Consolidated Annual Financial Statements Figures in Rand

Group 2010

2009

Municipality 2010

2009

3. Inventories Forestry Consumable stores Workshop stores Unused water Fuel - diesel & petrol Impairment of inventories Cost of inventories recognised as an expense Consumables / workshop stores Fuel - diesel and petrol Forestry Unused water

38,412,870 25,500,851 674,531 1,596,249 893,152 67,077,653 (3,510,553) 63,567,100

37,475,123 27,346,448 674,292 1,451,267 471,002 67,418,132 (3,113,172) 64,304,960

38,412,870 25,500,851 674,531 1,596,249 893,152 67,077,653 (3,510,553) 63,567,100

37,475,123 27,346,448 674,292 1,451,267 471,002 67,418,132 (3,113,172) 64,304,960

23,822,729 16,085,067 6,677,655 236,743,218 283,328,669

32,243,152 20,675,287 5,590,029 216,651,627 275,160,095

23,822,729 16,085,067 6,677,655 236,743,218 283,328,669

32,243,152 20,675,287 5,590,029 216,651,627 275,160,095

(324,061) 26,682,957 2,330,730 28,689,626

(385,314) 16,955,403 2,365,471 18,935,560

(324,061) 26,682,957 2,330,730 28,689,626

(385,314) 16,955,403 2,365,471 18,935,560

163,532,979 318,311,324 84,544,334 13,863,228 25,480,536 11,592,514 28,056,855 645,381,770

137,934,216 217,951,333 77,166,555 11,774,192 23,155,762 11,437,719 22,891,141 502,310,918

163,532,979 318,311,324 84,544,334 13,863,228 25,480,536 11,592,514 28,056,855 645,381,770

137,934,216 217,951,333 77,166,555 11,774,192 23,155,762 11,437,719 22,891,141 502,310,918

(86,870,383) (285,956,125) (57,751,623) (430,578,131)

(36,769,018) (121,224,104) (24,007,312) (182,000,434)

(86,870,383) (285,956,125) (57,751,623) (430,578,131)

(36,769,018) (121,224,104) (24,007,312) (182,000,434)

4. Trade and other receivables from non exchange transactions Other debtors - discounted interest Other debtors Land sale debtors

5. Consumer debtors Gross balances Rates Electricity Water Sewerage Refuse Housing rental Other (specify) Less: Provision for debt impairment Rates Electricity Water

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Figures in Rand Net balance Rates Electricity Water Sewerage Refuse Housing rental Other (specify) Rates Current (0 -30 days) 31 - 60 days 61 - 90 days 91 - 120 days 121 - 365 days > 365 days Electricity, refuse, sewerage, water & housing rentals Current (0 -30 days) 31 - 60 days 61 - 90 days 91 - 120 days 121 - 365 days > 365 days Other Financial instruments - discounted interest

Group 2010

2009

Municipality 2010

2009

76,662,596 32,355,199 26,792,711 13,863,228 25,480,536 11,592,514 28,056,853 214,803,637

101,165,198 96,727,229 53,159,243 11,774,192 23,155,762 11,437,719 22,891,137 320,310,480

76,662,596 32,355,199 26,792,711 13,863,228 25,480,536 11,592,514 28,056,855 214,803,639

101,165,198 96,727,229 53,159,243 11,774,192 23,155,762 11,437,719 22,891,141 320,310,484

35,893,975 6,727,860 5,160,111 4,824,242 4,525,559 106,401,232 163,532,979

32,322,279 4,600,076 4,022,221 3,467,448 3,137,053 90,385,139 137,934,216

35,893,975 6,727,860 5,160,111 4,824,242 4,525,559 106,401,232 163,532,979

32,322,279 4,600,076 4,022,221 3,467,448 3,137,053 90,385,139 137,934,216

162,614,432 18,239,279 12,041,789 12,916,884 12,139,114 235,840,439 453,791,937

116,141,788 17,232,177 14,520,339 10,866,079 10,893,474 171,831,704 341,485,561

162,614,432 18,239,279 12,041,789 12,916,884 12,139,114 235,840,439 453,791,937

116,141,788 17,232,177 14,520,339 10,866,079 10,893,474 171,831,704 341,485,561

28,056,855

22,891,141

28,056,855

22,891,141

77,678,797 16,382,650 11,740,804 13,161,413 11,458,980 234,936,595 365,359,239 (324,175,080) 41,184,159

63,315,544 12,593,391 11,310,589 9,632,243 9,325,122 163,370,417 269,547,306 (154,700,369) 114,846,937

77,678,797 16,382,650 11,740,804 13,161,413 11,458,980 234,936,565 365,359,209 (324,175,080) 41,184,129

63,315,544 12,593,391 11,310,589 9,632,243 9,325,122 163,370,417 269,547,306 (154,700,369) 114,846,937

Summary of debtors by customer classification Consumers Current (0 -30 days) 31 - 60 days 61 - 90 days 91 - 120 days 121 - 365 days > 365 days Less: Provision for debt impairment

42


43

Figures in Rand Industrial/ commercial Current (0 -30 days) 31 - 60 days 61 - 90 days 91 - 120 days 121 - 365 days > 365 days Less: Provision for debt impairment National and provincial government Current (0 -30 days) 31 - 60 days 61 - 90 days 91 - 120 days 121 - 365 days > 365 days Reconciliation of debt impairment provision Balance at beginning of the year Contributions to provision Debt impairment written off against provision

Group 2010

Municipality 2010

2009

2009

99,264,188 5,068,377 2,651,792 2,533,601 2,546,927 46,966,584 159,031,469 (106,403,052) 52,628,417

71,772,015 4,138,520 2,667,417 2,060,958 1,739,901 40,777,711 123,156,522 (27,300,065) 95,856,457

99,264,188 5,068,377 2,651,792 2,533,601 2,546,927 46,966,584 159,031,469 (106,403,052) 52,628,417

71,772,015 4,138,520 2,667,417 2,060,958 1,739,901 40,777,711 123,156,522 (27,300,065) 95,856,457

14,313,229 3,569,294 3,074,803 2,102,902 2,709,506 67,250,943 93,020,677

10,153,493 4,578,913 4,157,454 2,436,751 2,686,489 62,704,221 86,717,321

14,313,229 3,569,294 3,074,803 2,102,902 2,709,506 67,250,943 93,020,677

10,153,493 4,578,913 4,157,454 2,436,751 2,686,489 62,704,221 86,717,321

(182,000,434) (250,539,606) 1,961,909 (430,578,131)

(178,592,418) (10,000,000) 6,591,984 (182,000,434)

(182,000,434) (250,539,606) 1,961,909 (430,578,131)

(178,592,418) (10,000,000) 6,591,984 (182,000,434)

Credit quality of consumer debtors Trade receivables comprise of a widespread customer base consisting of domestic,commercial and government consumers. 6. Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents consist of: Cash on hand Bank balances Short-term deposits Other cash and cash equivalents

48,479 20,073,746 118,688,660 138,810,885

46,746 19,258,293 93,761,648 600,000 113,666,687

44,585 20,058,725 117,920,883 138,024,193

45,590 19,246,950 93,574,692 112,867,232

Cash and cash equivalents are classified as financial instruments under the loans and receivable category. Due to the short term nature of these investments no amortisation was performed. Fair value is taken at face value. The total amount of undrawn facilities available for future operating activities and commitments Average rate of return For each year

-

10,000,000

-

10,000,000

7.09

7.25

7.09

7.25

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 The municipality had the following bank accounts Account number / Bank statement balances Cash book balances description 30 June 2010 30 June 2009 30 June 2008 30 June 2010 30 June 2009 30 June 2008 FNB - No: 5094187782 (Primary) FNB - No: 5090058750 (Electronic transfers) FNB - No: 62006041157 (Post office) FNB - No: 5094187774 (Unpaid cheques) FNB - No: 62058007264 (Slum clearance) FNB - No: 62065528930 (Library extension) FNB - No: 62052319756 (Restructuring grant) FNB - No: 62045272143 (Traffic fines) FNB - No: 50941840627 (Market) FNB - No: 62069378539 (Oribi airport) FNB - No: 50930082248 (Forestry) ABSA - No: 9076022706 (Forestry) Forestry service operations (Ledger account) FNB - No: 50941849512 (Metro transport) FNB - No: 50941847029 (Salaries main) FNB - No: 62003432846 (Salaries PACs no.1) FNB - No: 62003433414 (Salaries PACs no.2) FNB - No: 62035467978 (Safe City) Total

44

52,922,539

17,564,736

8,816,824

(17,645,903)

11,586,616

1,280,210

-

-

69,867

-

1,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

(700)

(106,205)

(34,906)

(39,321)

(106,205)

(34,906)

(39,321)

31,200,807

25,581,036

12,882,783

31,200,807

26,652,854

12,966,982

2,643,263

5,671,854

6,241,291

2,643,263

5,688,294

6,282,327

-

-

4,642,437

-

-

4,642,437

(100)

28,853

29,250

-

-

-

2,009,212

2,119,320

1,387,910

-

-

-

(321,325)

143,935

(325,444)

(541,280)

(529,356)

(548,330)

292,967

123,752

314,972

292,967

123,752

314,972

483,343

1,109,330

1,221,371

488,343

1,109,330

1,221,371

-

-

-

(18,945,389)

(18,945,289)

(18,945,289)

-

-

964,563

-

-

964,563

584,435

405,837

307,040

542,965

405,837

98,671

1,962

-

-

-

-

-

973,284

606,023

388,588

-

-

-

15,021

11,343

62,083

22,676

27,337

87,963

90,699,203

53,331,113

36,964,214

(2,047,756)

26,085,469

8,325,856


317,400,363 (250,514,840) 66,885,523 298,797,453 316,857,467 (250,514,840) 66,342,627 298,109,070 542,896 542,896 688,383 7,400,516,583 (1,178,798,081) 6,221,718,502 7,250,902,672

MOVABLE ASSETS Movables Biological assets TOTALS

2010 Accumulated Carrying Value Cost/Valuation Depreciation (928,283,241) 6,154,832,979 6,952,105,219 (66,333,849) 395,801,297 455,128,178 (602,329,946) 4,865,147,320 5,343,561,232 (133,179,674) 528,327,036 651,599,394 (126,439,772) 365,557,326 501,816,415

7,083,116,220 462,135,146 5,467,477,266 661,506,710 491,997,098

Cost/Valuation

IMMOVABLE ASSETS Buildings Infrastructure Community Other

Municipality

455,128,178 5,343,561,232 651,599,394 501,816,415

317,570,777 (250,596,727) 66,974,050 298,907,867 316,857,467 (250,514,840) 66,342,627 298,109,070 64,615 (37,777) 26,838 64,615 60,000 (2,000) 58,000 7,000 (7,000) 7,000 38,799 (35,110) 3,689 38,799 542,896 542,896 688,383 7,400,686,997 (1,178,879,968) 6,221,807,029 7,251,013,086

395,801,297 4,865,147,320 528,327,036 365,557,326

MOVABLE ASSETS Movables Furniture and Fittings Motor vehicles Office Equipment IT Equipment Biological assets TOTALS

(66,333,849) (602,329,946) (133,179,674) (126,439,772)

(928,283,241) 6,154,832,979 6,952,105,219

462,135,146 5,467,477,266 661,506,710 491,997,098

Carrying Value Cost/Valuation

7,083,116,220

2010 Accumulated Depreciation

Buildings Infrastructure Community Other

Cost/Valuation

IMMOVABLE ASSETS

Group

7. Property, plant and equipment

Figures in Rand

58,649,954 57,910,249 39,761 1,148 10,413 688,383 6,193,149,884

393,048,071 4,831,273,448 527,434,646 382,743,765

6,134,499,930

Carrying Value

291,403,703 290,801,033 602,670 6,966,799,844

454,645,104 5,111,100,000 636,989,505 472,661,532

6,675,396,141

Cost/Valuation

(224,836,983) (224,836,983) (592,169,324)

(30,364,099) (235,377,531) (54,608,032) (46,982,679)

(367,332,341)

2008 Restated Accumulated Depreciation

66,566,720 65,964,050 602,670 6,374,630,520

424,281,005 4,875,722,469 582,381,473 425,678,853

6,308,063,800

Carrying Value

(240,198,821) (240,198,821) (1,057,804,110)

58,598,632 57,910,249 688,383 6,193,098,562

291,403,703 290,801,033 602,670 6,966,799,844

(224,836,983) (224,836,983) (592,169,324)

66,566,720 65,964,050 602,670 6,374,630,520

2009 Restated 2008 Restated Accumulated Carrying Value Cost/Valuation Accumulated Carrying Value Depreciation Depreciation (817,605,289) 6,134,499,930 6,675,396,141 (367,332,341) 6,308,063,800 (62,080,107) 393,048,071 454,645,104 (30,364,099) 424,281,005 (512,287,784) 4,831,273,448 5,111,100,000 (235,377,531) 4,875,722,469 (124,164,748) 527,434,646 636,989,505 (54,608,032) 582,381,473 (119,072,650) 382,743,765 472,661,532 (46,982,679) 425,678,853

(240,257,913) (240,198,821) (24,854) (5,852) (28,386) (1,057,863,202)

(62,080,107) (512,287,784) (124,164,748) (119,072,650)

(817,605,289)

2009 Restated Accumulated Depreciation

The Msunduzi Municipality and its Municipal Entity Notes to the Consolidated Annual Financial Statements

45

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


46 6,308,063,801 424,281,005 4,875,722,470 582,381,473 425,678,853 66,636,810 65,964,050 52,684 2,548 14,858 602,670 6,374,700,611

IMMOVABLE ASSETS Buildings Infrastructure Community Other

MOVABLE ASSETS Movables Furniture and Fittings Motor vehicles Office Equipment IT Equipment Biological assets TOTALS

Opening Balance

58,649,953 57,910,249 39,761 1,148 10,412 688,383 6,193,149,883

MOVABLE ASSETS Movables Furniture and Fittings Motor vehicles Office Equipment IT Equipment Biological assets TOTALS

Reconciliation of property, plant and equipment - Group - 2009 Restated

6,134,499,930 393,048,071 4,831,273,448 527,434,646 382,743,765

Opening Balance

IMMOVABLE ASSETS Buildings Infrastructure Community Other

Reconciliation of property, plant and equipment - Group - 2010

16,126,583 16,033,672 7,198 85,713 79,947,610

63,821,027 384,092 32,678,497 11,064,509 19,693,929

Additions

20,811,982 20,673,942 60,000 78,040 101,375,387

80,563,405 6,022,539 60,812,671 7,666,770 6,061,425

Additions

2,016,500 2,016,500 215,149,516

(10,987,101)

213,133,016 100,643 200,009,934 3,545,380 9,477,059

Capital under construction

172,694 172,694 68,866,175

68,693,481 989,609 63,103,364 2,240,546 2,359,962

Capital under construction

(10,742,135) (10,742,135) -

(16,105)

(244,966) (1,661) (227,200)

Disposals

(2,321,767) (2,098,240) (223,527) (20,567,652)

(18,245,885) (5,180) (18,240,705)

Disposals

(465,660,753)

(15,387,805) (15,361,838) (12,923) (1,400) (11,644)

(450,272,948) (31,716,008) (276,910,253) (69,556,716) (72,089,971)

Depreciation

(10,338,813) (10,316,019) (12,923) (2,000) (1,148) (6,723) (121,016,765)

(110,677,952) (4,253,742) (90,042,162) (9,014,926) (7,367,122)

Depreciation

58,649,954 57,910,249 39,762 1,148 10,412 688,383 6,193,149,884

6,134,499,930 393,048,071 4,831,273,448 527,434,646 382,743,765

Closing Balance

66,974,050 66,342,626 26,839 58,000 3,689 542,896 6,221,807,029

6,154,832,979 395,801,297 4,865,147,321 528,327,036 365,557,325

Closing Balance

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


6,134,499,930 393,048,071 4,831,273,448 527,434,646 382,743,765 58,598,632 57,910,249 688,383 6,193,098,562

IMMOVABLE ASSETS Buildings Infrastructure Community Other

MOVABLE ASSETS Movables Biological assets TOTALS

Opening Balance

274,643,360 274,122,417 520,943 6,758,006,815

MOVABLE ASSETS Movables Biological assets TOTALS

Reconciliation of property, plant and equipment - Municipality - 2010

6,483,363,455 451,651,480 4,956,368,692 623,085,273 452,258,010

Opening Balance

IMMOVABLE ASSETS Buildings Infrastructure Community Other

Reconciliation of property, plant and equipment - Group - 2008 Restated

20,751,982 20,673,942 78,040 101,315,387

80,563,405 6,022,539 60,812,671 7,666,770 6,061,425

Additions

13,415,575 13,333,848 81,727 64,027,305

50,611,730 835,281 38,577,215 8,731,365 2,467,869

Additions

(2,321,767) (2,098,240) (223,527) (20,567,652)

(18,245,885) (5,180) (18,240,705)

(10,316,019) (10,316,019) (120,993,971)

68,866,175

(110,677,952) (4,253,742) (90,042,162) (9,014,926) (7,367,122)

Depreciation

(592,169,325)

(224,836,983) (224,836,983)

(367,332,342) (30,364,099) (235,377,531) (54,608,032) (46,982,680)

Depreciation

172,694 172,694

68,693,481 989,609 63,103,364 2,240,546 2,359,962

Capital under construction

145,207,785

(442,059)

Disposals

3,474,199 3,474,199

141,733,586 2,436,766 116,185,694 5,172,867 17,938,259

Capital under construction

(129,431) (129,431)

(312,628) (278,423) (31,600) (2,605)

Disposals

66,885,522 66,342,626 542,896 6,221,718,501

6,154,832,979 395,801,297 4,865,147,321 528,327,036 365,557,325

Closing Balance

66,566,720 65,964,050 602,670 6,374,630,521

6,308,063,801 424,281,005 4,875,722,470 582,381,473 425,678,853

Closing Balance

47

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


48 3,474,199 3,474,199 145,207,785

(129,431) (129,431) (442,059)

MOVABLE ASSETS 274,643,360 13,415,575 Movables 274,122,417 13,333,848 Biological assets 520,943 81,727 TOTALS 6,758,006,815 64,027,305

141,733,586 2,436,766 116,185,694 5,172,867 17,938,259

Capital under construction

215,149,516

(10,987,101) Disposals

2,016,500 2,016,500

213,133,016 100,643 200,009,934 3,545,380 9,477,059

Capital under construction

(10,742,135) (10,742,135)

(16,105)

(244,966) (1,661) (227,200)

Disposals

(312,628) (278,423) (31,600) (2,605)

6,483,363,455 451,651,480 4,956,368,692 623,085,273 452,258,010

Additions

16,119,385 16,033,672 85,713 79,940,412

63,821,027 384,092 32,678,497 11,064,509 19,693,929

Additions

50,611,730 835,281 38,577,215 8,731,365 2,467,869

IMMOVABLE ASSETS Buildings Infrastructure Community Other

Opening Balance

66,566,720 65,964,050 602,670 6,374,630,521

MOVABLE ASSETS Movables Biological assets TOTALS

Reconciliation of property, plant and equipment - Municipality - 2008 Restated

6,308,063,801 424,281,005 4,875,722,470 582,381,473 425,678,853

Opening Balance

IMMOVABLE ASSETS Buildings Infrastructure Community Other

Reconciliation of property, plant and equipment - Municipality - 2009 Restated

(592,169,325)

(224,836,983) (224,836,983)

(367,332,342) (30,364,099) (235,377,531) (54,608,032) (46,982,680)

Depreciation

(465,634,786)

(15,361,838) (15,361,838)

(450,272,948) (31,716,008) (276,910,253) (69,556,716) (72,089,971)

Depreciation

66,566,720 65,964,050 602,670 6,374,630,521

6,308,063,801 424,281,005 4,875,722,470 582,381,473 425,678,853

Closing Balance

58,598,632 57,910,249 688,383 6,193,098,562

6,134,499,930 393,048,071 4,831,273,448 527,434,646 382,743,765

Closing Balance

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


49 Infrastructure Assets. During the previous financial year the Municipality implemented a process to identify, record, value and manage infrastructure assets as required in terms of GRAP 17. This resulted in a reconstructed fixed asset register for infrastructure assets. The key issues in this regards were as follows: Physical verification and valuation • • • •

The assets have been valued by an independent valuer and are effective on 30 June 2009. Due to the specialised nature of the assets, and market availability of information, the depreciated replacement cost method was used. A 100% verification and a conditional assessment was done. In the case of inaccessible assets various methods were employed to record and value the assets. These assets are reflected in the asset register as “polygon assets”. A polygon asset that is referenced by a geographically referenced area and the actual position and detail of the asset estimated within this geographical area. As the assets are maintained or a process implemented to more accurately record these assets the polygon can be broken down into detail components.

Retrospective application of the effects of implementation of GRAP 17 •

The implementation of GRAP 17 is a prior period error. In terms of GRAP 3 prior period errors should be applied retrospectively. On initial application the Municipality applied retrospective application of the infrastructure assets during the 2008 financial year. The methodology followed for the retrospective application corrections was done as follows:

Disclosure of the asset information • • • • • •

The deemed cost was determined on 30 June 2009 by using the depreciated replacement values (DRC). In order to apply the retrospective application as required for the infrastructure assets previously adjusted prospectively, the CPI index was used to determine the DRC values as at 2007. For movable assets actual values were used. The opening for the take-on values of the assets as well as for accumulated depreciation is restated. This adjustment is made directly to accumulated surplus. Depreciation for the year has been based on the new asset values and is calculated on a straight line method. During the financial year the Municipality also identified and measured investment properties in terms of GRAP 16.

Fully Depreciated Assets •

The fixed asset register as at 30 October 2010 had approximately 42667 fully depreciated assets still in use. Approximately 40383 were acquired prior to July 2006. The Municipality opted not to revalue these assets due to the use of fund accounting in that period. In the interim the assets classified as vehicles have been revalued and the useful lives reviewed through a Section 78 of the Municipal Systems Act - investigation of fleet.

* The remainder of the assets acquired subsequent to June 2006 which were classified as Furniture and Equipment have been revalued and the useful lives have been reviewed. These values will be updated in the 2010/2011 financial year.

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Group Figures in Rand

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

8. Intangible assets Group Cost / Valuation Computer software, other Servitutes Total

Cost / Valuation

Carrying value

(16,306,764)

5,661,446

17,267,370

(13,673,954)

3,593,416

803,846 22,772,056

(16,306,764)

803,846 6,465,292

176,686 17,444,056

(13,673,954)

176,686 3,770,102

Cost / Valuation

2010 Accumulated amortisation

Carrying value

Cost / Valuation

2009 Accumulated amortisation

Carrying value

21,968,210

(16,306,764)

5,661,446

17,267,370

(13,673,954)

3,593,416

803,846 22,772,056

(16,306,764)

803,846 6,465,292

176,686 17,444,056

(13,673,954)

176,686 3,770,102

Reconciliation of intangible assets Group - 2010 Computer software, other Servitutes

Reconciliation of intangible assets Group - 2009 Computer software, other Servitutes

Reconciliation of intangible assets Municipality - 2010 Computer software, other Servitutes

Reconciliation of intangible assets Municipality - 2009 Computer software, other Servitutes

50

Carrying value

2009 Accumulated amortisation

21,968,210

Municipality

Computer software, other Servitutes Total

2010 Accumulated amortisation

Opening balance 3,593,416 176,686 3,770,102 Opening balance 1,253,954 176,686 1,430,640 Opening balance 3,593,416 176,686 3,770,102 Opening balance 1,253,954 176,686 1,430,640

Additions

4,700,840 627,160 5,328,000 Additions

3,003,211 3,003,211 Additions

4,700,840 627,160 5,328,000 Additions

3,003,211 3,003,211

Amortisation

(2,632,810) (2,632,810) Amortisation

(663,749) (663,749) Amortisation

(2,632,810) (2,632,810) Amortisation

(663,749) (663,749)

Total

5,661,446 803,846 6,465,292 Total

3,593,416 176,686 3,770,102 Total

5,661,446 803,846 6,465,292 Total

3,593,416 176,686 3,770,102


51 Group Figures in Rand

2010

Municipality 2010 2009

2009

9. Investment property Group Cost / Valuation Investment property

534,167,000

Municipality Cost / Valuation Investment property

534,167,000

2010 Accumulated amortisation

Carrying value

-

2010 Accumulated amortisation

534,167,000

Carrying value

-

534,167,000

2009 Accumulated amortisation

Cost / Valuation

Carrying value

-

534,167,000

2009 Accumulated amortisation

Cost / Valuation 534,167,000

Carrying value

-

Reconciliation of investment property - Group - 2010

Opening balance

Investment property

534,167,000

Reconciliation of investment property - Group - 2009

Opening balance

Investment property

Transfers

-

534,167,000

Reconciliation of investment property - Municipality - 2010

Opening balance

Investment property

534,167,000

Reconciliation of investment property - Municipality - 2009

Investment property

Opening balance

Transfers

-

534,167,000

534,167,000

534,167,000

Total

534,167,000 Total

534,167,000 Total

534,167,000 Total

534,167,000

Other disclosures Included in the land and building are items that may meet the definition of investment properties because the municipality has not yet finalised the process to identify investment properties for reporting purposes. At the time of preparation of the consolidated financial statements, the tender for the appointment of a service provider to perform this task was approved, but not yet completed. This process will be finalised during the 2010/2011 financial year. In addition this task will also identify unsold properties.

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Group Figures in Rand

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

10. Long - term receivables Housing Loans to educational facilities and sporting bodies

3,817,511 372,903 4,190,414

4,283,354 403,038 4,686,392

3,817,511 372,903 4,190,414

4,283,354 403,038 4,686,392

Current portion of housing debtors 2010: R 1 444 570 and 2009: R 1 492 047. 11. Current portion - other financial assets Fixed deposits - long to medium term investment Non-current assets At fair value through surplus or deficit - designated Current assets At fair value through surplus or deficit

1,924,051

1,930,842

1,924,051

1,930,842

64,051

70,842

64,051

70,842

1,860,000 1,924,051

1,860,000 1,930,842

1,860,000 1,924,051

1,860,000 1,930,842

The group has not reclassified any financial assets from cost or amortised cost to fair value, or from fair value to cost or amortised cost during the current or prior year. 12. Long - term liabilities External loan liability Finance lease liability

Long term liabilities net of current portion of long term liabilities Finance lease and external loan liability

Long term liabilities At amortised cost Current liabilities Current portion of long term liabilities

52

44,526,158 3,442,950 47,969,108

41,868,718 5,236,693 47,105,411

44,526,158 3,442,950 47,969,108

41,868,718 5,236,693 47,105,411

562,978,504 610,947,612

371,716,196 418,821,607

562,978,504 610,947,612

371,716,196 418,821,607

562,978,504

371,716,196

562,978,504

371,716,196

47,969,108 610,947,612

47,105,411 418,821,607

47,969,108 610,947,612

47,105,411 418,821,607


53 Group Figures in Rand

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

13. Finance lease obligation Minimum lease payments due • within one year • in second to fifth year inclusive • later than five years Add: future finance charges Present value of minimum lease payments Present value of minimum lease payments due • within one year • in second to fifth year inclusive • later than five years

Non-current liabilities Finance lease obligation

4,489,147 7,775,730 667,882 12,932,759 1,488,742 14,421,501

6,797,447 12,186,424 1,066,959 20,050,830 2,560,800 22,611,630

4,489,147 7,775,730 667,882 12,932,759 1,488,742 14,421,501

6,797,447 12,186,424 1,066,959 20,050,830 2,560,800 22,611,630

4,211,231 6,631,806 600,981 11,444,018

6,432,791 10,132,975 924,264 17,490,030

4,211,231 6,631,806 600,981 11,444,018

6,432,791 10,132,975 924,264 17,490,030

7,150,234 7,150,234

10,670,399 10,670,399

7,150,234 7,150,234

10,670,399 10,670,399

The average lease term was 5 years and the average effective borrowing rate was 12.1% (2009: 11 %). 14. Trade and other payables Trade payables Other payables Other deposits Accrued leave pay Operating lease payables Retention Other payables accrued Other payables - discounted interest

7,280,984 66,549,093 3,197,119 43,990,395 170,715 12,579,039 198,414,052 (6,227,708) 325,953,689

16,589,530 107,485,650 2,790,750 38,502,728 130,810 13,867,375 128,042,882 (5,434,385) 301,975,340

7,258,023 66,549,093 3,197,119 43,990,395 170,715 12,579,039 198,407,452 (6,227,708) 325,924,128

16,586,696 107,485,650 2,790,750 38,502,728 130,810 13,867,375 128,036,282 (5,434,385) 301,965,906

22,512,954

5,040,704

22,512,954

5,040,704

28,278,355 4,899,556 905,800 1,710,252 35,793,963

27,523,586 4,748,861 877,941 1,657,650 34,808,038

28,278,355 4,899,556 905,800 1,710,252 35,793,963

27,523,586 4,748,861 877,941 1,657,650 34,808,038

15. VAT payable VAT payable 16. Consumer deposits Electricity Water Refuse Regional services levies

Included in deposits is an accrual of interest at an effective interest of 4% per annum. Balance on the interest reserve as at 30 June 2010 is R8 401 971 and 30 June 2009 R7 652 419 .

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Group Figures in Rand

Guarantees in lieu of electricity and water deposit

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

8,856,716

8,654,786

8,856,716

8,654,786

140,882,033 140,882,033

113,470,182 113,470,182

140,882,033 140,882,033

113,470,182 113,470,182

17. Unspent conditional grants and receipts Non-current liabilities Current liabilities

The nature and extent of government grants recognised in the consolidated annual financial statements and an indication of other forms of government assistance from which the entity has directly benefited; and Unfulfilled conditions and other contingencies attaching to government assistance that has been recognised. Refer to Appendix H for details of unspent conditional grants, receipts and transfers from National/Provincial Government and Other . These amounts are invested in a ring-fenced investment until utilised. National grants Provincial grants & subsidies Other conditional grant receipts

81,028,290 24,065,042 35,788,701 140,882,033

57,830,336 13,545,137 42,094,709 113,470,182

81,028,290 24,065,042 35,788,701 140,882,033

57,830,336 13,545,137 42,094,709 113,470,182

760,739

625,167

760,739

625,167

625,167 135,572 760,739

861,265 625,167 (861,265) 625,167

625,167 135,572 760,739

861,265 625,167 (861,265) 625,167

18. Current provisions Performance bonus The movement in the current provison is reconciled as follows Opening Balance Contributions Expenditure incurred

19. Retirement benefits Defined contribution and benefit plan The Council provides retirement benefits to employees by contributing to pension and provident funds Membership of either pension or provident fund is compulsory for all permanent employees. The majority members and Council contribute to the Natal Joint Retirement and Provident Funds (NJMP), employees contributing to SALA, AIPF, Pietermaritzburg Provident Fund and GEPF. Employees contributing to SALA, AIPF, Pietermaritzburg Provident Fund and GEPF make up a small number of the total members of pension funds. Msunduzi Municipality liability in these funds could not be determined owing mainly to the assets not being allocated to each employer and one set of financials being compiled for each fund and not for each employer.

54


55 Group Figures in Rand

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

At the time of submission of this annual financial statement were the actuarial valuation reports not available for the SALA, AIPF, Pietermaritzburg Provident Fund and GEPF. The majority of personnel are members of the following pension funds: Kwa-Zulu-Natal Joint Municipal Provident Fund. Actuarial Valuation as at 31 March 2009. Results of valuation. The Fund self-insures its risk benefits in excess of the full benefit. It therefore maintains a Risk Reserve Account as a measure of protection against volatility in claims experience. The amount of R13,165,000 is required to be held in the Risk Reserve Account. The liabilities of the fund exceeded the assets. Resulting in a small deficit at the valuation date of R13,930,000. The deficit of R13,930,000 will be met from future investment earnings. The Investment Reserve Account far exceeds the deficit, so that the Fund is financially sound as at the valuation date. Benefits: : Pension age 65 years : Earliest retirement age 58 years : Full benefit - Initial transfer plus member’s contributions plus employer’s contributions for full benefits plus investment earnings and bonuses. : Member’s portion of full benefits - Initial transfer plus members contributions plus local authorities contributions for full benefits plus interim, special and final bonuses. : Benefit on retirement after earliest retirement age or pension age - Full benefit. : Benefit on retirement because of ill health - Full benefit : Benefit on death in service - Full benefit plus 0.7% of annual pensionable salary for each month of potential service to a maximum of 2.1 years salary. Contributions: : Members may choose to contribute at a rate of 5%, 7% or 9.25% of their pensionable emoluments in terms of regulation 14(a). : Participating employers contribute at a rate of 1.95 times of the rate of members contribution in terms of regulation 17(1)(b) Benchmark: The benchmark asset allocation determined as being appropriate forthe fund, which takes cognisance of membership and liability profile, is stated below Domestic Investments: International Investments: Membership:

516,818,000 57,134,000 7,977

Natal Joint Pension Fund: Natal Joint Municipal Pension Fund: (Retirement) Interim actuarial valuation An interim actuarial valuation was performed on 31 March 2009.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Group Figures in Rand

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

The statutory actuarial valuation as at 31 March 2000 disclosed that the fund was in shortfall. As required by the Pension Funds act, a “Scheme of Arrangement” was implemented so that the shortfall would be funded over the 9 year period 1 July 2001 to 30 June 2010. The initial surcharge has been reviewed at each annual actuarial valuation. With effect from 1 July 2000 the local authority commenced paying a surcharge equal to 2% of pensionable salaries. The surcharge has been increased as follows: : 2002-07-01 : 2004-07-01 : 2006-07-01 : 2007-07-01

6% 12% 14% 17%

* 1.65% is paid by members Based on the valuation assumptions that applied in 2000, the shortfall is expected to be fully funded by 2010. On the DCF funding level has improved and the overall shortfall has decreased. The valuation disclosed a surplus of R134.1 million in respect of pensioners and a shortfall of R214.2 million in respect of members. The fund’s financial condition has improved, with the overall funding level increasing 83,1% to 88,6% on the DCF method of valuation. The regulations of the fund have been amended with effect from 1 July 2004, so that the Committee of Management is able to levy a separate surcharge on local authorities which grant excessive salary increases, thereby causing a financial strain on the Fund to the detriment of other steakholders. The employers are no longer permitting members to join the Fund, so that it is effectively closed to new members. This means that the average age will increase over time which, in turn, means that the required rate of contribution will also increase. Thus, once the surcharge ceases, the underlying rate of contribution will not be sufficient to meet the cost of the benefits. It is necessary to set aside a reserve to hold assets equal to the expected shortfall. For this reason a “Contribution Reserve is held equal to the present value of the shortfall in terms of the Financial Services Board’s Circular PF117 for the 4 years to 2012 when it is expected that the surcharge will cease. Benefits: : Pension age 65 Years : Final average Salary - Average annual pensionable salaries during the last year of service. : Pension on retirement at pension age - 2.1% of final average emoluments per year of continuous service. : Lump sum on retirement at pension age - 5.5% of final average emoluments per year of service. : Pension on retirement because of ill-health (minimum ten years continuous service) - Pension as for retirement at pension age

56


57 Group Figures in Rand

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

: Lump sum on retirement because of ill-health (minimum 10 years continuous service) - Lump sum as for retirement at pension age : Lump sum on retirement because of ill health (less than ten years continuous service) - The greater of the resignation benefit or twice the members contributions : Surviving Spouses pension on death in service – 1.05% of final average emoluments per year of continuous service that the member would have had at the pension age. : Surviving Spouses pension on death of pensioner – 1.05% (0,77% in the case of a pensioner who retired before 1 July 1999) of final average emoluments per year of continuous service. : Lump sum on death in service - Annual pensionable emoluments : Withdrawal - members contribution plus 5/12% for each month of continuous service (the addition is approximately equal to compound interest at 10% a year) and increased by 5% for each complete year of service up to a maximum of 20 years. Benchmark Investments Domestic International Membership

1,267,978,000 186,883,000 4,318

The employees of the Council as well as the Council as employer, contribute to municipal pension,retirement and various provident funds as listed below: Natal Joint Pension Fund Natal Joint Provident Fund Government Employees Pension Fund Associated Institution Pension Fund South Africa Local Authorities Pension Fund Councillors Pension Fund Pietermaritzburg Provident Fund

83,944,668 23,112,838 4,196,154 187,111 581,969 3,106,040 575,149 115,703,929

79,298,249 17,769,429 4,089,269 174,089 531,706 2,928,337 605,381 105,396,460

83,944,668 23,112,838 4,196,154 187,111 581,969 3,106,040 575,149 115,703,929

79,298,249 17,769,429 4,089,269 174,089 531,706 2,928,337 605,381 105,396,460

Post retirement medical aid contributions. The municipality operates on 6 accredited medical aid schemes, namely Bonitas. Discovery Health, Hosmed, Key-Health, LA Health and SAMWU Medical Aid Scheme,Pensioners continue on the option they belonged to on the day of their retirement. The last post-employment health care benefits actuarial valuation in terms of IAS19 was done by Delliotte and Touche for the period ending 30 June 2009. For the financial period ending 30 June 2010 Ernst and Young undertook the valuation in accordance with the requirements of Professional Guidance Note (PPN) 301 of the Actuarial Society of South Africa. The accrued liability amounted to R 290.45 million as at 30 June 2009 according to the previous valuation report. A projection of this result assuming that all actuarial assumptions are realized as at 30 June 2010 is R 309.22 million. The accrued liability calculated in this valuation is R 310.12 million, reflecting an unexpected loss of R 0.9 million.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Group Figures in Rand

2010

Municipality 2010 2009

2009

A reconciliation of Msunduzi’s accrued liability for the year ending 30 June 2010 is set out below. Year ended 30 June 2010 Opening balance Service cost Interest cost Expected benefit payment Expected closing balance Actuarial (gain)/loss Actual closing balance

290,450,000 7,090,000 22,550,000 (10,870,000) 309,220,000 900,000 310,120,000

-

290,450,000 7,090,000 22,550,000 (10,870,000) 309,220,000 900,000 310,120,000

-

(151,097,282)

(98,089,800)

(151,097,282)

(98,089,800)

(98,089,800) (53,007,482) (151,097,282)

(50,000,000) (48,089,800) (98,089,800)

(98,089,800) (53,007,482) (151,097,282)

(50,000,000) (48,089,800) (98,089,800)

310,120,000 (98,089,800) (53,007,482) 159,022,718

290,448,544 (50,000,000) (48,089,800) 192,358,744

310,120,000 (98,089,800) (53,007,482) 159,022,718

290,448,544 (50,000,000) (48,089,800) 192,358,744

Carrying value Present value of the defined benefit obligationwholly unfunded Movements for the year Opening balance Other

Reconciliation of Obligation to disclosed liability Actuarial liability Amount disclosed at 30 June 2009 Straight line contribution on remainder of liability Amount to be contributed in the next four years Key assumptions used The projected Unit Credit Method is used as the standard valuation methodology for the valuation done as on 30 June 2010. Plan assets were valued at current market value as required by IAS19. Assumptions used on last valuation on 30 June 2010. Discount rates used from to Medical inflation- lower than discount rate Medical inflation- higher than CPI Salary inflation- higher than CPI

6.42 % 9.27 % 1.00 % 1.00 % 2.00 %

7.60 % 8.39 % 1.00 % 2.50 % 2.00 %

6.42 % 9.27 % 1.00 % 1.00 % 2.00 %

Other assumptions: Post retirement mortality PA (90). Retirement age 65 years. Sensitivity analysis The impact of a 1% change in the medical aid inflation rate is reflected in the table underneath.

58

7.60 % 8.39 % 1.00 % 2.50 % 2.00 %


59 Group Figures in Rand

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

Sensitivity to medical inflation Base -1% +1%

290,448,544 248,825,292 343,541,221 882,815,057

290,448,544 248,825,292 343,541,221 882,815,057

290,448,544 248,825,292 343,541,221 882,815,057

290,448,544 248,825,292 343,541,221 882,815,057

10,044,399 30,650,727 2,657,965 271,319 11,269,404 821,175 55,714,989

5,196,274 28,374,923 2,407,315 242,137 6,379,404 609,616 43,209,669

10,044,399 30,650,727 2,657,965 271,319 11,269,404 821,175 55,714,989

5,196,274 28,374,923 2,407,315 242,137 6,379,404 609,616 43,209,669

The employees of the Council as well as the Council as employer, contribute to municipal medical aids as listed below: LA Health Key Health Samwumed Discovery Bonitas Hosmed

20. Provisions Reconciliation of provisions - Group - 2010

Landfill rehabilitation provision Reconciliation of provisions - Group - 2009

Landfill rehabiltation provision Reconciliation of provisions - Municipality - 2010

Landfill rehabilitation provision Reconciliation of provisions - Municipality - 2009

Landfill rehabiltation provision

Opening Balance

Change in accouting estimate

16,871,166 Opening Balance

(13,779,153) Change in accouting estimate

27,500,000 Opening Balance

(8,800,000) Change in accouting estimate

16,871,166 Opening Balance

(13,779,153) Change in accouting estimate

27,500,000

(8,800,000)

Change in discount factor 531,635 Change in discount factor (1,828,834) Change in discount factor 531,635 Change in discount factor (1,828,834)

Total

3,623,648 Total

16,871,166 Total

3,623,648 Total

16,871,166

The landfill site provision represents management’s best estimate of the municipality’s rehabilition liability based on an valuation provided by an external consultant on the remaining useful life of the landfill site.The provision’s change in estimate amounts to R 13 779 153.41. Alien vegetation provision.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Group Figures in Rand

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

According to the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (Act No. 107 of 1998) the municipality was encouraged to recognise a provision in this regard. The Department of Agriculture has since 2006 provided considerable support to the Msunduzi Municipality in terms of clearing listed alien invasive plants. The Msunduzi Municipality’s involvement and responsibility is effectively operational support to the Department of Agriculture terms of clearing listed alien invasive plants. 21. Housing development fund Unappropriated surplus Loans extinguished by government on 1 April 1998

18,223,110 34,256,892 52,480,002

17,745,827 34,256,892 52,002,719

18,223,110 34,256,892 52,480,002

17,745,827 34,256,892 52,002,719

179,968 4,293,875 11,592,558 34,256,892 2,158,990 (2,281) 52,480,002

179,968 4,807,240 11,437,719 34,256,892 1,323,181 (2,281) 52,002,719

179,968 4,293,875 11,592,558 34,256,892 2,158,990 (2,281) 52,480,002

179,968 4,807,240 11,437,719 34,256,892 1,323,181 (2,281) 52,002,719

420,030,161 20,284,950

378,556,015 20,581,029

420,030,161 20,284,950

378,556,015 20,581,029

1,159,281,895 60,000 15,571,328 1,435,383 7,084,343 72,254 355,033,160 1,978,853,474

952,422,683 10,000 16,684,449 689,431 14,299,020 53,988 324,440,359 1,707,736,974

1,159,300,660 15,571,328 1,435,383 7,084,343 72,254 355,033,160 1,978,812,239

952,438,874 16,684,449 689,431 14,299,020 53,988 324,440,359 1,707,743,165

The housing development fund is represented by the following assets & liabilities Property plant and equipment Housing selling scheme loans Housing rental trade receivables Loans extinguished by Government on 1 April 1998 Bank and cash Less: trade payables

22. Revenue Property rates Property rates – Penalties imposed and collection charges Service charges Donation received Rental of facilities & equipment Income from agency services Fines Licences and permits Government grants & subsidies

60


61 Group Figures in Rand

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

The amount included in revenue arising from exchanges of goods or services are as follows: Service charges Donation received Rental of facilities & equipment Income from agency services Licences and permits

1,159,281,895 60,000 15,571,328 1,435,383 72,254 1,176,420,860

952,422,683 10,000 16,684,449 689,431 53,988 969,860,551

1,159,300,660 15,571,328 1,435,383 72,254 1,176,379,625

952,438,874 16,684,449 689,431 53,988 969,866,742

420,030,161 20,284,950

378,556,015 20,581,029

420,030,161 20,284,950

378,556,015 20,581,029

7,084,343 355,033,160 802,432,614

14,299,020 324,440,359 737,876,423

7,084,343 355,033,160 802,432,614

14,299,020 324,440,359 737,876,423

209,492,142 187,836,514 1,716,588 1,055,148 18,404,737 1,525,032 420,030,161 20,284,950

252,213,191 176,134,262 58,610,152 22,183,384 (130,584,974) 378,556,015 20,581,029

209,492,142 187,836,514 1,716,588 1,055,148 18,404,737 1,525,032 420,030,161 20,284,950

252,213,191 176,134,262 58,610,152 22,183,384 (130,584,974) 378,556,015 20,581,029

440,315,111

399,137,044

440,315,111

399,137,044

The amount included in revenue arising from nonexchange transactions is as follows: Property rates Property rates – Penalties imposed and collection charges Fines Government grants & subsidies

23. Property rates Rates received Residential Commercial State Municipal Small holdings and farms Property rates Less: Income forgone Property rates - penalties imposed and collection charges

Valuations Residential Commercial State Agriculture Public service infrastructure Vacant land

30,651,309,401 8,336,993,700 30,651,309,401 8,336,993,700 13,789,137,000 6,201,992,100 13,789,137,000 6,201,992,100 26,000,000 2,256,104,100 26,000,000 2,256,104,100 493,501,000 493,501,000 302,410,001 302,410,001 1,880,513,000 301,028,600 1,880,513,000 301,028,600 47,142,870,402 17,096,118,500 47,142,870,402 17,096,118,500

Valuations on land and buildings are performed every 4 years. The last general valuation came into effect on 1 July 2010. Interim valuations are processed on an annual basis to take into account changes in individual property values due to alterations and subdivisions.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Group Figures in Rand

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

Interim valuations are processed on an annual basis to take into account changes in individual property values due to alterations and subdivisions. A general rate of 18 % for 2010 (2009: 18%) is applied to property valuations to determine assessment rates. The new market valuation was implemented on 01 July 2009. 24. Service charges Sale of electricity Sale of water Solid waste Sewerage and sanitation charges

816,154,074 213,633,343 53,287,411 76,207,067 1,159,281,895

627,490,313 213,920,408 42,579,578 68,432,384 952,422,683

816,172,839 213,633,343 53,287,411 76,207,067 1,159,300,660

627,506,504 213,920,408 42,579,578 68,432,384 952,438,874

59,047,219 79,011,226 206,177,611 10,797,104 355,033,160

43,193,058 85,802,876 187,098,867 8,147,972 197,586 324,440,359

59,047,219 79,011,226 206,177,611 10,797,104 355,033,160

43,193,058 85,802,876 187,098,867 8,147,972 197,586 324,440,359

1,308,453 10,327,267 16,648,041 942,446 1,454,763 9,772,804 2,456,370 525,179 13,058,266 432,622,618 1,827,026 53,181 3,220 5,551,029 496,550,663

1,746,821 10,459,592 14,845,259 1,188,207 1,730,706 7,088,028 2,025,279 686,490 14,346,747 251,024,522 1,689,010 149,931 91,307 22,891,141 9,036,098 338,999,138

1,308,453 10,327,267 16,648,041 942,446 1,454,763 9,772,804 2,456,370 525,179 13,033,876 432,622,618 1,827,026 53,181 3,220 5,551,029 496,526,273

1,746,821 10,459,592 14,845,259 1,188,207 1,730,706 7,088,028 2,025,279 686,490 14,345,744 251,024,522 1,689,010 149,931 91,307 22,891,141 9,036,098 338,998,135

The above figure is net of revenue foregone. 25. Government grants and subsidies Conditional grants - revenue Grants & subsidies - capital Equitable share KZN - NPA subsidies Grants - other

26. Other revenue Airport Forestry Market Burials and cremations Buildings Re-connections Training levy recoveries Discount received Sundry income Other revenue - foregone Other revenue - MIG (PMU) operating costs Other revenue - insurance recoveries Other revenue Discounting of debtors Reversal of provisions

62


63 Group Figures in Rand

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

27. Interest received Interest received - external investments Interest received - sundry debtors Interest received - service debtors Interest received - Municipal Entity

5,453,509 1,303,696 21,160,808 111,298 28,029,311

17,073,381 1,395,660 17,041,453 63,460 35,573,954

5,453,509 1,303,696 21,160,808 27,918,013

17,073,381 1,395,660 17,041,453 35,510,494

427,579,263 107,082,128 29,783,672

383,528,443 94,582,730 19,785,812

425,520,578 106,992,821 29,783,672

381,340,737 94,546,734 19,785,812

50,108,001 13,984,329 5,170,764 633,708,157

65,937,561 12,505,426 6,055,806 582,395,778

50,108,001 13,984,329 5,170,764 631,560,165

65,937,561 12,505,426 6,055,806 580,172,076

901,027 50,000 22,065 2,425 975,517

854,648 65,067 215,369 33,203 1,168,287

901,027 50,000 22,065 2,425 975,517

854,648 65,067 215,369 33,203 1,168,287

651,440 93,883 185,374 6,583 937,280

603,740 94,941 72,783 19,102 790,566

651,440 93,883 185,374 6,583 937,280

603,740 94,941 72,783 19,102 790,566

307,046 101,562 38,273 84,107 12,626 1,618 545,232

412,999 132,953 33,957 116,416 375 696,700

307,046 101,562 38,273 84,107 12,626 1,618 545,232

412,999 132,953 33,957 116,416 375 696,700

28. Employee related costs Basic Contributions for UIF,pensions & medical aid Travel, motor car, accommodation, subsistence and other allowances Overtime payments Long-service awards Housing benefits and allowances

Remuneration of municipal manager Annual Remuneration Car Allowance Contributions to UIF, Medical and Pension Funds Travel Claim

Remuneration of chief finance officer Annual Remuneration Car Allowance Contributions to UIF, Medical and Pension Funds Travel Claim

Remuneration of executive manager - internal audit Annual Remuneration Car Allowance Annual Bonus Contributions to UIF, Medical and Pension Funds Acting allowance - March 2010 to June 2010 Travel claim

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Group Figures in Rand

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

Remuneration of deputy municipal manager community services Annual Remuneration Car Allowance Performance Bonuses Contributions to UIF, Medical and Pension Funds Travel claim

644,592 200,903 93,144 1,497 68,404 1,008,540

584,279 200,903 1,497 103,042 889,721

644,592 200,903 93,144 1,497 68,404 1,008,540

584,279 200,903 1,497 103,042 889,721

725,182 60,000 1,497 126,359 913,038

799,338 50,000 96,428 1,497 93,345 1,040,608

725,182 60,000 1,497 126,359 913,038

737,182 48,000 1,497 26,266 812,945

372,327 24,000 749 348,520 745,596

737,182 48,000 1,497 26,266 812,945

47,381 319,400 366,781

397,247 397,247

47,381 319,400 366,781

397,247 397,247

675,011 540,008 8,995,001 540,008 5,568,838 3,064,835 19,383,701

646,835 520,664 9,612,629 520,664 4,402,098 3,461,786 19,164,676

675,011 540,008 8,995,001 540,008 5,568,838 3,064,835 19,383,701

646,835 520,664 9,612,629 520,664 4,402,098 3,461,786 19,164,676

Remuneration of deputy municipal manager corporate services Annual Remuneration Car Allowance Performance Bonuses Contributions to UIF, Medical and Pension Funds Travel claim

799,338 50,000 96,428 1,497 93,345 1,040,608

Remuneration of deputy municipal manager infrastructure services Annual Remuneration Car Allowance Contributions to UIF, Medical and Pension Funds Other - Arbitration Travel claim

372,327 24,000 749 348,520 745,596

Remuneration of deputy municipal manager develpoment services Performance Bonuses Acting allowance

29. Remuneration of councillors Mayor Deputy Executive Mayor Councillors Speaker Executive committee members Councillors’ pension and medical contribution

In-kind benefits The Mayor, Deputy Mayor, Speaker and Mayoral Committee Members are full-time. Each is provided with an office and secretarial support at the cost of the Council.

64


65 Group Figures in Rand

2010

Municipality 2010 2009

2009

The Mayor and the Deputy Mayor each have the use of separate Council owned vehicles for official duties. The Mayor and Deputy Mayor have security and an official driver at a cost to Council. 30. Depreciation and amortisation Property, plant and equipment

123,669,181

96,651,653

123,646,386

96,625,686

397,381

-

397,381

-

71,236,781 2,517,213 73,753,994

53,271,398 4,150,193 57,421,591

71,236,781 2,517,213 73,753,994

53,271,199 4,150,193 57,421,392

31. Impairment of assets Impairments Inventories Due to technological changes the inventory has become redundant. 32. Finance costs Annunity and finance loans Other interest paid

Capitalisation rates used during the period were 12.01 % on specific borrowings for capital projects and 10.84 % being the weighted average cost of funds borrowed generally by the group. 33. Debt impairment Contributions to debt impairment provision

250,539,606

10,000,000

250,539,606

10,000,000

568,236,145 236,743,218 804,979,363

420,119,222 216,651,627 636,770,849

568,236,145 236,743,218 804,979,363

420,119,222 216,651,627 636,770,849

845,477 2,000 863,160 1,710,637

994,079 16,770 1,335,908 2,346,757

845,477 2,000 863,160 2,631,579 4,342,216

994,079 16,770 1,335,908 2,631,579 4,978,336

34. Bulk purchases Electricity Water

35. Grants and subsidies paid Other subsidies Community bodies Mayors grants Arts and culture Safe city project

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Group Figures in Rand

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

36. General expenses Accounting fees Other Contracted services External services Airport Forestry Insurance VAT provision Foregone income - discounts to bulk consumers Foregone income - poor relief / indigents Foregone income - other rebates Telephone and fax Distribution - wages Leave / sickpay - downtime Extraordinary Pensions payable Mayoral projects Government grant expenditure

11,500 95,102,008 14,690,414 24,572,827 6,877,867 8,963,703 21,906,126 89,522,003 21,008,067 327,744,164 7,632,122 41,484,730 17,484,593 7,125,127 10,374,532 11,137,530 59,042,381 764,679,694

10,250 113,268,190 15,297,625 25,162,484 5,698,469 8,346,885 19,177,693 (253,769) 93,507,513 38,773,547 130,743,958 9,654,506 43,743,960 15,857,967 10,785,537 10,154,602 19,234,479 43,438,093 602,601,989

94,847,237 14,690,414 24,572,827 6,877,867 8,963,703 21,906,126 89,522,003 21,008,067 327,744,164 7,606,648 41,484,730 17,484,593 7,125,127 10,374,532 11,137,530 59,042,381 764,387,949

113,181,931 15,297,625 25,162,484 5,698,469 8,346,885 19,177,693 93,507,513 38,773,547 130,743,958 9,623,590 43,743,960 15,857,967 10,785,537 10,154,602 19,234,479 43,438,093 602,728,333

(182,181) 2,119,592 1,937,411

1,137,979 2,231,297 3,369,276

(182,181) 2,119,592 1,937,411

1,137,979 2,231,297 3,369,276

37. Gains or losses on sale of assets Property, plant and equipment Land Sales

66


67 Group Figures in Rand

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

38. Cash generated from operations (Deficit) surplus Adjustments for: Depreciation and amortisation surplus on sale of assets and liabilities Fair asset amortised Financial liability amortised Impairment deficit Movements in retirement benefit assets and liabilities Movements in provisions Other non-cash items Changes in working capital: Inventories Trade and other receivables from non exchange transactions Consumer debtors Current portion of long - term receivables Trade and other payables VAT Unspent conditional grants and receipts

(235,934,625)

4,040,132

(235,920,190)

4,027,893

123,669,181 (1,937,411) 531,635 (793,323) 397,381 53,007,482

96,651,653 (3,369,276) (5,434,385) 385,314 48,089,800

123,646,386 (1,937,411) 531,635 (793,323) 397,381 53,007,482

96,625,686 (3,369,276) (5,434,385) 385,314 48,089,800

(16,290,400) (53,515,507)

(14,737,530) (27,024,695)

(16,290,400) (53,455,507)

(14,737,530) (26,979,533)

340,479 (10,609,762)

(10,472,767) 19,471,656

340,479 (10,609,762)

(10,472,767) 19,449,075

105,830,905 47,477 24,376,582 17,490,998 27,806,942 34,418,034

(63,461,860) 65,216 32,674,586 5,896,918 (32,851,533) 49,923,229

105,830,905 47,477 24,356,453 17,472,250 27,806,942 34,430,797

(63,461,860) 65,216 32,935,134 5,896,918 (32,851,533) 50,168,152

39. Additional disclosure in terms of the municipal finance management act Contributions to SALGA/KWANALOGA Council subscriptions Amount paid - current year

Audit fees Opening balance Over provision written back Audit fee invoiced Amount paid - current year

PAYE & UIF Opening balance Current year payroll deductions Amount paid - current year

2,481,456 (2,481,456) -

3,029,463 (3,029,463) -

2,481,456 (2,481,456) -

3,029,463 (3,029,463) -

13,034 59,570 (3,640,303) 3,640,303 72,604

61,950 (48,916) (2,437,834) 2,437,834 13,034

13,034 59,570 (3,640,303) 3,640,303 72,604

61,950 (48,916) (2,437,834) 2,437,834 13,034

(32,915) 79,809,019 (79,809,019) (32,915)

(32,915) 74,241,463 (74,241,463) (32,915)

(32,915) 79,809,019 (79,809,019) (32,915)

(32,915) 74,241,463 (74,241,463) (32,915)

Note: The difference represents PAYE & UIF deducted from the employees salaries, however payroll will have to be adjusted in July 2009. Pension & medical aid deductions

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Group Figures in Rand Current year payroll deductions & Council contributions Amount paid - current year Pension & medical aid deductions Current year payroll deductions & Council contributions Amount paid - current year

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

171,418,918

149,735,475

171,418,918

149,735,475

(171,418,918)

(149,735,475)

(171,418,918)

(149,735,475)

171,418,918

149,735,475

171,418,918

149,735,475

(171,418,918) -

(149,735,475) -

(171,418,918) -

(149,735,475) -

7,095 588 14,117 72,603 21,066 1,873 2 6,949 10,298 51 1,397 1,194,297 508 4 1,330,848

3,740 13,213 58,733 19,110 4,783 3,256 650 13 1,147,334 159 2,854 2,327 1,256,172

Councillor’s Arrear Consumer Accounts. The following councillors had arrear accounts for a period of over 60 days. 30 June 2009 and 30 June 2010 VT Magubane TI Ndlovu BB Zuma PW Moon I Inderjit SR Ntuli SC Gabela TRM Zungu MV Ntshangase M Maphumulo CT Dlamini H Ngubane (Sekure Afrique Outdoor Advertising) M Inderjith MA Tarr MB Mkhize MA Dirks BS Ngubane

7,095 588 14,117 72,603 21,066 1,873 2 6,949 10,298 51 1,397 1,194,297 508 4 1,330,848

3,740 13,213 58,733 19,110 4,783 3,256 650 13 1,147,334 159 2,854 2,327 1,256,172

40. Prepaid Electricity Commissions - are calculated on sales from prepaid electricity sales made by vendors on behalf of the Council. The commissions are included in the general expenses category of the statement of financial performance. In the 2006/2007 financial year two vendors had defaulted in depositing amounts received from prepaid sales. As a result no commission was paid to them. The defaulting vendors are Sweet waters and Phayiphini who had ceased trading in January 2007 and October 2006 respectively. The amounts of R55 723 and R75 896 respectively are deemed to be irrecoverable for the 2005/2006 financial year. Also the amounts of R13 980 and R15 671 being the movements for the 2006/2007 year are deemed irrecoverable . The matter is being handled by the legal division.

68


69 Group Figures in Rand

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

35,350,000

68,699,890

35,350,000

41. Commitments Authorised capital expenditure Already contracted for but not provided for • Property, plant and equipment

68,699,890

This committed expenditure relates to infrastructure assets and will be financed by available bank facilities. Operating leases – as lessee (expense) Minimum lease payments due • within one year • in second to fifth year inclusive

2,310,593 1,950,085 4,260,678

1,430,205 1,430,205

2,310,593 1,950,085 4,260,678

1,430,205 1,430,205

Operating lease payments represent rentals payable by the group for certain of its office properties. Leases are negotiated for an average term of two years and rentals are linked to an increase for an average of two years. Operating lease payments represents payment for a contract namely H. Collins (Compen Building). No contingent rent is payable. Operating lease payments represent rentals payable by the group for rental of photocopy machines and fax machines. The contract has been extended for a period of four months. 42. Contingencies Refer to appendix J for list of contingent liabilities. 43. Related parties The NCT tree farming (Pty) Ltd manages timber plantations established on Council owned land on behalf of the Council by a management agreement. NCT is entitled to a 5% management fee based on net profit. Safe City has been formed as a partnership with the business community to combat crime in the city. Council allocates a grant in aid to the entity. NCT - 5% of management fee Safe City - grant

71,767 3,000,000 3,071,767

556,010 3,000,000 3,556,010

71,767 3,000,000 3,071,767

556,010 3,000,000 3,556,010

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Group Figures in Rand

2010

Municipality 2010 2009

2009

44. Prior period errors During the year ended 30 June 2010, the following transactions were erroneously expensed in the statement of financial position and statement of financial performance. The comparative amounts have been re-stated as follow: Statement of financial position

-

798,448,189

-

798,448,189

Statement of financial performance

-

(6,971,285)

-

(6,971,285)

-

5,949

-

5,949

-

(338,872)

-

(338,872)

-

(332,923)

-

(332,923)

-

(6,344,483)

-

(6,344,483)

-

(8,276)

-

(8,276)

-

1,471,140

-

1,471,140

-

(2,235,944) (7,117,563)

-

(2,235,944) (7,117,563)

-

(970,551)

-

(970,551)

-

(605,190) (86,460)

-

(605,190) (86,460)

-

(289,020)

-

(289,020)

-

(508,308)

-

(508,308)

-

270,711

-

270,711

-

(2,188,818)

-

(2,188,818)

Restatement of expenditure iro 2007/08 during 2009/10 General ledger been adjusted to match stores report Recoveries of over charge for security cash in transit

Restatement of revenue iro 2007/08 during 2009/10 Billing for water consumption for vulindlela receipted by Umgeni Water Payments and interest received on funds advanced to PMB chamber of commerce Prepaid electricity sales - vendors under investigation Timing difference of receipting

Restatement of expenditure iro 2008/09 during 2009/10 Cancelling goods received notes created but not processed for payment Expenditure recovered from grant Non payment of commission on prepaid electricity sales Over accrual of expenditure being adjusted retrospectively Recoveries of over charge for security cash in transit Under accrual of expenditure being adjusted retrospectively

70


71 Group Figures in Rand

2010

Restatement of revenue iro 2008/09 during 2009/10 Prepaid electricity sales - vendors under investigation Property rates revenue corrections Restatement of power supply in reference to illegal tampering of meters

Restatement of the trade and other receivables from non exchange transactions iro 1995/96 to 2000/01 during 2009/10 Clearing of general ledger balances with debit amounts Restatement of the trade and other receivables from non exchange transactions iro 2000/01 during 2009/10 Clearing of general ledger balances with debit amounts Restatement of the trade and other payables iro 1994/95 to 2007/08 during 2009/10 Clearing of general ledger balances with credit amounts Restatement of the trade and other payables iro 2004/05 during 2009/10 Clearing of general ledger balances with credit amounts Restatement of the trade and other payables iro 2005/06 during 2009/10 Clearing of general ledger balances with credit amounts Stale cheques re-issued for deposit refunds

Restatement of the trade and other payables iro 2006/07 during 2009/10 Clearing of general ledger balances with credit balances Restatement of the PPE iro 2007/08 during 2009/10 Correction of land fill site assets

Municipality 2010 2009

2009

-

(41,317)

-

(41,317)

-

2,509 (747,468)

-

2,509 (747,468)

-

(786,276)

-

(786,276)

-

(14,905)

-

(14,905)

-

(443)

-

(443)

-

(47,677)

-

(47,677)

-

(142,467)

-

(142,467)

-

(104,982)

-

(104,982)

-

381 (104,601)

-

381 (104,601)

-

(50,929)

-

(50,929)

-

36,713,408

-

36,713,408

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Group Figures in Rand Restatement of the trade and other payables iro 2007/08 during 2009/10 Clearing of general ledger balances with credit amounts Stale cheques re-issued for deposit refunds

Restatement of the reserves iro 2007/08 during 2009/10 Corrections on debi market development and maintenance reserve Restatement of the trade and other payables iro 2008/09 during 2009/10 Clearing of general ledger balances with credit amounts Clearing of control votes Closing entries for market Input VAT credit not claimed from SARS now being claimed Over accrual of expenditure being adjusted retrospectively Payment of objections receipted into incorrect vote Payment of surety receipted into incorrect vote Stale cheques re-issued for deposit refunds Under accrual of expenditure being adjusted retrospectively

Restatement of the trade and other receivables from non exchange transactions iro 2008/09 during 2009/10 Clearing of general ledger balances with debit amounts Reversal of a bad debt write off on a government account in error

Restatement of the finance lease obligations iro 2008/09 during 2009/10 Correction of calculation error on operating leases Restatement of expenditure iro prior to 2007/2008 in 2009/2010 Depreciation relating to motor vehicles and equipment that were previously classified as non capital items

72

2010

Municipality 2010 2009

2009

-

(2,908)

-

(2,908)

-

(12,148) (15,056)

-

(12,148) (15,056)

-

126,887

-

126,887

-

(15,203)

-

(15,203)

-

(2,250,478) 387,655 (49,577)

-

(2,250,478) 387,655 (49,577)

-

(121,666)

-

(121,666)

-

2,000

-

2,000

-

30,000 358,623 112,770

-

30,000 358,623 112,770

-

(1,545,876)

-

(1,545,876)

-

173,335

-

173,335

-

1,808,752

-

1,808,752

-

1,982,087

-

1,982,087

-

10,000

-

(10,000)

-

17,500,785

-

17,500,785


73 Group Figures in Rand

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

Restatement of expenditure iro 2007/2008 in 2009/10 Depreciation relating to motor vehicles and equipment that were previously classified as no capital items.

-

2,938,968

-

2,938,968

Restatement of PPE iro 2007/2008 in 2009/10 Retrospective application of GRAP 17 to the infrastructure assets- increase in cost of assets.

-

769,249,414

-

769,249,414

Restatement of PPE iro prior to 2005/2006 Motor vehicles and equipment that were previously classified as non capital items.

-

(33,938,342)

-

(33,938,342)

Restatement of expenditure iro 2008/2009 in 2009/10 Depreciation relating to motor vehicles and equipment that were previously classified as no capital items

-

2,938,968

-

2,938,968

45. Events after the reporting date The valuation roll entry for a property included in the investment property is reflected in the valuation roll at a market value of R220 million. The effective date of the valuation roll is 01 July 2009. A tolerance check was done by the valuation section and it was discovered that the property was incorrectly valued and corrective measures were taken to adjust this value with the correct value of R5 580 000 in the supplementary valuation roll (4) which will become effective on 1 April 2011. The asset register will be adjusted therefore in the 2010/2011 financial year. 46. Irregular expenditure Total irregular expenditure

17,281,518

4,077,827

17,281,518

4,077,827

Reconciliation of irregular expenditure Opening balance Irregular expenditure for current year Approval/repayment during current year Irregular expenditure awaiting condonement

4,077,827 13,203,691 17,281,518

4,077,827 4,077,827

4,077,827 13,203,691 17,281,518

4,077,827 4,077,827

-

450,033

-

450,033

2009: Deviation from normal procurement process Overseas trip taken for Martin Luther King Junior celebration - 19 January 2009 to Atlanta/ Washington/Miami by former Mayor and two councillors (Additional travel not authorised)

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Group Figures in Rand 2009: Procurement irregularities Various questionable quotes Contravention of section 112(f) of the MFMA Various unexplained differences between order/ invoice/quotes

2009: Non adherence to supply chain management policy Various suppliers 2009: Abuse of emergency/urgent procurement provisions The following not qualify for urgent/emergency procurement Advertisement of IDP Four built-in braai stands at hatchery Uniforms for beverage ladies Donation

2010: Procurement irregularities Meter reading contract - payment for the following Data concentrator unit Computers Software Other irregularities Awards to persons in service of state Extension of contract

2010

Municipality 2010 2009

2009

-

592,500 450,034 1,277,510

-

592,500 450,034 1,277,510

-

2,320,044

-

2,320,044

-

1,204,697

-

1,204,697

-

74,520 24,480 3,053 1,000 103,053

-

74,520 24,480 3,053 1,000 103,053

685,847 114,308 5,130,000

-

685,847 114,308 5,130,000

-

6,340,203 933,333 13,203,691

-

6,340,203 933,333 13,203,691

-

The Administrator is currently investigating all procurement procedures. 47. Fruitless and wasteful expenditure Total fruitless and wasteful expenditure

2,560,609

15,168

2,560,609

15,168

Reconciliation of fruitles and wasteful expenditure Opening Balance Fruitless and wasteful expenditure current year Approval/repayment during current year Fruitless and wasteful expenditure awaiting condonement/repayment

15,168 2,545,441 2,560,609

15,168 15,168

15,168 2,545,441 2,560,609

15,168 15,168

74


75 Group Figures in Rand Interest on: late payment of Telkom accounts Interest on: late payment of Umgeni Water account Interest on: late payment of CBRE Valuation roll account SAP HR Management System

2010

Municipality 2010 2009

2009

46,949 157,511

15,168 -

46,949 157,511

15,168 -

70,670

-

70,670

-

2,270,311 2,545,441

15,168

2,270,311 2,545,441

15,168

No action has been taken to date. 48. Unauthorised expenditure None to report on. 49. Municipal entity The Safe City project PMB was declared a municipal entity in terms of the MFMA and was incorporated as a section 21 company and was initiated in partnership with the business sector to create a safer CBD. 50. Electricity & water losses Electricity losses Units purchased - kWh Units sold - kWh Loss - kWh Electricty loss as a percentage Electricity loss in rand value

1,735,836,294 1,531,293,203 204,543,091 12 66,483,628

1,679,141,913 1,518,447,404 160,694,509 10 60,052,372

1,735,836,294 1,531,293,203 204,543,091 12 66,483,628

1,679,141,913 1,518,447,404 160,694,509 10 60,052,372

The acceptable norm of electricity loss is 3%.The significant electricity losses of 204,543,091 kWh (2009: 160,694,509 kWh) occurred during the year under review, which resulted material revenue losses to the municipality. The loss above the norm is due to theft, distribution losses, illegal tampering of electricty meters and can also be attributable to the ageing infrastructure. Water losses Units purchased -Kl Units sold - Kl Losses - Kl Apparent losses - Kl Real losses - Kl Water loss as a percentage Water loss in rand value

58,492,009 37,865,504 20,626,505 (1,393,193) 19,233,312 33 63,066,030

58,492,009 37,865,504 20,626,505 (1,393,193) 10,413,860 19 32,422,512

58,492,009 37,865,504 20,626,505 (1,393,193) 19,233,312 33 63,066,030

55,426,244 43,619,191 11,807,053 (1,393,193) 10,413,860 19 32,422,512

The acceptable norm in developing countries of water loss is 20%.The significant water losses of 19,233,312 kl (2009: 10,413,860 kl) occurred during the year under review, which resulted material revenue losses to the municipality. The loss above the norm is due to theft, distribution losses, illegal tampering of water meters and can also be attributable to the ageing infrastructure.

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Group Figures in Rand

2010

Municipality 2010 2009

2009

Water and electricity distribution management was implemented by the Provincial Intervention Team(PIT). PIT has identified and stopped several illegal connections. A 5 year strategic plan for reduction of non-revenue water and a similar plan for electricity management has been drafted for the next 5 years. Operation Pitbull was established to: • audit all electricity and water meters and conduct a data clean-up • check electricity mini circuit breaker (MCB) values • check for illegal tampering of meters • check for theft of electricity and water Action taken against perpetrators is as follows: • Consumers with a direct connection where the meter has been by-passed. • An average consumption was back charged for a maximum period of three years • The MCB charge was back charged for a maximum period of three years with a maximum MCB value of 100 amps. • Both electricity and water services were removed where theft of consumption was found. • These consumers were subjected to a further audit within 14 days and if theft had resumed the following action was taken • • • •

Services removed Illegal cable removed Consumers were cautioned that they would be criminally charged for theft Domestic consumers were charged an additional fee of R10000 and Commercial consumers R250000

• Consumers with MCB’s of a higher value than billed for • The consumer was back charged for three years at 100Amps. • Consumers were cautioned and advised to do a load test to establish the correct MCB requirement • Consumers were requested to make application for the correct size MCB • Consumers where meters had been tampered with • An average consumption was back charged for a maximum period of three years • These consumers were subjected to a further audit within 14 days • Consumers were cautioned not to tamper with their meters. • Electricity theft by informal settlements • All cable was removed • Residents were warned not steal and threatened with criminal charges Criminal steps have not been instituted against perpetrators Inventory losses Central Stores - net write up of general ledger

76

110,444

-

110,444

-


77 Group Figures in Rand

2010

Municipality 2010 2009

2009

The background to this adjustment is that during this period there was a lack in management and internal controls were very weak added to this is that there was no segregation of duties. Procedures and processes were not followed and there was a total breakdown of controls. This could have been a combination of theft and gross inefficiency regarding the recording of transactions. Cable stores - net write down of general ledger

(372,587)

-

(372,587)

-

This variance arose through the theft of cable from the cable yard. Copper is a high value commodity in the scrap metal market place. The thefts took place over a period of time and all have been reported to the South African Police as well as our Internal Security. Edendale stores - net write down of general ledger

(25,153)

-

(25,153)

-

The above variance was due to the lack of management and internal controls at this store. After the retirement of the senior storeman at Edendale the junior staff were relocated but the stock was left there, We had a break in and all the copper water fittings were stolen. This matter was reported to Internal Security as well as the South African Police. Quarterly inventory counts are to be performed going forward. An inventory management plan has been drafted which indicate the procedures that have been implemented with regard to receipts, issuing, safegarding and physical verification of stores items. Monthly reconciliations are also being performed. A inventory policy is being drafted as part of the Supply Chain Management policies and procedures. 51. Traffic fines outstanding As per NATIS - traffic department Notice of intention to prosecute - 341’s Notice before summons Section 54 notices - summons Unfinalised fines Warrant of arrests

1,270,470 300 414,950 609,300 4,013,650 6,308,670

293,590 16,250 2,746,530 9,229,940 87,150 12,373,460

1,270,470 300 414,950 609,300 4,013,650 6,308,670

293,590 16,250 2,746,530 9,229,940 87,150 12,373,460

52. Comparative figures Certain comparative figures have been reclassified. The effects of the reclassification are as follows: Statement of financial position Trade and other payables and unspent conditional grants In the 2008/2009 financial year - trade & other payables decreased & unspent conditional grants - other increased by the Grant- Spoornet

(395,092)

-

(395,092)

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Group Figures in Rand

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

53. Accumulated surplus/deficit - internal reserves Implementation of GRAP - Ring fencing of reserves Accumulated surplus Self insurance reserve COID Government grant reserve Capital replacement reseerve

5,254,018,137 43,045,176 554,976,749 12,635,718 5,864,675,780

5,546,588,712 25,726,622 5,311,952 563,802,908 12,635,718 6,154,065,912

5,253,164,149 43,045,176 554,976,749 12,635,718 5,863,821,792

5,545,720,289 25,726,622 5,311,952 563,802,908 12,635,718 6,153,197,489

54. Going concern The Msunduzi Municipality currently are experiencing serious financial challenges which have necessitated Provincial Government intervention in terms of section 139 (1) (b) of the Constitution. The financial crises came to be because of poor controls, rampant corruption amongst senior staff, failure to prepare the mid-year adjustments budget and the 2010/11 budget in time and other issue relating to poor internal control and procedures, which has placed tremendous pressure on the municipality’s liquidity ratio and financial sustainability. Although certain of the strategies have already being implementation by the Provincial Intervention Team, it is the assumption that it will take sometime for the municipality to recover. The Provincial Intervention Team appointed by the Provincial Department of Corporate Governance drafted four Strategies consisting of a Financial Strategy, an Infrastructure Development Strategy, a Community Service Strategy and a Good Governance Strategy. With regards to financial strategic is the following financial measures being implemented to achieve the turn around strategic of the municipality: 1. The MIG funds for the 2010/11 financial year is reprioritised in order to use funds for revenues enhancement projects including proper contract management 2. A comprehensive Debt Collection strategy has been developed to ensure a much more effective debt collection. This would result in increased levels in debt collection. 3. A project of fortifying electricity meters starting with high risk areas is implemented as a way of reducing electricity losses, thefts and illegal connections 4. A project for installing water district meters in order to establish water losses in the various distribution regions will be implemented in order to cope with the current water losses. 5. A new tariff structure has been developed for electricity and such structures will also be developed for water, sewer and refuse so that the correct revenue may be billed and collected. The tariff structures will take into consideration the funding of expenditure required for 2010/11, budget deficit for 2009/10 and affordability to the community. 6. The indigent policy will be reviewed so that only those who are legible actually benefit. 7. Priority will be given to the updating of the valuation roll so that the municipality’s revenue may be levied accurately, lesser objections and increased collections. A fully fledged exercise to recover debt will be in place from 1 July 2010.

78


79 Group Figures in Rand

2010

2009

Municipality 2010 2009

8. Feasibility studies are currently performed in order to consider the viability of the airport, market and forestry. 9. Where need be, will loose relationships with several institutions be formalised in order to save cost. 10. Land or other assets identified can be disposed of to generate additional revenue for capital projects, R 20 million worth of land will be sold in the 2010/11 financial year. These sales were identified earlier in the 2009/10 financial year. 11. Council will reduce council funded projects to a minimal and maximise utilisation of external funding. 12. The Budget will focus on service delivery provision and nice to have items is eliminated from the budget. 13. An effective Supply Chain Management will be in place to eliminate abuse, corruption and theft. 14. Policies which were draining the council’s cash, such as Locomotion , Overtime and Travel and Subsistence is being reviewed.

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


80

Net cash from (used) operating Net cash from (used) investing Net cash from (used) financing Cash/cash equivalents at the year end

Cash flows Cash/cash equivalents at the beginning of the year

Transfers recognised -capital Public contributions & donations Borrowing Internally generated funds Total sources of capital funds

276,439,080 164,790,505 (327,794,152) 156,475,380 269,910,813

112,866,705 182,896,649 (262,509,799) 131,996,661 165,250,216

267,714,698

(59,628,584)

112,866,705 182,896,649 (262,509,799) 131,996,661 165,250,216

134,035,688

(67,391,912)

(523,983,990)

(523,983,990)

133,679,010

0

0

112,867,232 34,430,797 (152,521,338) 143,247,502 138,024,193

176,033,494

97,626,257

78,407,237

(235,920,190)

(235,920,190)

405,500,000 420,030,162 1,132,740,512 1,159,300,660 12,682,277 5,453,509 75,487,819 276,021,934 482,296,105 566,351,949 2,108,706,713 2,427,158,214 639,159,070 631,560,166 19,502,202 19,383,701 433,673,936 250,539,606 65,322,793 123,646,386 93,220,724 73,753,994 785,093,103 804,979,363 59,973,480 4,342,216 670,424,405 833,884,199 2,766,369,713 2,742,089,630 (657,663,000) (314,931,415) 133,679,010 79,011,226

7,763,328

127,543,031 (651,527,021)

Share of surplus/ (deficit) of associate Surplus/(Deficit) for the year

125,915,682 201,427,600 327,343,282

(651,527,021)

127,543,031

Transfers recognised -capital Contributions recognised -capital & contributed assets Surplus/(Deficit) after capital transfers & contributions

Capital expenditure & funds sources Capital expenditure

0 0 0 61,588,748 2,069,080 63,657,828 16,976,523 (1,066,671) 423,673,936 (5,743,659) 14,267,375 44,755,806 55,411,550 174,673,317 722,948,177 (659,290,349) 7,763,328

405,500,000 1,132,740,512 12,682,277 13,899,071 480,227,025 2,045,048,885 622,182,547 20,568,873 10,000,000 71,066,452 78,953,349 740,337,297 4,561,930 495,751,088 2,043,421,536 1,627,349 125,915,682

Financial Performance Property rates Service charges Investment revenue Transfers recognised -operational Other own revenue Total Revenue (excluding capital transfers and contributions) Employee costs Remuneration of councillors Debt impairment Depreciation & asset impairment Finance charges Materials and bulk purchases Transfers and grants Other expenditure Total Expenditure Surplus/(Deficit)

R thousands or R

Description

THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY AND ITS MUNICIPAL ENTITY Appendix A: Statement of comparative and actual information 2009/10 Virement Final Budget Actual Original Budget Outcome Budget Adjustments (i.t.o. (i.t.o. s28 and Council s31 of the approved MFMA) by-law) 1 2 3 4 5 6

0

0

Unauthorised expenditure

527 (148,465,852) 109,988,461 11,250,841 (27,226,023)

(36,409,431) 0 (91,681,204)

(55,271,773)

288,063,800

288,063,800

14,530,162 26,560,148 (7,228,768) 200,534,115 84,055,844 318,451,501 (7,598,904) (118,501) (183,134,330) 58,323,593 (19,466,730) 19,886,260 (55,631,264) 163,459,794 (24,280,083) 342,731,585 (54,667,784)

7

Variance

8

100 19 58 109 84

66

73

59

45

45

104 102 43 366 117 115 99 99 58 189 79 103 7 124 99 48 59

Actual Outcome as % of Final Budget

41 21 47 92 51

54

48

62

(185)

(185)

104 102 43 1,986 118 119 102 94 2,505 174 93 109 95 168 134 (19,352) 63

9

Actual Outcome as % of Original Budget

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


81 Reconciliation of budget surplus/deficit with the surplus/deficit in the statement of financial performance Note Net surplus/deficit per the statement of financial performance Adjusted for: Revenue variances Fair value adjustments Income Surplus on the sale of assets Add : Revenue variances Adjusted for: Expenditure variances Impairments recognised Loss on sale of asset Less : Expenditure variances Debt Impairment- Actual Debt Impairment- Budget Net surplus/deficit per approved budget Note 1 Revenue Property Rates Property Rates - Penalties and Collection Charges Service Charges Rentals Received Interest earned - External Investments Interest earned - Outstanding debtors Fines 7,084,343 8,808,324 -1,723,981 Income for Agency Services Governments Grants & Subsidies Other Income Total Revenue

-235,920,190

1

2

256,082,893 -793,323 -2,119,592 258,995,808

-431,460,221 397,381 182,181 -672,579,389 250,539,606 -10,000,000 -411,297,518

Actual 420,030,162 20,284,950 1,159,300,660 15,571,328 5,453,509 22,464,504

Budget 405,500,000 33,906,200 1,132,740,512 18,298,212 12,682,277 19,811,757

Variance 14,530,162 -13,621,250 26,560,148 -2,726,884 -7,228,768 2,652,747

1,435,383 355,033,160 496,598,526 2,503,256,524

500,000 281,665,510 848,339,541 2,762,252,333

935,383 73,367,650 -351,741,015 -258,995,809

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Note 2 Expenditure Executive & Council Budget & Treasury Office Corporate Services Planning & Development Health Community & Social Services Housing Public Safety Sport and Recreation Environmental Protection Waste Management Waste Water Management Road Transport Water Electricity Other/Air Transport Other/Forestry Other/Markets Other/Licensing & Regulation Less: Inter-Dept Charges Total Expenditure

82

Actual 62,839,354 279,106,845 82,228,986 63,695,904 39,627,952 49,852,310 62,127,176 104,979,254 50,390,226 60,453,737 166,170,520 36,984,566 174,015,686 279,281,205 981,414,822 8,812,084 9,303,547 16,626,990 2,938,550 -39,879,251 2,490,970,462

Budget 65,665,577 1,074,043,667 87,862,732 63,724,205 39,947,466 48,499,679 54,581,756 106,666,204 50,399,992 61,665,517 168,047,707 36,922,375 171,115,189 239,154,958 862,046,649 8,213,962 4,649,983 13,787,441 2,937,507 3,617,285 3,163,549,851

Variance 2,826,223 794,936,822 5,633,746 28,301 319,514 -1,352,631 -7,545,420 1,686,950 9,766 1,211,780 1,877,187 -62,191 -2,900,497 -40,126,247 -119,368,173 -598,122 -4,653,564 -2,839,549 -1,043 43,496,536 672,579,389


83

EXTERNAL LOANS

LONG-TERM LOANS DBSA - 15.5% DBSA - 15.5% DBSA - 15.5% DBSA - 16.5% DBSA - 16.5% DBSA - 16.5% DBSA - 14.27% DBSA - 14.27% DBSA - 14.27% DBSA - 14.27% DBSA - 10.75% DBSA - 9.31% DBSA - 8.7% DBSA - 10.79% DBSA - 6.75% DBSA -12.02% DBSA - 6.75% DBSA - 12.10% DBSA Total RMB/INCA - 16.35% RMB/INCA - 13.39% INCA - 11.65% RMB/INCA Total INCA - 11.75% INCA - 14.50% RMB/HULETTS - 8.71% RMB/HULETTS Total Metro Transport Fund - 5.5% Eastwood Library DSB DSB DSB Temporary borrowings-FNB Other loans total Total Long-term Loans

THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY AND ITS MUNICIPAL ENTITY APPENDIX B SCHEDULE OF EXTERNAL LOANS AS AT 30 JUNE 2010 ACCOUNT NO Loan Number Redeemable Balance at 30/06/09

PMB8108710930 PMB8108710930 PMB8108710930 PMB8108710930 PMB8108710930 PMB8108710930 PMB8108710930 PMB8108710930 PMB8108710930 PMB8108710930 PMB7878719598 PMB8108710930 PMB8108710930 PMB8108710930 PMB8108710930 PMB8108710930 PMB8108710930 PMB8108710930

11158 11159 11160 13446 13447 13448 14039/101 14039/102 102091 102416 11649 101922 102797 103059/1 103059/2 103594/1 103594/2 103721

30/09/2018 31/03/2019 31/03/2019 31/03/2020 31/03/2020 31/03/2020 31/12/2014 31/12/2015 2/11/2020 28/06/2021 30/6/2013 30/09/2020 30/09/2022 9/30/2023 9/30/2023 12/31/2024 12/31/2024 3/31/2025

PMB8108710929 PMB8108710929 PMB8108710929

Piet-00-0001 Msun-00-0001 Msun-00-0001

12/31/2010 12/31/2010 12/31/2013

PMB8108710997 PMB81087 0996 PMB8108710931

PMB107XA-S PMB107XB-S Sub-station

11/1/2007 11/1/2007 6/30/2013

Plessislaer Plessislaer Ashburton

2008 2008 2008

PMB8108710906 PMB7878719599 PMB7878719598 PMB8108710001

R 10,928,249 13,531,667 11,532,436 21,461,838 9,148,341 13,545,340 39,674,038 1,125,775 4,856,283 45,162,165 23,810 22,245,188 85,059,285 63,070,779 15,679,032 357,044,227 19,132,632 13,921,781 17,734,329 50,788,742 5,751,944 5,751,944 50,000,000 50,000,000 463,584,914

Received during the period R

112,500,000 37,500,000 76,095,421 226,095,421

Redeemed written off during the period R 563,321 632,944 539,430 783,583 334,011 494,548 2,526,851 117,470 234,637 2,218,590 2,451 1,163,300 3,509,373 923,004 323,013 14,366,527 9,450,374 4,191,877 3,200,255 16,842,506

966,639

50,000,000 50,000,000 226,095,421 81,209,033

Balance at 30/06/10

R 10,364,928 12,898,723 10,993,006 20,678,255 8,814,330 13,050,792 37,147,186 1,008,305 4,621,647 42,943,575 21,359 21,081,888 81,549,912 62,147,775 15,356,019 112,500,000 37,500,000 76,095,421 568,773,121 9,682,259 9,729,904 14,534,074 33,946,237 4,785,305 4,785,305 607,504,663

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 EXTERNAL LOANS

LEASE LIABILITY Standard Bank - 9.4488% Standard Bank - 8.9819% Standard Bank - 8.9471% Standard Bank - 8.9073% Standard Bank - 9.1192% Standard Bank - 9.1182% Standard Bank - 8.5791% Standard Bank - 8.3560% Standard Bank - 8.3376% Standard Bank - 8.3878% Standard Bank - 8.3104% Standard Bank - 8.4305% Standard Bank - 8.4150% Standard Bank - 8.4403% Standard Bank - 8.3305% Standard Bank - 8.3299% Standard Bank - 8.3750% Standard Bank Total Nedbank - 10.000% Nedbank - 10.000% Nedbank - 10.000% Nedbank - 10.000% Nedbank - 10.000% Nedbank - 10.000% Nedbank - 10.000% Nedbank - 10.000% Nedbank - 10.000% Nedbank - 10.000% Nedbank - 10.000% Nedbank - 10.500% Nedbank - 10.413% Nedbank - 10.413% Nedbank - 10.413% Nedbank - 10.413% Nedbank - 10.413% Nedbank - 10.413% Nedbank - 10.413% Nedbank - 10.413% Nedbank - 10.413% Nedbank - 10.413% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369%

84

THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY AND ITS MUNICIPAL ENTITY APPENDIX B SCHEDULE OF EXTERNAL LOANS AS AT 30 JUNE 2010 ACCOUNT NO Loan Number Redeemable Balance at 30/06/09

PMB 810 871 0947 PMB 810 8710949 PMB 810 8710950 PMB 810 871 0951 PMB 810 871 0952 PMB 810 871 0953 PMB 810 871 0954 PMB 810 871 0955 PMB 810 871 0956 PMB 810 871 0957 PMB 810 871 0958 PMB 810 871 0959 PMB 810 871 0960 PMB 810 871 0961 PMB 810 871 0962 PMB 810 871 0963 PMB 810 871 0964

Stannic 6 Stannic 7 Stannic 8 Stannic 9 Stannic 10 Stannic 11 Stannic 12 Stannic 13 Stannic 14 Stannic 15 Stannic 16 Stannic 17 Stannic 18 Stannic 19 Stannic 20 Stannic 21 Stannic 22

31/03/2009 7/10/2009 5/31/2009 8/31/2009 2/28/2010 3/31/2010 3/31/2010 3/23/2010 4/30/2010 4/30/2010 4/21/2010 4/30/2010 5/31/2010 6/30/2010 8/31/2010 8/31/2010 8/31/2010

PMB 810 871 0965 PMB 810 871 0966 PMB 810 871 0967 PMB 810 871 0968 PMB 810 871 0969 PMB 810 871 0970 PMB 810 871 0971 PMB 810 871 0972 PMB 810 871 0973 PMB 810 871 0974 PMB 810 871 0975 PMB 810 871 0976 PMB 810 871 0977 PMB 810 871 0978 PMB 810 871 0979 PMB 810 871 0980 PMB 810 871 0981 PMB 810 871 0982 PMB 810 871 0983 PMB 810 871 0984 PMB 810 871 0985 PMB 810 871 0986 PMB 810 871 0138 PMB 810 871 0139 PMB 810 871 0137 PMB 810 871 0104 PMB 810 871 0102 PMB 810 871 0103 PMB 810 871 0105 PMB 810 871 0109 PMB 810 871 0107 PMB 810 871 0110 PMB 810 871 0108 PMB 810 871 0106

Nedbank 1 Nedbank 2 Nedbank 3 Nedbank 4 Nedbank 5 Nedbank 6 Nedbank 7 Nedbank 8 Nedbank 9 Nedbank 10 Nedbank 11 Nedbank 12 Nedbank 13 Nedbank 14 Nedbank 15 Nedbank 16 Nedbank 17 Nedbank 18 Nedbank 19 Nedbank 20 Nedbank 21 Nedbank 22 Nedbank 23 Nedbank 24 Nedbank 26 Nedbank 27 Nedbank 28 Nedbank 29 Nedbank 30 Nedbank 31 Nedbank 32 Nedbank 33 Nedbank 34 Nedbank 35

31/12/2011 31/12/2012 31/12/2013 31/12/2014 31/12/2015 31/12/2016 31/12/2017 31/12/2018 31/12/2019 31/12/2014 24/12/2014 31/12/2017 6/30/2012 6/30/2012 6/30/2012 6/30/2012 6/30/2012 6/30/2012 6/30/2012 6/30/2012 6/30/2012 6/30/2012 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013

67,278 212,009 81,608 22,035 24,148 255,359 123,735 53,885 78,704 156,895 441,672 86,250 69,720 404,273 791,554 363,608 3,232,734 88,182 88,182 88,182 88,182 88,182 88,182 88,182 91,346 91,446 381,942 381,942 1,724,315 107,370 107,370 107,370 107,370 107,370 107,370 107,370 107,370 107,370 107,370 208,754 208,754 208,754 189,637 189,637 189,637 284,727 137,711 137,711 137,711 139,671 281,762

Received during the period

Redeemed written off during the period

-

67,279 212,009 81,608 22,035 24,148 255,359 123,735 53,885 78,704 156,895 406,252 68,269 55,184 320,028 585,458 191,422 2,702,270 32,663 32,663 32,663 32,663 32,663 32,663 32,663 33,835 33,873 54,839 54,839 145,288 32,150 32,150 32,150 32,150 32,150 32,150 32,150 32,150 32,150 32,150 38,098 38,098 38,098 34,610 34,610 34,610 51,964 25,133 25,133 25,133 25,490 51,423

Balance at 30/06/10

35,420 17,981 14,537 84,245 206,095 172,186 530,464 55,518 55,518 55,518 55,518 55,518 55,518 55,518 57,511 57,574 327,103 327,103 1,579,027 75,220 75,220 75,220 75,220 75,220 75,220 75,220 75,220 75,220 75,220 170,655 170,655 170,655 155,027 155,027 155,027 232,763 112,579 112,579 112,579 114,180 230,339


85

EXTERNAL LOANS

Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.556% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.556% Nedbank - 13.556% Nedbank - 13.556% Nedbank - 13.556% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.369% Nedbank - 13.376% Nedbank - 13.376% Nedbank - 13.376% Nedbank - 13.376% Nedbank Total Airport security system Other Finance lease total Total lease liability TOTAL EXTERNAL LOANS

THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY AND ITS MUNICIPAL ENTITY APPENDIX B SCHEDULE OF EXTERNAL LOANS AS AT 30 JUNE 2010 ACCOUNT NO Loan Number Redeemable Balance at 30/06/09

PMB 810 871 0128 PMB 810 871 0100 PMB 810 871 0999 PMB 810 871 0998 PMB 810 871 0997 PMB 810 871 0996 PMB 810 871 0995 PMB 810 871 0994 PMB 810 871 0131 PMB 810 871 0993 PMB 810 871 0129 PMB 810 871 0101 PMB 810 871 0130 PMB 810 871 0991 PMB 810 871 0136 PMB 810 871 0990 PMB 810 871 0988 PMB 810 871 0989 PMB 810 871 0992 PMB 810 871 0987 PMB 810 871 0133 PMB 810 871 0134 PMB 810 871 0135 PMB 810 871 0132 PMB 810 871 0121 PMB 810 871 0119 PMB 810 871 0123 PMB 810 871 0122 PMB 810 871 0113 PMB 810 871 0115 PMB 810 871 0120 PMB 810 871 0125 PMB 810 871 0114 PMB 810 871 0112 PMB 810 871 0124 PMB 810 871 0117 PMB 810 871 0127 PMB 810 871 0126 PMB 810 871 0116 PMB 810 871 0118 PMB 810 871 0111 PMB 810 871 0140 PMB 810 871 0141 PMB 810 871 0142 PMB 810 871 0143

Nedbank 36 Nedbank 37 Nedbank 38 Nedbank 39 Nedbank 40 Nedbank 41 Nedbank 42 Nedbank 43 Nedbank 44 Nedbank 45 Nedbank 46 Nedbank 47 Nedbank 48 Nedbank 49 Nedbank 50 Nedbank 51 Nedbank 52 Nedbank 53 Nedbank 54 Nedbank 55 Nedbank 56 Nedbank 57 Nedbank 58 Nedbank 59 Nedbank 60 Nedbank 62 Nedbank 63 Nedbank 64 Nedbank 65 Nedbank 66 Nedbank 67 Nedbank 68 Nedbank 69 Nedbank 70 Nedbank 71 Nedbank 72 Nedbank 73 Nedbank 74 Nedbank 75 Nedbank 76 Nedbank 77 Nedbank 78 Nedbank 79 Nedbank 80 Nedbank 81

10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013 10/1/2013

PMB 810 871 0002

Khomani

31/03/2012

110,715 62,918 62,918 62,918 62,918 62,918 62,918 62,918 110,715 62,918 110,715 62,918 110,715 62,918 94,382 62,918 62,918 62,918 62,918 62,918 94,382 94,382 94,382 94,382 124,682 124,682 124,682 124,682 124,682 124,682 124,682 124,682 124,682 124,682 124,682 124,682 124,682 124,682 124,682 124,682 124,682 251,968 253,447 247,354 253,670 11,661,015 1,013,343 1,013,343 15,907,092 479,492,006

Received during the period

Redeemed written off during the period

Balance at 30/06/10

20,206 11,483 11,483 11,483 11,483 11,483 11,483 11,483 20,206 11,483 20,206 11,483 20,206 11,483 94,382 11,483 11,483 11,483 11,483 11,483 17,166 17,166 17,166 17,166 22,755 22,755 22,755 22,755 22,755 22,755 22,755 22,755 22,755 22,755 22,755 22,755 22,755 22,755 22,755 22,755 22,755 44,838 45,102 44,017 45,141 2,277,262 334,376 334,376 5,313,908

90,509 51,436 51,436 51,436 51,436 51,436 51,436 51,436 90,509 51,436 90,509 51,436 90,509 51,436 0 51,436 51,436 51,436 51,436 51,436 77,216 77,216 77,216 77,216 101,927 101,927 101,927 101,927 101,927 101,927 101,927 101,927 101,927 101,927 101,927 101,927 101,927 101,927 101,927 101,927 101,927 207,130 208,345 203,337 208,529 9,383,753 678,967 678,967 10,593,183

226,095,421 86,522,941

618,097,846

0 0 0

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


86

Roads Overhead Gantry Concrete Roads Flexible Roads Roads Other Unpaved Roads Other Roads Structures Bridges Signalised Intersections Traffic Lights Airport Runway

Electricity HV Overhead lines HV Substations Power Stations HV Underground Cables Electricity Supply MV Ground mounted transformers Transformer Kiosks MV mini Substations MV Overhead lines MV Substations MV Underground cables MV Pole mounted Transformer MV Ring Main Unit LV Street Lighting Street Lighting

LAND AND BUILDINGS Land Buildings Investment Property Total Land and Buildings

130,000 26,225,077 1,341,509,360 91,055,659 131,646,775 372,879 214,055,672 184,212 31,245,598 1,281,658 50,070,566 1,887,777,455

48,048,265 360,947,390 13,652,159 15,071,085 3,167,623 798,931 3,883,279 106,593,898 21,707,533 120,746,950 706,074,100 13,404,706 8,475,574 29,784,086 960,472 1,453,316,050

180,462,626 274,665,552 534,167,000 989,295,178

Opening balance

238,500 19,429,557 11,674,190

177,257

2,986,034 501,530

11,496,933

15,538,492 165,000

20,486,032

92,949 1,263,737 946,944 1,036,259 7,272,889

1,970,056 2,613,600 585,688

-

989,609

6,022,539

4,615,276 72,150 16,485

989,609

245,557 5,776,982

180,703,003 281,432,143 534,167,000 996,302,146

130,000 26,225,077 1,368,544,785 91,220,659 131,646,775 372,879 217,218,963 184,212 31,747,128 1,281,658 50,309,066 - 1,918,881,202

48,048,265 365,562,666 13,724,309 15,087,570 3,167,623 2,768,987 6,496,879 107,179,585 21,707,533 120,839,898 707,337,837 14,351,650 9,511,833 37,056,976 960,472 - 1,473,802,082

-5,180

-5,180

-5,000 -1,578,580 -131,891,120 -917,711 -29,009,786 -33,738 12,242,095 1,483,069 -4,973,391 -154,684,162

-3,131,033 -34,036,758 -1,925,512 -102,462 -6,974,817 -873,630 -10,308,810 -46,472,243 -977,887 -519,856 -2,120,136 -107,443,144

-

-

-

-

-1,250 -308,030 -20,276,005 -5,967,294 -4,104,780 -8,477 -2,268,564 -4,070 -2,181,632 -42,477 -1,113,063 -36,275,642

-898,191 -6,537,847 -180,112 -262,959 -104,981 -14,035 -20,114 -1,992,073 -416,607 -2,208,387 -13,190,118 -250,415 -176,994 -554,231 -25,466 -26,832,530

-4,253,742

-4,253,742

ACCUMULATED DEPRECIATION Disposals Additions

-62,080,107 -62,080,107

THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY AND ITS MUNICIPAL ENTITY APPENDIX C ANALYSIS OF PROPERY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT AS AT 30 JUNE 2010 COST Additions Under Disposals Closing Opening construction balance balance

-6,250 -1,886,610 -152,167,125 -6,885,005 -33,114,566 -42,215 9,973,531 -4,070 -698,563 -42,477 -6,086,454 -190,959,804

-4,029,224 -40,574,605 -180,112 -2,188,471 -104,981 -116,497 -20,114 -8,966,890 -1,290,237 -12,517,197 -59,662,361 -1,228,302 -696,850 -2,674,367 -25,466 -134,275,674

-66,333,849 -66,333,849

Closing balance

123,750 24,338,467 1,216,377,660 84,335,654 98,532,209 330,664 227,192,493 180,142 31,048,566 1,239,181 44,222,612 1,727,921,398

44,019,041 324,988,061 13,544,197 12,899,099 3,062,642 2,652,490 6,476,765 98,212,695 20,417,296 108,322,701 647,675,476 13,123,347 8,814,983 34,382,609 935,006 1,339,526,408

180,703,003 215,098,293 534,167,000 929,968,296

Carrying value

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


Railway Lines Railway Lines

Stormwater Major Culverts Minor Culverts Kerb Inlets Manholes Open Channels Stormwater Drains Reticulation Head and Wingwalls Rivers

Security Access Control Systems Fencing Security Systems

Water Water Reticulation Water Mains Pump Stations Reservoirs Water Reservoirs Water Supply Bulkwater Pipelines Water Supply Pressure Reduce Valves Water Meters

Sewerage Sewerage Treatment Works Pump Stations Bulk Sewers Sewer reticulation Sewers

5,551,549 5,551,549

40,006,010 662,608 87,218,519 56,558,788 12,649,340 473,418 332,086,073 5,549,544 2,754,682 537,958,982

139,957 6,474,171 40,622,586 47,236,714

342,691,325 4,618,522 9,809,887 118,979,367 3,859,896 441,416,503 2,312,016 -1,249,697 922,437,821

2,380,258 8,213,986 61,788,243 350,084,843 61,365,576 483,832,906

Opening balance

-

1,895,857

659,976

343,823

892,058

38,590 124,339

-

484,923

484,923

-

3,180,340

13,623,371

85,749

657,457

1,018,764 230,325 438,582

47,763,912

5,253,515

2,522,883

46,920,474

5,208,772

9,401,053 2,534,647

380,360 463,078

44,742

-

-

-

-

-

5,551,549 5,551,549

41,382,991 662,608 87,562,342 56,558,788 13,309,316 473,418 332,086,073 5,549,544 2,754,682 540,339,762

225,705 6,474,171 40,661,176 47,361,053

354,615,261 7,153,169 9,809,887 120,655,588 4,090,222 441,855,086 2,312,016 -1,249,697 939,241,532

2,760,618 8,721,807 61,788,243 402,214,090 61,365,576 536,850,333

-5,699,885 -5,699,885

-2,505,340 -154,130 -16,192,650 -10,283,416 -1,011,208 -33,208,608 -1,009,008 -1,126,365 -65,490,725

-111,211 -3,957,793 -38,584,161 -42,653,165

-57,053,444 -1,503,794 -11,261,204 -24,193,252 616,084 1,388,261 -92,007,349

-

-

-

-

-

-54,930 -54,930

-751,183 -4,237 -2,845,118 -1,850,699 -236,206 -15,690 -5,976,529 -181,591 -26,246 -11,887,498

-5,795 -879,018 -407,637 -1,292,450

-2,820,615 -158,386 -83,047 -1,077,025 -83,810 -4,172,612 -195,173 -9,235 -8,599,902

-19,372 -137,094 -710,958 -3,920,978 -217,259 -5,005,661

ACCUMULATED DEPRECIATION Disposals Additions

-442,676 -1,358,217 -4,901,958 -36,834,826 -43,537,677

THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY AND ITS MUNICIPAL ENTITY APPENDIX C ANALYSIS OF PROPERY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT AS AT 30 JUNE 2010 COST Additions Under Disposals Closing Opening construction balance balance

-5,754,815 -5,754,815

-3,256,523 -158,367 -19,037,768 -12,134,115 -1,247,414 -15,690 -39,185,137 -1,190,599 -1,152,611 -77,378,223

-117,006 -4,836,811 -38,991,798 -43,945,615

-59,874,059 -158,386 -1,586,841 -12,338,229 -83,810 -28,365,864 420,911 1,379,026 -100,607,251

-462,048 -1,495,311 -5,612,916 -40,755,804 -217,259 -48,543,338

Closing balance

-203,266 -203,266

38,126,467 504,240 68,524,574 44,424,673 12,061,902 457,728 292,900,936 4,358,945 1,602,072 462,961,538

108,699 1,637,360 1,669,379 3,415,438

294,741,203 6,994,784 8,223,046 108,317,359 4,006,412 413,489,222 2,732,927 129,329 838,634,281

2,298,569 7,226,496 56,175,327 361,458,285 61,148,317 488,306,995

Carrying value

87

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


88

Total Community Assets

Recreational Facilities Swimming Pools Sports Facilities Squash Courts Cemetries Parks Sports Grounds

COMMUNITY ASSETS Buildings Fire Stations Stadiums Public Conveniences Clinics Libraries Community Centres Museums and Art Galleries Beer Halls Cemetries Parks Civic Theatres

Total Infrastructure Assets

Solid Waste Disposal Garden Refuse Landfill Site Sorting Stations

651,599,394

14,790,674 8,797,964 5,882,858 2,921,435 31,885,959 142,199,524 206,478,413

21,360,812 48,364,275 67,000,097 27,321,515 77,695,254 138,405,008 13,163,587 4,571,603 412,138 5,752,833 41,073,860 445,120,981

5,343,561,231

1,886,197 2,693,156 870,400 5,449,753

Opening balance

7,666,770

732,098

109,830 622,268

6,934,672

179,819 714,787 403,432

38,800 367,660 47,850 4,630,748 560,983

2,240,546

-

2,240,546

912,658

29,850

63,103,365

-

1,288,632

60,812,671

-

-

-

-

661,506,710

14,900,504 9,420,232 5,882,858 2,921,435 31,885,959 142,199,524 207,210,511

22,679,294 48,364,275 67,038,897 27,868,994 78,457,891 143,439,188 13,724,570 4,571,603 1,324,796 5,752,833 41,073,860 454,296,199

- 5,467,477,267

-

1,886,197 2,693,156 870,400 5,449,753

-124,164,748

-30,971,202

-3,306,597 -2,379,796 -1,179,764 -24,105,045

-3,951,700 -10,300,873 -11,503,554 -7,258,436 -16,471,173 -34,945,401 2,689,507 -310,837 -127,052 -1,624,508 -9,389,519 -93,193,546

-512,287,783

-

-

-

-

-

-9,014,926

-229,648 -135,586 -94,046 -29,209 -77,796 -1,421,752 -1,988,038

-347,861 -761,139 -1,110,322 -401,213 -1,224,275 -2,054,312 -320,735 -85,200 -5,701 -82,553 -633,579 -7,026,888

-90,042,159

-31,490 -47,747 -14,308 -93,545

ACCUMULATED DEPRECIATION Disposals Additions

-311,416 -305,400 -154,860 -771,676

THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY AND ITS MUNICIPAL ENTITY APPENDIX C ANALYSIS OF PROPERY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT AS AT 30 JUNE 2010 COST Additions Under Disposals Closing Opening construction balance balance

-133,179,674

-3,536,245 -2,515,382 -1,273,810 -29,209 -24,182,841 -1,421,752 -32,959,240

-4,299,561 -11,062,012 -12,613,876 -7,659,649 -17,695,448 -36,999,713 2,368,772 -396,037 -132,753 -1,707,061 -10,023,098 -100,220,434

-602,329,942

-342,906 -353,147 -169,168 -865,221

Closing balance

528,327,036

11,364,259 6,904,850 4,609,048 2,892,225 7,703,117 140,777,771 174,251,271

18,379,734 37,302,263 54,425,020 20,209,345 60,762,442 106,439,475 16,093,342 4,175,566 1,192,043 4,045,772 31,050,762 354,075,765

4,865,147,325

1,543,291 2,340,009 701,232 4,584,532

Carrying value

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


Furniture and Fittings Cabinets and Cupboards Chairs Furniture and Fittings Other Tables and Desks

Office Equipment Air Conditioners Computer Hardware Office Machines

Plant and Equipment Graders Compressors Cremators Farm Equipment General Lawnmowers Laboratory Equipment Radio Equipment Firearms Telecommunication Equipment Tractors

OTHER ASSETS Other Properties Housing Schemes Market Sewage Works and Dump Site Workshops and Depots Hostels Training Centre Landfill Site Old Age Home Transport Facility Crematorium Nurseries Airport Buildings Creches Substations

8,740,922 9,854,108 7,476,599 8,467,264 34,538,893

11,461,172 33,971,785 4,030,417 49,463,374

6,118,266 138,950 1,767,178 103,323 16,976,762 2,279,960 1,457,855 1,424,766 5,627,343 6,393,902 42,288,304

132,069,744 227,347,078 515,501 28,802,917 387,236 9,301,085 39,167,082 924,086 17,997,094 6,245,803 9,811,035 12,415,536 15,717,654 1,114,563 501,816,415

Opening balance

148,938 127,002 13,162 51,870 340,972

-

-

-

-

-453

1,546,458

121,823 628,329 124,413 874,565

-453

-

2,359,963 -18,240,705

-17,983,081

-257,624

1,293,536 120,001 51,449 49,672 31,800

6,061,425

1,668,288

17,000

56,150 3,453,700

70,211

75,791

2,196,961

265,541

617,745

8,889,860 9,981,110 7,489,761 8,519,134 34,879,865

11,582,995 34,600,114 4,154,831 50,337,939

6,118,266 138,950 1,767,178 103,323 18,269,845 2,399,961 1,509,303 1,474,438 31,800 5,627,343 6,393,902 43,834,309

134,009,081 227,964,823 515,501 29,144,250 387,236 9,374,235 24,637,701 924,086 17,997,094 6,316,014 9,811,035 14,083,824 15,717,654 1,114,563 491,997,098

-7,530,050 -9,711,123 -6,864,053 -8,343,133 -32,448,359

-9,758,893 -26,659,137 -3,416,342 -39,834,372

-4,643,365 -5,771,111 -30,995,892

-3,801,557 -138,950 -511,103 -66,045 -11,871,705 -2,278,866 -627,732 -1,285,456

-

-

100

100

120,476

115,324

5,152

-181,525 -20,473 -85,663 -17,750 -305,410

-389,045 -1,545,077 -232,907 -2,167,029

-83,724 -7,454 -1,298,276 -13,167 -170,112 -27,884 -17 -196,762 -62,268 -2,091,296

-231,632

-1,947,087 -3,656,660 -10,229 -445,218 -6,052 -134,547 -216,612 -11,290 -305,511 -99,574 -149,274 -259,350 -228,445 -17,748 -7,487,597

ACCUMULATED DEPRECIATION Disposals Additions

-34,698,924 -44,638,990 -3,977 -6,538,981 -84,576 -2,572,770 -19,349,969 -359,456 -2,692,218 -1,266,239 -2,346,065 -4,293,452 -227,034 -119,072,651

THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY AND ITS MUNICIPAL ENTITY APPENDIX C ANALYSIS OF PROPERY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT AS AT 30 JUNE 2010 COST Additions Under Disposals Closing Opening construction balance balance

-7,711,575 -9,731,596 -6,949,716 -8,360,883 -32,753,769

-10,147,938 -28,204,214 -3,649,248 -42,001,401

-4,033,189 -138,950 -594,827 -73,499 -13,169,881 -2,292,032 -797,844 -1,313,341 -17 -4,840,127 -5,833,380 -33,087,088

-36,640,859 -48,295,650 -14,206 -6,984,199 -90,628 -2,707,317 -19,451,257 -370,746 -2,997,729 -1,365,813 -2,495,339 -259,350 -4,521,897 -244,782 -126,439,772

Closing balance

1,178,285 249,515 540,045 158,251 2,126,096

1,435,056 6,395,900 505,582 8,336,538

2,085,077 1,172,350 29,824 5,099,965 107,928 711,460 161,097 31,783 787,215 560,522 10,747,221

97,368,222 179,669,173 501,295 22,160,051 296,608 6,666,918 5,186,444 553,340 14,999,365 4,950,201 7,315,696 13,824,474 11,195,757 869,782 365,557,326

Carrying value

89

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


90

7,802,513,726

688,383

Agricultural/Biological Assets

Grand Total Assets

176,686

12,817,971 4,449,399 17,267,370

298,109,070

367,564 131,177 1,832,853 2,331,594

14,731,104 21,327,583 33,938,343 696,111 1,130,770 86,907,302 158,731,213

7,928,612 1,279,924 9,208,536

256,014 1,291,141 1,547,155

Servitudes

Intangible Assets Intangible Assets \ Software Computer Software

Movable Assets

General Aircraft Watercraft Rivers Land-Housing Artworks

Motor Vehicles Fire Engines Buses Motor Vehicles Motor Vehicles - corrections Motor Cycles Trailers Trucks and Bakkies

Fire & Ambulance (Medical) Fire Equipment Medical Equipment - Clinics

Containers Household Refuse Bins Bulk Containers

Opening balance

106,643,387

78,040

627,160

184,880 4,515,960 4,700,840

20,673,942

85,000 85,000

16,791,480

128,508

16,662,972

999,929 35,538 1,035,467

-

-223,527

-

-2,098,241

-

-2,097,788

-81,287

-2,016,501

-

-

542,896

803,846

13,002,851 8,965,359 21,968,210

316,857,465

367,564 131,177 1,917,853 2,416,594

29,377,575 21,246,296 33,938,343 696,111 1,259,278 86,907,302 173,424,905

8,928,541 1,315,462 10,244,003

256,014 1,463,835 1,719,849

68,866,177 -20,567,653 7,957,455,637

-

172,694

-

-

-

172,694 172,694

-1,071,478,065

-9,697,221 -3,976,734 -13,673,954

-240,198,822

-420,903

-289,725 -131,177

-15,141,948 -23,378,721 -696,111 -1,062,403 -83,415,361 -127,784,560

-4,090,016

-6,879,865 -1,040,294 -7,920,160

223,262

-

102,786

-

102,686

66,831 35,855

-

-

-10,748,810 -5,557,954 -16,306,764

-250,514,842

-426,091

-294,914 -131,177

-4,591,092 35,855 -16,417,145 -26,317,689 -696,111 -1,082,618 -84,262,833 -133,331,633

-6,949,953 -1,090,586 -8,040,538

-220,014 -654,307 -874,321

Closing balance

-123,850,040 -1,195,104,843

-1,051,590 -1,581,220 -2,632,810

-10,418,806

-5,188

-5,188

-20,215 -847,472 -5,649,759

-1,275,197 -2,938,968

-567,907

-70,087 -50,292 -120,379

-8,998 -70,746 -79,744

ACCUMULATED DEPRECIATION Disposals Additions

-211,016 -583,562 -794,578

THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY AND ITS MUNICIPAL ENTITY APPENDIX C ANALYSIS OF PROPERY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT AS AT 30 JUNE 2010 COST Additions Under Disposals Closing Opening construction balance balance

6,762,350,794

542,896

803,846

2,254,040 3,407,405 5,661,445

66,342,623

1,917,853 1,990,503

72,650 -

24,786,483 35,855 4,829,151 7,620,654 176,660 2,644,469 40,093,272

1,978,589 224,876 2,203,465

36,000 809,527 845,527

Carrying value

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


TOTALS

Other

7,458,492

21,456,165

5,851,668

13,711,893

20,420,383

984,880

17,927,028

1,696,970

696,608

626,575

1,605,606

14,072,735

134,383

-81,287

-2,016,500

-257,624

-5,180

Disposals

880,079,376

1,501,480,820

550,029,461

948,018,286

2,450,228,608

375,500,527

96,058,134

159,758,861

116,886,965

37,410,054

146,548,711

690,045,413

5,410,420

Closing Balance

68,866,177 -20,567,653 7,957,455,637

12,331,806 -18,207,063

22,500

47,763,912

3,180,340

959,508

673,202

1,752,107

179,819

2,002,982

Historical Cost Under Additions Construction

7,802,513,726 106,643,387

878,496,141

1,480,002,156

496,413,881

Waste Water Management

Electricity

931,207,339

2,429,808,225

374,515,647

Water

Environmental Protection

Road Transport

Sport and Recreation

79,188,098

157,646,313

Housing

Public Safety

114,438,249

Community and Social Services

36,603,660

144,948,284

Planning and Development

Health

673,969,695

5,276,037

Opening Balance

Finance and Administration

Executive and Council

Description

Fixed Assets

-35,855

-66,831

-5,152

-3,797,454 -115,424

27,693,480

5,493,344

8,814,568

47,914,509

4,925,531

17,626,436

2,324,355

2,737,847

891,391

1,976,204

6,834,537

415,294

75,467,963

157,218,932

9,309,869

107,556,885

59,738,274

21,286,779

52,731,186

3,181,227

9,105,648

8,331,608

13,625,680

673,521,134

4,029,659

Accumulated Depreciation Closing Additions Disposals Balance

1,071,478,065 123,850,041 -223,262 1,195,104,843

79,380,842

129,525,452

3,816,524

98,778,172

11,823,765

16,361,248

35,171,581

862,024

6,367,801

7,440,217

11,649,476

666,686,597

3,614,365

Opening Balance

THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY AND ITS MUNICIPALITY ENTITY APPENDIX C ANALYSIS OF PROPERTY , PLANT AND EQUIPMENT AS AT 30 JUNE 2010

6,762,350,794

804,611,413

1,344,261,888

540,719,593

840,461,401

354,213,748 0 2,390,490,334

43,326,948

156,577,635

107,781,317

29,078,446

132,923,031

16,524,279

1,380,761

Carrying Value

91

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


92

2009 Actual Expenditure 71,894,906 273,873,011 80,943,578 60,181,338 39,159,997 41,753,179 53,209,000 110,350,124 54,391,961 60,754,635 176,452,596 33,467,476 157,795,952 230,456,909 662,243,682 7,459,879 8,854,197 11,983,079 2,755,502

2,137,981,003

(51,887,001)

2,086,094,002

Actual Income 498,575 707,616,066 4,458,563 14,964,395 8,186,503 12,139,780 38,712,712 20,837,476 1,001,383 5,454 176,224,642 4,464 46,749,102 301,779,365 745,394,999 2,700,058 10,459,592 15,339,356 364,095

2,107,436,579

-

2,107,436,579

2009

21,342,577

(51,887,001)

(30,544,423)

Surplus/(Deficit) (71,396,331) 433,743,055 (76,485,015) (45,216,944) (30,973,494) (29,613,398) (14,496,288) (89,512,648) (53,390,579) (60,749,182) (227,954) (33,463,012) (111,046,850) 71,322,456 83,151,317 (4,759,822) 1,605,395 3,356,278 (2,391,407)

2009

Total

Less: Inter-Dept Charges

Sub - Total

Executive & Council Budget & Treasury Office Corporate Services Planning & Development Health Community & Social Services Housing Public Safety Sport and Recreation Environmental Protection Waste Management Waste Water Management Road Transport Water Electricity Other/Air Transport Other/Forestry Other/Markets Other/Licensing & Regulation

2,506,169,440

-

2,506,169,440

Actual Income 472,147 891,480,253 5,146,291 17,613,308 10,847,230 5,700,151 50,923,742 15,229,229 898,593 11,464 210,410,251 4,752 14,795,000 306,999,496 945,462,701 2,255,854 10,327,267 17,078,611 513,100

2010

2,742,089,630

(39,879,251)

2,781,968,881

(235,920,190)

(39,879,251)

(275,799,441)

2010 2010 Actual Expenditure Surplus/(Deficit) 62,839,354 (62,367,206) 530,226,013 361,254,240 82,228,986 (77,082,696) 63,695,904 (46,082,595) 39,627,952 (28,780,722) 49,852,310 (44,152,158) 62,127,176 (11,203,434) 104,979,254 (89,750,024) 50,390,226 (49,491,633) 60,453,737 (60,442,273) 166,170,520 44,239,731 36,984,566 (36,979,814) 174,015,686 (159,220,686) 279,281,205 27,718,291 981,414,823 (35,952,122) 8,812,084 (6,556,230) 9,303,547 1,023,720 16,626,990 451,621 2,938,550 (2,425,450)

APPENDIX - D Msunduzi Municipality and its municipal entity: Segmental Statement of Financial Performance for the Year Ended 30 June

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


Description

62,839,353.55 530,226,012.68

82,228,986.04 63,695,903.71 39,627,951.85 49,852,309.59 62,127,175.61 104,979,253.52 50,390,226.03 60,453,736.51 166,170,520.12 36,984,566.37 174,015,686.09

Executive & Council Budget & Treasury Office

Corporate Services Planning & Development Health Community & Social Services Housing Public Safety Sport and Recreation Environmental Protection Waste Management Waste Water Management Road Transport

355,033,160

Governments Grants & Subsidies

499,511,441 2,506,169,440

8,808,324 500,000

7,084,343 1,435,383

Public Contributions & Donations Other Income Total Revenue Expenditure

19,811,757

22,464,504

87,862,732.00 63,724,205.00 39,947,466.00 48,499,679.00 54,581,756.00 106,666,204.00 50,399,992.00 61,665,517.00 168,047,707.00 36,922,375.00 171,115,189.00

65,665,577.00 1,084,043,667.00

848,339,541 2,762,252,333

281,665,510

12,682,277

5,453,509

50,189,202 18,298,212

1,132,740,512 803,737,192 209,638,005 69,176,113

1,159,300,660 816,172,839 213,633,343 76,207,067

53,287,411 15,571,328

405,500,000 33,906,200

420,030,162 20,284,950

Interest earned - External Investments Interest earned - Outstanding debtors Fines Income for Agency Services

Refuse Rentals Received

Property Rates Property Rates - Penalties and Collection Charges Service Charges Sale of Electricity Sale of Water Sewerage

Revenue

5,633,745.96 28,301.29 319,514.15 (1,352,630.59) (7,545,419.61) 1,686,950.48 9,765.97 1,211,780.49 1,877,186.88 (62,191.37) (2,900,497.09)

2,826,223.45 553,817,654.32

(348,828,100) (256,082,893)

73,367,650

(1,723,981) 935,383

2,652,747

(7,228,768)

3,098,209 (2,726,884)

26,560,148 12,435,647 3,995,338 7,030,954

14,530,162 (13,621,250)

4.30 51.09 A new vote was created to balance the adjustments budgey shoortfall of R 572m for the bad debts provision due to high levels of expenditure and low collection levels of revenue.( As per the Provincial Intervention Task Team) 6.41 0.04 0.80 (2.79) (13.82) DOH Funding- Expenditure exceeded the budget due to excelerated housing delivery. 1.58 0.02 1.97 1.12 (0.17) (1.70)

(20) Due to termination of TMT contract production (fines) in terms of prosecuting has dropped. 187 This revenue is generated by the fire deparment for emergency call-outs. It is so difficult to do a proper projection based on the nature of revenue. 26 Business Units processed journals towards the end of the financial year without budget at the beginning of the year. In the 2010/2011 financial year provision has been made for capital grants and subsidies. (41)

4 (40) Due to the change in rating, change from municipal valuation to MPRA. The impact could not be assessed. 2 2 2 10 Budget modelling was not conducted.The variation on sewerage service charges stems from the increase in water sales which impacts on sewer consumption. 6 (15) No analysis was done on the debtors, a percentage increase was applied by the previous Chief Finance Officer. (57) The decrease is due to lower interest rates as well as the cash flow crisis that Msunduzi is faced with resulting in less funds being invested. 13 The increase in interest is due to non payment of debt, hence

Appendix - E The Msunduzi Municipality and its municipal entity : Actual versus Budget (Revenue and Expenditure) for the year ended 30 June 2010 Actual 2010 Budget 2010 Variance 2010 Variance Explanation of Significant variances greater than 10% versus Budget 2010 R R R %

93

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


94

Operating Surplus/(Deficit)

(235,920,190.84)

(411,297,518.00)

175,377,327.16

Appendix - E The Msunduzi Municipality and its municipal entity : Actual versus Budget (Revenue and Expenditure) for the year ended 30 June 2010 Actual 2010 Budget 2010 Variance 2010 Variance Explanation of Significant variances greater than 10% versus Budget 2010 Description R R R % Water 279,281,205.31 239,154,958.00 (40,126,247.31) (16.78) Budget for water purchases was not in line as per business units submission however an attempt was made during the budget adjustment to increase the allocation.Salaries overexpenditure re: Overtime, shift, operators, standby and night work allowances for staff attending to emergency work. Electricity 981,414,823.49 862,046,649.00 (119,368,174.49) (13.85) Variance attributed to the shortfall for Electricity Bulk Purchases whereby an attempt was made to adjust the allocation during the budget adjustment process. Increase in the electricity tariff was also a contributing factor. An increase in insurance costs- for property damage, workmens tools. Overtime, shift operators, standby and night work allowances for staff attending to emergency work. As these are essential services they must be attended to as they occur. Other/Air Transport 8,812,083.51 8,213,962.00 (598,121.51) (7.28) Other/Forestry 9,303,546.61 4,649,983.00 (4,653,563.61) (100.08) The original budget figures were not those submitted by the service provider, NCT and hence the true figures are completely different. Other/Markets 16,626,990.14 13,787,441.00 (2,839,549.14) (20.60) This was an exceptionally good year with an increase in produce prices and an active new Agent on the market. Other/Licensing & Regulation 2,938,550.14 2,937,507.00 (1,043.14) (0.04) Less: Inter-Dept Charges (39,879,250.52) 3,617,285.00 43,496,535.52 1,202.46 Over recovery on charge-outs on what income and expenditure was budgeted for. Total Expenditure 2,742,089,630.35 3,173,549,851.00 431,460,220.65

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


TOTALS

Executive and Council Finance and Administration Planning and Development Public Safety Community and Social Services Health Sport and Recreation Road Transport Water Waste Water Management Electricity Housing Other Environment Protection

Description

40,695.90 16,102,275.61 2,234,529.76 16,086,799.83 2,553,702.00 794,463.77 942,636.42 32,581,294.07 16,768,638.67 39,120,271.81 21,458,564.68 2,112,548.50 4,290,978.14 -145,487.00

2010 Actual R

267,715,691.00 154,941,912.16

81,489.00 23,586,960.00 2,805,048.00 18,596,971.00 4,490,235.00 796,465.00 942,639.00 69,646,375.00 20,909,748.00 68,010,468.00 50,863,728.00 2,370,702.00 4,614,863.00 0.00

2010 Budget R 40,793.10 7,484,684.39 570,518.24 2,510,171.17 1,936,533.00 2,001.23 2.58 37,065,080.93 4,141,109.33 28,890,196.19 29,405,163.32 258,153.50 323,884.86 145,487.00

2010 Variance R

68,866,176.69 112,773,778.84

0.00 80,378.54 1,156,261.05 326,218.27 1,156,871.03 684,097.86 0.00 388,732.13 61,422,679.07 0.00 1,575,359.49 731,860.55 1,343,718.70 0.00

2010 Under construction R

42%

50% 32% 20% 13% 43% 0% 0% 53% 20% 42% 58% 11% 7% 0%

2010 Variance %

The reason for the negative figure is the reduction in the biological assets.

All Capital Council Funded projects were stopped by the Provincial Intervention Team due to the Financial constraints the Msunduzi Municipality is facing.

Explanation of Significant Variances greater than 5% versus Budget

THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY APPENDIX F ACTUAL VERSUS BUDGET (ACQUISITION OF PROPERTY , PLANT AND EQUIPMENT ) FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2010

95

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


96

GRANT COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT WORKERS NATIONAL GRANT - MSIG GRANT DPLG AMENDMENT IDP GRANT - FMG UNSPENT CONDITIONAL GRANT - MIG GRANT - DEV.ADMIN CAPACITY BUILDING UNSPENT COND.GRANT - HRD/LGSETA STORM DAMAGE - DOH FUNDING UNSPENT CONDITIONAL GRANT - PHB ELECT.DEMAND SIDE MGT GRANT - NT UNSPENT CONDITIONAL GRANT - DEPT OF MINERALS EDN S - UPGRADE WATER SUPPLY

PG:COMMUNITY COMMUNICATION INITIATIVE UNSPENT CONDITIONAL GRANT - PROVINCE PROVINCE - TRANSPORT GRANT PROV - URBAN RENEWAL PROJECT FOOD AID PROGRAMME UNSPENT GRANT : LIBRARY SERVICES I.D.P. FUND FROM DEPT. OF LG&H GRANT - WATER SERVICE DELIVERY PLANNING GRANT - ASSESSMENT OF SERVICE DELIVERY MECHANISMS

0138960002 0608960013 1318960001 2858960004 3458970006 5138960001 5278980001 7878980801 7878980802

Account Description

0108960001 0108960002 0118960002 0358980801 0608960012 5308960002 5308960003 5608960001 5608960010 7138960005 7138960015 7878960001

Account Number

-50,000.00 -360,166.15 -9,546,485.76 -2,683,788.60 -70,104.49 -11,443.32 -679,258.84 -143,890.06 0.00 -13,545,137.22

-7,818.17 0.00 -50,000.00 -24,147.12 -1,917,809.84 0.00 0.00 -915,845.60 -53,955,816.16 0.00 -468,136.00 -490,763.15 -57,830,336.04

Unspent Balance @ 1 July 2010

0.00 676,588.65 2,927,044.45 417,774.08 125,272.00 11,443.32 0.00 60,905.99 2,061.40 4,221,089.89

0.00 388,073.05 7,580.23 799,999.98 70,917,024.12 118,426.36 72,000.00 0.00 36,585,391.49 1,358,496.28 468,136.00 713,577.98 111,428,705.49

Transfers

0.00 -818,037.89 -13,774,922.74 -83,336.49 -62,636.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 -2,061.40 -14,740,994.52

0.00 -400,000.00 0.00 -775,852.86 -93,833,302.58 -118,426.36 -1,077,000.00 0.00 -25,692,034.20 -12,266,965.80 0.00 -463,077.98 -134,626,659.78

Current Year receipts

-50,000.00 -501,615.39 -20,394,364.05 -2,349,351.01 -7,468.49 0.00 -679,258.84 -82,984.07 0.00 -24,065,041.85

-7,818.17 -11,926.95 -42,419.77 0.00 -24,834,088.30 0.00 -1,005,000.00 -915,845.60 -43,062,458.87 -10,908,469.52 0.00 -240,263.15 -81,028,290.33

Unspent Balance @ 30 June 2010

THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY APPENDIX G DETAILS OF UNSPENT CONDITIONAL GRANTS, RECEIPTS AND TRANSFERS TO INCOME AS AT 30 JUNE 2010

UNSPENT CG - PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT

UNSPENT CG - NATIONAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - NATIONAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - NATIONAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - NATIONAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - NATIONAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - NATIONAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - NATIONAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - NATIONAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - NATIONAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - NATIONAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - NATIONAL GOVERNMENT UNSPENT CG - NATIONAL GOVERNMENT

Source Code

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


0608960014 1258960001 2028960002 2858960001 2858960002 2858960003 5108980101 5118960002 5118960003 5538960001 8328760903 8358760909 8368760911 8378760913 8388760916 8388760920 8398760908 8408760915 8408760922 8418760906 8428010001 8428760842 8438760925

Account Number

UNSPENT CONDITIONAL GRANTS : LIBRARY EXTERNAL UNSPENT GRANT - DEVELOPER CONTRIBUTION RETENTION - MIG - VULINDLELA VIP CONSTR. GEDI - GIJIMA FUNDS E/DALE LAND LEGAL E/DALE PVT LAND LEGAL GRANT - YOUTH ADVISORY COUNCIL UDM - LOCAL TOURISM DEVELOPMENT GRANT - WARD 3 5 6 GRANT - SPOORNET TRUST - CEMETERY TRUST ACCOUNT TRUST - PATRIOTIC LEAGUE TRUST ACCOUNT TRUST - PEARSE TRUST ACCOUNT TRUST - WELCH TRUST ACCOUNT TRUST - MARIA KINSMAN TRUST ACCOUNT TRUST - MARIA KINSMAN TRUST - NET INCOME TRUST - MAYORESS NECESSITY FUND TRUST - CEMETERY TRUST ACCOUNT (M/RISE) TRUST - CEMETERY TRUST ACCOUNT (M/RISE) - INTEREST TRUST - FLEMING TRUST ACCOUNT TRUST - CONT IMBALI FLOOD VICTIMS - PMB FLOOD VICTIMS TRUST - PMB FLOOD DISASTER TRUST - REFUGEES TRUST ACCOUNT

Account Description 3,528,229.03 135,852.88 0.00 39,101.60 158,243.89 5,268,314.04 0.00 967,109.40 0.00 91,000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 10,187,850.84 125,837,646.22

-113,470,182.63

Transfers

-5,675,899.70 -1,004,035.20 -32,810.65 -24,760.70 -341,651.41 -18,623,373.43 0.00 -10,400,000.00 -40,122.84 -395,091.63 -15,456.48 -47,090.23 -1,454,412.66 -371,753.84 -591,487.72 -55,632.00 -79,412.50 -2,293,363.65 -420,291.69 -75,611.89 -60,858.00 -30,989.32 -60,603.83 -42,094,709.37

Unspent Balance @ 1 July 2010

-153,249,496.36

-104,303.01 0.00 0.00 -32,310.77 -8,073.01 -556,749.83 -125,000.00 -3,000,000.00 0.00 -10,904.14 0.00 0.00 -20,552.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 -364.80 -23,584.50 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 -3,881,842.06

Current Year receipts

-140,882,032.77

-2,251,973.68 -868,182.32 -32,810.65 -17,969.87 -191,480.53 -13,911,809.22 -125,000.00 -12,432,890.60 -40,122.84 -314,995.77 -15,456.48 -47,090.23 -1,474,964.66 -371,753.84 -591,487.72 -55,632.00 -79,777.30 -2,316,948.15 -420,291.69 -75,611.89 -60,858.00 -30,989.32 -60,603.83 -35,788,700.59

Unspent Balance @ 30 June 2010

THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY APPENDIX G DETAILS OF UNSPENT CONDITIONAL GRANTS, RECEIPTS AND TRANSFERS TO INCOME AS AT 30 JUNE 2010

UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER UNSPENT CG - OTHER

Source Code

97

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY APPENDIX H DETAILS OF UNSPENT CONDITIONAL GRANTS, RECEIPTS AND TRANSFERS TO INCOME AS AT 30 JUNE 2010 Unspent Balance @ 1 July 2010

Transfers

Current Year receipts

Unspent Balance @ 30 June 2010

NATIONAL GOVERNMENT Various as per Appendix G

(57,830,336) 111,428,705

(134,626,660)

(81,028,290)

PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT Various as per Appendix G

(13,545,137)

4,221,090

(14,740,995)

(24,065,042)

(42,094,709)

10,187,851

(3,881,842)

(35,788,701)

(113,470,183) 125,837,646

(153,249,496)

(140,882,033)

OTHER GRANTS Various as per Appendix G

98


TOTAL CONDITIONAL GRANTS & RECEIPTS

DONATIONS AND PUBLIC CONTRIBUTIONS Other Greater Edendale Private Land Acquisition Iniatiative Freedom Square Tourism Hub- uMgungundlovu Msunduzi Library - Carnegie Corporation of New York TOTAL DONATIONS AND PUBLIC CONTRIBUTIONS

TOTAL NATIONAL/PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT GRANT

Department of Transport Greater Edendale Development Iniatiative Urban Renewal Department of Traditional and Local Govt

PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT

Municipal Infrastructure Grant Department of Water Affairs Department of Human Settlements Department of Minerals and Energy

NATIONAL GOVERNMENT

TRANSFER TO REVENUE - CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

-

-

-

-

-

EXECUTIVE & COUNCIL

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4,848,808

964,484

839,283

125,202

3,884,324

47,893,616 4,176,788

-

47,893,616 4,176,788

12,938,294

135,853

135,853

12,802,441

1,062,960

403,432

11,739,481

3,995,540

7,743,941

ROAD TRANSPORT

1,062,960

-

47,893,616 4,176,788

47,430,538 2,236,817 463,078 1,939,972

WATER

403,432

3,480,892

3,480,892

BUDGET & CORPORATE COMMUNITY WASTE TREASURY SERVICES SERVICES MANAGEMENT OFFICE

THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY APPENDIX I DISCLOSURE OF GRANTS AND RECEIPTS AT 30 JUNE 2010

815,098

-

815,098

815,098

815,098

HOUSING

7,371,512

-

7,371,512

7,371,512 7,371,512

ELECTRICITY

967,109

967,109

967,109

PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT

79,011,225

2,067,446

839,283

967,109

135,853 125,202

76,943,779

1,466,392

1,062,960 403,432

60,892,187 463,078 6,750,610 7,371,512 75,477,387

TOTAL

99

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


100

DONATIONS AND PUBLIC CONTRIBUTIONS Greater Edendale Land Iniatiative and Land Legal Msunduzi Library - Carnegie Corporation of New York Other Greater Edendale Land Iniatiative DBSA

TOTAL NATIONAL/PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT GRANT

Eastwood Library - Provincial Library Service Msunduzi Library - Provincial Library Service Department of Transport Greater Edendale Development Iniatiative - Urban Renewal Water service delivery

PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT

Equitable Share Financial Management Grant Municipal Infrastructure Grant Intergrated Devlopment Plan Local Government SETA Development Admin Capacity Building Municipal Systems Improvement Grant Department of Water Affairs Department of Human Settlements

NATIONAL GOVERNMENT

TRANSFER TO REVENUE - OPERATING EXPENDITURE

114,181,161 774,147

BUDGET & TREASURY OFFICE

36,000

395,653 114,955,308

62,636

-

36,000

36,000

250,500

40,995

-

-

8,391,429

8,391,429

ELECTRICITY

PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT

-

250,500 46,283,895 255,524,029

388,073

206,177,611 774,147 1,606,223 7,580 36,000 -

TOTAL

8,391,429

256,688,285

54,824

62,636 54,824

3,043,768

46,283,895

3,043,768

826,162

60,906 1,164,256

5,274,540

16,674,145 68,823,986

826,162

826,162 14,342

5,274,540

301,708

277,188

14,342

92,661

-

46,283,895 46,283,895

HOUSING

92,661 826,162

ROAD TRANSPORT

170,186

60,906 60,906

16,674,145 68,763,080

1,540,708

68,471,585

WATER

170,186

24,520

24,520

15,133,437

CORPORATE COMMUNITY WASTE SERVICES SERVICES MANAGEMENT

-

-

395,653 114,955,308

388,073

7,580

EXECUTIVE & COUNCIL

THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY APPENDIX I DISCLOSURE OF GRANTS AND RECEIPTS AT 30 JUNE 2010

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


TOTAL DONATIONS AND PUBLIC CONTRIBUTIONS TOTAL CONDITIONAL GRANTS & RECEIPTS

Greater Edendale Land Iniatiative GIJIMA Msunduzi Library - US Consulate Spoornet

BUDGET & TREASURY OFFICE

-

395,653 114,955,308

-

EXECUTIVE & COUNCIL

98,636

62,636

8,684,618

8,382,909

-

16,674,145 68,823,986

-

-

ELECTRICITY

-

PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT

-

TOTAL

826,162

46,374,895

8,391,429

265,224,830

1,500 91,000 8,536,545

91,000 91,000

HOUSING

1,500

ROAD TRANSPORT

8,278

WATER

8,278

CORPORATE COMMUNITY WASTE SERVICES SERVICES MANAGEMENT

THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY APPENDIX I DISCLOSURE OF GRANTS AND RECEIPTS AT 30 JUNE 2010

101

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10

14 I. Ogilvie

THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY APPENDIX J SCHEDULE OF CONTINGENT LIABILITIES AS AT 30 JUNE 2010 MATTER TYPE YEAR ATTORNEY/ADVO- Risk to the municipality as INITIATED CATE INSTRUCTED at 30 June 2010 Delictual Claim 1998 Internal R 50 000, 00 Delictual Claim 2002 Internal R 41 032, 58 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. Counter Claim 2003 TMJ Attorneys R9,279,625 plus interest at 15,5% per annum Delictual Claim 2003 Internal R 11 340, 00 Delictual Claim 2003 Internal R 11 375, 27 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. Delictual Claim 2004 Internal R 98 800, 00 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. Delictual Claim 2004 Lister & Lister Attor- case finalised neys Delictual Claim 2005 Internal R 31 000, 00 Delictual Claim 2005 Internal R 42 704, 96 plus interest Delictual Claim 2005 Lister & Lister Attor- R 34 806, 17 plus interest at neys 15, 5 % per annum. Delictual Claim 2005 Internal R 8 071, 64 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. Delictual Claim 2005 Savage Jooste & R 600 000, 00 Adams Attorneys Delictual Claim 2006 Afzal Akoo & Part- Matter settled in May 2010. ners Council to pay R200,000 and costs of R117,047 Delictual Claim 2006 Insurance

15 K.Chetty v Msunduzi Municipality 16 Painter v Msunduzi Municipality

Delictual Claim Delictual Claim

2006 2006

Internal Internal

17 G.Dladla v Msunduzi Municipality

Delictual Claim

2006

Internal

18 Piexoto v Msunduzi Municipality

Delictual Claim

2006

Internal

19 M.Zondi v Msunduzi Municipality

Delictual Claim

2006

Internal

20 Telkom S.A Ltd v Msunduzi Municipality Delictual Claim

2006

21 Telkom S.A Ltd v Msunduzi Municipality Delictual Claim

2006

22 F.Osman V Msunduzi Municipality 23 T.E.Zulu v Msunduzi Municipality 24 D.V. Ngcobo

Delictual Claim Delictual Claim Delictual Claim

2007 2007 2007

Lister & Lister Attorneys Lister & Lister Attorneys Internal Internal Insurance

25 Orion Telecon v Msunduzi Municipality Delictual Claim

2007

Jasat & Jasat

26 Thuthugisa Contracting Enterprise

Memorandum of Agreement Delictual Claim

2007

Delictual Claim Delictual Claim Delictual Claim Delictual Claim Delictual Claim Delictual Claim Delictual Claim

2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007

Pension Surcharge Delictual Claim

2008

File closed and dealt internally by Msunduzi. Internal R 210 749, 00 plus vat at 14 %. Kruger Ngcobo Inc R 85 470, 00 plus interest at 15, 5 %. Insurance R 50 000, 00. Internal R 17 181, 33 Internal R 6 213, 00 Internal R 20 000, 00 Internal R 110 046, 28 Internal R 15 080, 00 Internal R 9 823, 48 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. Internal

2008

Internal

NO.

MATTER

1 2

R.Sulaiman v Msunduzi Municipality Roelofse v Msunduzi Municipality

3

MA Jewitt

4 5

Premier of KZN v Msunduzi Municipality R.B.Ngcobo v Msunduzi Municipality

6

R.Haffejee v Msunduzi Municipality

7

Telkom S.A Ltd v Msunduzi Municipality

8 M.Omarjee v Msunduzi Municipality 9 S.Makhaya v Msunduzi Municipality 10 Telkom S.A Ltd v Msunduzi Municipality 11 Telkom S.A Ltd v Msunduzi Municipality 12 Woodley v Msunduzi Municipality 13 Zeedim Investment v Msunduzi Municipality

27 Hampton College v Msunduzi Municipality 28 R.Terry v Msunduzi Municipality 29 A& F.Mall v Msunduzi Municipality 30 E.Makungisa v Msunduzi Municipality 31 R.Rabikisson v Msunduzi Municipality 32 N.V.Majozi v Msunduzi Municipality 33 P.S.Zondi V Msunduzi Municipality 34 Mamusa Marketing v Msunduzi Municipality 35 South African Local Authorities Pension Fund v Msunduzi Municipality 36 Msunduzi Municipality v D.L. Petersen

102

2007

Risk to the municipality as at 30 June 2009 R 50 000, 00 R 41 032, 58 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. R9,279,625 plus interest at 15,5% per annum R 11 340, 00 R 11 375, 27 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. R 98 800, 00 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. R 32 585, 78 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. R 31 000, 00 R 42 704, 96 plus interest R 34 806, 17 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. R 8 071, 64 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. R 600 000, 00 R 450 183, 96 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum.

R 26 169, 86. R 45 361, 38 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. R 20 000, 00 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. R 39 822, 89 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. R 50 000, 00 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. R34,427 plus interest

R 166 160.54 plus interest at 15% per annum R 26 169, 86. R 45 361, 38 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. R 20 000, 00 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. R 39 822, 89 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. R 50 000, 00 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. R34,427 plus interest

R45,979 plus interest

R45,979 plus interest R 306 666, 45 R 8 709, 23 R1800 000.00 plus interest at 15% Per annum R92189.52+ 23047.38 per month plus interest R 210 749, 00 plus vat at 14 %. R 85 470, 00 plus interest at 15, 5 %. R 50 000, 00. R 17 181, 33 R 6 213, 00 R 20 000, 00 R 110 046, 28 R 15 080, 00 R 9 823, 48 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. R 217 184, 13 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum.


103

NO. 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45

THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY APPENDIX J SCHEDULE OF CONTINGENT LIABILITIES AS AT 30 JUNE 2010 MATTER MATTER TYPE YEAR ATTORNEY/ADVO- Risk to the municipality as INITIATED CATE INSTRUCTED at 30 June 2010 Mkhumbuzi v Msunduzi Municipality Delictual Claim 2008 Internal Nzaba v Msunduzi Municipality Delictual Claim 2008 Internal P.J.Terwolbleek v Msunduzi Municipality Delictual Claim 2008 Insurance Mouton v Msunduzi Municipality Delictual Claim 2008 Bhamjee Attorneys Telkom v Msunduzi Municipality Delictual Claim 2008 Lister & Lister Attor- R 45 979, 87 plus interest at neys 15, 5 % per annum. R.S.Govender v Msunduzi Municipality Delictual Claim 2008 Internal R 75 000, 00 N.G.Zuma v Msunduzi Municipality Delictual Claim 2008 Internal R 100 000, 00 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. Motor Accident-NP 3238 Dr W Van Delictual Claim 2008 Internal R 96 401, 43 Straaten T Gonasillan v Msunduzi Municipality Delictual Claim 2009 Internal

46 F.B.I. Khan v Msunduzi Municipality

Delictual Claim

2009

Internal

47 S.Mthimkulu v Msunduzi Municipality

Delictual Claim

2009

Insurance/External

48 Blue Thunder Trading CC/ TA Khanyisa Energy Management and Services 49 Stand 2436 PMB (pty) Ltd.

Delictual Claim

2009

Vather Attorneys

Delictual Claim

2009

50 SAPPI 51 Keshwa v Msunduzi Municipality

Delictual Claim Delictual Claim

2009 2009

Cajee Setsubi Chetty Inc. & Adv Dickson Insurance Internal

52 Bishop’s Roadworks

Contractual Claim Delictual Claim

2009

Internal

2010

Internal

Contractual Claim Contractual Claim Contractual Claim Contractual Claim Contractual Claim Contractual Claim Contractual Claim Delictual Claim Delictual Claim Delictual Claim Delictual Claim Delictual Claim Delictual Claim Delictual Claim Delictual Claim Delictual Claim Delictual Claim Delictual Claim

2010

Internal

R 1267,00 plus interest at 15,5 per annum. R2424-50

2010

Internal

R5519-06

2010

Internal

R5586-00

2010

Internal

R1721-40

2010

Internal

R4902-00

2010

Internal

R5163-06

2010

Internal

R5506-20

2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010

Internal Internal Internal Internal Internal/Insurance Internal Internal/Insurance

R100 000-00 R95 000-00 R 300 000.00 R21406-36 R2650-00 R200 000.00 R69 224.62 R118 490.00 R 97 430.00 R100 000.00 & R4438.00 R100 000.00 R379 975.84 plus interest at 15,5 % per annum R 22 541, 11 plus interest at 15, 5 %.

53

RY Khan v Msunduzi Municipality

54 Gavin’s Panel Shop 55 Gavin’s Panel Shop 56 Gavin’s Panel Shop 57 Gavin’s Panel Shop 58 Gavin’s Panel Shop 59 Gavin’s Panel Shop 60 Gavin’s Panel Shop 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71

Kogulan Naidoo HS Majozi BM Dlamini J Mahlaba Daljeeth Daljeeth MS Singh TT Ngubane GP Bayeni VD Ramdeen M Mlaba B.A.Clark v Msunduzi Municipality

72 Telkom S.A Ltd v Msunduzi Municipality Delictual Claim

Internal Internal Vather Attorneys

R223 576.00 plus interest at 15% per annum Matter settled . No monetary settlement, legal costs estimated at R50,000. R25000 000.00 R 30 470, 12 plus interest at 11, 5 % per annum. R120 000-00

Risk to the municipality as at 30 June 2009 R 100 000, 01 R 73 500, 01 R 1 121 620, 01 R 45 979, 87 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. R 75 000, 00 R 100 000, 00 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. R 96 401, 43 R 100 000, 00 plus interest at 15, 5% per annum. R 63 280, 39 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum R 204 650, 00 plus interest at 15, 5 % per annum. R223 576.00 plus interest at 15% per annum Matter settled . No monetary settlement, legal costs estimated at R50,000. R25000 000.00 R 30 470, 12 plus interest at 11, 5 % per annum. R120 000-00

R379 975.84 plus interest at 15,5 % per annum

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 SAFE CITY PIETERMARITZBURG - ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 30 June 2010 (Association incorporated under Section 21) (Registration Number: 2002/007386/08) CONTENTS Chairman’s report Independent auditors’ report Report of the directors Statement of financial performance Statement of financial position Statement of cash flows Notes to the statement of cash flows Notes to the annual financial statements Detailed statement of financial performance List of contributors

PAGE 104 - 112 113 - 114 115 116 116 117 117 - 118 118 - 124 123 - 124 124

APPROVAL OF THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS The annual financial statements and other financial information set out in this annual report were prepared by the directors in conformity with International Financial Reporting Standards applied on a consistent basis. The manner of presentation of the annual financial statements, the selection of accounting policies and the integrity of the financial information are the responsibility of the directors. The directors are also responsible for the systems of internal control. These are designed to provide reasonable but not absolute, assurance as to the reliability of the financial statements, and to adequately safeguard, verify and maintain accountability of assets, and to prevent and detect material misstatement and loss. The systems are implemented and monitored by suitably trained personnel with an appropriate segregation of authority and duties. Nothing has come to the attention of the directors to indicate that any material breakdown in the functioning of these controls, procedures and systems has occurred during the year under review. The annual financial statements are prepared on a going concern basis. Nothing has come to the attention of the directors to indicate that the association will not remain a going concern for the foreseeable future. The annual financial statements set out on pages 116 to 124 and the supplementary schedules on pages 123 to 124 were approved by the Board of Directors on 15 July 2010 and are signed on its behalf by:-

DIRECTOR - Z D SOKHELA

DIRECTOR - P WARMINGTON

104

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER - N K BHIKHA


105 3.1 BACKGROUND Safe City Pietermaritzburg was formally constituted as an Association incorporated under section 21 of the Companies Act on 28 March 2002. Its establishment followed a long period of research and planning undertaken under the guidance of Mr Des Winship and colleagues who constituted the Board of the local organisation known as Business Against Crime. Initially, the organisation’s Board, conceptualised as a partnership between the Municipality and the private sector, was chaired by the Mayor at the time, Cllr Hloni Zondi. Other representatives of the Municipality also sat on the Board. In the course of time, legislation prohibited these representatives from holding directorships and Safe City Pietermaritzburg lost the advantage of having direct Municipal input into decisionmaking. Representation on the Board aside, the partnership was governed by an agreement by which the Municipality would make the necessary financial resources available for the operation of the organisation as well as the capital expenditure required to extend the CCTV surveillance to other parts of the city. The Municipality regarded Safe City Pietermaritzburg as a „municipal entity’, although this status was contested by Safe City itself. Changes in the municipal administration and the legislative paradigm resulted in confusion and some breakdown in relations between the two partners. Municipal funding was no longer secure and some elements within the Municipality overtly questioned several aspects of the operations of Safe City Pietermaritzburg. The organisation took steps to meet the expectations of the Municipality by terminating the contract of the service provider that had managed the operation from the company’s inception and assuming the management role itself as a means of saving costs. Later, at the request of the city’s administration team, the section 21 status was changed so that the relationship between the organisation and the Municipality would be aligned to legal requirements. While it is understood that the Board cannot include representatives of the Municipality, the organisation has felt for sometime that its work is hampered by a lack of regular and constructive communication with its funding body. The Safe City operation has earned high praise for its professional effectiveness in meeting its objectives which are fundamentally concerned with reducing crime in the city. All the people who have directed this project through both the planning and operational phases have done so on a voluntary basis and it remains a principle of the Board that there is no remuneration to directors.

1. DIRECTORS The following people are directors of the Company. There are several vacancies on the Board that will be filled in due course. Mrs Z Sokhela

Director of BP Cascades, Ex President and Member of PCB, UFET Council, UKZN Council, Deputy Chair BFC Mr D Winship Retired CEO: Huletts Aluminium, Retired Executive Director of Tongaat Hulett Group, Member of BFC, Director of Life Line Mr P Warmington Director: Warmingtons Inc, Member of BFC Mr D Kambouris Chairperson of BFC, Member of Community Chest Mr V C Biggs Retired Director: McCarthy, Member of Allison Homes, Member of SAVS/NCVV, Member of BFC Mrs D Harrison Director: Lifeline PMB T/A Lifeline and Rape Crisis, Member of BFC, Member of Community Chest Mr K Vorster Financial Planner for PSG, Member of BFC Adv R P Stuart Deputy Director of Public Prosecution, Chairman of KZN Wildlife Crime Working Group (WCWG) Major General P Maharaj Cluster General of SAPF of Pietermaritzburg Central

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 2. PARTNERS For various reasons, Business Against Crime in Pietermaritzburg reconstituted itself as Business Fighting Crime and is an important strategic partner of Safe City. BFC has borne the costs of marketing an SMS crime alert campaign that was initiated by Safe City in 2008. BFC has also contributed financially in several other ways, including a grant of R10 000 towards the cost of a commercial van purchased during the year. This purchase was made possible by a generous donation of R50 000 by Hulamin (Pty) Ltd. The organisation considers its partnership with the SAPF to be one of its notable strengths, while it also enjoys constructive relationships with the National Prosecuting Authority and various Community Police Forums.

3. STAFFING Safe City took over the control of the CCTV Control Room operation as well as the maintenance of cameras on 1 March 2010. Ivision Technologies, the contractor who had formerly managed the Control Room operation, took legal action in terms of Section 197 of the LRA. This concerns the conditions of service and the rights of employees when a transfer from one employer to another is effected. The Safe City Board decided not to challenge Ivision Technologies’ contention and took over all 29 of the former Ivision employees, despite the fact that the additional cost of salaries could not be catered for in the budget. In addition, at the time of the termination of its contract, Ivision Technologies faced a claim made by 4 (four) other former employees that they had been dismissed unfairly. Safe City faced this charge as a respondent alongside Ivision Technologies. By agreement between Ivision Technologies and Safe City, a monetary settlement was negotiated with the four Ivision Technologies disaffected employees who then dropped their claim for re-instatement. This cost Safe City an unexpected R75 000 plus its share of the legal costs incurred to the point of settlement of R20 000. At the time of writing, the Safe City staff comprises • • • • • • • • •

106

A CEO A General Manager A Control Room Manager 3 Supervisors 18 Control Room Operators 7 Control Room Operators [Relievers] A Technician Manager A Technician An Assistant Technician


107 4. PARTICULAR MATTERS RELATING TO THE YEAR 2009/10 4.1. A Number Plate Recognition System, to enable the city to generate income from outstanding fines, was introduced by Safe City. A Memorandum of Understanding between the Msunduzi Traffic Department and Safe City Pietermaritzburg has been drafted and submitted to the New Administrator for perusal to enable this project to proceed. 4.2 At the request of the city’s administration team, the organisation co-operated in the formation of a Safe City Development Committee to provide a platform for ongoing dialogue between the Municipality and Safe City regarding all matters concerning safety and security in the city. An enhanced role for Safe City in this sphere is expected to emerge through the discussions in this committee. 4.3. In partnership with BFC, SAPF and the NPA, Safe City exhibited at the Royal Show in a hall dedicated to the agencies responsible for crime and justice. The theme of the exhibition was “The Winning Nation” in conjunction with a slogan “Blow Vuvuzela to Fight Crime” and it secured a Gold Medallion award for being an outstanding display. In addition to showcasing the effectiveness of the CCTV camera system, Safe City used the exhibition to market its SMS Crime Alerting and Cell phone Panic Alert services that are monitored in the Safe City control room and feed directly to the SAPF.

5. FINANCE 5.1. The audited financial statements of the organisation are attached to this report. 5.2. Safe City’s capital expenditure proposal of R4.48 million, as well as the request for R2.2 million for the upgrade of the recording system were declined due to lack of funds by Council. This was disappointing since the organisation has an urgent desire to extend its CCTV protection services, especially into Edendale, and to maintain the highest level of efficiency by ensuring that its technology is up to date. 5.3. Safe City is also hoping to install cameras to provide a CCTV security facility at the Harry Gwala Stadium which will also cover Alexandra Park. An initiative of the First Lady of the Province, Dr May Mkhize, is to revitalise the Park as a recreational centre where children can be taken to play and be entertained in safety. The presence of digital surveillance is considered essential for this.

6. PERFORMANCE OF THE CONTROL CENTRE The 24/7 surveillance operation is the core of Safe City’s business. It is ISO 9001:2008 certified and SABS approved. The primary core function is: • • • • •

The prevention of crime. The detection of crime. The maintenance of existing CCTV system. Advise municipality on expansion of CCTV system. Oversee the design, specification and installation of new CCTV equipment.

The secondary function is: • • • •

The monitoring of traffic bylaws and motor vehicle accidents. Monitoring of Municipal bylaws such as littering, street gambling, and illegal trading. Facilitating the Disaster Management JOC. The monitoring of gatherings, marches and events of public interest within the camera visual area.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 6.1. Standard Procedure

The crime statistics for Pietermaritzburg are submitted to the control room every morning by the SAPF. These are compared with our statistics and thereafter plotted on street maps in order to identify where crimes were committed without any detection by the control centre. This enables operators to be more crime prevention orientated.

Every suspicious incident noted on camera is regarded as an “Incident detected�. The police officer (present in the control room 24/7) will determine whether a SAPF vehicle needs to be despatched to the scene of the incident. The yearly target for SAPF dispatches is 90% of Incidents Detected. A record is maintained of vehicle despatches as compared with Incidents detected. An arrest is made when the suspect is apprehended. Frequently the progress of a crime is fully observed and followed via the camera network. There is a recording capacity of 21 days after which footage is automatically over-written.

6.2. Summary of Operational Performance Description

Total for Year Target for Year

Diff

No of Incidents Detected

3067

2796

271 (+9.6%)

Response by SAP Units

1550

2516

-960 (- 38%)

Arrests Effected

181

360

179 (-49.7)

SAP Response Time

5.4

4

-1 (-25%)

% Camera down time

2.8

1

-1.8 (-130%)

6.3. Incidents Detected 3200

3067

3000

2800

2800 2600

2488

NO. OF ARRESTS

2400

2153

2200 2000

1871

1800

1625

1600

1447

1400

1208

1200

984

1000

745

800 600 400

547 344 203

200

198

239

224

239

282 178

328

320 267

246

Monthly

JUNE

MAY

APRIL

MAR

FEB

JAN

DEC

NOV

OCT

SEPT

AUG

JULY

0

Accumulative

The total number of incidents detected was 3067 compared to 2796 previous year. The target was exceeded by 271 (+10%) incidents. These incidents include all matters detected such as fighting, crime, suspicious behaviour and motor vehicle accidents. Some of the incidents detected are as follows: Fighting Suspicious behaviour Motor vehicle Accidents Bylaw Infringements

108

1120 431 245 121


109 6.4. Responses by the SAPF 2800 2600 2400

NO. OF ARRESTS

2200 2000 1800

1589

1600

1424

1400

844

724

800 600 200

1071

947

1000

400

1317

1182

1200

585

432 164

131

295

137

120

139

153

96

135

111

131

126

107

Monthly

JUNE

MAY

APRIL

MAR

FEB

JAN

DEC

NOV

OCT

SEPT

AUG

JULY

0

Accumulative

The total number of responses of the SAP was 1550 compared to 1623 for the previous year. The target for the year of 2516 (- 38%) was not met. Theft of motor vehicles has shown a sharp increase in the Pietermaritzburg area but most occurred outside of the area monitored by cameras. It is also known that tow truck operators are involved in the theft of vehicles especially those fitted with immobilisers or gear locks. It was therefore decided to monitor all vehicles being towed by tow truck and to record their details for possible investigation purposes. These incidents do not require immediate SAP response. 6.2. Arrests Effected 360 340 320 300 280 260 240

NO. OF ARRESTS

220 200

181

180 160 140 93

100

69

80 60 20

144

134

124

111

120

40

164

154

24

75

43 26

19

18

6

18

13

10

10

12 8

17

Monthly

JUNE

MAY

APRIL

MAR

FEB

JAN

DEC

NOV

OCT

SEPT

AUG

JULY

0

Accumulative

The number of arrest made was 181 compared to 193 for the previous year. The target of 360 was not met. It has become increasingly clear that criminals are avoiding the area covered by the cameras and are committing their crimes in unmonitored areas.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 6.3. SAPF Response Time 18 16

RESPONSE TIME

14 12 10 8 6

6.8 5.1

5.5 5.35

4.8 5.1

4.2

5.5

4.9 4

4

4.7

4.9

6.6 5.1

6.4

6 5.3

5.5

5.3

5.4

5.6

6.2 5.4

2

Monthly

JUNE

MAY

APRIL

MAR

FEB

JAN

DEC

NOV

OCT

SEPT

AUG

JULY

0

Accumulative

The average response time for SAPF vehicle to respond from the time of notifying the SAPF Emergency Control Room until a vehicle arrived on the scene was 5.4 min compared to 5 min. for the previous year. This is 1.4 min. more than the target of 4 min. The availability of patrol vehicles during peak times and traffic congestion have had a negative effective in this regard. 6.4 Camera Downtime 6.00

CAMERA DOWN TIME

5.50

5.00 4.50 4.00 3.50 3.00 2.50 2.00 1.50 1.00 0.50

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV DEC JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL MAY

JUNE

The average camera downtime was 2.8%. The Safe City target has always been 1%. It will be noticed that during July to October 2009 the downtime was above 4%. This high number can be attributed to the delay in obtaining crucial spares from the United Kingdom. Most of the spares used in maintaining the CCTV system have to be imported.

110


111 6.5 Reported Crime Statistics Please note that the statistics as provided by the SAP Pietermaritzburg is for operational evaluation and is not for public consumption. Jul 08 to Jun 09 Jul 09 to Jun 10 Inc/Dec Murder 42 33 -9 Att. Murder 22 17 -5 Ass. Com 278 391 +113 Ass. GBH 278 391 +113 Rape 44 64 +20 Rob with F/A 106 63 -43 Rob Other Weapon 278 202 -76 Rob Com 194 154 -40 Bus. Rob 92 56 -36 Hi Jacking 12 14 +2 Theft from M/V 137 152 +15 Theft out of M/V 221 211 -10 Theft of M/V 310 213 -97 Burglary Bus. 284 234 -50 A Crime 7801 7932 +131

% -21% -23% 41% 41% 45% -41% -27% -21% -39% 17% 11% -5% -31% -18% 2%

It is very evident that crimes which show an increase are those that are committed primarily indoors or that are domestic by nature i.e. Assault Common, Assault GBH and Rape. These types of crime are difficult to prevent and are related mainly to socio economic factors such as unemployment, family violence and drug or liquor abuse. Crimes that have decreased are mainly street related crimes such as Robberies, Burglary Business, Murder, Attempted Murder etc. These crimes can be prevented by intelligence-driven crime prevention operations, CCTV detection or SAP patrols. The increase in reported A Crime may be attributed directly to the increase in assault related cases.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 7. CONCLUSION The year 2009/10 has been one of many challenges, not the least of which was the take-over of the management and administration after the termination of the service contracts. This was followed by difficulties in Safe City’s engagement with the Municipality and threats that the funding would be withheld. While the relationship with the city’s new administration has been a great deal more constructive, it has posed the additional challenge of having to deregister the section 21 company and register a full-blown company. We thank the Mayor and Johan Mettler and his administration team for their constructive support for the Safe City project and for revitalising our belief that our organisation performs a valuable community service. We thank all partners including BFC, SAPF, CPF, NPA and several others who are, to a lesser or greater extent, stakeholders in our operation. The members of the Safe City Board are thanked and commended for their support and commitment. Among these, Messrs Peter Warmington, the former chairperson of the Board, Des Winship and Dem Kambouris, the chairperson of BFC, have earned special thanks for their particular and loyal support. The Board expresses its thanks to the CEO, management and staff of Safe City, as well as the Project Engineer, Mr Pieter Janse van Rensburg of Dihlase Consulting. We reserve our particular gratitude to the Msunduzi Municipality, the main funders of this operation. We acknowledge, too, the financial and moral support of Business Fighting Crime and Hulamin, as well as the valuable assistance rendered by legal advisors, Venn Nemeth & Hart, our auditors, Deloitte and Touche, and the Witness for continuously reporting on safety statistics.

ZINHLE SOKHELA CHAIRPERSON OF THE BOARD 15 JULY 2010

112


113

P.O. Box 365 Deloitte & Touche Pietermaritzburg Registered Auditors 3200 Audit - KZN South Africa Deloitte & Touche House 181 Hoosen Haffejee Street (formerly Berg Street) Pietermaritzburg 3201 Docex 14 Pietermaritzburg Tel: +27 (0)33 345 0271 Fax: +27 (0)33 345 0285 ww.deloitte.com

REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT AUDITORS TO THE MEMBERS OF SAFE CITY PIETERMARITZBURG Report on the Financial Statements We have audited the annual financial statements of Safe City Pietermaritzburg which comprise the statement of financial position as at 30 June 2010, the statement of financial performance and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory notes, as set out on pages 116 to 124.

Directors’ Responsibility for the Financial Statements The company’s directors are responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards. This responsibility includes: designing, implementing and maintaining internal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error; selecting and applying appropriate accounting policies; and making accounting estimates that are reasonable in the circumstances.

Auditor’s Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the directors, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.

National Executive GG Gelink Chief Executive AE Swiegers Chief Operating Officer GM Pinnock Audit DL Kennedy Tax & Legal and Risk Advisory I. Geeringh Consulting I. Barn Corporate Finance CR. Beukman Finance TJ Brown Clients & Markets NT Mtoba Chairman of the Board CR Quality Deputy Chairman of the Board Reginal Leader: GC Brazier A full list of partners and directors is available on request.

B-BBEE rating: Level 3 contributor/AA (certified by Empowerdex) Member of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Basis for Qualified Opinion – Cash Collections and Donations In common with similar organisations, it is not feasible for Safe City Pietermaritzburg to institute accounting controls over cash collections and donations prior to initial entry of the collections in the accounting records. Accordingly, it was impractical for us to extend our examination beyond the receipts actually recorded.

Qualified opinion In our opinion, except for the effect on the annual financial statements of the matter described in the Basis for Qualified Opinion paragraph, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the association as at 30 June 2010, and of its financial performance and its cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards, and in the manner required by the Companies Act of South Africa.

Other matters Without further qualifying our opinion we draw attention to the fact that the supplementary information set out on pages 123 and 124 does not form part of the annual financial statements and is presented as additional information. We have not audited these schedules and accordingly we do not express an opinion thereon.

Deloitte & Touche Per D McArthur (Registered Accoutant and Auditor) Partner Pietermaritzburg 21July 2010

114


115 REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS for the year ended 30 June 2010 The directors have pleasure in presenting their report for the year ended 30 June 2010.

REVIEW OF THE OPERATIONS FOR THE YEAR The financial position of the association at 30 June 2010 is set out in the attached annual financial statements. The statement of financial performance reflects an operating (deficit)/surplus for the year of (R14 434) (2009: R12 239).

SUBSEQUENT EVENTS No material fact or circumstances has occurred between the reporting date and the date of this report.

DIRECTORS The following members acted as directors during the year under review: Z D Sokhela P Warmington W D Winship V C Biggs M Ghela R P Stuart P Maharaj N K Bhikha J A Vorster D Harrison D Kambouris I Dugmore N.P Dlangisa CHAIRMAN Z D Sokhela

(Chairman)

(retired in February 2010) (CEO)

(retired in March 2010) (retired in February 2010) (appointed in October 2009)

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER N K Bhikha

PLACE OF BUSINESS

City Hall Chief Albert Luthuli Road PIETERMARITZBURG 3201

NATURE OF BUSINESS

An Association between business, the local authority, the community, government and non-government organisations to proactively combat crime in Pietermaritzburg.

AUDITORS

Deloitte & Touche

BANKERS

First National Bank

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Deloitte & Touche for their engagement in carrying out a partly honorary audit for Safe City.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE for the year ended 30 June 2010 Notes Revenue

2010

2009

R

R

2 715 969

2 642 582

111 298

63 460

Total income

2 827 267

2 706 042

Operating expenses

2 841 701

2 693 803

(14 434)

12 239

14 434

(12 239)

(14 434)

12 239

-

-

Interest received

Operating (deficit)/surplus for the year

4

Transfers to reserves - Non-distributable reserve - General DEFICIT/SURPLUS for the year

5

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL Position for the year ended 30 June 2010 Notes

2010

2009

R

R

ASSETS NON-CURRENT ASSETS Property, plant and equipment

7

CURRENT ASSETS Accounts receivable

8

Cash on hand and balances with banks TOTAL ASSETS

88 526

51 321

795 024

826 534

8 332

27 080

9 786 692

799 454

883 550

877 855

853 989

868 423

29 561

9 432

29 561

9 432

883 550

877 855

EQUITY AND LIABILITIES EQUITY RESERVES Non-distributable reserve - general

5

CURRENT LIABILITIES Accounts payable TOTAL EQUITY AND LIABILITIES

116

11


117 STATEMENT OF Cash Flow for the year ended 30 June 2010 Notes

2010

2009

R

R

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash receipts from donors

2 674 717

2 683 462

(2 798 777)

(2 991 646)

(124 060)

(308 184)

111 298

63 460

-

(199)

(12 762)

(244 923)

Additions to property, plant and equipment

-

(7 198)

Net cash flow used in investing activities

-

(7 198)

NET DECREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

(12 762)

(252 121)

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the year

799 454

1 051 575

786 692

799 454

Cash paid to suppliers and employees Cash utilised in operations

A

Interest received Interest paid Net cash generated from/(utilised in) operating activities INVESTING ACTIVITIES

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AT END OF THE YEAR

B

Notes to the statement of Cash Flow for the year ended 30 June 2010 Notes

2010

2009

R

R

A. RECONCILIATION OF OPERATING (DEFICIT)/SURPLUS FOR THE YEAR TO CASH UTILISED IN OPERATIONS Operating (deficit)/surplus for the year

(14 434)

12 239

(111 298)

(63 460)

Adjustment for:

Interest received

Interest paid

Non-cash donation received

Depreciation

Working capital changes

-

199

(60 000)

-

22 795

25 967

(162 937)

(25 055)

Decrease/(increase) in accounts receivable

18 748

(22 581)

Increase/(decrease) in accounts payable

20 129

(260 548)

(124 060)

(308 184)

Cash utilised in operation

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Notes

2010

2009

R

R

786 692

799 454

B. CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash on hand and balances with banks. Cash and cash equivalents included in the cash flow statement comprise the following balance sheet amounts: Bank

NOTES TO THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2010 1.

Basis of preparation

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the South African Statements of Generally Accepted Accounting Practice (“GAAP”) including any interpretations of such Statements issued by the Accounting Practices Board, with the effective Standards of Generally Recognised Accounting Practice (“GRAP”) issued by the Accounting Standards Board replacing the equivalent GAAP Statement as follows: Standard of GRAP GRAP 1: GRAP 2: GRAP 3:

Replaced Statement of GAAP

Presentation of financial statements AC I01: Presentation of financial statements Cash flow statements AC 118: Cash flow statements Accounting policies, changes in AC 1O3: Accounting policies, changes in accounting estimates and errors accounting estimates and errors

The recognition and measurement principles in the above GRAP and GAAP Statements do not differ or result in material differences in items presented and disclosed in the financial statements. The implementation of GRAP 1, 2 & 3 has resulted in the following changes in the presentation of the financial statements: A.

Terminology differences:

Standard of GRAP

Replaced Statement of GAAP

Statement of changes in net assets Net assets Surplus/deficit for the period Accumulated surplus/deficit Contributions from owners Distributions to owners Reporting date

Statement of changes in equity Equity Profit/loss for the period Retained earnings Share capital Dividends Balance sheet date

B. C.

The cash flow statement can only be prepared in accordance with the direct method. Specific information such as: (a) (b) (c)

D.

118

Receivables from non-exchange transactions, including taxes and transfers. Taxes and transfers payable. Trade and other payables from non-exchange transactions must be presented separately on the statement of financial position.

Amount and nature of any restrictions on cash balances is required to be disclosed.


119 2.

Adoption of new and revised International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”)

In the current year, the directors have adopted all the new and revised Standards and Interpretations issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (the IASB) and the International Financial Reporting Interpretations Committee (IFRIC) of the IASB that are relevant to its operations and effective for accounting periods beginning on 1 January 2009. The adoption of these new and revised Standards and Interpretations has not resulted in any changes to the association’s accounting policies. The following new standards, interpretations, technical corrections and amendments, with effective dates on or after 1 January 2010, have been issued: Number IFRS 8

Description Amendments resulting from April 2009 Annual Improvements to IFRS

Effective date Effective for annual accounting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2010.

IAS 1

Amendments resulting from April 2009 Annual Improvements to IFRS

Effective for annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2010.

IAS 7

Statement of cash flows - Amendments resulting from April 2009 Annual Improvements to IFRS

Effective for annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2010

IAS 17

Leases - Amendments resulting from Effective for annual periods beginning on or April 2009 Annual Improvements to IFRS after 1 January 2010.

IAS 36

Amendments resulting from April 2009 Annual Improvements to IFRS

Effective for annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2010

The directors anticipate that the adoption of these Standards and Interpretations in future periods will have no material financial impact on the financial statements of the organisation.

3.

SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

3.1 Revenue

Revenue comprises cash contributions from the Msunduzi Municipality and does not include contributions in specie.

3.2 Interest

Interest income is accrued on a time basis, by reference to the principal outstanding and at the interest rate applicable.

3.3 Property, plant and equipment

Property, plant and equipment are depreciated over their estimated useful life to an estimated residual value. Motor vehicles Furniture & fittings Computer equipment Other 5

Years 5 5 3

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 4.

OPERATING SURPLUS FOR THE YEAR 2010

2009

R

R

Operating surplus for the year is stated after: Audit fees - current year

6 600

10 250

- prior year under provision

4 900

-

22 795

25 967

2 147 226

2 222 795

-

199

Depreciation Administration salaries Interest paid

5.

NON-DISTRIBUTABLE RESERVE - GENERAL 2010

2009

R

R

Balance at beginning of the year

868 423

856 184

Operating (deficit)/surplus for the year

(14 434)

12 239

Balance at end of the year

853 989

868 423

The Association is registered under Section 21 of the Companies Act of South Africa as an incorporated association not for gain and, as such, no part of its income and property shall be transferred to members, directly or indirectly. All reserves of the Association are therefore non-distributable and may only be utilised towards the cost of projects and initiatives and meeting any shortfall in expenditure.

6.

TAXATION 2010

2009

R

R

2010

2009

R

R

No provision for taxation is necessary, as the income of the Association is exempt in terms of section 10(1) cB) of the Income Tax Act, 1962, as amended.

7.

PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

Motor vehicles

58 000

-

Furniture and fittings

26 838

39 761

3 688

10 412

Computer equipment Office equipment

120

-

1 148

88 526

51 321


121 2010 Reconciliation of net book value at beginning of the year to net book value at end of the year. Net Book value at beginning of year

Additions

Disposals

R

R

R

Motor vehicles

Net Book value at end of Depreciation year R

R

-

60 000

-

(2 000)

58 000

Furniture and fittings

39 761

-

-

(12 923)

26 838

Computer equipment

10 412

-

-

(6 724)

3 688

1 148

-

-

(1 148)

-

51 321

60 000

-

(22 795)

88 526

Office equipment Total - 2010

2009 Reconciliation of net book value at beginning of the year to net book value at end of the year. Net Book value at beginning of year

Additions

Disposals

R

R

R

Net Book value at end of Depreciation year R

R

Furniture and fittings

52 684

-

-

(12 923)

39 761

Computer equipment

14 858

7 198

-

(11 644)

10 412

2 548

-

-

(1 400)

1 148

70 090

7 198

-

(25 967)

51 321

Office equipment Total - 2009

8.

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

Trade and other receivables are classified as loans and receivables at amortised cost and their carrying amount approximates fair value. Trade and other receivables are predominately non-interest bearing. Accounts receivable are all current being receivable within 1 month. No amounts receivable are past due.

9.

CASH ON HAND AND BALANCES WITH BANKS

Balance

2010

2009

R

R

786 692

799 454

It is the intention of the board that the surplus funds be utilised to cover additional funding of any emergency requirements.

10. RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS Business Fighting Crime is a related party of Safe City and transactions conducted between these parties are at arms length.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 11. ACCOUNTS PAYABLE Trade and other payables are measured at amortised cost and their carrying amount approximates fair value. Trade and other payables are predominately non-interest bearing.

12. FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT Interest rate risk In the normal course of business, the company is exposed to the effect of movements in interest rates. Decisions on the interest rates are made according to short, medium and long-term expectations. Management have obtained funding for bank overdrafts at a floating rate linked to the prime lending rate. Sensitivity analysis At year end the sensitivity to changes in interest rates on the operating profit is as follows: 2010 +10% -10%

11 130 (11 130)

2009 +10% -10%

6 346 (6 346)

Liquidity risk The company manages liquidity risk by monitoring forecast cash flows and ensuring that adequate borrowing facilities are maintained. The directors may from time to time at their discretion raise or borrow monies for the purpose of the company as they deem fit. The table below analyses the companyâ€&#x;s financial liabilities into relevant maturity groupings based on the remaining period at the balance sheet to the contractual maturity date. The amounts disclosed in the table are the contractual undiscounted cash flows. Balances due within 12 months equal their carrying balances as the impact of discounting is not significant. Company At 30 June 2010 Accounts payable At 30 June 2009 Accounts payable

122

Less than 1 year

Between 2 and 4 years

29 561

-

9 432

-


123 2010

2009

R

R

REVENUE Contributions received

2 715 969

2 642 582

111 298

63 460

2 827 267

2 706 042

(2 841 701)

(2 693 803)

20 756

16 989

8 973

-

2 147 226

2 222 795

160 534

289 997

1 396 578

1 932 799

590 115

-

Advertising and promotions

1 585

6 166

Assets written off

7 772

2 671

- current

6 600

10 250

- prior year underprovision

4 900

-

Bank charges

4 624

4 984

Interest received TOTAL INCOME Less: ADMINISTRATION EXPENDITURE Accounting fees Administration fees – Pietermaritzburg Chamber of Commerce Salaries and wages Administration salaries: 8 months Control room consultancy fees: 8 months Safe City salaries/wages: 4 months

Audit fees

125

-

Cleaning

Casual Wage

8 652

7 215

Computer expenses

7 155

16 206

10 093

-

4 286

-

Conference and travel Consulting fees

109

133

Depreciation

Courier and postage

22 795

25 967

Electricity and water

18 764

16 191

661

2 098

General expenses

3 086

3 670

Insurance

1 090

-

Entertainment expenses

Interest paid

-

199

55 374

3 614

Motor vehicle expenses

3 014

192

Out of court settlement

50 000

-

6 173

-

17 737

25 338

Legal fees

Payroll set-up fees Printing and stationery Recruitment expense

19 989

-

360 405

554 088

20 417

-

3 100

-

Staff welfare

765

906

Subscriptions

-

(3 017)

Repairs and maintenance Royal show expense Staff petrol

Telephone and fax Write-back of VAT provision

25 474

30 916

-

(253 769)

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10

OPERATING DEFICIT after administration expenditure OPERATING (DEFICIT)/SURPLUS FOR THE YEAR

2010

2009

R

R

(2 730 403)

(2 630 343)

(14 434)

12 239

Administration expenditure %

%

Personnel costs

79

83

Repairs and maintenance

13

21

Other

9

(4)

100

100

2010

2009

R

R

LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS for the year ended 30 June 2010

Msunduzi Municipality (inclusive of VAT)

Contributions by business are referred to in the Chairman’s report.

124

3 000 000

3 000 000


125 3.2 REPORT OF THE AUDITOR GENERAL AUDITOR’S REPORT OF THE AUDITOR-GENERAL TO THE KWAZULU-NATAL PROVINCIAL LEGISLATURE AND THE COUNCIL ON MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY

REPORT ON THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Introduction 1.

I have audited the accompanying consolidated financial statements of the Msunduzi Municipality, which comprise the consolidated statement of financial position as at 30 June 2010, and the consolidated statement of financial performance, the consolidated statement of changes in net assets and the consolidated cash flow statement for the year then ended, and a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information, as set out on pages 17 to 82.

Accounting officer’s responsibility for the consolidated financial statements 2.

The accounting officer is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with the South African Standards of Generally Recognised Accounting Practice (SA Standards of GRAP) and in the manner required by the Local Government Municipal Finance Management Act of South Africa, 2003 (Act No. 56 of 2003) (MFMA) and the Division of Revenue Act of South Africa, 2010 (Act No. 1 of 2010) (DoRA). This responsibility includes: designing, implementing and maintaining internal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error; selecting and applying appropriate accounting policies; and making accounting estimates that are reasonable in the circumstances.

Auditor-General’s responsibility 3.

As required by section 188 of the Constitution of South Africa, 1996 (Act No. 108 of 1996), section 4 of the Public Audit Act of South Africa, 2004 (Act No. 25 of 2004) (PAA) and section 126(3) of the MFMA, my responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on my audit.

4.

I conducted my audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing and General Notice 1570 of 2009 issued in Government Gazette 32758 of 27 November 2009. Those standards require that I comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement.

5.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements.

6.

I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my audit opinion.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Basis for qualified opinion Property, plant and equipment 7.

The municipality did not review the residual values and useful lives of furniture and equipment at each reporting date in accordance with GRAP 17: Property, plant and equipment, as evidenced by 43,517 items of furniture and equipment with a gross carrying amount of R34 (2009: R34) being included in the financial statements at a R1 or zero net carrying amount whilst still being in use. Because of the nature of these assets, I was unable to confirm or verify by alternative means the value of furniture and equipment included in the financial statements at R26,249 million (2009: R26,963 million). Consequently, I did not obtain sufficient appropriate audit evidence to satisfy myself as to the valuation of furniture and equipment and the related adjustments to depreciation.

Investment property 8.

GRAP 16: Investment property requires that property held to earn rentals or for capital appreciation be recognized as investment property. As disclosed in note 9 to the financial statements, the municipality has not yet finalised the process of recognising all investment properties. As a result, buildings, included under property, plant and equipment, which are potentially investment properties have not been classified as investment property in the financial statements. Consequently I could not satisfy myself as to the valuation and completeness of the investment properties and the accuracy of the necessary adjustments to land and buildings, depreciation and accumulated surplus.

9.

Investment property of R5, 580 million was incorrectly valued in the prior year at R220, 000 million. Had this property been recognised at the correct value, investment property would be decreased by R214, 420 million (2009: R214, 420 million) and the accumulated surplus in the current and prior year would be decreased by the same amount.

Irregular expenditure 10. Section 65(2) (i) of the MFMA requires the accounting officer to implement and maintain an appropriate procurement and provisioning system which is fair, equitable, transparent, competitive and cost-effective. During the audit, payments amounting to R19, 326 million were identified as being made in contravention of the supply chain management requirements. The municipality did not have adequate systems in place to identify and record all irregular expenditure. The municipality’s records did not permit the application of alternative audit procedures. Consequently, I did not obtain sufficient appropriate audit evidence to satisfy myself as to the completeness of the irregular expenditure disclosed in note 46 to the financial statements.

Employee costs: overtime payments 11. A proper system of control was not in place over the authorisation and recording of overtime claims on which I could rely for the purpose of my audit and there were no satisfactory alternative audit procedures that I could perform to obtain reasonable assurance that overtime payments were adequately authorised and correctly calculated as recorded in the accounting records. Consequently, I was unable to obtain sufficient appropriate audit evidence to satisfy myself as to the occurrence, accuracy and completeness of overtime payments of R50, 108 million.

126


127 Qualified opinion 12. In my opinion, except for the possible effects of the matters described in the Basis for qualified opinion paragraphs, these financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated and separate financial position of the Msunduzi Municipality as at 30 June 2010 and its consolidated and separate financial performance and its consolidated and separate cash flows for the year then ended are prepared, in all material respects, in accordance with the SA Standards of GRAP and in the manner required by the MFMA and DoRA.

Emphasis of matters 13. I draw attention to the matters below. My opinion is not modified in respect of these matters:

Significant uncertainties 14. With reference to note 42 to the financial statements, the municipality is a defendant in a delictual claim lawsuit. The municipality is opposing the claim as it believes the claim to be invalid. The ultimate outcome of the matter cannot be determined at present and no provision has been made in the financial statements for any liability that may result.

Restatement of corresponding figures 15. As disclosed in note 44 to the financial statements, the corresponding figures for 2008/2009 have been restated as a result of errors discovered during 2009/2010 in the financial statements of the Msunduzi Municipality for the year ended, 30 June 2009.

Fruitless and wasteful expenditure 16. As disclosed in note 47 to the financial statements, fruitless and wasteful expenditure to the amount of R290, 298 was incurred due to late payments to suppliers and an amount of R2, 270 million was incurred in respect of an information system that was purchased but not used.

Material losses 17. As disclosed in note 50 to the financial statements and as a result of theft, distribution losses, illegal tampering and ageing infrastructure, the municipality suffered significant electricity losses, of R66,484 million (204,543,091 kilowatts), water losses of R63,066 million (19,233,312 kilolitres) and inventory losses of R397,740 during the year.

Going concern 18. As disclosed in note 54 to the financial statements, the municipality is currently experiencing significant financial challenges, having incurred a net loss of R235, 920 million during the year ended 30 June 2010 and, as of that date, the entity’s current liabilities exceeded its current assets by R125, 454 million. These conditions, along with other matters as set forth in note 54, indicate the existence of a material uncertainty that may cast significant doubt on the municipality’s ability to operate as going concern.

Additional matter 19. I draw attention to the matter below. My opinion is not modified in respect of this matter:

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Unaudited supplementary schedules 20. The supplementary information set out on pages 83 to 103 does not form part of the financial statements and is presented as additional information. I have not audited these schedules and accordingly I do not express an opinion thereon.

REPORT ON OTHER LEGAL AND REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS 21. As required by the PAA and in terms of General Notice 1570 of 2009 issued in Government Gazette 32758 of 27 November 2009, I include below my findings on the report on predetermined objectives, compliance with the following key laws and regulations: the MFMA, Local Government : Municipal Systems Act of South Africa, 2000(Act No. 32 of 2000) (MSA), the Municipal Supply Chain Management Regulations (GNR 868 of 30 May 2005)(Municipal SCM Regulations) and the Basic Conditions of Employment Act of South Africa,1997( Act No. 75 of 1997) (BCEA) and financial management (internal control).

Predetermined objectives 22. Material findings on the report on predetermined objectives, as set out on pages 145 to 268, are reported below:

Non-compliance with regulatory and reporting requirements Functioning of a performance audit committee 23. The audit committee functioning as the performance audit committee did not in accordance with section 14(4) of the Municipal Planning and Performance Management Regulations, 2001 • • •

meet at least twice during the financial year; review the municipality’s performance management system and make recommendations in this regard to the council of the municipality; and submit an auditor’s report to the council regarding the performance management system at least twice during the financial year.

Internal auditing of performance measurements 24. The internal auditors of the municipality did not audit the performance measurements on a continuous basis and did not submit quarterly reports on their audits to the municipal manager and the performance audit committee as required by section 45 of the MSA.

Lack of adoption or implementation of a performance management system 25. The municipality did not adopt and implement a framework that describes and represents how the municipality’s cycle and processes of performance planning, monitoring, measurement, review, reporting and improvement will be conducted, organised and managed, including determining the roles of the different role players, as required in terms of sections 36, 38 and 41(2) of the MSA, and regulations 7 and 8 of the Municipal Planning and Performance Management Regulations, 2001.

128


129 Usefulness of reported performance information 26. The following criteria were used to assess the usefulness of the planned and reported performance: • • •

Consistency: Has the municipality reported on its performance with regard to its objectives, indicators and targets in its approved integrated development plan, i.e. are the objectives, indicators and targets consistent between planning and reporting documents? Relevance: Is there a clear and logical link between the objectives, outcomes, outputs, indicators and performance targets? Measurability: Are objectives made measurable by means of indicators and targets? Are indicators well defined and verifiable, and are targets specific, measurable, and time bound?

The following audit findings relate to the above criteria:

Reported information not consistent with planned objectives, indicators and targets 27. The municipality has not reported on its performance against predetermined objectives/indicators/targets which is consistent with the approved integrated development plan.

Planned and reported targets not specific and measurable 28. The planned and reported target were not specific in clearly identifying the nature and the required level of performance and not measurable in identifying the required level of performance for the following selected objectives:• • • •

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/graded roads to surfaced roads. To provide 18,300 households in informal settlements with basic sanitation by 2011. To ensure access to electricity by poor communities. To provide households with access to basic water.

Reliability of reported performance information 29. The following criteria were used to assess the reliability of the planned and reported performance: • • •

Validity: Has the actual reported performance occurred and does it pertain to the entity i.e. can the reported performance information be traced back to the source data or documentation? Accuracy: Amounts, numbers and other data relating to reported actual performance has been recorded and reported appropriately. Completeness: All actual results and events that should have been recorded have been included in the reported performance information.

The following audit finding relates to the above criteria:

Reported targets not reliable as inadequate supporting source information was provided 30. For the reported targets relating to the objective: “To ensure access to electricity by poor communities”, which is material by nature, the validity, accuracy and completeness of the target could not be established as relevant source documentation could not be provided for audit purposes.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 No reporting against predetermined objectives, indicators and targets 31. The municipal entity, Safe City Pietermaritzburg, did not prepare and include an assessment by the entity’s accounting officer of its performance against any measurable performance objectives set in terms of the service delivery agreement or other agreement between the entity and its parent municipality, as required by section 121(4)(d) of the MFMA.

Inadequate content of integrated development plan 32. The integrated development plan of the municipality did not include all the key performance indicators for some of the strategic objectives and did not include performance targets set in terms of its performance management system as required by sections 26(i) and 41(1) (b) of the MSA and regulation 12 of the Municipal Planning and Performance Management Regulations, 2001.

Compliance with laws and regulations Included below are findings related to material non-compliance with the legislation as indicated:

Municipal Finance Management Act Municipal officials did not adhere to their statutory responsibilities per section 78(1) 33. Contrary to the requirements of section 78(1)of the MFMA, the senior managers and officials of the municipality exercising financial management responsibilities did not take reasonable steps within his/her areas of responsibility to ensure that: • • • •

the system of financial management and internal control established for the municipality is carried out diligently; the financial and other resources of the municipality were utilised effectively, efficiently, economically and transparently; all revenue due to the municipality was collected; and the assets of the municipality were managed effectively and that the assets were safeguarded and maintained to the extent necessary.

Payments were not made within the parameters set by the applicable legislation 34. Contrary to the requirements of section 65(2)(e) of the MFMA, payments were not made within the required 30 days from the receipt of an invoice, or such a period as prescribed for certain categories of expenditure.

Expenditure was incurred in contravention of or not in accordance with applicable legislation resulting in irregular expenditure 35. Contrary to the requirements of section 62(1)(d) of the MFMA and Municipal SCM Regulations 2, irregular expenditure was incurred which was not in accordance with the requirements of the supply chain management policy of the municipality or the requirements of the municipality’s by-laws giving effect to such policy as defined in section 1 of the MFMA.

Expenditure incurred was made in vain or could have been avoided resulting in fruitless and wasteful expenditure 36. Contrary to the requirements of section 62 (1)(d) of the MFMA, fruitless and wasteful expenditure was incurred as it was made in vain, and could have been avoided had reasonable care been exercised, as defined in section 1 of the MFMA.

130


131 Financial statements not prepared in accordance with relevant legislation 37. Contrary to the requirements of section 122 (1) of the MFMA, the municipality did not prepare financial statements which fairly presented the results of its operations at 30 June 2010, as material adjustments were made to the financial statements submitted for audit on 31 August 2010.

Basic Conditions of Employment Act Compliance with other enabling legislation 38. Contrary to the requirements of section 10(1)(b) of the BCEA, working hours exceeded the prescribed norms legislated in terms of the BCEA as evidenced by the actual overtime expenditure exceeding the budget by R16,608 million.

INTERNAL CONTROL 39. I considered internal control relevant to my audit of the financial statements and the report on predetermined objectives as well as compliance with the MFMA, MSA , SCM Regulations and the BCEA, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of internal control. 40. The matters reported below are limited to the significant deficiencies regarding the basis for qualified opinion paragraph, the findings on the report on predetermined objectives and the findings on compliance with laws and regulations.

Leadership 41. The integrity, philosophy and operating style of the leadership of the municipality had resulted in a lack of effective control, accountability and oversight within the municipality which ultimately gave rise to serious financial challenges for the municipality. Consequently, timely actions were not taken to address significant deficiencies that were identified by internal and external audit. The integrity and ethical values of the employees were not evident and did not set the standard for sound corporate governance. Management’s philosophy and operating style did not promote fair, equitable, transparent, competitive and cost effective supply chain management processes that comply with legislation and minimises the likelihood of fraud, corruption, favouritism and unfair and irregular practices.

Financial and performance management 42. The municipality does not have competent individuals who understand controls and related processes over the financial reporting framework and performance management requirements. Pertinent information is not identified and captured in a form and time frame to support financial and performance reporting resulting in material amendments to the financial statements. General information technology controls are not adequately designed to maintain the integrity and security of the information systems data as these systems are ineffective in facilitating the preparation of the financial statements and performance reports.

Governance 43. The municipality does not assess the likelihood and impact of risks identified and does not respond to the assessed risks by determining a risk strategy/action plan to manage identified risks, as the risk of material misstatement due to fraud is not considered and internal controls are not selected and developed to prevent / detect and correct material misstatements in financial reporting and reporting on predetermined objectives. The implementation of internal and external audit recommendations are not monitored by the Audit Committee and performance reports are not reviewed prior to submission for audit.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 OTHER REPORTS Investigations in progress 44. Various allegations of misconduct against section 57 managers, managers and other employees are currently being investigated by the provincial intervention team. Several of these employees were suspended and disciplinary proceedings have commenced where applicable. Cases have also been handed over to the attorneys for consideration and to proceed with disciplinary action.

Pietermaritzburg 30 November 2010

132


133 3.3 REPORT OF THE AUDIT COMMITTEE We are pleased to present our report for the financial year ended 30th of June 2010. Audit Committee Members and Attendance: The audit committee consisted of six members listed hereunder as per its approved terms of reference to comply with section (4) (b) of the Municipal Finance Management Act No. 56 of 2003, hereafter referred to as the MFMA. Two members resigned during the year. During the current year the Provincial Department of Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs intervened and placed the municipality under its administration, the Audit Committee sat for 6 meetings during this period.

Meetings Attended Name

Number of Meetings Attended

Mr. MA Jordan (Chairperson) Professional Accountant in private practice Ms S Kershaw (Deputy Chairperson) Attorney in private practice Ms K Zama Chief Financial Officer, CA (SA) Mr. M Ntuli Managing Director Mr. A Layman1 Business Chamber Chief Executive Mr. P. Dlamini2

4 6 6 5 3 6

Business Executive Audit Committee Responsibility The Audit Committee reports that it has complied with its responsibilities arising from Section 166 of the MFMA and Treasury Regulation 3.1.13. The Audit Committee also reports that it has adopted appropriate formal terms of reference as its audit committee charter. It has regulated its affairs in compliance with this charter and has discharged all it’s responsibilities as contained therein, and intends revising the charter to factor in the recommendations of the Administrator’s turnaround strategy. The effectiveness of internal control The system of internal control was not entirely effective as compliance with the minimum prescribed policies and procedures were lacking in certain instances. During the year under review several instances of non-compliance were reported by internal and external auditors that resulted from the breakdown in the functioning of internal controls. Significant control weaknesses have been reported by the Auditor General under the qualification and emphasis of matter paragraphs and in the management letter. In most instances, weaknesses reported previously have not been fully and satisfactorily addressed. The effect of these instances has been included in the annual financial statements. The committee seeks to continue discharging its duties in line with the Audit Committee terms of reference to ensure improvements in the effectiveness of the internal controls. Municipality Performance and Risk Assessment The Audit committee expressed, throughout the year, its dissatisfaction with the lack of quarterly reports or performance management related policies, framework and quarterly assessments that are necessary to ascertain spending against planned Key Performance Areas, Key Performance Indicators and service delivery targets. It is 1 2

Resigned on the 30 November 2010 Resigned on the 21 July 2010

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 the considered view of the Audit Committee that the municipality failed to comply with sections 166(2) (v) of the Municipal Finance Management Act read together with 38 to 40 of the Municipal Systems Act No 32 of 2000. The Committee approved the Risk Management Support Strategy Plan aimed at enabling the municipality to reach a risk management maturity level 3. However, due to the financial and various other constraints and challenges the plan has not yet been implemented. The quality of monthly management / quarterly reports submitted in Terms of the Act and the Division of Revenue Act The committee was satisfied with the quality of monthly management/ quarterly reports submitted in terms of the Act and Division of Revenue Act but not with the content of the monthly and quarterly reports issued during the year under review as they seldom included management comment. Evaluation of Financial Statements The Audit Committee has reviewed and discussed the audited annual financial statements to be included in the annual report, with the Auditor General and the Municipality; reviewed the Auditor Generals management letter and management’s response thereto; reviewed changes in accounting policies and practices; and reviewed significant adjustments resulting from the audit. The committee concurs and accepts the Auditor Generals conclusions on the annual financial statements, and is of the opinion that the audited annual financial statements be accepted and read together with the report of the Auditor General

Mr. M. A. JORDAAN Chairperson of the Audit Committee Date: 12 January 2011

134


135 3.4 SUMMARIZED RESPONSE TO THE AUDITOR GENERAL REPORT BY MUNICIPAL MANAGER FOR COUNCIL - 23 December 2010 RESPONSE TO THE REPORT OF THE AUDITOR - GENERAL ON THE CONSOLIDATED ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2010 BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE OF REPORT The report of the Auditor-General dated 30 November 2010 on the Audit of the Accounts of the Council for the financial year ended 30 June 2010, has been received and is on the Council agenda. Section 21(1) and (2) of the Public Audit Act, 2004 (Act No. 25 of 2004) states: (1)

The Auditor-General must submit an audit report in accordance with any legislation applicable to the auditee which is the subject of the audit.

(2)

If there is no such legislation as contemplated in subsection (1) the Auditor-General must submit the audit report to the relevant legislature within a reasonable time.

Also the requirements of the Municipal Finance Management Act 56 of 2003 (MFMA) Section 126 (1) and (2) must be complied with. Comments and action on matters raised in the report are set out below with the numbering corresponding to the Auditor-General’s report.

GENERAL RESPONSE The Auditor General once again expressed a qualified opinion. The audit opinion has not improved from the 2008/2009 financial year. The qualification is based on non-compliance, with Generally Recognised Accounting Practice (GRAP), in two main areas: property, plant and equipment (GRAP 17), and investment property (GRAP 16), and non compliance with policies and procedures with regards to irregular expenditure and overtime. The audit report revealed serious deficiencies in the supply chain procedures resulting in irregular expenditure, and serious internal control deficiencies, which is also manifested in the over expenditure on overtime, and the loss of more than R129 million on electricity and water. The municipality’s Integrated Development Plan/Budget alignment and performance management system need concerted and specialised attention. Our emphasis on, annually growing our Capital Budget, and achieving full expenditure thereof, surely is one of, if not the primary measure of a municipality’s performance. While we have tried to provide roads, water, sanitation and electricity on an unprecedented scale, we were placed under administration in March 2010 in terms of section 139 (b) of the Constitution. Due to the unavailability of cash the municipality could not spend 100% of its capital budget thereby not delivering 100% service delivery in certain areas.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 REPORT ON THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 1.

Introduction

Noted 2.

The accounting officer’s responsibility for the financial statements

Noted 3.

Responsibility of the Auditor - General

Noted from point 3 to 7

Basis for qualified opinion 8.

Property, plant and equipment

The Asset Management Unit only reviewed the useful life of fully depreciated assets and this information is awaited from the consultant PriceWaterhouseCoopers. This exercise is targeted to be completed by end of January 2011. Following the revision of the audit finding by the Auditor General the asset unit is in the process of reviewing all the R1 assets and this exercise is targeted for completion by February 2011. In order to comply with GRAP, in April of every financial year, all assets on the asset register that are close to being fully depreciated will be identified and their useful lives will be reviewed. 9 and 10. Investment property The supply chain management process to appoint and award the service provider to update the asset register has been completed. The service provider has commenced with his key performance areas and is on target to be completed by end of January 2011. Upon completion all discrepancies with respect to land values will be corrected, and the asset register will be updated accordingly. 11. Irregular expenditure Irregular expenditure was confined to the following areas: Awards to persons in service of the state and service of the Municipality The Supply Chain Management Unit has in its possession a declaration file containing declarations made only by staff members. However, Supply Chain Management Staff were requested to complete new Declarations of Interest for the current Financial Year. Should staff members not declare business interests in terms of section 5(1) of the Code of Conduct stringent controls shall be enforced and disciplinary action shall be taken against the said staff member if found guilty of this offence. Three quotations not received/ Splitting of Orders The Supply Chain Management processes are subject to definite time lines which is cumbersome when business units make requests without the proper and timeous planning. At the time of tender, competition between suppliers is guaranteed as not less than three tenderers collect bid documents. At the time of tender closing only one tenderer may respond. The award of the tender may be subject to service delivery to communities and any delay in the award leads to hampering of services. Furthermore, the tender results are established at tender opening meetings and become public interest and public information. Should only one tender be received, a possible retender could take a possible three to six months and also does not guarantee that three quotes will be received again. Deliberate splitting of orders will be monitored to ensure that that this practice does not continue.

136


137 Awards without proof of Tax Clearance All Supply Chain Management staff are trained and are aware of the above tender requirement. A checklist including the above has been compiled for the inclusion into all tender documents. Stringent control measures will take effect in future. Final Award/recommendation to the Accounting Officer not made by a properly constituted Adjudication Committee All samples for the above audit were contracts that were awarded by the Bid Adjudication Committee, resolutions of which were available on request albeit that these resolutions may not have been placed in the contract files but filed separately. In future all recommendations to the Municipal Manager will be taken by a properly constituted Bid Adjudication Committee. All committee resolutions shall be placed on contract files for ease of reference by the Auditor/s. Invitation of competitive bids not advertised in a newspaper The sample requested for by the Auditor was Contract Supply Chain Management (3) 31 of 09/10 which pertains to the re-tender. Information on the previous tender will be found on the initial contract file i.e Supply Chain Management(3) 3 of 09/10. Separate files are created due to the fact that they are separate tenders. In future, closed tenders will be linked to previous tenders in one contract file bearing the same description and reasons for a closed bid, stated as a file note. Bids not recorded in the Register of all bids received It is recorded that out of twelve samples audited one sample did not contain the tender opening register and was not placed on the contract file. Tender opening registers are however, recorded in triplicate bound in a separate book. At any given time a copy of the tender opening register may be obtained from the Supply Chain Management Office. In future, the unit will endeavor to have all opening registers on file. 12. Employee costs: overtime payments While Section 10(1) of the Basic Conditions of Employment does prohibit an employee working more than 10 hours per week, it is also important to note the provisions of Section 6(2) which states: “Sections 9, 10(1), 14(1), 15(1), 17(1), and 18(1), do not apply to work which is required to be done without delay owing to circumstances for which the employer could not reasonably have been expected to make provision and which cannot be performed by employees during their ordinary hours of work.” The above applies to staff in traffic and security, health, electricity, fire, water, sewerage and refuse business units who are on standby and are called out to attend to emergencies after hours. Notwithstanding this provision, managers are called upon to try and limit, for safety reasons, the amount of emergency work carried out by individuals by spreading the call outs amongst standby staff. In view of the reactive nature of operations in the above units, the Administrator has given authority for employees to work more than 40 hours per month (10x4) subject to regular reporting on the amount of overtime worked and the reasons therefore. The overtime policy has been reviewed and approved by Council on 30 June 2010. This policy includes, inter alia, control measures to minimise abuse and ensure overtime worked is within budget and in compliance with the Basic Conditions of Employment Act. For the monitoring of overtime, monthly statistics are being generated and analysed and corrective measures are being auctioned by the business units. The municipality’s organagram is presently being reviewed; this will result in the centralisation of the processing of overtime to ensure consistency in the processing, authorisation and control of overtime.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 13. Qualified opinion Noted

EMPHASIS OF MATTER 14. Noted 15. Significant uncertainties In terms of GRAP 19 – Provisions, contingent liabilities and assets, a provision shall be recognised when: (a) (b) (c)

an entity has a present obligation (legal or constructive) as a result of a past event; it is probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits or service potential will be required to settle the obligation; and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation.

If these conditions are not met, no provision shall be recognised. On 3 April 2008 an aircraft belonging to Sappi was damaged at the Oribi Airport after it passed over a cast-iron manhole-cover which fractured causing the right hand wing-wheel to drop into a cavity. Msunduzi insurers have voided the policy on the strength of an alleged failure to disclose material facts. Notice has been given to the SAPPI Insurers that we dispute their repudiation of the claim. The municipality has not had any further communication from Sappi’s attorneys.   SAPPI has not instituted a lawsuit against the municipality and it is not clear whether the event gives rise to a legal obligation. Although an estimate was provided as a contingent liability, no reliance can be placed on this amount due to no lawsuit being initiated to date. As the conditions to raise a provision in terms of GRAP 19 were not met, no provision was raised, but was disclosed as a contingent liability, notifying the users of the financial statements of a potential liability the municipality might be faced with in the future. 16. Restatement of corresponding figures Restatements of corresponding figures are in line with the accounting standard: GRAP 3 - Accounting Policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Errors. GRAP 3 paragraph 41 gives guidance on how to deal with material errors that are not discovered until a subsequent period. These prior period errors are corrected in the comparative information presented in the financial statements for that subsequent period. 17. Fruitless and wasteful expenditure A report will be done to Full Council on the total value of all fruitless and wasteful expenditure, irregular expenditure for the 2009/2010 financial year. Since the municipality was placed under administration, an expenditure committee was established in order to review all requests for expenditure prior to service being rendered by a service provider in order to determine the need for the service. This committee will continue to review requests in order to reduce fruitless and wasteful expenditure. A corporate communications minute was sent out to all staff in November 2010, advising staff that the officials found to be responsible for late payment of invoices will be held accountable for interest and penalties incurred due to the late payment.

138


139 18.

Material losses

Noted. 18.1 Electricity losses

The acceptable norm of electricity loss is 3%. The significant electricity losses of 204,543,091 kWh: 12 % occurred during the year under review, which resulted material revenue losses to the municipality.

The loss above the norm is due to theft, distribution losses, illegal tampering of electricity meters and can also be attributable to the ageing infrastructure.

18.2 Water losses

The acceptable norm in developing countries of water loss is 20%.The significant water losses of 19,233,312 kl : 33 % occurred during the year under review, which resulted material revenue losses to the municipality.

The loss above the norm is due to theft, distribution losses, illegal tampering of water meters and can also be attributable to the ageing infrastructure.

Water and electricity distribution management was implemented by the Provincial Intervention Team (PIT). PIT has identified and stopped several illegal connections. A 5 year strategic plan for reduction of non-revenue water and a similar plan for electricity management have been drafted for the next 5 years.

Operation Pitbull was established to:

• • • •

Action taken against perpetrators is as follows:

Consumers with a direct connection where the meter has been by-passed An average consumption was back charged for a maximum period of three years. The MCB charge was back charged for a maximum period of three years with a maximum MCB value of 100 amps.

Both electricity and water services were removed where theft of consumption was found.

These consumers were subjected to a further audit within 14 days and if theft had resumed the following action was taken:

• • • •

Consumers with MCB’s of a higher value than billed for

The consumer was back charged for three years at 100Amps. Consumers were cautioned and advised to do a load test to establish the correct MCB requirement Consumers were requested to make application for the correct size MCB

audit all electricity and water meters and conduct a data clean-up check electricity mini circuit breaker (MCB) values check for illegal tampering of meters check for theft of electricity and water

Services removed Illegal cable removed Consumers were cautioned that they would be criminally charged for theft Domestic consumers were charged an additional fee of R10000 and Commercial consumers R250000

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10

Consumers where meters had been tampered with

An average consumption was back charged for a maximum period of three years These consumers were subjected to a further audit within 14 days Consumers were cautioned not to tamper with their meters.

Electricity theft by informal settlements

All cable was removed Residents were warned not steal and threatened with criminal charges

18.3 Inventory losses

19.

Quarterly inventory counts are to be performed going forward. An inventory management plan has been drafted which indicate the procedures that have been implemented with regard to receipts, issuing, safeguarding and physical verification of stores items. Monthly reconciliations are also being performed. An inventory policy is being drafted as part of the Supply Chain Management policies and procedures.

Going concern

The Msunduzi Municipality was placed under Provincial Government intervention in terms of section 139 (1) (b) of the Constitution. The financial crises came to be because of poor controls, rampant corruption amongst senior staff, failure to prepare the mid-year adjustments budget and the 2010/11 budget in time and other issue relating to poor internal control and procedures, which has placed tremendous pressure on the municipality’s liquidity ratio and financial sustainability. Although certain of the strategies have already being implementation by the Provincial Intervention Team, it is the assumption that it will take sometime for the municipality to recover. The Provincial Intervention Team appointed by the Provincial Department of Corporate Governance drafted four Strategies consisting of a Financial Strategy, an Infrastructure Development Strategy, a Community Service Strategy and a Good Governance Strategy. With regards to financial strategic is the following financial measures being implemented to achieve the turn around strategic of the municipality: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7. 8. 9.

140

The MIG funds for the 2010/11 financial year is reprioritised in order to use funds for revenues enhancement projects including proper contract management A comprehensive Debt Collection strategy has been developed to ensure a much more effective debt collection. This would result in increased levels in debt collection. A project of fortifying electricity meters starting with high risk areas is implemented as a way of reducing electricity losses, thefts and illegal connections A project for installing water district meters in order to establish water losses in the various distribution regions will be implemented in order to cope with the current water losses. A new tariff structure has been developed for electricity and such structures will also be developed for water, sewer and refuse so that the correct revenue may be billed and collected. The tariff structures will take into consideration the funding of expenditure required for 2010/11, budget deficit for 2009/10 and affordability to the community. The indigent policy will be reviewed so that only those who are legible actually benefit. Priority will be given to the updating of the valuation roll so that the municipality’s revenue may be levied accurately, lesser objections and increased collections. A fully fledged exercise to recover debt will be in place from 1 July 2010. Feasibility studies are currently performed in order to consider the viability of the airport, market and forestry. Where need be, will loose relationships with several institutions be formalised in order to save cost.


141 10. Land or other assets identified can be disposed of to generate additional revenue for capital projects, R 20 million worth of land will be sold in the 2010/11 financial year. These sales were identified earlier in the 2009/10 financial year. 11. Council will reduce council funded projects to a minimal and maximise utilisation of external funding. 12. The Budget will focus on service delivery provision and nice to have items is eliminated from the budget. 13. An effective Supply Chain Management will be in place to eliminate abuse, corruption and theft. 14. Policies which were draining the council’s cash, such as Locomotion, Overtime and Travel and Subsistence have been reviewed.

ADDITIONAL MATTERS 20. Noted 21. Unaudited supplementary schedules Noted 22. Report on other legal and regulatory requirements Noted 23. Predetermined objectives Noted

Non–compliance with regulatory and reporting requirements 24.

Functioning of a performance audit committee

Noted In the 2010/ 2011 financial year, the performance audit committee will meet, at least, twice during the financial year. Firstly to assess the mid-year performance report and secondly, to assess the annual performance report. During the mid-year assessment a reviewed PMS policy and Annual PMS plan will be submitted to the performance audit commit for review. Based on the above, the performance audit committee will submit a report to Council regarding the PMS. 25.

Internal auditing of performance measurements

Noted. As from the 2010/ 2011 financial year, the internal audit unit of the Municipality will conduct quarterly audits on information reported in the quarterly SDBIP reports and submit such report to the Municipal Manager, performance audit committee and Council. 26.

Lack of adoption or implementation of a performance management System

Noted. During the mid-year assessment a reviewed PMS policy and Annual PMS plan will be submitted to Council for adoption. 27. to 28. Usefulness of reported performance information- reported information not consistent with planned objectives, indicators and targets Noted.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Whilst the Msunduzi Municipality adopted the Organizational Performance Management System (OPMS) some few years back, the system was not fully operational, the implementation of it was done in phases. Only the S57 employees were performance managed. In measuring the organizational performance, the Municipality then used the SDBIP as the performance measuring tool and the migration to fully operationalize the OPMS has greatly improved during this financial year. 29. Planned and reported targets not specific and measurable Noted. All indicators contained in the approved SDBIP 2010/ 2011 are Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and have a Timeframe. 30. to 31. Reliability of reported performance information – reported targets supporting source information was provided

not reliable as inadequate

Noted Since the internal audit unit will be conducting quarterly performance audits on information reported in the quarterly reports of the SDBIP, all source documentation will have to be made available. As from the second quarterly reports of the SDBIP, all Business Units will be requested to indicate the source documentation for all reported achievements. 32. No reporting against predetermined objectives, indicators and targets Noted. Safe City will be engaged in order for them to submit an annual performance assessment/ report, including an assessment by the accounting officer of its performance against measurable performance objectives, to the Municipal Manager. 33. Inadequate content to integrated development plan Noted. The audit finding identified some projects/priorities that were implemented for 2009/10 financial year with neither planned objectives nor indicators in the IDP. That rare anomaly was caused by a prevailing culture of a lack of timeous submissions by business units which has improved thus far with the intervention of the Provincial Intervention Team, a two day turn-around response has been adopted.

Compliance with laws and regulations Municipal Finance Management Act 34. Municipal officials did not adhere to their statutory responsibilities per section 78 (1) Noted. Steps and procedures have been put in place to adhere to section 78. 35. Payments were not made within the parameters set by the applicable legislation As per the Financial Regulations, suppliers are paid within 30 days of receiving statement or agreed upon. This is also a condition of the municipality and appears on the official order of the municipality. Payments can only be processed once the goods received note or sundry payment voucher is received from the business units as these documents are the confirmation that the services or goods are rendered and received.

142


143 Some instances suppliers are invoicing the business units before the services are rendered and payments are only processed once goods received notes are received from the business units. Due to the municipality being under administration as from the 8th March 2010, expenditure must be submitted to the expenditure committee for approval. Suppliers and business units are informed on a regular basis in writing of the cut off dates for processing of all payments but documents are still being received in Creditors after the cut off date for processing. Acting Executive managers will advise the relevant business units and suppliers to comply with the cut off dates and to ensure there are no late payments. Order clerks will be placed at Procurement so that expenditure can be paid timeously. A minute on corporate communications was sent out to all staff in November 2010, advising staff that the officials found to be responsible for late payment of invoices will be held accountable for interest and penalties incurred due to the late payment. 36. Expenditure was incurred in contravention of or not in accordance with applicable legislation resulting in irregular expenditure. In order to improve the situation, the SCM policy has been amended to include tighter controls and was accordingly approved by Full Council in November 2010. Moreover, the current SCM procedure manual is being revised in line with the SCM policy and once completed; workshops are planned in the New Year for all relevant staff. It must also be mentioned that that the root cause of non - compliance does not lie solely at SCM but with business units that simply by-pass the SCM processes / procedures. This is being addressed in the new SCM organogram where all order clerks are to be centralized to the SCM unit. Moving forward, stricter SCM controls and due diligence will be enforced throughout the organisation. 37. Expenditure incurred was made in vain or could have been avoided resulting in fruitless and wasteful expenditure. Noted – see response to 17. 38.

Financial statements not prepared in accordance with relevant legislation

Noted. Financial statements were handed to the Auditor General on 31 August 2010 as legislated in the MFMA , however as the audit was being conducted the auditor’s from the Auditor General allowed, the municipality to pass subsequent journal entries and amend the annual financial statements. The amended annual financial statements were handed in on 5 November 2010. .

Basic Conditions of Employment Act

39. Compliance with other enabling legislation Noted – see response to 12.

Internal Control 40. to 41. Noted 42. Leadership Noted.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 43.

Financial and performance management

Noted. 44.

Governance

Noted.

Other reports 45.

Investigations in progress

Forensic investigation conducted into a public event held in the Msunduzi Municipality, which was forwarded to the Mayor on Msunduzi Municipality on 3 August 2010: The recommendations of the investigation have been implemented in respect of the disciplinary action needed to be taken against those persons identified in the report by Ngubane & Partners in respect of the Nkosi Mlaba Cultural Event. Forensic Investigation conducted into the financial irregularities in Msunduzi Municipality dated April 2007: To date, the recommendations of the investigation have been implemented in respect of certain individuals identified in the report. Further investigation is being conducted with regard to other individuals. Legal Counsel has been instructed to consider all criminal and civil action needed to be taken against those persons identified. The various internal investigations instituted by the Administrator since taking office. Various internal investigations are underway however the findings of the investigations are not yet in the public domain and cannot be released at this stage. The recommendations of the investigations (albeit not finalised) are being implemented by the Municipality in terms of disciplinary/criminal/civil action. 46.

Recommendation

It is recommended: That the report dated 30 November 2010 by the Auditor - General to the members of the Council on the financial statements of The Msunduzi Municipality for the year ended 30th June 2010 be noted. That the report dated 23 December 2010 by the Municipal Manager, in reply to the Auditor-General’s report, be noted. That the Executive: Internal Audit be tasked to investigate the findings of the Auditor-General in respect of irregular expenditure as disclosed in note no. 46 in the 2009/2010 consolidated annual financial statements. Submitted for consideration as per Legislation.

T. MASEKO MUNICIPAL MANAGER (Acting)

144


Number of households with access to basic water

Number of households with access to basic sanitation

Number of households with access to basic electricity

Number of households with access to basic solid waste removal

Number of households with access to Free Basic Water

Number of households with access to Free Basic Sanitation

Number of households with access to Free Basic Electricity

Number of households with access to Free Basic Solid Waste Removal

% municipality’s capital budget spent on projects identified in the municipality’s IDP

Number of jobs created through municipal LED initiatives (refer to no 8 in Questionaire)

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

STANDARD PROVINCIAL INDICATOR/ MUNICIPAL PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

1

NO

_

N/A

40000

8000

37891

5304

52 090

3000

37891

5304

BACKLOG

nil

80

69.42

6 946

7 311

46 387

38 567

3 910

2 465

15 277

1 350

PREVIOUS YEAR’S CONCLUDING BASELINE MEASUREMENT (2008/2009)

no figures stipulates

100

_

_

_

_

_

3000

_

_

ANNUAL DEVELOPMENT TARGET FROM THE IDP (2009/2010 IDP TARGET)

300

56,5%

20 600

630

3779

34407

77 910

1100

7251

12000

CURRENT YEAR’S CONCLUDING BASELINE MEASUREMENT (2009/2010)

_

100 100 100

7000

10000

4043

35112

7000

4500

11431

12000

3 YEAR TARGET FROM THE IDP (2012/2013 TARGET)

SECTION 1 LEGISLATED KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS REGULATION 10, MUNICIPAL PLANNING AND PERFORMANCE REGULATIONS, DATED 21 AUGUST 2001

4.1 2009/2010 ANNUAL MUNICIPAL PERFORMANCE REPORT:

CHAPTER FOUR: REPORT ON ANNUAL MUNICIPAL PERFORMANCE

Executive: Water & Sanitation (Acting)

SOURCE OF INFOMATION

Executive: Water & Sanitation (Acting)

Waste Management Statistics

Executive: Electricity (Acting)

_

This number refers to Eskom customers only.

Development Planning Business Unit

CFO (Acting)

Waste Management Statistics

Executive: Electricity (Acting)

Depending on Darvill Executive: Water & capacity Sanitation (Acting)

Vulindlela recovery

This number refers to new connections during the financial year.

depending on Darvill Executive: Water & capacity Sanitation (Acting)

standpipe eradication (approx 20 house holds per standpipe)

ACTIONS TO CORRECT UNDER PERFORMANCE/ COMMENTS

AUDIT OF INFORMATION YES NO

145

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146

Number of people from employment equity target groups employed in the three highest management levels in the municipality (consolidated figure)

Number of women employed in the three highest management levels in the municipality (consolidated figure)

Number of people with diabilities employed in the three highest management levels in the municipality (consolidated figure)

% of the municipality’s budget spent on implementing the work place skills plan (refer to KPI 18+19 below)

Financial viability 1 (refer to Annexure A)

Financial viability 2 (refer to Annexure A)

Financial viability 3 (refer to Annexure A)

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

0

BACKLOG

STANDARD PROVINCIAL INDICATOR/MUNICIPAL PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

Number of Councilors undergone leadership development training

Number of senior management (Section 57) undergone leadership development training

NO

18

19

2

0

BACKLOG

9

52

PREVIOUS YEAR’S CONCLUDING/ CONSOLIDATED BASELINE MEASUREMENT (2006/2007)

R3 926 949

PREVIOUS YEAR’S CONCLUDING BASELINE MEASUREMENT (2008/2009)

ADDITIONAL PROVINCIAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

SECTION 2

STANDARD PROVINCIAL INDICATOR/ MUNICIPAL PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

NO

CURRENT YEAR’S CONCLUDING BASELINE MEASUREMENT (2009/2010)

3 YEAR TARGET FROM THE IDP (2012/2013 TARGET)

3%

N/A

N/A

ANNUAL DEVELOPMENT TARGET FROM THE IDP (2007/2008 IDP TARGET)

0

3

CURRENT YEAR’S CONCLUDING/ CONSOLIDATED BASELINE MEASUREMENT (2007/2008)

Please refer to attached ‘Annexure A’

Not available.

NIL

N/A

N/A

3 YEAR TARGET OF THE IDP (2010/2011 TARGET)

Not available.

7 Made up of Top and Senior Management

33 Made up of Top and Senior Management

ANNUAL DEVELOPMENT TARGET FROM THE IDP (2009/2010 IDP TARGET)

SOURCE OF INFORMARION

CFO (Acting)

Executive: HR (Acting)

Executive: HR (Acting)

Executive: HR (Acting)

Executive: HR (Acting)

SOURCE OF INFOMATION

N/A -NO PROJECTION DEPENDENT ON TRAINING NEEDS

Executive: HR (Acting)

N/A - NO PROJECExecutive: HR (ActTION DEPENDANT ON ing) TRAINING NEEDS OF NEW COUNCILLORS

ACTIONS TO CORRECT

ACTIONS TO CORRECT UNDER PERFORMANCE/ COMMENTS

YES

NO

AUDIT OF INFORMATION

AUDIT OF INFORMATION YES NO

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


STANDARD PROVINCIAL INDICATOR/ MUNICIPAL PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

% improved cost recovery with respect to trading services: water

% improved cost recovery with respect to trading services: sanitation

% improved cost recovery with respect to trading services: electricity

% improved cost recovery with respect to trading services: refuse

% improved cost recovery with respect to trading services: municipal rates

% improved cost recovery with respect to trading services: other (state others by inserting appropriate lines)

% of MIG budget spent

% of total municipal capital budget spent

% of the municipal capital budget spent in applicable nodes as per the PSEDS

% of the municipal capital budget spent in applicable corridors as per the PSEDS

% of the total capital budget spent in strategic intervention areas of the Spatial Development Framework

% of the the total municipal budget allocated to the development of community social infrastructure

Number of households serviced with formal housing

NO

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

16000

_

N/A

42.83

Not Available

BACKLOG

2550

35%

485 808

80

99

N/A

123%

92%

98%

100.96%

137%

PREVIOUS YEAR’S CONCLUDING BASELINE MEASUREMENT (2008/2009)

1017

15,5%

Information not available

Information not available

1800

_

_

65.80%

72.80%

88%

59%

95%

137%

92%

CURRENT YEAR’S CONCLUDING BASELINE MEASUREMENT (2009/2010)

Information not available

100

100

N/A

100%

98%

100%

98%

100%

ANNUAL DEVELOPMENT TARGET FROM THE IDP (2009/2010 IDP TARGET)

2500

_

_

N/A

100

100

100

100

100

3 YEAR TARGET FROM THE IDP (2012/2013 TARGET)

Finance Support Services Manager: Community Services & Social Equity

Manager: IDP

CFO (Acting)

CFO (Acting)

CFO (Acting)

CFO (Acting)

CFO (Acting)

CFO (Acting)

CFO (Acting)

CFO (Acting)

SOURCE OF INFOMATION

Reasons: 1) sites Manager: Housing Delivery were not suitable for the construction of houses. 2) large houses exist on site and not enough space for the 30 m2 RDP house. 3) beneficiaries cannot be located.

Finalization of the Spatial Development Framework

N/A

ACTIONS TO CORRECT UNDER PERFORMANCE/ COMMENTS

N/A

AUDIT OF INFORMATION YES NO

147

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STANDARD PROVINCIAL INDICATOR/ MUNICIPAL PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

Number of ward committees established

Number of ward committees functional (conduct meetings, have records and discuss issues with the municipality)

Number of ward committees trained

NO

33

148

34

35

37

37

37

BACKLOG

37

37

37

PREVIOUS YEAR’S CONCLUDING BASELINE MEASUREMENT (2008/2009)

37

37

37

ANNUAL DEVELOPMENT TARGET FROM THE IDP (2009/2010 IDP TARGET)

37

37

37

CURRENT YEAR’S CONCLUDING BASELINE MEASUREMENT (2009/2010)

37

37

37

3 YEAR TARGET FROM THE IDP (2012/2013 TARGET)

Refers to training as was provided by the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs.

ACTIONS TO CORRECT UNDER PERFORMANCE/ COMMENTS

Office of the Speaker

Office of the Speaker

Office of the Speaker

SOURCE OF INFOMATION

AUDIT OF INFORMATION YES NO

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


2

1

“C” represents annual revenue actually received for services;

“B” represents total outstanding service debtors

“A”represents outstanding service debtors to revenue

Where:

A=B/C

“D” represents debt service payments (i.e. interest + redemption) due

“C” represents operating grants

“B”represents total operating revenue received -

“A”represents debt coverage

Where:

A= B-C/D

Financial Viability as Expressed by the Following Ratios

ANNEXURE A’ (REFER KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 15-17)

1,647,089,690 0.30

1,647,089,690 0.30

502,310,918

18.35

17.64

502,310,918

100,376,610

1,841,881,649

1,843,614,311 104,526,803

-238,439,897

0.30

1,647,089,690

502,310,918

17.64

104,526,803

1,843,614,311

-238,637,483

2,082,251,794

2008/2009

2008/2009

2,080,321,546

ACTUAL

TARGET

-238,637,483

2,082,251,794

CONCLUDING BASELINE 2008/2009

0.34

1,837,535,484

617,324,915

20.24

113,623,046

2,300,049,353

-256,900,967

2,556,950,320

2009/2010

ACTUAL -PROV

0.34

1,837,535,484

617,324,915

20.24

113,623,046

2,300,049,353

-256,900,967

2,556,950,320

2010/2011

TARGET

149

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3

150 173,886,854 0.65

173,886,854 0.65

112,867,232

112,867,232

“D”represents monthly fixed operating expenditure,

93,574,692

93,574,692

“C” represents investments

0.65

173,886,854

112,867,232

93,574,692

19,292,540

2008/2009

2008/2009

19,292,540

ACTUAL

TARGET

19,292,540

CONCLUDING BASELINE 2008/2009

“B”represents all available cash at a particular time

“A” represents cost coverage

Where:

A= B+C/D

Financial Viability as Expressed by the Following Ratios

0.41

216,834,873

89,373,430

89,328,845

44,585

2009/2010

ACTUAL -PROV

0.41

216,834,873

89,373,430

89,328,845

44,585

2010/2011

TARGET

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


151 2009/2010 ANNUAL MUNICIPAL PERFORMANCE REPORT COMPLIANCE CHECK QUESTIONAIRE MSUNDUZI LOCAL/ DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY NO

1

ITEM

Core administrative policies, plans, procedures, systems and frameworks developed in municipalities

STANDARD PROVINCIAL INDICATOR/ MUNICIPAL PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

In Place /yes

In proNo cess / progress review /no

ACTIONS TO CORRECT

Legally compliant Employment Equity Plan Workplace Skills Development Plan (staff other than Sec 57) Recruitment policy Legally compliant Supply Chain Management policy Budget policy

Use MFMA and Municipality’s Financial Regulations

Indigent support policy Credit control and debt collection policy Bank and investment policy

Currently use cash management policy

Asset and Liability management policy Tariff policy Risk management policy Revised bylaws Standing operating procedures and administrative delegations Anti-corruption Strategy and structures

Strategy has been approved; structures developed but not filled.

Internal and Financial and Performance Auditing structures and sustems Public Consultation and Participation Framework 2

Competency Frameworks

Competency Framework developed for the Administration Competency Framework developed for the Council

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 NO

3

ITEM

Implementing organograms

STANDARD PROVINCIAL INDICATOR/ MUNICIPAL PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

In Place /yes

In proNo cess / progress review /no

ACTIONS TO CORRECT

Approved Organogram Municipal organogram aligned to allocated and assigned powers and functions municipal manager post filled at the end of the financial year (EXCLUDING acting and not suspended) municipal manager post occupied occupied by PDI

N/A

municipal manager post occupied by women

N/A

Senior management POST (Section 57 only) posts filled at the end of the financial year (EXCLUDING acting and not suspended)

filled

vacant

Municipal Manager Monitoring and Evaluation (Performance Management)

N/A

Financial Management Technical Services Local Economic Development Community Services Corporate Services Development Planning number senior management posts (Section 57 only) occupied by PDI number senior management (Section 57 only) posts occupied by women number senior management posts (Section 57 only) occupied by disabled

152

Number 3 numbers must exclude the Municipal Manager posistion (information to Number 0 provided: number women Sec 57 occupants/ number of Sec 57 Number 0 post on organogram, eg 1/5)

advertised

if filled, occupied for how many months in the year

if filled, occupied with the same person/ not


153 NO

4

ITEM

Financial Management

STANDARD PROVINCIAL INDICATOR/ MUNICIPAL PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

In Place /yes

In proNo cess / progress review /no

ACTIONS TO CORRECT

Revenue Raising Strategy developed Debt Recovery Plan developed Approved budget by end of June Service Delivery Budget Implementation Plan (SDBIP) approved by July Submission of annual financial statements to the Auditor General by August

Currently in process

Results of Auditor Gen- Unqualified eral 09/10 audit (mark the appropriate block) Qualified

In process of being audited

No Opinion Disclaimer Functional billing system in place 5

Municipal Prop- Property Rates Policy erty Rates Act Valuation Role

6

Basic Services

Backlog study completed and verified by Statistics South Africa Municipal Infrastructure Implementation Strategy for 5 years Indigent Register Housing Strategy to eradicate informal settlements

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 NO

7

ITEM

Good Governance

STANDARD PROVINCIAL INDICATOR/ MUNICIPAL PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

In Place /yes

In proNo cess / progress review /no

ACTIONS TO CORRECT

Consultation and Public Participation Framework in place Customer Complaints system Traditional Leadership consultation and participation programme Conducted customer satisfaction surveys HIV/AIDS strategy developed Adopted Community Development Worker Frameworks

N/A

Adopted Section 53 Framework in terms of the MSystemsA adopted by Council District Coordinating Forum (DCF) established and operational

N/A

District Technical Forum established and operational

N/A

08/09 Annual Report adopted 09/10 Annual Performance Report Council adopted 08/09 Oversight Report Functional Audit Committee Functional Performance Audit Committee IDP adopted by end June 8

154

Local Economic LED programme developed Development Poverty alleviation programme adopted

PMS specialist on Audit Committee


BASIC & SUSTAINABLE SERVICES

MUNICIPAL INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND TRANSFORMATION

GOOD GOVERNANCE & PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

MUNICIPAL INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND TRANSFORMATION

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Asset maintenance & renewal Asset maintenance & renewal

Asset maintenance & renewal Protection of tourist attraction

Security

Creating a knowledgebased organization in support of efficient and effective : • monitoring & evaluation; • decision-making; • strategic direction; & City hall repairs & maintenance

Legislative compliance

Legislative compliance

Creating a knowledgebased organization in support of efficient and effective : • monitoring & evaluation; • decision-making; • strategic direction; & • service delivery. Public participation

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

Corporate business unit UNIT OF MEASURE

PROJECT 2009/2010

Publish & distrib- 5000 ute SDBIP

1

ANNUAL TARGET

All

N/a

WARD

Developed data base

New generator

Upgrade of city hall as per project manager schedule New lift

As per schedule of City hall refurappointed project man- bishment ager New lift + invoice Purchase new lift New generator + City hall new invoice generator

Purchased car park Car park guard house + City hall - car guard house invoice park guard houses City hall plant

As per schedule of appointed project manager

1

N/a

N/a

Feasibility & 1 complete data N/a development base of service delivery data base

Schedule of comCompleted renovations City hall - gen- As per schedule pleted renovations eral fabric renowith close-out report vations

Project management system

Completed annual Published annual report Compilation of 500 copies N/a report as per legisla- 2008/2009 annual report tive requirements as per legislative requirements Completed overPublished oversight Coordination Completed over- N/a report 2008/2009 of the oversight sight report sight report as per legislative requireprocess on the ments annual report 2008/2009

Publication and dis- Published & distributed tribution of SDBIP SDBIP

Organizational ser- Approved service deliv- Development vice delivery & bud- ery & budget impleof organizaget implementation mentation plan (SDBIP) tional SDBIP plan (SDBIP)

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

Annual report on the SDBIP 2009/10: ANNUAL ACHIEVED

1000000

1200000

4000000

900000

550000

1000000

1 000 000

70 000

300 000

200 000

Not achieved.

Not completed.

Not achieved.

Not achieved within projected timeframes.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Nil required Not achieved within projected timeframes.

2009/ 2010 Budget

Delays on project, mainly attributed to financial difficulties. Funds were consolidated to cater for City Hall renovations aove.

Approval was delayed due to discontinuation of Committee meetings during the 3rd quarter Lack of funds.

N/A

Lack of funds.

Delay in finalization of the budget.

REASON FOR DEVIATION

155

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


156 ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

A) provide support to coun- Training councilcillors lors on life skills programme B) empower councillors Functioning of ward committees

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

Record of stakeholders needs and meetings held

Approved 1st and final drafts

PROJECT 2009/2010

Number of reviewed/ adopted corporate sector plans within the deadlines as stipulated in the process plan One first idp draft and final draft

R11 m

All

All

4

Review previous adverts in publications Publish municipal publication

200 000

50 000

New material in 10 publications Annual municipal publication

25 000

Alignment of the idp plans with relevent stakeholders

200 000

100 000

R2m

R2m

60 000

All

All

All

5

R600 000

Hrd

2009/ 2010 Budget

All

WARD

5 zonal meetings All (1 per zone)

ANNUAL TARGET

Internal stakeholders consultation

Reviewed idp document

Corporate strategies review

5 zonal full council meetings Number of heritage cel- Heritage celebrations ebrations

Number of zonal full council meetings

Monitor progress and identify training needs

Reviving ward committee forums Computer skills training

Computer skills trainings in local government and finance Community and ward Conduct ward committee meetings committee and community meetings

UNIT OF MEASURE

Number of stakeholders meetings and adopted developed plans from the needs Representivity of the Linkages of various idp vision and goals stakeholders plans with PARTICIPATION in various stakehold- the idp ers and dissemination of information (public notices) To draw attention and Regular advertising Number of adverts awareness to Msunduzi in selected publiMUNICIPAL municipality/ Pietermaritzcations, showcasTRANSFORMATION & burg as a brand that repre- ing the city’s tourist Municipal publication sents investment attraction, attraction, enterINSTITUTIONAL events, tourism and service tainment centres, DEVELOPMENT delivery housing & industrial development

Review idp document in terms of its 1st and final drafts Conduct steering committee, broad planning committee and various stakeholders consultations GOOD GOVERNANCE & Networking and publicity PUBLIC

INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Provision of efficient human resources support A) bringing local governRotation of full ment to the people council meetings to the communities GOOD GOVERNANCE & B) create a link between Involvement of PUBLIC local, district and provincial amakhosi in council PARTICIPATION government meetings and the preservation oc their culture Develop and review corReviewed strategies porate strategy in line with and adopted idp MUNICIPAL approved corporate plans process plan TRANSFORMATION & and strategies

MUNICIPAL TRANSFORMATION & INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA Lack of funds.

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Not achieved.

Partially achieved (6 publications).

Achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

4

2

Not Achieved

Lack of support from business for advertising.

Budget constraints.

lack of funds.

A total of 99 ward committee meetings and a total of 92 Community meetings were held. Not Achieved lack of funds.

Not Achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


GOOD GOVERNANCE & PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

MUNICIPAL TRANSFORMATION & INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

To inform and make the public aware of council’s roles & functions To encourage all stakeholders to fully participate in matters relating to the budget, property rates, spatial development framework (SDF), etc.

To draw attention and awareness to Msunduzi municipality/ Pietermaritzburg as a brand that represents investment attraction, events, tourism and service delivery To ensure the development of a marketing strategy for the city Develop a communications strategy for the city

To draw attention and awareness to Msunduzi municipality/ Pietermaritzburg as a brand that represents investment attraction, events, tourism and service delivery

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

UNIT OF MEASURE

ANNUAL TARGET

Provide new Review previous television & material radio advertising for the city

Material provided

*assessment & response *develop timereport line to followup on COMMENTS QRT 1 & inputs and take appropriate action

2

*conduct survey during mayoral izimbizo

All

Completed com- N/a munication strategy 2 All

N/a

N/a

N/a

Develop communication strategy Mayoral izimbizo

Reviewed strategy doc- Implementation Reviewed stratument of strategy egy

Networking ses- 2 sessions sions

Conduct public Number of izimbizo participation/ mayoral izimbizo Conduct survey dur- *survey report ing mayoral izimbizo

N/a

WARD

All annual events N/a plus additional 2 (MTB & BMX world cup) As presented by As presented by N/a business units business units

· MTB world cup

Procure additional marketing material

PROJECT 2009/2010

Number of networking sessions

As presented by business units

Completed comCompleted communimunication strategy cation strategy

Review marketing strategy

Sound working relationship with business units Networking with other government departments, business sector & other relevant players Audio/visual marketing for the city

Have and provide New marketing material adequate marketing and branding material Marketing events for Number of events the city

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

3 500 000

100 000

180 000

R 250 000

250 000

R 1 500 000

100 000

2009/ 2010 Budget

Community needs survey conducted at all Izimbizo, except the ward committee imbizo held in June 2010. Not achieved.

Achieved.

Partially achieved (draft strategy)

Partially achieved (draft strategy)

Partially achieved.

Achieved. check previous reports

Fantasia; Edendale Marathon.

Total of 13 events for the financial year.

10 telescopic banners.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

No central coordination.

check with Brian

check with Brian

Due to lack of funds, all audio/ visual marketing was done as part of the marketing of various events.

REASON FOR DEVIATION

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158

GOOD GOVERNANCE & PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR ANNUAL TARGET

*identify focal per- *number of SBU’s supGender & sons from each SBU; porting the programme elderly ; *establish forums to address/deal with issues concerning all target groups (youth, elderly, children & people with disability) cont……

Mainstreaming & advancing all mayoral programmes (internally & externally) cont……

Schedule workshops with relevant government departments to get feedback on their ability to impact mayoral games Youth 1

PROJECT 2009/2010

*identify focal per- *number of SBU’s supsons from each SBU; porting the programme ; *establish forums to *number of forums established; address/deal with issues concerning all target groups (youth, elderly, children & people with disability) * number of per* number of persons attended learners drivsons attended learners drivers ers license license Leadership Training Completed Leadership Training *establish forums to *number of forums address/deal with established; issues concerning all target groups (youth, elderly, children & people with disability) cont…… *number of successful (forum) initiatives/ programmes cont…...

Completed plan (to improve relationship between relevant government departments & mayoral games)

UNIT OF MEASURE

Mainstreaming & advancing all mayoral programmes (internally & externally)

Strengthen relationship with Access the departgovernment departments ments with services relevant to the mayoral programmes

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

Not Achieved. Not Achieved.

Not Achieved. Not achieved. Not Achieved. Achieved. Not Achieved. Not Achieved. Not Achieved.

Not Achieved.

200 000 80 000 50 000 195 000 40 000 200 000

65 000

All All All All All All

85 000

All

All

13 Schools to be selected in the new financial year. 4 learners per school. 2 sessions

195 000

All

Not achieved.

No info. Provided.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Ongoing meetings with SAPS, DED and DTI

65 000

2009/ 2010 Budget

All

All

All

WARD

Lack of funds. Lack of funds. No buy in for Special Programs in Council. Lack of funds.

Lack of funds. Currently only gender focal persons. Lack of funds. structures not formalized Lack of funds.

Lack of buy-in from business units.

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


GOOD GOVERNANCE & PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Audit of all programmes Determine the number of opportunities through programme intervention

To determine the impact of mayoral programmes at large

Formulate policy

Adopted policy

Policy formulation

PROJECT 2009/2010

Mainstreaming & advancing all mayoral programmes (internally & externally) cont……

UNIT OF MEASURE

*identify focal per- *number of SBU’s supPeople with dissons from each SBU; porting the programme abilities ; *establish forums to address/deal with *number of forums issues concerning established; all target groups *number of successful (youth, elderly, chil(forum) initiatives/ prodren & people with grammes cont…... disability) cont……

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

Mainstreaming & advancing all mayoral programmes (internally & externally) cont……

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

2 audits

ANNUAL TARGET

N/a

N/a

All

WARD

350 000 330 000

65 000

2009/ 2010 Budget

Not Achieved.

Not Achieved. No info. Provided. Not Achieved.

Special Programmes Unit not consulted when formulating policies. no support for Special programs and no funds available.

Currently only gender focal persons. Lack of funds.

Not Achieved.

Not Achieved. Not Achieved.

Currently only gender focal persons. Lack of funds. Lack of funds.

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Not Achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

159

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LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR UNIT OF MEASURE

Promote economic development, skills and empowerment for youth, elderly and people with disabilities

To create awareness amongst the public on issues concerning people with disabilities

To improve the economic development environment for the youth, elderly and people living with disabilities through empowerment and skills development

To improve living conditions by educating the public on their responsibility to assist and support people with disabilities in all sectors of our community

2

All

All

All

All

All

Gender & elderly

Establish cooperatives for all target groups Provision of mentorship to up and coming and development businesses on a small to medium scale Assist with registration of business to government database

All

Children

WARD All

ANNUAL TARGET

Youth

PROJECT 2009/2010

*no. Of youth and people with disabilities admitted to institutes of higher learning; No. Of employment opportunities available to youth No. Of public members Awareness attending workshops workshops

*no. Of businesses up and running;

*no. Of co-operatives functional and operating;

To promote sports develop- Establish sports Number of structures ment & healthy living development structures

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

Not Achieved. Not Achieved. Achieved. Achieved. No info. Provided. Achieved. No info. Provided. Achieved. Ongoing

60 000 2 000 000 20 000 1 500 000 200 000 150 000 350 000 32 625

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Not achieved. Achieved. Not Achieved. Not Achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

3 000 000 269 000 45 000 135 680

2009/ 2010 Budget

Lack of funds. no support for youth month programme and no funds. Lack of funds. Lack of funds.

Lack of funds.

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


GOOD GOVERNANCE &PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

To promote sound goverReviewed adenance in accordance with quacy and funcKing 2 report tioning of the municipality’s framework of risk management, control and governance processes Municipal wide awareness of key risks and their synchronization into strategies Investigation of fraud and corruption activities within the municipality

PROJECT 2009/2010 ANNUAL TARGET

No of investigations finalized

Strategic and operational risks identified

N/A

All

All

250 000

250 000

900 000

Province

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Ongoing.

Not achieved.

Not achieved

All

Not achieved

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Not achieved

Province & infrastructure services

2009/ 2010 Budget

All

All

WARD

N/A Implementation Top 10 strateof Risk Manage- gic risks identified ment strategy and incorporated into strategic planning Implementation 5 investigations N/A of Anti-fraud finalized and and corruption reported strategy

Provision of housing for child-headed households, elderly & people with disabilities No. Of wheelchairConstruction of friendly sidewalks sidewalks that are wheelchairfriendly No. Of sectors conNegotiate with tacted all sectors to improve accessibility of buildings to people with disabilties Conduct data baseline Conduct data survey baseline survey on all child-headed households, orphans, oldaged homes & households with disabilities Determine type of Municipalities support & assistance & government offered to offer support & assistance to underresourced day care centres No of audit assignments Internal Audit 8 audit assignconducted Implementation ments comPlan pleted

UNIT OF MEASURE

To improve the living condi- To create a condu- No. Of households tions of all targeted groups cive environment for all target groups

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

Lack of funds to appoint service provider who would

Lack of funds.

No consultation during planning process.

No consultation during planning process.

No consultation during planning process.

REASON FOR DEVIATION

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162

Municipal Institutional Transformation and Development

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

40

Increase employability of youth by 10% Increase employability of youth by 10%

Contribute Towards Employability & Self Employability of Youth and Community

Contribute Towards Employability & Self Employability of Youth and Community

UNIT OF MEASURE

Effective and efficient operational frameworks are in place for application on the HRD planning Effective and efficient operational frameworks are in place for application on the HRD planning Effective and efficient operational frameworks are in place for application on the HRD planning Roll-out implemen- 300 tation of ABET Programme to all at NQF Level

To ensure a competent workforce to achieve Organizational objectives.

To ensure a competent workforce to achieve Organizational objectives.

To ensure a competent workforce to achieve Organizational objectives.

To ensure a competent workforce to achieve Organizational objectives.

Operational Training Centre

Functional Resource Centre

3 Technical Areas

100% implemenWorkplace Skills Plan tation of Workplace Developed and ImpleSkills Plan mented

To ensure a competent workforce to achieve Organizational objectives.

Skills transfer clause to be included all contracts

60

Increase employability of youth by 10%

Contribute Towards Employability & Self Employability of Youth and Community

10

Increase employability of youth by 10%

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

Contribute Towards Employability & Self Employability of Youth and Community

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

Corporate Services ANNUAL TARGET

N/A

Include skills transfer Skills transfer clause clause in all conincluded in all contracts tracts with service providers

Established Resource Centre

RPL Assessments conducted in 3 technical areas

Roll out of ABET Programme

300 TRAINED ABET LEARNERS

Establishment of the Fully fledged TrainTraining Centre ing Centre

Resource Centre establishment Promotion of e-learning

Conduct RPL

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Workplace Skills Plan Workplace Skills Plan N/A is Developed and Developed and Implemented 100% Implemented

N/A

40 Trained Emerging Contractors

Training of Emerging contractors

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Partially achieved (1 technical area).

42% achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

CCTV for Compen Building

Funding lost due to Procurement Process.

Lack of funding.

Lack of funding.

* Dates not confirmed by FET; * Budget constraints.

Training put on hold due to lack of funds.

ED&G to develop policy.

Budget constraints.

Budget constraints.

Budget constraints.

Not achieved.

2 students did not meet the requirements.

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Replacing existing computers and data projector for Resource centre

Partially achieved, 8 students registered.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Due to financial constraints, only 17 interns were placed.

N/A

N/A

WARD

Partially achieved.

Placement of interns 60 students appointed on Internship Programme

Awarding of external Awarding 10 exterbursaries nal bursaries

PROJECT 2009/2010

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


improve organisational efficiency and measures results

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

Municipal Transformation and Organisational Development

Cultivate a Positive and Professional Organisational culture.

Implementation of Performance Management System

Improve organisational efficacy and measure results

number of meetings held by the committee

number of workshops

All Employees

All SBU’s

Implementation of Programme

All Managers

Establishment and 4 meetings training of the PMS Steering Committee

Change Management Workshops

Promotion of Ethic throughout the Organisation

number of SBU’s

Improve organisational efficacy and measure results

Implementation of Peer Assisted Programme

Development and Implementation of effective internal processes

Improve organisational efficacy and measure results

Conduct Skills Audit

A Programme is Developed

100% implementa- number of managers tion of the national audited competency levels

Purchase access control system

Acquire access control system

To ensure a competent workforce to achieve Organizational objectives.

System in place

Purchase timekeeping system

Recovery of 50% of Skills Levy

Acquire time-keeping system

Effective & efficient management of information

Ensuring the Effectiveness and Efficiency of the Council decision making system and improving communication and understanding.

WARD

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Evaluate 60% of all N/A programmes undertaken

ANNUAL TARGET

Approve Policy

Submission of WSP and ATR

Increased productivity

PROJECT 2009/2010

Link Career Pathing Policy with Succession Policy and progression policy

number of frameworks

Recover 50 % of Levies paid

60% of programmes undertaken

UNIT OF MEASURE

Effective and efficient operational frameworks are in place for application on the HRD planning

50% Skills Levy Recovery

Designed pre and post evaluation forms for both supervisors, delegates and provider

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

To ensure a competent workforce to achieve Organizational objectives.

Municipal Effective Financial Manfinancial Viability agement and Management

Municipal Institutional Transformation and Development

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

All PMS initiatives were referred to Controls Transformation Steering Committee.

The Deputy Municipal Manager: Corporate Services advised that the change management workshops would only be implemented when the macro organization structure had been approved by the Council

Lack of funds.

The proposal was constantly not discussed by the MM’s Manco. Peer assist proposal sent to DMM infrastructure and Road maintanance was identified as the pilot unit. Process plan was developed and links with Ethekwini Municipality’s MILE project formed.

Availability of senior managers.

No report given.

No report given.

Project was handed over to the HRM Process Unit as the Succession Policy has not been developed as yet.

Lack of funding.

* Not Achieved, managers and delegates do not complete evaluations. * training stopped at mid-year.

REASON FOR DEVIATION

163

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164

Municipal Institutional Transformation and Development

Municipal Transformation and Organisational Development

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Asset Renewal Programme Effective and EffiFunctional electronic cient Management databases of Information

Effective and EffiUpgrade and renew of cient Management printing machines of Information

Effective and EffiA functional electronic cient Management link on the intranet in of Information order to access available resources at the Bessie Head & Law Society libraries

Sustaining existing ICT Ifrastructure.

Ensuring the Effectiveness and Efficiency of the Council decision making system and improving communication and understanding

Ensuring the Effectiveness and Efficiency of the Council decision making system and improving communication and understanding

Ensuring the Effectiveness and Efficiency of the Council decision making system and improving communication and understanding

Upgrade and renew of 5x new computers at Switchboard

Upgrade and renew 1 x Plotter

Create a functional electronic link on the intranet in order to access available resources at the Bessie Head & Law Society libraries

(renew) purchase 1 new printing machine

Maintain electronic databases

Purchase 5 x new computers

Purchase 1 new Plotter machine.

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Complete the N/A development of the electronic link on the intranet in order to access available resources at the Bessie Head & Law Society libraries

Renew (acquire) 1 new printing machine

Update and populate electronic databases

Acquire 5 x new computers

Acquire 1 new Plotter machine.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Asset Renewal Programme

N/A

N/A

Sustaining existing ICT Ifrastructure.

Upgrade server Envi- Acquire 20 x New ronment Servers

Upgrade LAN/WAN to Clinics

Upgrade and renew of 20 x Servers

Not achieved.

Sustaining existing ICT Infra- Asset Renewal Prostructure. gramme

N/A

Not achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Not achieved.

Level 1 to 2

N/A

WARD

5 x Clinics with upgrade Upgrade LAN/WAN Network

A practical: Implementable Language Policy to be applied throughout the organisation.

Ensuring the Effectiveness and Efficiency of the Council decision making system and improving communication and understanding.

Monitor Implementation of Policy

Develop Framework Framework to Cascade PMS Approved

ANNUAL TARGET

Ensure Building & sustaining Extend LAN/WAN of a secure, Integrated ICT infrastructure to newly acquired Infrastructure. Buildings, Clinics on going

Implementation of Performance Management System

Improve organisational efficacy and measure results

Development of the Proposal

PROJECT 2009/2010

Not achieved.

Implementation of Performance Management System

Improve organisational efficacy and measure results

UNIT OF MEASURE

More efficient decision- Develop and Imple- Compile a LanN/A making processes. ment a uniform guage Policy which Language Policy. is to include a translation Procedure Manual and which is acceptable to all role players.

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

Project deferred to next financial year.

Project frozen.

Project frozen.

Project frozen.

Lack of expertise.

Included in the development of PMS operational plan: Control Transformation Steering Committee.

Priority has been given in consolidating PMS at first 2 levels of Management. Hence the development of PMS

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


Good Governance and Public Participation

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Existing MOU’s

Promotion of Private Public Partnerships

WARD

Achieve a 30% improvement in customer satisfaction.

N/A

Achieve 100 % N/A accuracy in respect of the Preparation of Agendas and Minutes and Eliminate delays in the dispatch thereof.

ANNUAL TARGET

Review and reaffirm Reviewed and reaf- N/A existing MOU’s firmed Private Public Partnerships

Develop and Implement a fully fledged Batho Pele policy and Action Plan.

An improved service to our customers.

Less dissatisfaction amongst stake holders.

Ensuring the Effectiveness and Efficiency of the Council decision making system and improving communication and understanding.

PROJECT 2009/2010

Reduce delays in the Improve secretarial Preparation and Disservices to council tribution of Agenand committees das and Minutes. Reduce inaccuracies in the Preparation of Minutes and Agendas.

UNIT OF MEASURE

100 % accuracy of Agenda and Minutes. Timeous distribution of Agendas, Minutes and dissemination of all decisions taken.

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

Ensuring the Effectiveness and Efficiency of the Council decision making system and improving communication and understanding.

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Partially achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Due to budget contraints no review of existing MOU’s undertaken.

Lack of funding.

* Tight timeframes; * Inaccuracies on reports/ data from Business Units.

REASON FOR DEVIATION

165

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166

BASIC & SUSTAINABLE SERVICE DELIVERY

MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY & MANAGEMENT

BASIC & SUSTAINABLE SERVICE DELIVERY

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

To determine the total value of the capital budget spent on projects identified in the municipality’s IDP.

To determine the total value of the capital budget spent on projects identified in the municipality’s IDP.

To determine the total value of the capital budget spent on projects identified in the municipality’s IDP reserved for road upgrading and maintenance, municipal debt, salary budget, and its impact on both the capital and operating budgets.

To determine the total value of the capital budget spent on projects identified in the municipality’s IDP.

To determine the total value of the capital budget spent on projects identified in the municipality’s IDP reserved for road upgrading and maintenance, municipal debt, salary budget, and its impact on both the capital and operating budgets.

To determine the total value of the capital budget spent on projects identified in the municipality’s IDP reserved for road upgrading and maintenance, municipal debt, salary budget, and its impact on both the capital and operating budgets.

25% of capital budget as a percentage of the total budget

To determine the total value of the capital budget spent on projects identified in the municipality’s IDP.

To determine the total value of the capital budget spent on projects identified in the municipality’s IDP reserved for road upgrading and maintenance, municipal debt, salary budget, and its impact on both the capital and operating budgets.

Municipal Infrastructure Grant spending, quarter.

Total municipal debt as % of revenue.

salary budget should not exceed 30% of total operating income

20% of capital budget reserved for road upgrading and maintenance.

To determine the total value of the capital budget spent on projects identified in the municipality’s IDP.

To determine the total value of the capital budget spent on projects identified in the municipality’s IDP reserved for road upgrading and maintenance, municipal debt, salary budget, and its impact on both the capital and operating budgets.

UNIT OF MEASURE 90% municipality’s capital budget spent on projects identified in the municipality’s IDP

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR To determine the total value of the capital budget spent on projects identified in the municipality’s IDP.

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

To determine the total value of the capital budget spent on projects identified in the municipality’s IDP reserved for road upgrading and maintenance, municipal debt, salary budget, and its impact on both the capital and operating budgets.

Financial Services PROJECT 2009/ 2010

Not exceed 80% of total operating income.

25%

4,253,721

Not available at time of going to print.

Achieved, (24%)

Not available at time of going to print.

Achieved (21%).

20%

ANNUAL ACHIEVED Not achieved, 56%

WARD

90%

ANNUAL TARGET * Capital projects were put on hold when the intervention started; * Lack of DBSA funding

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


MUNICIPAL INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT & TRANSFORMATION

2. GOOD GOVERNANCE & PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

1. MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY & MANAGEMENT/

MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY & MANAGEMENT

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Complying with legislated processes leading to implementation

To Implement the Municipal Property Rates Act in accordance with National and Provincial legislation.

To identify the number of indigent households registered on the municipal database.

Number of indigent households registered on the municipal database compared with the number of indigent households of the municipality

Review of Policies & Other Relevant Review of credit control and Legislation on an annual basis. debt collection policy and other relevant legislation.

Improve revenue collection by streamlining & enhancing efficiency within the income section.

To Improve the Municipality’s revenue stream by adopting an Enhanced Revenue Management Programme.

Reviewed policy.

Reviewed policy.

(2) Reviewing issues relating to the enforcing of the current policy. (3) Review of the indigent policy particularly issues relating to the enforcing of the current policy annually. Number of indigent households registered on the municipal database

Reviewed policy.

100%

(4) Budget process. (1) Incorporating issues from the new rating Act.

100%

100% adherence.

(2) Completed public participation processes involved in each phase of implementation. (3) Recalculated and remodeled rates model.

Approve policy

(1) Approved draft rates policy.

Address issues raised by audit of consolidated billing

(2) Reduction in queries.

Completed policy.

Completed strategy.

ANNUAL TARGET

Complete review

PROJECT 2009/ 2010

(1) Full review of all working processes.

Develop a Cash Management Policy

To develop a Cash Management Develop a Cash ManagePolicy adopted by Council, and ment Policy by December that can demonstrate tangible evi- 2009 dence of performance against the Cash Management Policy.

UNIT OF MEASURE Development of a Debt Reduction Strategy

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

To develop a Debt Reduction Strat- Development of a Debt egy Reduction Strategy by November 2009

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

WARD

Not available at time of going to print.

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Achieved

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Working with the Provincial Intervention Team to achieve this

Not available at time of going to print.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

PIT currently working on this.

REASON FOR DEVIATION

167

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168

MUNICIPAL INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT & TRANSFORMATION

MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY & MANAGEMENT

MUNICIPAL INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT & TRANSFORMATION

GOOD GOVERNANCE & PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Annual financial statements

Preparation of an Effective and Realistic Budget, as well as Management and Reporting thereon

Activity-Based Costing (ABC)

Appointment ABC Costing Manager and begin ABC Pilot Stage

To complete the MFMA Implemen- Full compliance with MFMA tation Programme in accordance in accordance with National with National Treasury guidelines. Treasury implementation strategy.

Produce an operational clean audit report and inyear monitoring at SBU and corporate level.

GAMAP/ GRAP

Preparation of an Effective and Realistic Budget, as well as Management and Reporting thereon

Develop comprehensive Budget Policy

Develop 5-Year financial plan

Preparation of an Effective and Realistic Budget, as well as Management and Reporting thereon

Budget timetable prepared and circulated within the required deadline and format.

UNIT OF MEASURE

Full compliance in accordance with National Treasury implementation strategy.

Full compliance with MFMA.

100%

100%

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Improved audit report over previous year’s as well as monthly performance of SBU.

Action plans.

Achieved.

Completed AFS and circulated.

Working with the Provincial Intervention Team to achieve this

Achieved

Not achieved.

Achieved

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Achieved.

WARD

Compliant framework & statements.

Approved plan.

Aproved policy.

New budget system developed/ acquired.

Budget timetable.

ANNUAL TARGET

Achieved.

PROJECT 2009/ 2010

(3) Respond timeously to internal and external audit accounting policies.

(2) Evidence of controls implemented to produce unqualified statements.

(1) Annual financial statements prepared and circulated.

Budget policy framework, financial statements are based on GAMAP/ GRAP

Approved Plan

Approved Policy by December 2009.

Design a New Budget system Design and develop a system that is linked to the IDP, PMS and SDBIP.

Multi year budgets

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

Preparation of an Effective and Realistic Budget, as well as Management and Reporting thereon

Preparation of an Effective and Realistic Budget, as well as Management and Reporting thereon

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

PIT looking at structure to appoint ABC Costing Manager.

PIT have introduced monthly monitoring processes.

Put on hold due to intervention.

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


MUNICIPAL INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT & TRANSFORMATION

1. MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY & MANAGEMENT 2. MUNICIPAL INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT & TRANSFORMATION

MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY & MANAGEMENT

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Submission of financial statements by grant recipients.

Compliance with s67 for Grant-in-Aid

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Link Insurance system with Asset Register Clear segregation of duties between HR and Pay office

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Clean up and consolidate insurance system

Updated supplier database with adequate and credible information.

Agreement form is in compliance

Need to establish new KPA’s

Administration - Insufficient Funds

Administration -Insufficient Funds

Need to update SCM Database first. Insufficient funds due to Administration

Administration Previously reduced to once a achieved, however, the PIT have month reduced to once a week.

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Process EFT’s twice a week; SMME’s paid within 7 days

Achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Achieved.

WARD

Reduce cheque payments by 100% by

ANNUAL TARGET

In the System SCM need to extend already and negotiations completed a few years back now

PROJECT 2009/ 2010

Increase discount collection by 30%

Compliance with MFMA and related legislation by December 2009.

UNIT OF MEASURE

Clear segregation of duties between HR and Pay Office

Replace PROMIS system

Update supplier database and link insurance system with Asset Register.

Improve Accounts payable

Effective Financial Expenditure

Improve Expenditure Section to perform more efficiently.

Cash Management Policy and implement Cash Management system.

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

Effective Financial Expenditure

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

169

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170

LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Extension of airport fire station to comply with legislation appointment of consultant to review expansion plan Reconstruct cold room No 2 replace internal fencing

extension of fire station

improve market floor space to increase turnover

renovate market coldroom to comply with HACCP standards

Improve market to generate revenue

Electric essential power

Standby generators

Report to EXCO and a resolution there-of

Legislative SACAA requirement

Meteorological equipment

To take decisive direction on the future of the airport

Security measures ito SACAA requirements

Airport Traffic Control Tower

Extension of terminal building

3km

Maintained storm water drainage system

To maintain runway, taxiway, apron and airfield storm water drainage system

Expansion of terminal building to accommodate more passengers and retail facilities for site

No. of hangars functional

Compliance with required building regulations and standards

Repair and maintenance of aircraft hangars in accordance with annual maintenance schedule

new fencing

compliant cold room

updated plan

fire station

Resolution

Square metres

1

Replacement of redundant equipment

100m²

Fire Hydrants

Maintained fire hydrants

Upgrading of fire hydrants at the airport

Kilometres

UNIT OF MEASURE

Maintenance and repairs to comply with CAA safety standards

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

To maintain runway condition at the airport

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

Development Services PROJECT 2009/2010 ANNUAL TARGET

all

all

all

all

all

all

all

all

all

all

WARD

Achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

funds removed from budget

Decision recinded

Plans delayed, however, to be followed up during 2010/11

Recommendation submitted to reallocate funds, however, too late and funds absorbed by task team.

Replacement to be completed during 2010/11

ISF FAILED TO PERFORM MAINTENANCE

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Reviewed SDF in conjunction with IDP.

Appointment of Appeals Board by Province.

Approved Land Release Program.

Completed Valuation Appeals.

Land Release Strategy.

Development and approval of baseline policy and management plans.

Informed and accurate environmental management

Review of Spatial Development Framework.

Develop unit standards and undertake detailed consideration of environmental implications of developments.

Environmentally sustainable development

Develop a GIS based Environmental Decision Support Tool.

purchase hyster

Purchase market hyster to service cold rooms and improve service standards

Development of environmental management tools.

purchase floor scrubber

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

Purchase market floor scrubber to clean floors

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

Achieved.

Achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Number of land parcels leased or sold

Percentage Complete

Rural Economic Development with Amakhosi

Percentage Complete

Access to and use of EDST by Municipal Business Units

100% Complete

All

All

All

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

80 jobs created

90% completed.

80% completed.

Achieved.

all

all

WARD

Percentage of developments assessed and approved in terms of an Environmental Policy, Strategic Environmental Assessment and Management Plan

ANNUAL TARGET

Achieved.

Unknown. Province experienced difficulties in appointing Appeal Board

PROJECT 2009/2010

Percentage of developments complying with Environmental Unit standards

efficient service to public

clean and hygienic floors

UNIT OF MEASURE

Lack of filling of critical vacancies

Delayed appointment of the Valuation Appeal Board by the MEC

A dispute with the consultants about the quality and content of the final report delayed completion.

Budget for GIS Licence and Hardware to be sourced

REASON FOR DEVIATION

171

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172

LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Production of appropriate marketing material Processing applications for incentive packages. Participation in Trade and Investment Missions Compilation of joint action plan for the revival of businesses.

Implementation of visitation programme

Facilitation of Economic Development Initiative.

To promote the City as the preferred investment destination in the Country.

To promote the City as the preferred investment destination in the Country.

To facilitate the Expansion & Retention of Township business

To facilitate the Expansion & Retention of Township business

To maximize the number of jobs created through Local Economic Development Initiative.

Approved Policy / Strategy document

The development of Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment Policy / Strategy for the Msunduzi Municipality

To promote the City as the preferred investment destination in the Country.

The development of Informal Trade Policy and Strategy for the City.

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

To maximize and integrate the informal trade sector into the mainstream economy.

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

No. of jobs created.

No. of businesses visited and interventions needed

Action Plan

No. of Trade and Investment Missions participated in.

No. of applications processed, jobs created and total investments.

City Brochure

Approved document

Policy / Strategy Document

UNIT OF MEASURE

PROJECT 2009/2010

Food Security Program

ANNUAL TARGET

All

All

All

All

All

City

City

WARD

Not achieved.

Partially achieved.

Partially achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Lack of funds. Facilitating 5 projects which will come on stream in 2010/2011

Some meetings postponed due to unforseen circumstances

Visitation programme still being done, 22 businesses have been visited, and data base is being compiled

Lack of funds.

Policy to be reviewed

Funds reallocated

A globular amount of R435 974,00 was initially made available for both capital and operating. Project could not proceed as funds were reallocated

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

The city is in dire need to review its Street Trading policy and align it to the provincial framework for informal trading. The provincial policy is expected o be approved by September 2010

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Not achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


BASIC & SUSTAINABLE SERVICE DELIVERY

LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

To identify demand for 100 Individual Serviced sites for release to individuals by 2010.

Identify demand for 100 Individual Serviced sites

Community Residential Units planned and initiated

To Plan & Initiate 500 Community Residential Units (CRUs) by 2010.

Construction start date – 2011.

Restructuring Zones to be approved by MEC.

Provisional Restructuring zones have been approved by Council. To be submitted to Dept of Human Settlements for approval.

No. of people wanting vacant serviced sites

No. of CRUs

Number of PRZ’s approved

No. of settlements

Housing Admin to obtain Housing Demand Database and finalize Waiting List.

NHFC to Prepare feasibility studies for Projects at Baverstock, Paton Street, Boom Street, Westgate/ Grange and Yellowwood Place.

Final Approval of Provisional Restructuring Zones

Housing Sector Plan to identify Informal Settlements and prepare a slums clearance strategy. To identify projects & prepare a 5 year housing delivery plan

Extract names of 100 people wanting vacant serviced sites.

Conclude land Availability Agreement and complete feasibility studies for 500 units

Get MEC approval for PRZs.

Various

24, 27, 32.

All

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Partially achieved.

All

Complete Housing Sector Plan. Obtain approval from Council. Submit to DoHS for approval & prioritization.

Number of informal settlements.

1017

10, 11, 13, 15, 16, 18, 21, 23, 29, 34

1800

To eliminate the number of settlements that have not been formalized in terms of the Town Planning Regulations.

Low Income Housing

Number of families provided with houses

To provide shelter for all people living in slum conditions, by 2014.

No. of Houses

Not achieved.

Ekhrosini

Feasibility report, plans, building contract

Detailed feasibility study completed and appointment of contractors.

Establishing of satelite markets linked to main market.

Not achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Partially achieved.

All

WARD

Layout plan for industrial park

ANNUAL TARGET

Identification of a suitable site and determination costs

PROJECT 2009/2010

Establishment of a new industrial park

Quarterly economic reports on % growth

UNIT OF MEASURE

Appoint a consultant to compile an economic report

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

To monitor and evaluate the growth in the city’s economy

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

Discussions have been held with DOHS. Certain SITA problems exist and is receiving attention.

Legal dispute with MHA affected progress. Dispute now resolved, various feasibility studies to begin to roll out in next year.

Delays in getting info. on communities

Certain sites planned for construction was determined to be undevelopable

Consultants not appointed - money removed from vote

Site identified, layout costs to be calculated by IS&F

Appointment of consultant delayed

REASON FOR DEVIATION

173

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


174

GOOD GOVERNANCE & PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

BASIC & SUSTAINABLE SERVICE DELIVERY

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Ensure Council’s compliance with SCM Policy

Provide assistance/ advice to the Oversight Committee, as required

Enhace Councillor’s Oversight Role

Attend at all Procurement Meetings

Attend oversight Committee meetings when summoned to do so

500 Emergency Housing units to be built

Four Rural Housing Projects Initiated

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

To provide Emergency Housing to people who have suffered or are victims of Natural Disasters

Construction to start: 2011/12.

Ximba

Enadi, &

Nxamalala,

Sweetwaters,

To Plan & Initiate 2000 Rural Housing Units in Vulindlela.

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

No. of Meetings

No. of Meetings

No. of Meetings

No. Of Temporary units built

No of projects

UNIT OF MEASURE

Temporary Housing for various projects (to be identified).

Stage 1 process for 4 rural projects.

PROJECT 2009/2010

Provide temporary housing to 500 victims of Natural Disasters.

Complete Stage 1 for Ximba rural project, and commence pre-feasibility studies on other 3.

ANNUAL TARGET

Various

6

5,

3,

1,

WARD

No report given.

0

No report given.

Not achieved.

Partially achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

No report given.

Not yet submitted to DoHS. Being addressed with ABM (names and IDs still awaiting verification by ABM)

DoHS delayed joint evaluation process. Feasibility funding application has now been submitted to DOHS.

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


Radio Control can Access to Radio control due to power be fully functional failure New Alarms

Number of baiting stations / burrows specimens collected and identified %samples in compliance

Registration of Food Premises % samples compliance with Legislative Standards

Provision of security to council property

Reduce and prevent vector-borne disease

Reduce incidence of water-borne diseases Reduce risk of food-

Upgrading of emergency generator

Maintenance and protection of council property

To control and manage the multiplication and prevalence of vectors such as rodents, flies, mosquitoes and snails in terms of the Government Regulations

To monitor potable water supplied by the water service provider, including springs, boreholes, etc

To ensure food quality and

Data and air pollution statisticsmonthly and quarterly reports Reports , Data and statistics – vector and food control Completion of clinic

Completion of renovation

Improve service delivery

Improve service delivery

Improve PHC services

Improve PHC services

To investigate, monitor and control communicable disease in terms of the National Health Act

Act, Food Regulations and ByLaws.

Use of new facilities for counselling

New clinic fully functional

Self defence

Access to basic self protection

Upgrading of Traffic and security firearms

UNIT OF MEASURE

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

BASIC & SUSTAINABLE safety in terms of the Foodstuffs, borne diseases SERVICES Cosmetics, and Disinfectants

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Community Services

Addition of 2 rooms to Impilwenhle Clinic

New clinic structure at Masons Clinic.

Computer

18

29

All

All

All Wards

Autoclave Huxley 2 Half baskets 72l for sterilising equipment

Computer

All Wards

Microscope for bacteriological sampling

Microscope for vector control

Partially achieved, Architectural drawings completed and paid forPlans completed.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Building Upgrade - City Engineer’s Clinic All Wards

WARD

Not achieved.

ANNUAL TARGET

Alarm system on council property

Emergency generator control room

Weapons - 9mm Pistols

PROJECT 2009/2010

Project stopped by Provincial Task Team.

Project stopped by Provincial Task Team.

Purchase of computers stopped as per Provincial Task Team

Purchase of computers stopped as per Provincial Task Team

Awaiting feedback from Lorraine.

All capital projects were stoped due to funding

All capital projects were stoped due to funding

REASON FOR DEVIATION

175

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


176 Completion of renovation

Completion of renovation

Completion of fencing Completion of fencing Completion of fencing Completion of fencing Completion of fencing Complete repairs

Complete renovations

Cost effective facility

Quarterly Reports

Improve PHC services

Improve PHC services

Improve security of council property

Improve security of council property

Improve security of council property

BASIC & SUSTAINABLE Improve security of council property SERVICES

Improve security of council property

Improve pharmacy standards/ improve service delivery

Improve PHC services

Improve HIV and AIDS unit facility

HIV and AIDS Reports and Statistics

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR Completion of renovation

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

Improve PHC services

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Computer

Functional Unit

Clinic fully functional

Full utilisation of packing space

Clinic secure

Clinic secure

Clinic secure

Clinic secure

Clinic secure

Use of new facilities for counselling

Use of new facilities for counselling

Use of new facilities for counselling

UNIT OF MEASURE

Restoration of old bus depot premises in Doull Rd for office use

Renovations to house at 144 Zwartkop Rd for use as clinic and build new carport

Repairs to building housing the pharmacy

Provision of palisade security fencing at Zwartkop Rd Clinic

Provision of palisade security fencing at Impilwenhle Clinic

Provision of palisade security fencing at Northdale Clinic

Provision of pallisade security fencing at Willowfontein Clinic

Provision of pallisade security fencing at Esigodini Clinic

Addition of 2 rooms to Esigodini Clinic

Addition of 2 rooms to Sinathing Clinic

Addition of 2 rooms to Willowfontein Clinic

PROJECT 2009/2010

ANNUAL TARGET

Tender process facilitated by procurement

26

27

26

18

30

14

12

12

10

14

WARD

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Partially achieved, Architectural drawings completed and paid forPlans completed.

Partially achieved, Architectural drawings completed and paid forPlans completed.

Partially achieved, Architectural drawings completed and paid forPlans completed.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Purchase of computers stopped as per Provincial Task Team

Project subsequently not viable as it would cost too much to restore premises.

Funds incorrectly used by I S to renovate Ward Councillors offices.

Project stopped by Provincial Task Team.

Lack of funds.

Project stopped by Provincial Task Team.

Project stopped by Provincial Task Team.

Project stopped by Provincial Task Team.

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


BASIC & SUSTAINABLE SERVICES

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Beautify our city and environment Renovation To increase the output of speeding violations To increase the no of drunk drivers

Upgrade of Facility

Traffic Control/Law Enforcement

To detect drivers under the influence for evidential value

Replace aged equipment.

Upgrading of parks equipment.

To provide a beautiful/cleaner environment

Replace aged equipment.

Upgrading of parks equipment

Replace aged equipment.

Replace aged equipment.

Upgrading of parks equipment

Upgrading of parks equipment.

Access to basic service.

To have all 3 cremators in working order.

Acquisition of new Alcohol testing Machine

Acquisition of new Prolaser

Upgrade

Replace all trees that have been cut.

Acquisition of trucks & crane grab

Acquisition of hydro and slasher mowers

Acquisition of mowers.

All 3 cremators to be operational.

Hollingwood Cemetery to be fully functional.

Access to basic services.

Develop a new cemetery to accommodate burials.

Computer

UNIT OF MEASURE

Improved administration and record keeping system in use

Quarterly Reports

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

Improve administration and record keeping systems

HIV and AIDS Reports and Statistics

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

Not achieved.

tractor trailers/tractor small for above.

Drager Alcohol Testing Machine

Prolaser

Junior Traffic Training Centre

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

hydro-tower, back blade, scarifer, top soil spreader,

Urban greening and replacement of street trees

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Specialised equipment for aerovators, fertilizer sprayer

Replace trucks x 2 and crane grab

Hydro mower, replace slasher mowers x 6

Replace ride on mower x7

Cremators

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Development of Hollingwood cemetery

Tender process facilitated by procurement

WARD

Not achieved.

ANNUAL TARGET

Computer

PROJECT 2009/2010

Stopped as per Task Team due to lack of funds.

Stopped as per Task Team due to lack of funds.

Stopped as per Task Team due to lack of funds.

Stopped as per Task Team due to lack of funds.

Stopped as per Task Team due to lack of funds.

Stopped as per Task Team due to lack of funds.

Stopped as per Task Team due to lack of funds.

Stopped as per Task Team due to lack of funds.

Stopped as per Task Team

Work stopped. Land dispute with Sobantu residents

Purchase of computers stopped as per Provincial Task Team

Purchase of computers stopped as per Provincial Task Team

REASON FOR DEVIATION

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178

BASIC & SUSTAINABLE SERVICES

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Provision of proper sporting facilities in the previous disadvantaged areas Excess to proper sport &recreational facilities Excess to proper sport &recreational facilities. Access to proper communication facilities Replace aged and damaged carpets

Replace aged components and renovate existing

Upgrade of sporting facilities.

Maintenance & upgrade of city’s main recreational facilities.

Maintenance & upgrade of city’s main recreational facilities.

Upgrade facilities to enhance hiring potential

Maintenance and upgrade of Art Museum

Maintenance and upgrade to ensure optimum climate control for Artworks

To be operational and fully functionable at all times for Artworks

For safety measure especially the stairwell of the gallery

New facility to enhance communication

New DE filtration system.

New DE filtration system.

PERIMETER FENCING MACS LIBRARY

PURCHASE OF ARTWORK

REPLACEMENT AND RENOVATION OF AIRCONDITIONING UNIT

REPLACING CARPETS THROUGHOUT GALLERY

AUDIOVISUAL & PA SYSTEM FOR LECTURE THEATRE

REFURBISH SAND FILTER AND EXTERIOR PIPING

UPGRADE EXISTING FILTRATION PIPING AT POOLS

Purchase of trailers

Purchase of new slashers

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Not Achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Purchase of amazone

Secure building

Provision of proper sporting facilities in the previous disadvantaged areas

Upgrade of sporting facilities.

Secure building and its contents

Provision of proper sporting facilities in the previous disadvantaged areas

Upgrade of sporting facilities.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Purchase Goal Posts

WARD

.

Security upgrade of library facility

Provision of proper sporting facilities in the previous disadvantaged areas

Upgrade of sporting facilities.

ANNUAL TARGET

Ablution facilities at France sports field

Alco meters

PROJECT 2009/2010

Proper ablution facilities.

Acquisition of new Artworks

Provision of proper sporting facilities in the previous disadvantaged areas

Upgrade of sporting facilities.

Acquisition of new Alco Meters for Traffic Officers

UNIT OF MEASURE

Additions to permanent art collection

To screen at least 1000 drivers per quarter

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

To detect alcohol when driving a motor vehicle

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

CANCELLED BY TASK TEAM

CANCELLED BY TASK TEAM

Stopped as per Task Team due to lack of funds.

Stopped as per Task Team due to lack of funds.

Stopped as per Task Team due to lack of funds.

Stopped as per Task Team due to lack of funds.

Stopped as per Task Team due to lack of funds.

Stopped as per Task Team due to lack of funds.

Stopped as per Task Team due to lack of funds.

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


BASIC & SUSTAINABLE SERVICES

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Refurbishment of entire toilet facility Installation of adequate shelving Connect areas to Municipality network Reduction in crime incidence Improve operations

IMPROVED COLLECTION IMPROVED COLLECTION

Maintenance & upgrade of library toilets

Purchase additional shelving

Bring municipality to the people

Asset/Property safety

Computerised satellite offices

PROVIDE SUSTAINABLE SERVICES

PROVIDE SUSTAINABLE SERVICES

Accessibility to the Public Construction of containment berms, capping of completed cells. Top soiling and vegetation of slopes. Cell development Adequate Equipment and Statistical Data Completed Study.

Improvement of Public Facility

Annual Development in Line with Permit

Computerised Systems and Statistical Data

IMPROVE SERVICE DELIVERY

DUMPING

REDUCED ILLEGAL DUMPING

Better security

Improve security of Municipal building and its contents

PROVIDE SUSTAINABLE SERVICE

Maintenance of Municipal asset

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

Replacement of roof/gutters & refurbishment of library toilets

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

Section 78 Waste Management Study Report

TONNES/M3

TONNES/M3

TONNES/M3

TONNES/M3

Sufficient shelving for newspapers

Operational toilet

Secure building

Refurbished building

UNIT OF MEASURE

Section 78 Waste Management Study

Computers Weighbridge

Development of Landfill Site

20m3 Garden site containers-Landfill(5 cont @ R46 000)

2 x new garden sites in Imbali @ R1 500 000 ea

15m3 Refuse bins (10 bins @ R35 000 ea)

1,75m3 Refuse bins (30 bins @ R17 000 ea)

Computers

Alarm System

Infrastructure Network

REPLACEMENT SHELVING

REFURBISH TOILETS NORTHDALE LIBRARY

SLIDING GATE MAIN LIBRARY

REFURBISH ASHDOWN LIBRARY

PROJECT 2009/2010

JUNE 30 2010.

20 X 5 X3X 15600M3

7800M3

25 X 2 X3 X 52 =

7800M3

15X10 X 52 =

30 X 1.75 X 52 = 12090M3

ANNUAL TARGET

ALL

All

All

All

ALL

ALL

ALL

all

all

all

WARD

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Partially Achieved, only 3 laptops purchased.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

CANCELLED AS MUNICIPALITY ENTERED ADMINISTRATION.

Project postponed PIT , No Funds

Project postponed PIT , No Funds

Project postponed PIT , No Funds

Project Postponed by PIT no Funds

Remaining 6 desktops could not be purchased due to financial constraints.

Capital cannot be used for repairs

Task Team cancelled contract

Capital cannot be used for repairs

REASON FOR DEVIATION

179

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


180 Provision of proper hall facilities. Reduce Crime & Traffic violations

LOWER LANDFILL WEIGHTS

Access to basic service.

Maintenance & upgrade of city’s main hall facilities.

Installation of CCTV in the Greater Edendale area

REDUCE WASTE

Improve Service Delievery to outline areas

Operational Requirement

Operational Training Facilities

Improve Communication Facil- Access to basic serity vice.

Improvement of current Training Facility

Pre requiste for Fire Training School

Operational Requirement

Provision Of communication Services

Improve Essential Service Delivery

Operational Station

Provision of Improved facilities

Maintenance & upgrade of current facilities

Operational Station

Provision of Improved facilities

Operational Station

Operational Station

TONNES

Public Protection

New roof.

New roof.

UNIT OF MEASURE

Maintenance & upgrade of current facilities

Access to basic service.

Provision of proper hall facilities.

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

Maintenance & upgrade of city’s main hall facilities.

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

BASIC & SUSTAINABLE Improve Service Delivery to outSERVICES line areas

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

COMMUNITY LIFE SAFETY TRAINING

COMMUNICATIONS RADIO

RENOVATIONS TO COMMUNICATIONS

UPGRADE EDENDALE FIRE STATION

UPGRADE ASHBURTON FIRE STATION

NEW NORTHDALE FIRE STATION

NEW VULINDLELA FIRE STATION

GREOGETOWN GREENING PROJECT

WASTE RECYCLING PROJECT

June 30 2010

June 30 2010

June 30 2010

June 30 2010

June 30 2010

June 30 2010

June 30 2010

All

All

All

All

All

All

All

Achieved.

unable to complete project due to PIT intervention and funding

unable to complete project due to PIT intervention and funding

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

unable to complete project due to PIT intervention and funding

unable to complete project due to PIT intervention and funding

Stopped as per Task Team due to lack of funds.

Stopped as per Task Team due to lack of funds.

Lack of funds.

Stopped as per Task Team

Stopped as per Task Team

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

ORANGE BAG PROJECT IN WESTERN AREAS. REDUCTION +-20 TONNES PER MONTH

Not achieved.

Partially achieved, air-conditioning units completed

Not achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

URBAN AGRICULTUREGREATER EDENDALE TO BE DETERMINED

WARD

Not achieved.

30-Jun

ANNUAL TARGET

SAFE CITY (PMB) - Edendale

REFURBISH ROOF TRURO COMPLEX

REFURBISH ROOF IMBALI HALL

PROJECT 2009/2010

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


BASIC & SUSTAINABLE SERVICES

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Upgrade of Training Tower

Provision of proper Car parking Facilties.

Maintenance & upgrade of A1 carpark .

Maintenance & upgrade of Training Tower .

Improved Equipment

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

Access to basic Training .

IDP GOAL/ OBJECTIVE

Operational Requirement

New Improved car park .

Fire Fighter Fitness

UNIT OF MEASURE

2 x New Public Toilets (Raisethorpe & Edendale)

REFURBISH TRAINING TOWER

CAR PARK RESURFACE / CARPORTS

GYM EQUIPMENT

PROJECT 2009/2010

June 30 2010

June 30 2010

June 30 2010

ANNUAL TARGET

All

All

All

WARD

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Stopped as per Task Team

unable to complete project due to PIT intervention and funding

REASON FOR DEVIATION

181

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


182 Km

Km

Km of roads completed in relation to budget Km of roads completed in relation to budget

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

Upgraded road

Upgraded road

Designed upgraded road

Upgraded road

Designed upgraded road

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

Constructed footbridge

Design Report

Km of roads completed in relation to budget

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

Design report

Km

Design report

Km

Complete

Existing footbridge

Km

Km of new or rehabilitated footpaths and kerbing/ channelling

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

Km

UNIT OF MEASURE

Km of roads completed in relation to budget

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

IDP GOAL/OBJECTIVE

BASIC & SUSTAINABLE To improve safety of pedestrians SERVICES

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Infrastructure Services

Upgrade – Malala Road

Construction – Khoza Road

Construction – Mthalane Road (D2015)

Construction – Simelane Road

Upgrade – Mbucwana Road

Footbridge Eshowe

Upgrade Short Retreat Road

Machibisa & Dambuza Roads

Upgrading of Magaba Road

New footpaths, kerbing & channelling in various areas

Upgrading design of gravel roads – Vulindlela – D1140

PROJECT 2009/2010

Design

1,2 km gravel road

Complete road design

400 m

1,2 km surfaced road

Complete

0.3 km

4 km

Design

2 km

1,7 km

ANNUAL TARGET

5

4

2

1

1

4

36

21

10

10, 15, 19 & 35

9

WARD

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Partially achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Project deferred due to Municipal financial constraints

Project deferred due to Municipal financial constraints

Project deferred due to Municipal financial constraints

Project deferred due to Municipal financial constraints

Poor contractor performance

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


Design report

M

Paved sidewalks, kerbs & channels

Designed upgraded road

700 m

To improve accessibility and safety.

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

To improve storm-water man-

Improved sidewalks, kerbs & channels

Designed upgraded road

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

Designed upgraded road

Designed upgraded road

Upgrade road

Upgrade road

Upgrade road

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

catch pits.

Km

Km

Km

Design report

Km

Design report

Design report

Designed upgraded road

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

Design report

UNIT OF MEASURE

Designed upgraded road

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

IDP GOAL/OBJECTIVE

BASIC & SUSTAINABLE agement by providing a formal channel & pipe system with SERVICES

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Tar road – Gordon Road

Upgrade Tar Roads, Phase 3, Unit 13

Extension – Main road (Willowfontein Rd)

Construction – Waterfall Road (approx. 0,7 km)

Construction – Hlathini Road (approx. 2,1 km)

Upgrade Storm-water Drainage System in Ashdown.

Upgrade Sbhomolo Rd – Dambuza Ring

Upgrade Crocus Rd (Provide kerbs, channel, speedhumps & paved sidewalks)

Link Road between Thembalihle & Tamboville

Upgrade internal roads in Caluza T/ship

Upgrade – D2065 Road

PROJECT 2009/2010

0,3 km

Complete 100% of design

Complete design

Design & construct

700m length with 16 catch-pits

16

17

14

12

11

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

90% Achieved.

23

Achieved.

Achieved.

28

Design

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

16

34

Design

Design

20

6

WARD

Design

Design

ANNUAL TARGET

Delayed appointment of the consultant. Payment deferred to 2010/11.

Project deferred due to Municipal financial constraints

Delayed appointment of the consultant. Payment deferred to 2010/11.

Project deferred due to Municipal financial constraints

Project affected by Municipali financial

Project deferred due to Municipal financial constraints

Lack of survey funds

REASON FOR DEVIATION

183

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


184

BASIC & SUSTAINABLE SERVICES

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Upgraded road

Completed retaining wall

Construct black base road

To improve accessibility by upgrading the road

To improve accessibility and road safety

To improve condition of roads by placing black base or regravelling

Canalised river

To reduce land degradation and improve safety of residents

Upgraded road

Design the canalization of the stream.

To reduce land degradation and improve safety of residents

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads

De-silted canal.

De-silt to improve holding capacity of the canal.

Designed road project

Improved road condition

To improve safety of roads by reworking road layer works

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads

Km

Improved road condition

To improve condition of roads by placing black base or regravelling

Upgraded road

Retaining wall

KM

KM

Design report

M

M

M^3

M

M

Paved sidewalks

To improve accessibility and safety

Km

UNIT OF MEASURE

Upgraded road

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

To improve accessibility and durability of roads by upgrading gravel/ graded roads to surfaced roads

IDP GOAL/OBJECTIVE

Construction of footbridge to school – Mthethomusha area (Place Black base on the road)

Upgrading of Willowfontein Road – Phase 1

Upgrading of gravel roads through Bisley Game Reserve – Almond Bank Development – Road

Shayamoya Road - 1,0 km - Taxi Route (no formal road reserve)

Upgrade – D638 RD (D1122)

Canalisation – Dolphin Avenue / Ishwari Road

Canalization – Greytown & Baijoo Roads

De-silting of Camps Drift Canal.

Upgrade layer works of Mbubu bridge affected by the landslide.

Tar – Haniville Internal Roads

Pavement – Jupiter & Larkspur Road

Tar – Martin’s Way Road

PROJECT 2009/2010

Construct footbridge

Completed road retaining wall + Design of the road

0,8 km

0,6 km

Complete design

20 m

Completed design & cost estimate

290 000 m^3

22

14

24

11

6

30

30

27

26

150 m

Not achieved.

Partially achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

31% Achieved.

Achieved.

Partially achieved.

29

0,9k m road + 150m s/w drainage

95% Achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Achieved.

20

WARD

28

100 m

Complete

ANNUAL TARGET

Ward Cllr refused the Community Participation in his Ward

Design portion deferred due to financials

Project deferred due to Municipal financial constraints

Municipal funding & approval of Water Licence caused delays

Poor contractor performance

Portion of works deferred

Poor contractor performance

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


New female changeroom

Steel balustrades

Surfaced roads

Commence upgrade of interchange

Plans

To improve working conditions of staff

To improve safety

To improve accessibility and durability and safety of roads

To improve mobility by easing congestion

To improve mobility

Roof of reservoir

Roof of reservoir

Length of pipeline installed Length of pipeline installed Replace faulty meters No. of new telemetry stations

To protect quality of water

To protect quality of water

To provide basic water

To ensure continuous supply of water

To ensure reliable water billing and reduce unaccounted for water

To improve monitoring of reservoirs and reduce water loss and ensure adequate water supply

Reinstatement of roads during sewerage connections

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

IDP GOAL/OBJECTIVE

BASIC & SUSTAINABLE To connect poor households to waterborne sewerage system SERVICES

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

No.

No. of meters

KM

KM

Roofed reservoir

Roofed reservoir

Reinstatements

Completed plans

Expenditure

KM

Balustrades

Change-room

UNIT OF MEASURE

Roofed reservoir

Roofed reservoir

Reinstate all roads

Complete plans

100% expenditure

6 km

Balustrades

Female Changerooms

ANNUAL TARGET

Telemetering

Replace consumer meters

Upgrade existing water capacity

7

500

100 m

Extensions to water retic- 100 m ulation

Copesville Reservoir

Masons Reservoir

Sewerage Pipe Site 11

Public Transport (Intermodal)

Church Street / N3 Interchange Upgrade

Road resurfacing - PMS - Projects to be advised and prioritised according to the results of the Roads Condition Assessment

Professor Nyembezi Building – external steel balustrades

New changeroom for female staff – Doull Road

PROJECT 2009/2010

Various

Various

Various

Various

29

26/27

32

Various

32

Various

32

27

WARD

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Partially achieved.

Partially achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Additional funds required to purchase telemetry units

Funds reallocated to VIP project as per council resolution.

Construction will only be undertaken once MIG has approved the funding.

Construction will only be undertaken once MIG has approved the funding.

Funds not transferred by DoT.

Due to late start of the project & financial status of Municipality, payment were deferred to 2010/11.

Project portion deferred due to Municipal financial constraints

Project deferred due to Municipal financial constraints

Implementation portion of the project deferred due to Municipal financial constraints

REASON FOR DEVIATION

185

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


186 No. of households connected & km

Sewer connections & length Sewage design for Shenstone Ambleton Planning & design report

To provide sewer connections to households in formal settlements

To provide sewer connections to households in formal settlements

Planning and design of new sewage treatment works to provide for development capacity

and Phase 1 construction

Reinstate all affected roads Design

Planning & design

Recommission pipe

Design report

No. of VIP toilets constructed

sanitation

To provide 18,300 households in formal settlements with basic sanitation by 2011/2012

To provide 18,300 households in formal settlements with basic sanitation by 2011/2012

To provide 18,300 households in formal settlements with basic sanitation by 2011/2012

To increase capacity of sewer infrastructure

Design to recommission sewer

To provide households in formal settlements with basic sanitation by 2011/2012

No. of VIP’s

% completed

1 km

% complete

% construction

No. of roads

% completed & m

% completed

% Design complete

Sewerage Pipes Azalea

No. of households

Sewer connections & design

To provide sewer connections to households in formal settlements for basic sanitation by 2011/12

VIP Installation Vulindlela

Grix Road Sewer & Pipe Bridge

Recommissioning of Outfall at Darvill

Sewerage pipes - Willowfontein

Sewerage pipe – France & Kwanyamazane

Toilets – Happy Valley

Sewerage pipe

Expansion of sewerage treatment works

Shenstone / Ambleton Toilets

Sewerage Pipes Unit ‘H’

Sanitation Infrastructure Asset Renewal

KM

Sewer pipes laid

Waterworks equipment

PROJECT 2009/2010

To rehabilitate 25% of sewer infrastructure by 2012

No.

UNIT OF MEASURE

No. of equipment upgraded

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

To improve water quality monitoring equipment

IDP GOAL/OBJECTIVE

BASIC & SUSTAINABLE To provide households in formal Planning & design settlements with waterborne report, including EIA SERVICES

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

6 500

100%

1 km reconstructed

100%

100%

4

% completed & 150 m

100% completed

Design

40 & 1,5 km

20 & design

3 km

10

ANNUAL TARGET

1 – 12

36

32

12

Various

18

16

10

Various

Various

WARD

Partially achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Partially achieved.

Not achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Project was slowed down due to the financial situation.

Project was deferred by Provincial Intervention team

Project was deferred

Project Deferred until bulk treatment master plan is completed

Project Deferred until bulk treatment master plan is completed

Project required indepth analysis of Umgeni Water infrastructure. To be completed in October 2010.

Temp general workers contract were not renewed.

Funds reallocated

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


BASIC & SUSTAINABLE SERVICES

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA No. of households connected to sewer Km of sewer pipes inspected

No. of pumpstations maintained Km of sewer pipes upgraded No. of households connected No. of households connected

Provision of standpipes or have connections in areas served by tankers No. of households benefitting from water supplied Km of reticulation mains laid

No. of households connected to sewer No. of pressure valves installed No. of meters installed Metres of pipe protected No. of hydrants replaced

Conduct condition assessment of sewer pipes

Maintain pumpstations

To rehabilitate 25% of sewer infrastructure by 2012

To provide water borne sewage system

To provide individual water connections

To decrease the number of households served by water tankers.

To provide households with access to basic water in informal areas and rural areas by 2011/2012

To provide households with access to basic water in informal areas and rural areas by 2011/12

To provide access to waterborne sanitation

To reduce water loss

To reduce unaccounted for water

To protect and maintain water assets

To replace hydrants as part of maintenance

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

To increase the number of households served by sewer reticulation.

IDP GOAL/OBJECTIVE

No. of hydrants

M

No. of new meters

No. of valves

No. of meters relocated

M

No. of standpipes installed

No. of standpipes

No. of households

M

M

No.

M

No. of households

UNIT OF MEASURE

Hydrants

Cathodic protection

Reservoir metering

Pressure reduction & zoning

Service midblock eradication in Sobantu, Imbali & Ashdown

Edendale Proper new mains & reticulation

Basic water supply

Elimination of water tankers

Elimination of communal standpipes

Extensions to sewer reticulation

Upgrade existing sewer capacity

Pumpstations general

Sanitation infrastructure CCTV Feasibility Study

Elimination of conservancy tanks

PROJECT 2009/2010

25

330

3

4

600

500

10

3

150

200

200

2

20 000

800

ANNUAL TARGET

Various

Various

Various

Various

Various

Various

Various

Various

Various

Various

Various

Various

Various

Various

WARD

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Partially achieved.

Achieved.

Partially achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Partially achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Partially achieved.

Partially achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

PIT deferred project due to cash flow constraints

Project deferred.

Project Scope was completed.

Project Deferred by PIT.

Design completed.

Money Reallocated to Vulindledla VIP Project as per EXCO resolution.

Funds reallocated.

Project deferred.

Project was only approved in February 2010 due to an objection that was received.

Project scope was reduced due to funding.

REASON FOR DEVIATION

187

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


188 Metres of pipe replaced Metres of pipe replaced Metres of pipe Install new technology on street lights to save energy Replacement of Municipal building lighting fittings and bulbs with energy efficient ones Replace obsolete and unsafe MV switchgear and transformers Connect and operate primary substations from the control room Extending and reinforcing the network to cater for additional demand Rewind the Woodburn 30MVA power transformer + repayment of Northdale substation refurbishment design Complete the refurbishment of two 33kV lines to Hilton Replace about 1,000 streetlight fittings in town Install and commission of a 30 MVA transformer in Pine Street

To maintain water infrastructure

To rehabilitate water reticulation network

To replace existing street lighting with energy efficient streetlights

To provide Municipality buildings with efficient lighting through Demand Side Management

To ensure access to provisions of services by communities

To ensure that electricity supply

To ensure access to provisions of services by communities

To ensure access to provisions of services by communities

To ensure access to provisions of services by communities

To ensure access to provisions of Services by communities

To ensure access to provisions of Services by communities

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

To rehabilitate the water reticulation network and reduce water loss

IDP GOAL/OBJECTIVE

BASIC & SUSTAINABLE network availability meets NRS SERVICES standards

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

No. of transformers

No. of fittings

Km

Km of network reinforced

No. of substations connected

Pine Street Refurbishment

Street Lighting Network Replacement

Refurbishment of 33kv Transmission Lines

Network Replacement/ Reinforcement

Network Expansion

Scada

Network Refurbishment

Building Lighting

% completed

% completed

Street Lighting

Replace pipe supply to Edendale Hospital

Ukulinga pipeline relay at Airport

Rehabilitation of water infrastructure

PROJECT 2009/2010

No. of streetlights

M

M

M

UNIT OF MEASURE

2

1000

13 km

100%

6 km of 240mm Cu Cable

10

100%

100%

3 500

150

300

2 500

ANNUAL TARGET

26

All

All

All

1&2

All

All

All

All

Various

WARD

Achieved.

Partially achieved (500).

Partially achieved.

Partially achieved.

Partially achieved (3km)

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Partially achieved (only 4 000 000 has been spent)

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Shortage of bucket trucks

Stopped in 3rd quarter due to problems with overtime.

Factory delay in rewinding transformers and late approval by P.I.T. for variation.

Delay in receiving approval from SANRAL

Reallocated to Pine street project.

Awaiting approval for the rollover of funds Dept of Energy

Awaiting approval for the rollover of funds Dept of Energy

Project deferred to 2010-2011 financial year

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


Replace 42 x 132kV insulators from Mersey to Riverside Refurbish faulty 11kV relays Change the infrastructure labelling due to street name changes Refurbishing Northdale substation

Replace unsafe LV relays in secondary substations To ensure effective planning for the position of services Replace 4 x cage transformers with mini-subs Improve safety of Municipal infrastructure Monitor quality of supply Provide cellphone vending to enable communities easy access to prepaid electricity Provide additional vending stations and technology to enable communities easy access to prepaid electricity Install 728 streetlights in Edendale, Imbali & Vulindlela + 21 high mast lights

To ensure access to provisions of services by communities

To ensure effective planning for the position of services

To ensure access to provisions of services by communities

To ensure access to provisions of services by communities

To ensure effective Planning for the position of services

To ensure access to provisions

To ensure access to provisions of services by communities

To ensure that electricity supply network availability meets NRS standards

To ensure access to provisions of services by communities

To ensure access to provisions of services by communities

To ensure access to provision of services by communities

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

To ensure access to provisions of services by communities

IDP GOAL/OBJECTIVE

BASIC & SUSTAINABLE of services by communities SERVICES

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

No. of streetlights

No. of stations

Operating cellphone vending software

Established systems

No. of substations secured

No.

% completed

No. of relays

No. of transformers

% completed

30 relays

No. of insulators

UNIT OF MEASURE

Streetlighting in Vulindlela and Edendale

Additional vending

Cellphone vending

QOS Systems

Substation security (cameras and fencing)

Replacement of Cage Transformers

Drawing Office Upgrade

Secondary Substations LV retrofit

Replace 3 x transformers & associated switchgear at Northdale Substation

Name changes/ Diagrams/ Control

Protection/ Test

Refurbishment of 132kv Transmission Lines

PROJECT 2009/2010

728

5

100%

100%

100%

4

100%

20

3

100%

30 relays

42

ANNUAL TARGET

All

All

All

All

All

All

Var

All

All

All

All

WARD

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Partially achieved (37)

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Project cancelled.

Project cancelled.

Project cancelled.

Project cancelled.

No funds available.

Reallocated to Pine street project.

5 Replaced during previous faults

REASON FOR DEVIATION

189

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


190 Connection of 1000 houses in Unit H

To ensure access to electricity by poor communities

regard to vehicle availability and reliability Implementation of Section 78 Assessment (4 month contract)

No. of vehicles

Connect about 1000 houses in Copesville

ANNUAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

To ensure access to provision of services by communities

IDP GOAL/OBJECTIVE

BASIC & SUSTAINABLE To provide a higher level of service to Business Units with SERVICES

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

Progress in weeks

Replacement of vehicles on FML

No. of houses

No. of houses

UNIT OF MEASURE

Implementation of Section 78 Assessment

142

Electrification in Ward 16

Electrification – Copesville, Swapo

PROJECT 2009/2010

Complete Assessment

All

1000

1000

ANNUAL TARGET

All

Advertise Tender

16

29

WARD

Partially achieved, Status Quo report completed, presented to EXCO 29_04/2010

Not achieved.

Achieved.

Not achieved.

ANNUAL ACHIEVED

Project put on hold by Administration Team

No tenders awarded. Put on hold by Administration Team

No agreement with DME - consult with Finance regarding funding

REASON FOR DEVIATION

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


Manager: Municipal Managers Office

PM Electricity

PM Area Based Management

PM Corporate Asset Management

PM Water & Sanitation

PM Information: Communication Technology Acting PM Health & Welfare

PM Community Development

PM Infrastructure: Construction &Reconstruction

PM Entrepreneurial Development & BEE

PM Expenditure

PM Budget & Finance

PM Risk Management

PM HRM & ER

DMM Corporate Services

PM Sound Governance

PM Human Resource Development

DMM Community Services

PM Infrastructure: Planning & Survey

DMM Infrastructure Services

PM Invest Attract Retention & Expansion

DMM Development Services

PM Income

DMM Finance Services

Municipal Manager

Executive Manager Internal Audit

191

CHAPTER FIVE: FUNCTIONAL AREA SERVICE DELIVERY REPORTING

5.1 ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 5.2. FINANCE 5.2.1 Sub Functions: Income, Expenditure, Budget and Finance Overview: Includes all activities relating to the finance function of the municipality including budget planning & implementation, financial management & reporting and revenue & debt management.

Description of Activities: The function of finance within the municipality is administered as follows and includes:

1.

Revenue Management

The Revenue Department is responsible for the billing, receipting, and customer care activities relating to a wide variety of municipal services.

2.

Expenditure Management

The Expenditure Department is responsible for the administration of the payroll management and payment of creditors whilst adhering to budgetary constraints.

3.

Budget Management

The Budget Department primary focus of concentration is the optimal implementation and management of all aspects of the MFMA and supporting legislation.

4.

Supply Chain Management

The Supply Chain Management Department is responsible for the systematic, strategic co-ordination of procuring goods and services by the municipality in accordance with the MFMA and other relevant legislation. This must always be conducted in a fair, equitable and transparent manner.

5.

Financial Control and Cash Management

The financial control and cash management department is primarily responsible for the provision of an effective accounting and financial management service to the Council and ensuring compliance with relevant legislation and regulations governing both the budgets and financial statements. The department also is responsible for providing the municipality with an investment and borrowings capacity in order to invest surplus funds at a maximum return with minimum risk and to secure funding from lending institutions at favourable terms and conditions to finance the service delivery programmes.

These services extend to include: These services extend to include all business units of the municipality and service the entire Msunduzi jurisdiction.

192


193 The Strategic Objectives of the Function are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Measure capacity of the municipality to achieve efficient and effective financial management. To promote ongoing improvements in revenue accounting and management. Maintain an effective expenditure control system. The annual and adjustments budgets are prepared in the prescribed formats and approved on a timely basis. To establish and maintain Supply Chain Management Systems that complies with the Municipal Finance Management Act. The annual and consolidated financial statements are prepared in the prescribed Generally Recognised Accounting Standards and on a timely basis.

The Key Issues for 2009 / 10 are: Revenue Management 1. 2.

Constructive amendments to the Credit Control, Debt Collection and Indigent Policies were done to guide and support progressive revenue collection and debt management. When the municipality went under administration an “Operation Pitbull Team� was established to audit all electricity and water meters and conduct a data clean up, all mini circuit breaker (MCB) values were checked and illegal tampering of meters and theft of electricity and water curtailed.

Expenditure Management 1.

The Provincial Intervention Task Team established an expenditure committee so that the expenditure that could be monitored and in line with the 2009/10 budget.

Budget Management 1. 2. 3.

The 2009/10 Budget was changed to be Output/Outcomes Revenue Driven and NOT expenditure driven. The recurrent expenditure in the 2009/10 Adjustments Budget was funded by the estimates of revenue that was strictly guided by the standards on actual revenue that was collected between 1 July 2009 to 31 January 2010. The budget was focused on service delivery provision.

Supply Chain Management 1. 2.

To review the SCM policy and procedures and align these to National Government mandates. An effective SCM unit was put in place to eliminate corruption and theft.

Financial Control and Cash Management 1. 2.

The locomotion, overtime, and travel and subsistence policies were reviewed. When the municipality experienced serious financial challenges and underwent administration the cash flow situation had to be strictly monitored and only Non Discretionary Municipal Commitments and Non Discretionary Professional & Special Services Commitments i.e. Bulk purchases on water and electricity, employee related benefits, redemptions on external loan obligations and only approved service delivery related contracts were paid.

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 ANALYSIS OF THE FUNCTION: 1

Number and cost to employer of all Finance personnel:

Number

Professional - Directors / Managers

29

12,643,167.33

Field

40

6,627,911.81

Office

90

9,484,716.87

Non professional

6

373,589.21

Temporary

0

0

Contract

0

0

165

2

3

4

5

(000’s)

Debtor billings: number and value of monthly billings:

29,129,385.22

• Number and amount billed each month across debtors by function (e.g.: water, electricity etc)

Refer to attached table 1

Debtor collections: value of amount received and interest:

R (000s)

• Value received from monthly billings each month and interest from the previous month across debtors by function (e.g.: water, electricity etc)

Refer to attached table 1

Debtor analysis: amount outstanding over 30, 60, 90 and 120 plus days:

R (000s)

• Total debts outstanding over 30, 60, 90 and 120 plus days across debtors by function (e.g.: water, electricity etc)

Refer to attached table 2

Write off of debts: number and value of debts written off:

Number

R (000s)

• Total debts written off each month across debtors by function (e.g.: water, electricity etc)

0

0

There has been no write off since 2007.

6

Property rates (Residential):

Number

R (000s)

• Number and value of properties rated

68041

30,444,287,001.00

• Number and value of properties not rated

0

0

• Number and value of rate exemptions

0

0

All properties are rated. No exemptions are applied in respect of rates.

• Rates collectible for the current year

Refer to attached table 1

Number

R (000s)

3920

12,815,450,000.00

7

Property rates (Commercial):

• Number and value of properties rated

• Number and value of properties not rated

0

0

• Number and value of rate exemptions

0

0

All properties are rated. No exemptions are applied in respect of rates.

• Rates collectible for the current year

Refer to attached table 1

194


195 8

Property valuation:

• Year of last valuation

2009/2010

• Regularity of valuation

4 years

Refer to attached table 3

R (000s)

Refer to attached table 4

R (000s)

9

Indigent Policy: • Quantity (number of households affected) • Quantum (total value across municipality)

10

Creditor Payments:

11

Credit Rating:

Credit rating for June 2010

Short term

A3

Long term

BBB

Rating was received from Global credit rating company.

12

External Loans:

• Total loans received and paid during the year

Note: Create a suitable table to reflect the balance of each external loan at the beginning of the year, new loans raised during the year and loans repaid during the year as well as the balance at the end of the year. Interest rates payable on each loan, together with the date of repayment should be also disclosed in the table.

13

Delayed and Default Payments:

The table requested is already reflected in the Annual Financial statements as Appendix A  

Refer to attached table 5

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


196

10

10

May

2009/2010

10

Apr

Jun

10

10

Feb

Mar

10

Jan

69,244,887.05

09

09

Nov

Dec

66,513,941.78

09

Oct

75,962,591.58

746,332,165.31

71,937,699.94

-12,703,760.80

85,727,158.62

78,653,604.34

48,785,306.56

58,565,696.57

67,349,140.44

70,986,038.90

09

09

65,309,860.33

Aug

09

July

Sep

 

(cshrevtpromis.xls) Date

City Grand Total - Revenue Raised excluding VAT Elect

230,974,240.08

19,215,928.78

19,664,789.56

19,603,021.06

19,411,643.04

18,343,024.09

16,661,111.95

18,971,028.67

19,111,817.20

17,024,577.59

25,121,814.96

19,857,597.50

17,987,885.68

Water

3,999,252.23

4,012,759.22

3,919,551.76

3,857,887.57

4,109,881.98

3,910,104.40

3,868,923.79

3,965,374.58

3,949,736.05

3,965,643.90

3,936,389.07

3,981,667.37

Refuse

79,952,945.31 47,477,171.92

6,595,209.45

6,587,670.46

6,310,336.24

6,008,804.01

6,739,310.03

6,441,419.43

6,582,669.49

7,379,348.02

6,231,388.09

7,840,909.17

6,412,068.67

6,823,812.25

Sewer

440,886,479.91

37,195,413.29

36,825,306.01

36,215,210.53

36,663,043.49

35,463,499.08

36,869,968.95

40,862,236.70

35,619,870.48

33,430,868.19

37,365,014.95

36,024,991.05

38,351,057.19

Rates

24,237,382.85

-1,288,013.42

4,832,174.35

1,837,100.04

1,831,810.70

1,415,800.13

2,220,638.42

3,793,895.75

1,793,412.79

1,731,752.09

1,917,352.28

1,906,159.46

2,245,300.26

2009-2010 Sundry Debtors

1,569,860,385.38

137,655,490.27

59,218,938.80

153,612,378.25

146,426,793.15

114,856,821.87

124,668,939.72

141,427,894.84

137,114,710.12

128,882,263.79

147,196,774.16

144,099,797.33

134,699,583.08

Total Revenue

138,318,148.75

129,199,836.87

118,644,486.98

128,520,865.01

120,509,375.74

113,132,241.96

146,700,727.02

113,098,013.44

158,265,699.27

127,089,015.75

102,305,526.88

98,076,956.41

Total Cash Less VAT Prtn

1,493,860,894.08

Table 1: Number and amount billed each month by function and value received from monthly billings each month:

95.16

100.48

218.17

77.24

87.77

104.92

90.75

103.73

82.48

122.80

86.34

71.00

72.81

Csh/Rev %

1,646,300,832.07

150,647,657.79

143,448,416.70

131,557,182.25

142,684,113.54

132,268,607.86

125,431,769.50

160,622,606.97

125,567,346.93

171,794,875.65

139,846,301.34

113,656,800.55

108,775,152.99

Total Cash Received

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


GENERAL DEBIT/CREDIT ASSESSMENT RATES RATES HANDED OVER LOANS BUSINESS RENTAL DEPOSIT ELECTRICITY - FIXED CHARGES ELECTRICITY BASIC ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION HOUSING PURCHASED HOUSING RENTAL REFUSE SEWERAGE TRADE EFFLUENT SERVICES - BALANCE B/FWD SUNDRY - SERVICES WATER CONSUMPTION SUNDRY

Category TOTAL (148838 Debtors, Paid: 152,168,139.21-)

AGE ANALYSIS BY DEBTOR TYPE - JUNE 2010 Current

30 Days

60 Days

90 Days

120 Days

120 Days Plus

Total

-27,890,805.29 230,779.82 121,525.36 497,814.21 70,545.23 5,426,668.70 -21,543,471.97 47,277,740.01 8,813,813.57 6,743,037.44 6,299,370.54 5,904,720.22 126,469,608.37 201,508,290.15 128,888.82 71,944.64 72,130.87 72,201.73 72,369.19 14,058,816.47 14,476,351.72 19.38 9.69 9.69 9.69 9.69 1,304.99 1,363.13 925,459.00 228,946.19 163,911.68 164,802.33 135,286.58 1,865,248.74 3,483,654.52 -1,038,567.15 4,500.00 2,401.34 500.00 2,000.00 11,233.57 -1,017,932.24 1,485,482.96 686,622.97 572,851.69 533,413.40 461,590.59 5,280,284.19 9,020,245.80 16,615,543.10 977,547.74 773,477.57 683,617.91 581,588.00 9,184,174.93 28,815,949.25 100,027,669.62 2,464,663.42 1,408,739.87 1,527,506.91 939,938.89 14,888,555.78 121,257,074.49 57,210.51 24,155.59 22,601.80 21,964.24 21,611.22 412,849.25 560,392.61 710,409.59 338,208.29 336,449.47 334,439.40 329,639.06 13,802,549.67 15,851,695.48 6,089,605.27 631,436.66 540,910.22 593,637.80 472,464.96 9,535,435.59 17,863,490.50 9,590,075.23 1,375,038.85 1,191,799.91 991,206.24 1,036,512.50 17,603,431.11 31,788,063.84 284,996.46 4,122.46 72,417.92 4,464.78 4,464.78 812,759.15 1,183,225.55 -933,293.75 47,609.15 49,504.98 49,515.30 49,677.26 6,458,328.39 5,721,341.33 -3,013.01 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1,487,700.38 1,484,687.37 34,256,310.60 8,790,040.96 5,126,326.86 5,909,895.69 5,979,935.67 113,449,037.58 173,511,547.36 3,672,482.26 330,880.34 269,301.84 113,555.57 653,059.65 8,406,135.07 13,445,414.73 191,256,213.61 25,020,320.34 17,467,398.51 17,797,915.74 16,715,413.49 349,154,121.93 617,411,383.62

Table 2: AGE ANALYSIS BY DEBTOR TYPE -

197

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


198

GENERAL DEBIT/CREDIT ASSESSMENT RATES RATES HANDED OVER LOANS BUSINESS RENTAL DEPOSIT ELECTRICITY - FIXED CHARGES ELECTRICITY BASIC ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION HOUSING PURCHASED HOUSING RENTAL REFUSE SEWERAGE TRADE EFFLUENT SERVICES - BALANCE B/FWD WATER CONSUMPTION SUNDRY

RESIDENTIAL (112923 Debtors, Paid: 59,375,851.31-)

GENERAL DEBIT/CREDIT ASSESSMENT RATES RATES HANDED OVER BUSINESS RENTAL DEPOSIT ELECTRICITY - FIXED CHARGES ELECTRICITY BASIC ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION REFUSE SEWERAGE SERVICES - BALANCE B/FWD WATER CONSUMPTION SUNDRY

Category GOVERNMENT (7816 Debtors, Paid: 9,981,026.05-) 55,414.67 1,512,276.86 7,037.87 120,541.15 0.00 7,095.11 68,132.58 208,260.44 59,235.86 377,682.31 7,966.54 1,143,842.59 1,808.15 3,569,294.13

30 Days

-15,409,256.62 123,776.73 22,785,117.14 4,082,084.07 55,770.63 34,267.66 19.38 9.69 14,491.74 233.00 -750,839.06 3,000.00 1,219,322.34 548,252.76 9,613,592.46 496,357.58 17,448,659.74 894,897.55 805.86 195.12 7,888.04 770.57 3,840,133.11 423,760.24 5,327,265.66 682,559.05 15,908.64 4,122.46 -830,473.97 3,705.88 22,014,998.21 6,681,279.71 395,887.48 100,632.72 65,749,290.78 14,079,904.79

-9,329,480.03 4,033,213.27 14,075.74 277,405.09 -1,037.84 9,689.01 350,426.49 10,268,233.90 519,663.77 1,579,977.34 -121,478.65 3,670,019.43 3,042,521.65 14,313,229.17

Current 0.63 1,287,816.36 7,052.50 101,410.26 0.00 3,123.62 49,293.49 24,009.15 39,608.80 125,414.95 7,979.70 456,365.71 827.23 2,102,902.40

90 Days

58,396.62 63,529.85 3,487,531.64 3,240,505.87 34,486.96 34,539.50 9.69 9.69 233.00 233.00 401.34 500.00 469,841.78 450,541.20 375,214.05 363,925.40 809,081.08 1,012,755.60 62.04 62.04 624.31 624.31 367,418.42 425,798.59 585,572.93 644,208.45 4,464.78 4,464.78 5,588.55 5,593.83 3,388,624.93 4,801,302.57 95,853.93 31,900.84 9,683,406.05 11,080,495.52

0.63 1,349,862.76 7,052.50 105,351.81 0.00 2,808.51 54,497.73 44,987.58 41,061.03 377,568.29 7,979.70 1,082,469.52 1,162.52 3,074,802.58

60 Days 7,991.55 44,090,039.33 1,270,710.88 63,189.45 0.00 16,217.62 834,182.64 733,571.86 978,790.09 4,192,068.14 1,160,339.16 13,822,742.92 81,099.29 67,250,942.93

120 Days Plus -9,266,071.92 53,540,637.04 1,312,981.99 764,041.41 -1,037.84 40,408.50 1,402,282.67 11,300,702.12 1,676,431.67 6,960,410.12 1,070,766.15 21,090,524.48 3,128,601.02 93,020,677.41

Total

49,407.03 3,972,656.77 -11,141,489.62 2,935,224.16 54,058,225.33 90,588,688.21 34,693.38 7,124,730.71 7,318,488.84 9.69 1,304.99 1,363.13 233.00 9,087.00 24,510.74 2,000.00 6,588.12 -738,349.60 379,289.39 3,864,068.95 6,931,316.42 290,320.20 3,448,750.63 14,588,160.32 591,387.10 7,070,795.66 27,827,576.73 62.04 1,734.08 2,921.18 624.31 8,448.74 18,980.28 317,601.09 4,785,450.31 10,160,161.76 522,470.84 8,120,243.82 15,882,320.75 4,464.78 294,874.74 328,300.18 5,593.83 583,968.68 -226,023.20 4,388,739.84 81,387,826.93 122,662,772.19 71,196.09 2,395,397.60 3,090,868.66 9,593,316.77 177,134,153.06 287,320,566.97

0.63 1,267,428.46 7,052.50 96,143.65 0.00 1,474.63 45,749.74 21,639.19 38,072.12 307,699.09 7,979.70 915,084.31 1,182.18 2,709,506.20

120 Days

Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10


GENERAL DEBIT/CREDIT ASSESSMENT RATES RATES HANDED OVER BUSINESS RENTAL DEPOSIT ELECTRICITY - FIXED CHARGES ELECTRICITY BASIC ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION HOUSING PURCHASED HOUSING RENTAL REFUSE SEWERAGE TRADE EFFLUENT SERVICES - BALANCE B/FWD SUNDRY - SERVICES WATER CONSUMPTION SUNDRY

-3,149,579.23 2,593,520.26 32,350.43 223,478.48 -108,856.03 64,986.93 613,461.84 8,324,327.46 56,404.65 702,521.55 250,162.35 727,398.86 13,350.81 -21.11 -3,013.01 2,184,734.73 -595,723.13 11,929,505.84

-2,489.41 17,865,889.34 26,692.02 410,083.69 -177,834.22 191,484.68 6,038,062.31 63,986,448.52 1,479,646.04 1,955,433.37 255,737.01 18,679.98 6,386,558.23 829,796.26 99,264,187.82

GENERAL DEBIT/CREDIT ASSESSMENT RATES RATES HANDED OVER BUSINESS RENTAL DEPOSIT ELECTRICITY - FIXED CHARGES ELECTRICITY BASIC ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION REFUSE SEWERAGE TRADE EFFLUENT SERVICES - BALANCE B/FWD WATER CONSUMPTION SUNDRY

OTHER (18391 Debtors, Paid: 8,561,107.30-)

Current

Category BUSINESS (9708 Debtors, Paid: 74,250,154.55-)

8,588.63 864,603.65 17,255.60 62,678.04 0.00 18,392.73 37,410.48 80,356.27 23,960.47 337,437.72 64,588.39 159,713.33 0.00 24,897.42 0.00 474,394.51 128,467.52 2,302,744.76

42,999.79 2,354,848.99 13,383.51 45,494.00 1,500.00 112,882.37 375,647.10 1,281,149.16 83,852.17 155,084.16 0.00 11,039.31 490,524.15 99,971.95 5,068,376.66

30 Days

19,911.14 817,012.12 17,207.90 14,886.30 0.00 12,165.43 24,037.25 52,867.38 22,539.76 335,825.16 60,784.40 135,001.48 0.00 24,897.42 0.00 398,753.04 121,509.56 2,057,398.34

43,216.97 1,088,630.92 13,383.51 43,440.57 2,000.00 88,035.97 319,728.54 501,803.83 71,646.37 93,657.21 67,953.14 11,039.31 256,479.37 50,775.83 2,651,791.54

60 Days

8,995.25 848,871.84 17,226.22 45,614.37 0.00 10,449.69 19,093.87 148,870.49 21,902.20 333,815.09 63,778.80 115,958.85 0.00 24,902.46 0.00 382,978.07 38,459.93 2,080,917.13

425,288.48 922,176.47 13,383.51 17,544.70 0.00 69,298.89 251,305.15 341,871.67 64,451.61 105,623.99 0.00 11,039.31 269,249.34 42,367.57 2,533,600.69

90 Days

11,952.31 753,750.32 17,239.80 6,017.83 0.00 14,604.71 16,509.33 32,543.69 21,549.18 329,014.75 55,622.28 120,062.10 0.00 25,064.42 0.00 418,086.89 43,645.48 1,865,663.09

9,185.26 948,317.28 13,383.51 32,892.10 0.00 66,221.86 229,008.73 294,368.91 61,169.47 86,280.47 0.00 11,039.31 258,024.63 537,035.90 2,546,927.43

120 Days

Total

336,634.19 13,995,325.91 2,986,665.20 314,980.34 200.00 315,032.69 564,113.07 768,254.36 411,115.17 13,794,100.93 2,150,405.77 3,553,551.28 0.00 3,120,689.37 1,487,700.38 12,362,226.98 1,641,446.38 57,802,442.02

-2,763,497.71 19,873,084.10 3,087,945.15 667,655.36 -108,656.03 435,632.18 1,274,625.84 9,407,219.65 557,471.43 15,832,715.20 2,645,341.99 4,811,685.90 13,350.81 3,220,429.98 1,484,687.37 16,221,174.22 1,377,805.74 78,038,671.18

1,109,386.19 1,627,587.28 14,326,017.80 37,505,880.80 2,676,709.68 2,756,935.74 1,477,991.95 2,027,447.01 4,445.45 -169,888.77 1,084,964.93 1,612,888.70 4,337,128.59 11,550,880.42 6,315,933.90 72,721,575.99 1,620,789.42 3,381,555.08 1,737,567.87 4,133,647.07 517,884.41 841,574.56 1,593,331.18 1,656,168.40 5,876,240.75 13,537,076.47 4,288,191.80 5,848,139.31 46,966,583.92 159,031,468.06

120 Days Plus

199

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Table 3: Indigent Policy Indigent Policy

Quantity

Quantum

Electricity Primary consumption tariff

1313

R 504,357.79

Life line reabate 200 KWH per month

901

R -50,003.43

Life line reabate 50 KWH per month

556

R -18,661.26

3916

R -17,237.29

Refuse Life line rebate 50% Sewerage Life line rebate 50% Water Life line rebate 6kl or less

Table 4: Supplier Name Supplier Name

Sup. Nr.

Current

30 Days

60 Days

GONAL CONSTRUCTION CC

23034

1,670,033.08

432,229.24

-

SARUPEN’S TRANSPORT CC

24181

1,113,884.40

5,016.00

-

FIRE RAIDERS (PTY) LTD

27571

1,280,678.99

AQUA TRANSPORT & PLANT HIRE (PTY) LTD

26411

SASOL OIL (PTY) LTD

28988

788,810.02

-

ARB ELECTRICAL WHOLESALERS

319

672,600.00

-

NATIONWIDE ELECTRICAL

23294

520,799.46

-

-

DERBY SUPERMARKET

29372

44,118.00

-

-

KHUSELANI SECURITY AND RISK MANAGEMENT (PTY) LTD

29608

485,116.64

-

-

200

-

476,036.93

90 Days 51,072.00

120 Days -

150+ Days 464,363.04

2,102,262.32 1,634,335.44

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

788,810.02

-

-

781,043.07

-

-

520,799.46

-

-

488,518.00

-

-

485,116.64

50,046.00

58,397.07 444,400.00 -

-

Total

373,933.68

1,280,678.99 849,970.61


201 Table 5: Delayed and Default Payments: Amount

Reason for delay

DBSA

31-Mar-10

Due date

01-Apr-10

Date paid

19,150,228.59

Technical problems with uploading to FNB electronic payment system

DBSA

30-Jun-10

01-Jul-10

23,408,766.38

Technical problems with uploading to FNB electronic payment system

Umgeni Water

30-Jun-10

01-Jul-10

22,612,836.70

Technical problems with uploading to FNB electronic payment system

SARS VAT

31-Mar-10

01-Apr-10

1,515,385.74

This was the first time that e-filing was used, employee uploaded return, and expected payment to go off automatically, after calling SARS on 01 April was told that payment was to be uploaded as well.

PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS: Key Performance Area

Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved and Plans to Improve Performance IDP Goal/Objective: Improve Expenditure Section to perform more efficiently.

MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY & MANAGEMENT

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Complying with legislated processes leading to implementation Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Nil Reason for Variance: N/A Improvements for Next Year: N/A

IDP Goal/Objective: Review of Policies & Other Relevant Legislation on an annual basis.

GOOD GOVERNANCE & PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Review of credit control and debt collection policy and other relevant legislation. Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Nil Reason for Variance: N/A Improvements for Next Year: N/A

MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY & MANAGEMENT

IDP Goal/Objective: Preparation of an Effective and Realistic Budget, as well as Management and Reporting thereon Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: GAMAP/ GRAP Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Nil Reason for Variance: N/A Improvements for Next Year: N/A

IDP Goal/Objective: Preparation of an Effective and Realistic Budget, as well as Management and Reporting thereon

MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY & MANAGEMENT

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Annual financial statements prepared within legislative deadline. Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): N/A Reason for Variance: N/A Improvements for Next Year: N/A

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 5.2.2 Sub Function: Asset Management Overview: Includes all activities relating to the asset management function of the municipality.

Description of Activities: • •

The asset management responsibilities of the municipality are administered as follows and include: The compilation and the management of Council’s Fixed Asset Register.

These services extend to include: All assets owned or controlled by the Msunduzi Municipality.

The Strategic Objectives of the Function are: The strategic objective of this function is to provide a support service to Business units.

The Key Issues for 2009 / 10 are: • • • • •

The compilation and the management of an up to date Council’s Fixed Asset Register. Staffing Vacancies Budgeting Assets Verification Review of Asset Management Policy

ANALYSIS OF THE FUNCTION: 1

Number and cost to employer of all asset management personnel: • Professional (Directors / Managers)

Number

R (000s)

0

0

• Professional (Engineers/Consultants)

0

0

• Field (Supervisors/Foremen incl inspectors)

0

0

• Office (Clerical/Administration)

2

270,000

• Non-professional (blue collar, outside workforce incl drivers)

0

0

• Temporary

1

130,000

• Contract

0

0

2

Number and total operating cost of assets population:

• Aged less than 10 years

• Aged 10 years or greater

Total

3

Number of property sales achieved

R (000s) 75,186 67,567 142,753

Number 0

4

Number of property leased

5

202

Number and cost to employer of all Building Inspectors employed: • Number of Building Inspectors

Number

R (000s)

14

7,246,037

Number

R (000s)

9

2,541,952


203

• Temporary

0

0

• Contract

0

0

6

Details of building plans:

• Number of building plans approved

• Value of building plans approved

Number

833

731,730,058

PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS: Key Performance Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved and Area Plans to Improve Performance

Current

Target

100%

100%

100%

100%

90%

100%

IDP Goal/Objective: Compilation and Management of Asset Register

Institutional Transformation & Development

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 100% Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): N/A Reason for Variance: N/A Improvements for Next Year: N/A

IDP Goal/Objective: Asset Verification

Institutional Transformation & Development

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 100% Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): N/A Reason for Variance: N/A Improvements for Next Year: N/A

IDP Goal/Objective: Asset Management Policy Review Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 90%

Institutional Transformation & Development

Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any):10% Reason for Variance: Not approved by Council, Legal Department’s comments to be finalised Improvements for Next Year: To be approved by Council and incorporate Legal Department’s comments if necessary.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 5.2.3 Sub Function: Supply Chain Management (Procurement) Overview: Includes all activities relating to overall Supply Chain Management Functions of the Municipality. The SCM Policy reflects and represents Government Policy within the provisions of the Local Government; Municipal Finance Management Act 2003 and other Legislative prescripts which include The Constitution of the RSA Act 108 of 1996; The Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act 5 of 2000 and its associated Regulations; The Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment Act 2003 (Act 53 of 2003); and the Local Government Municipal Finance Management Act 2003 : Municipal Supply Chain Management Regulations

Description of the Activities: The function of Supply Chain Management within the municipality is administered as follows and includes the following activities: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Acquisition Management (including Contract and Contract Management) Demand Management Logistics Management Supply Chain Performance Disposal Management Risk Management and Regular Assessment of Supply Chain Management

The strategic objectives of this function are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Procuring goods or services Disposing of Goods no longer needed Selecting Contractors to provide assistance in the provision of Municipal Services otherwise that in circumstances where Chapter 8 of the Municipal System Act applies Selecting External Mechanisms’ referred to in Section 80 (1) (b) of the Municipal Systems Act for the provision of Municipal Services in Circumstances contemplated in Section 83 of that Act. Appointing Consultants. Awarding Contracts for Building and Construction in Compliance with the Construction Industry Development Board Act. To annually specify the Targeted Procurement (Historically Disadvantaged Individuals, Women Equity Ownership, Youth, Disabled Persons and Co-operatives).

The key issues for 2009/10 are: Procuring of all goods and services, as required by the Municipality, in line with service delivery to Communities, within the Msunduzi Municipal Jurisdiction.

ANALYSIS OF THE FUNCTION: 1 Details of tender / procurement activities:

Number

• Total number of times that tender committee met during year

45

• Total number of tenders considered (Competitive Bids; Formal Quotes)

378

• Total number of tenders approved

251

• Average time taken from tender advertisement to award of tender

204

3 Months


205 2 Details of tender committee during the 09/10 Financial Year:

Details of tender committee membership as follows: 1. Bid Adjudication Committee • Roy Bridgmohan - DMM: Financial Services • Francis Grantham - Manager Procurement • Zwelithini Hulane - DMM: Community Services • Kevin Perumal - DMM: Corporate Services • Philemon Mashoko - DMM: Infrastructure Services • David Gengan - Development Services • William Cooper (Advisory Capacity) - Legal Advisor 2. Bid Evaluation Committee • Rakesh Singh - Procurement • Vinay Mohanlal - Procurement • Krishna Singh - Municipal Infrastructure Grants (MIG) • Billy Paton - Fire and Rescue Services • Sibulele Diko - Transportation 3. Bid Specification Committee • Thavandree Gounder - Procurement • Tyrone Ashby - Procurement • Wally Robins - Safety • Vasu Naidoo - Asset Management • Sipho Zimu - Development Services

PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS: Key Performance Area

Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved and Plans to Improve Performance IDP Goal/Objective: Providing efficient, transparent, fair, equitable and cost effective SCM services to customers within prescripts of the Policy. Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 70-75% Achievement of Targeted Preferential Procurement Goals

Procurement of Goods and Services in line with Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 20-30% Msunduzi Municipality’s Reason for Variance: The SCM Unit relies on support from the Economic Development and Growth Business Unit to provide targets as per Legislative Requirements. The Municipality does SCM Policy

not have an ED&G Policy to benchmark against. The staff compliment in the SCM unit is only at approx. 50%, therefore hampering 100% of achievement. Improvements for Next Year: Develop a Procurement Plan of demands made by each Business Unit to ensure timeous end results.

IDP Goal/Objective: To provide an efficient and reliable contract management service in line with the SCM Policy and the Municipal Finance Management Act No. 53 of 2003 Clause 116. Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: <50%

Contracts and Contract Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 50% Reason for Variance: 100% of this function was not part of SCM responsibility previously. Now Management

implemented and part of the SCM organogram. This critical part of SCM is sure to improve moving forward. Improvements for Next Year: This activity shall be enforced by ensuring that all contracts are properly managed within the ambits of the SCM Functions.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 IDP Goal/Objective: Providing efficient and effective service to all internal and external customers. Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 80%

Logistics, Inventory and Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 20% Warehouse Management Reason for Variance: Service delivery to customers was hampered due to financial constraints experienced by Council. Improvements for Next Year: Improve turnaround time for providing excellent service & maintenance of lean stock holding. Outsourcing non-core stores functions.

Â

 IDP Goal/Objective: Reducing and/or eliminating wasteful and fruitless expenditure Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Less than 50% Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): More than 50%

Wasteful and FruitReason for Variance: Outdated SCM policy and lack of monitoring less Expenditure due to Improvements for Next Year: Strict procedures must be adhered to by all staff engaging in Emergency Work

activities outside the control of the SCM. Existing SCM policy revised and updated, Procedure manual currently being amended. Once approved, workshops will be held in terms of making staff aware of SCM policy & procedures. Furthermore since the intervention order clerks are now centralised under SCM. This will ensure more control and centralised buying.

206


207 5.3 CORPORATE SERVICES 5.3.1 Sub Functions: Sound Governance, Human Resources, Employee Relations, Legal, Human Resource Development and Information and Communication Technology. OVERVIEW: Incorporates all activities related to the Sound Governance and Human Resources function of the municipality, which includes Human Resources Management, Employee Relations, Human Resources Development, Sound Governance, ICT, as well as Legal Services, whose services comprise, recruitment, selection and induction - also performance management systems, code of conduct detail and decision making systems.

5.3.2 Sub Function: Human Resources Management Description of the Activities: The Human Resources Management (HRM) function includes a variety of activities, and key among them is deciding what staffing needs the organisation has, and whether to recruit employees to fill these needs, recruiting the best employees, and ensuring the personnel and management practices conform to various regulations. Activities also include maintaining the staff establishment, managing employee relations, employee records and personnel policies. These services extend to include recruitment and induction of staff, maintaining the staff establishment, managing employee relations, employee records and personnel policies, but do not take account of employee conditions of service which resides within the jurisdiction of SALGA. The strategic objectives of this function are:

The strategic objectives of this function are to: 1. 2. 3. 4.

To Contribute Towards Employability & Self Employability of Youth and Community. To ensure a competent workforce to achieve organisational objectives. Improve Quality and Management Control Processes. To align the organisational culture to the business objectives to Improve organisational efficacy and measure results.

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 The key issues for 2009/10 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

External Student Bursaries Awarded Students registered on Learnerships/apprenticeship Students placed on Internship Programme Technical Skills programmes is provided to unemployed youth 200 Emerging Contractors trained on Procurement Procedures and processes. Conduct a pilot Skills Audit. Design and implement Personal Development Plan Implementation of the Work place Skills Plan Recovery of Skills development Levies Make ABET compulsory to all employees who are NQF level 1 and below Implement Learnerships for employees Development of Skills Development Committees in each Strategic Business Unit Batho Pele workshops and training are conducted (Ward Reps & Staff) Placement is evaluated Councillors Skills Audit is conducted Ward Committees are established, inducted and trained Conduct surveys based on staff satisfaction â&#x20AC;&#x201C; business objectives Knowledge Management system coordination at a SBUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s level Transformation workshops are conducted each year Areas of corporate image improvements are identified Induction programme is implemented Measures to cascade Performance Management System to all levels of the Organisation. Facilitate PMS Workshop 22. Annual Performance assessments are scheduled 23. Establish OD/PM Steering Committee

5.3.3 Sub Function: Legal Services Description of the Activities: It is the mandate of the Legal division to provide legal counsel and related legal services related to Municipal issues to the Mayor and Council, the various committees established by council, as well as the administration and staff of the Msunduzi Municipality. These services extend to include; municipal Bylaw prosecution, drafting of Bylaws for consideration/approval by Council, contracts and agreements, as well as the interpretation of legal statutes for Council and staff.

The strategic objectives of this function are to: To ensure legal compliance.

The key issues for 2009/10 are: 1. 2. 3.

208

Legal Division to verify all organisational contracts and policies for compliance. Strengthen law enforcement and the establishment of a Municipal Court. Development of by-law and policy units


209 5.3.4 Sub Function: Sound Governance Description of the Activities: The current corporate meeting and decision making structure within the Msunduzi Municipality is supported by Sound Governance. Sound Governance functions to ensure gainful access to information by collecting, capturing, reproducing, organising, maintaining, preserving and disseminating it. Sound Governance further functions to ensure improved service delivery within the organisation and the licensing and legal compliance of all business premises in operation within the Msunduzi area of jurisdiction. These services extend to include the Secretariat, Information centre, Batho Pele, and Printing

The strategic objectives of this function are to: 1. 2.

To ensure the effectiveness and efficiency of the Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision making system thereby improving communications and understanding. To ensure legal compliance of all businesses operating within the Msunduzi area of jurisdiction.

The key issues for 2009/10 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Effective and efficient management of information within the organization. Ensuring efficiency and effectiveness of committee system. To improve communication and understanding. Develop formal trading policies. Ensure all businesses are licensed in terms of the Act. To administer and monitor informal trading.

5.3.5 Sub Function: Information & Communications Technology Description of the Activities: The ICT Sub-unit provides efficient and cost effective management and control of ICT services within the Msunduzi Municipality. To improve and maintain the local area network (LAN and WAN), and to liaise with external suppliers and providers of ICT goods and services to provide computing, information, and telecommunications services and support at the Msunduzi Municipality.

The information communication technology responsibilities of the municipality are administered as follows and include: 1. 2. 3.

Technical services Information Management ICT Security

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 The strategic objectives of this function are to: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Deploy adequate and equitable ICT infrastructure to broaden access to information and services. Ensure optimal utilisation of technology and telecoms by relevant staff through awareness and training. Promote enterprise-wide approach to ICT planning. Formulation of policies and ICT steering committee. Provide data integrity, control and security. Centralised Data Provision e.g. PayDay, ProMIS. ICT Service Desk to provide Desktop, back-end and Business Process Provision support. GIS Service. Ensure building and sustaining of a secure, integrated ICT and acting as a change agent

The key issues for 2009/10 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7.

Systems Integrity and Security Optimization of existing Infrastructure: Networks, Telecoms, Hardware, Data Centre, Help Desk, Database Administration, GIS, Intra/Internet, Content Filtering, Backups. Improved Customer Service- Finance Consolidated Billing Call Centre. Desktop Replacement- 300 obsolete PCs were replaced. Sustaining (Operating, maintaining and improving) existing ICT infrastructure (Networks (LAN/WAN), Telecommunication, Networking services, Servers/mainframe, Business support applications, Computer data centre, End user support, Help desk, Database administration, GIS, Internet/Intranet, Content filtering, Disaster recovery ). Secure Council ICT - ICT risk management, Auditor General’s information security audit. Integrate Council ICT.

Analysis of the Function: 1             2    

210

Number and cost to employer of all information communication technology service personnel:

Number

R (000s)

• Professional (Directors / Managers)

3

1917

• Professional (Information Technology / Consultants)

9

2607

• Field (Supervisors/Foremen incl inspectors)

0

0

• Office (Clerical/Administration) (Switchboard)

5

509

• Non-professional (blue collar, outside workforce incl drivers)

0

0

• Temporary

0

0

• Contract

0

0

Number

R (000s)

• Aged less than 5 years

300

3000

• Aged 5years or greater

700

7000

Number and total of computers servicing municipality:


211 3

Operating, maintaining and improving existing ICT infrastructure.

The Wide area network of the Municipality was extended to several areas with a view to enhancing Service Delivery to the public. The areas are:-

           

• Vulindlela

• Mapumuza

• Mafunze

• France

• Truro Centre and

• Edendale Education Department

4

250

Total number customers supported:

Internal Users

5

1000

Total number of information communication technology service related complaints received: 50 per day

6

56342

Type and number of grants and subsidies received:

7

Total operating cost of information communication technology service function

 

R (000s)

0

0

R (000s) 4445

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS - ICT Key Performance Area

Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved and Plans to Improve Performance

Current

Target

5

5

38 seats

38 seats

IDP Goal/Objective: PC Upgrades

77

300

60% Spare Capacity

50% Spare Capacity

32+ Systems

8 Systems

IDP Goal/Objective: Deploy ICT Infrastructure at 5 sites

Institutional Development & Transformation

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 5 Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): N/A Reason for Variance: N/A Improvements for Next Year: N/A

IDP Goal/Objective: Install Customer Service Call Centre

Institutional Development & Transformation

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 38 seats Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): N/A Reason for Variance: N/A Improvements for Next Year: Integrate IS&F Call Centre

Institutional Development & Transformation

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 77 Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 123 Reason for Variance: Funding withdrawn Improvements for Next Year: R2m in Budget

IDP Goal/Objective: Billing system Server Upgrade

Institutional Development & Transformation

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 60% spare capacity Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): N/A Reason for Variance: N/A Improvements for Next Year: N/A

IDP Goal/Objective: Optimize Use of Systems

Institutional Development & Transformation

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 0 Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 32+ Systems Reason for Variance: No funding available for acquisition of new system Improvements for Next Year: R20m budgeted for new Billing System

212


Salary

Professional (Managerial/Specialist)

Office (Clerical/Administrative)

Non-professional (blue collar, outside workforce)

2 Skill or levels of education attained by staff:

5

No.

Table 2: Skill or levels of education attained by staff:

50,497,711.25

Technicians 340 53,056,150 52 8,114,470 40 & Associate Professionals 312 26,835,118.75 272 23,394,720 3 Field (Supervisory/Foremen) Office (Cleri- 1062 105,808,387.5 471 14,645,793.75 42 cal/Administrative) 961 75,556,783.75 766 58,268,352.5 6 Non-professional (blue collar, outside workforce) Temporary 172 8,214,267.5 91   Staff Contract Staff          

35

No.

Salaries

67,634,132.5

COLOURED

Professional (Directors / Managers)

202

AFRICAN

MALE

Number and cost TOTAL to employer of all 1 municipal staff No. employed: No.

6

5

457

10

Salary

WHITE No.

5

64

14

13

6

22 16

8

8

F

M

M

F

NQF 2

5

NQF 1

3,402,285

14,546,163 46

516,060

14,980,605 48

105,931,898 45

70

3

Below NQF 1 M F

668,542.5 30

4,184,512.5 146

258,030

6,241,900 96

1,748,378.8 62

Salary

INDIAN

Table 1: Number and cost to employer of all municipal staff employed:

ANALYSIS OF THE FUNCTION: CORPORATE SERVICES

No.

3

5

1

M

2

F

NQF 4

2

M

14

6

6

8

F

NQF 5

18 24 33 11

F

NQF 3 M

74

12,067,684

16,239,894

1,892,220

8,894,707.5

10,088,483

Salary

3

3

1

7

4

No.

COLOURED

12

19

M

6

4

F

NQF 6

No.

1

No.

86,010 2

3,745,140 16

22,294,748 3

Salary

WHITE Salary

172,020

2,496,760

71,803,530

237,764.25

2

4

M

1

2

F

NQF 7

M

F

NQF 8

2

4

F

768

71

105 162

M

Unknown

199

26

M

8

F 261

Total

460

34

Total

0

1304 182 1486

445,695 0

3,287,831.3 102 10,162,388 59 5,878,243.8

83,510

1,092,332.5 24

48,494,112.5 17

Salary

INDIAN

Highest level qualifications held by employees

396,273.75 141

4,583,037.5 163

430,050 22

7,490,280 57

15,267,980 31

Salary

AFRICAN

FEMALE

213

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Table 3: Number of people from employment equity target groups employed in the three highest management levels in the municipality (consolidated figure):

3

Number of people from employment equity target groups employed in the three highest management levels in the municipality (consolidated figure).

Race African

Coloured

Indian

White

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

Total

F

M

F

Total

Senior Managers

18

8

2

1

14

3

21

1

55

13

68

Professionals

8

1

1

9

4

7

4

24

10

34

Technicians & Associated Professionals

28

41

3

2

57

20

28

13

116

76

192

Table 4: Number of women employed in the three highest management levels in the municipality (consolidate figure.):

4

African F

Coloured F

Indian F

White F

Total F

Total

Senior Managers

8

1

3

1

13

13

Professionals

1

1

4

4

10

10

Technicians & Associated Professionals

41

2

20

13

76

76

Number of women employed in the three highest management levels in the municipality (consolidate figure.)

Table 5: People with disabilities: 5

Number of people with disabilities employed in the three highest management levels in the municipality (consolidated figure).

0

Table 6: Budget spent on implementing the work place skills plan: 6

% of the municipality’s budget spent on implementing the work place skills plan.

0.30%

Table 7: Personnel expenditure Trends: 7

Trends on total personnel expenditure over the last 3 to 5 years, compared to budget

Budget

Expenditure

% Spent

• Budget year 2007/2008

478,227,558

474,383,262

99%

• Budget year 2008/2009

580,172,075

578,165,402

100%

• Budget year 2009/2010

634,560,165

631,560,165

98%

Table 8: Senior management (Section 57) undergone leadership development training: 8

214

Number of senior management (Section 57) undergone leadership development training.

Race African Coloured Indian White Total M F M F M F M F M F

Total

Senior officials and managers SOC 100

2

1

1

2

1

1

1

5

4

9

TOTALS

2

1

1

2

1

0

1

1

5

4

9


215 Table 9: Name of pension and medical aid funds: 9

The number and name of pension and medical aid funds including an assessment Number of future risks or liabilities.

Liability

Name

• Pension

6

R 55,384,247 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Natal Joint Municipal Pension Fund SALA GEPF AIPF Pietermaritzburg Corporation Provident Fund Councillors Pension Fund

         

• Medical aid

6

R 17,221,463 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Key Health Munimed LA Health SAMWU Hosmed Bonitas

Table 10: Councillors undergone leadership development training: 10

Number of Councillors undergone leadership development training.

African M F

Race Coloured Indian White M F M F M F

Total M F

Total

Leadership & governance SOC 100

28

7

2

0

3

1

2

1

35

9

44

TOTALS

28

7

2

0

3

1

2

1

35

9

44

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS-HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT IDP Goal/Objective: To provide an efficient and effective Human Key Performance Resource Management Service in order to support the achievement of Area the organisational objectives

Planned

Actual

Variance

3

0

3

2. All advertised posts to be filled within a 2 months period from receipt of Staff Vacancy Advise

100%

20%

80%

3. Implementation of the Employment Equity Plan

100%

0%

100%

4. Complete job description writing exercise. Determine job grades based on the collective agreement.

100%

50%

50%

5. To promote and maintain a healthy employee relations climate. Less referral to Bargaining Council and CCMA

100%

50%

50%

6. All new employees inducted within 1 month

100%

50%

50%

1. Development & Maintenance of Operational Human Resource Plans and Policies.

Sound Governance

Reason for Variance:

Lack of co-ordination, budget and departmental needs

Improvements for Next Year: It is anticipated that the municipality will be able to meet its 2010/2011 goals, within budgetary constraints, including the backlogs from 2009/2010

  Key Performance IDP Goal/Objective: Contribute Towards Employability & Self EmployArea ability of Youth and Community

Community Participation

Planned

Actual

Variance

1. External Student Bursaries Awarded

20

8

12

2. 50 Students registered on Learnerships/apprenticeship

50

10

40

3. 150 Students placed on Internship Programme

150

25

125

4. Technical Skills programmes is provided to unemployed youth

1

1

0

5. 200 Emerging Contractors trained on Procurement Procedures and processes.

200

0

200

Reason for Variance:

Lack of co-ordination, budget and departmental needs

Improvements for Next Year: It is anticipated that the municipality will be able to meet its 2010/2011 goals, within budgetary constraints, including the backlogs from 2009/2010

Key Performance IDP Goal/Objective: To ensure a competent workforce to achieve Area organisational objectives. 1. Conduct a pilot Skills Audit. Design and implement Personal Development Plan

Sound Governance

Actual

Variance

70%

100%

30%

2. 100% implementation of the Work place Skills Plan

100%

110%

3. 100% Recovery of Skills development Levies

100%

113%

4. Make ABET compulsory to all employees who are NQF level 1 and below

620

0

620

5. Implement Learnerships for employees

50

30

20

7 SBU’s

2 SBU’s

5 SBU’s

6. Development of Skills Development Committees in each Strategic Business Unit Reason for Variance: Improvements for Next Year: It is anticipated that the municipality will be able to meet its 2010/2011 goals, within budgetary constraints, including the backlogs from 2009/2010

216

Planned

Lacking commitment with all role players, no follow-up


217 Key Performance IDP Goal/Objective: To create and maintain a safe and healthy work Area environment

Sound Governance

Planned

Actual

Variance

Conduct safety audits

25%

0%

25%

Review Occupational Health and Safety Systems & Procedures

100%

20%

80%

Establishment of effective Health and Safety Committee structures

100%

0%

0%

Review and improve safety Training Programmes for all SBU’s

100%

25%

75%

100

0

100%

Establishment of Employee Wellness Centre

Lack of co-ordination, budget and departmental needs

Reason for Variance: Improvements for Next Year: It is anticipated that the municipality will be able to meet its 2010/2011 goals, within budgetary constraints, including the backlogs from 2009/2010

Key Performance IDP Goal/Objective: Improve Quality and Management Control ProArea cesses 1. Batho Pele workshops and training are conducted (Ward Reps & Staff) 2. Placement is evaluated

Sound Governance

3. Councillors Skills Audit is conducted 4. Ward Committees are established, inducted and trained

Planned

Actual

Variance

1425

0

1425

Level 4 & 5

0

100%

73

33

40

100%

0

100%

Lack of commitment, Ward Committees not yet established

Reason for Variance: Improvements for Next Year: It is anticipated that the municipality will be able to meet its 2010/2011 goals, within budgetary constraints, including the backlogs from 2009/2010

  Key Performance IDP Goal/Objective: To align the organisational culture to the business Area objectives

Planned

Actual

Variance

660

0

1

2. Knowledge Management system coordination at a SBU’s level

All SBU’s

0

100%

3. Transformation workshops are conducted each year

3 workshops

0

3 workshops

4. Areas of corporate image improvements are identified

7 SBU’s

7 SBU’s

0

1. Conduct surveys based on staff satisfaction – business objectives

Sound Governance

Lack of planning and support

Reason for Variance: Improvements for Next Year: It is anticipated that the municipality will be able to meet its 2010/2011 goals, within budgetary constraints, including the backlogs from 2009/2010

Key Performance IDP Goal/Objective: Improve organisational efficacy and measure Area results

Planned

Actual

Variance

56

0

100%

2. Annual Performance assessments are scheduled

Sect 57, level 4 & 5

0

100%

3. Establish OD/PM Steering Committee

Level 4 & 5

0

100%

Reason for Variance: lack of commitment (implementation)

Lack of commitment (implementation)

1. Measures to cascade Performance Management System to all levels of the Organisation. Facilitate PMS Workshop

Sound Governance

Improvements for Next Year: It is anticipated that the municipality will be able to meet its 2010/2011 goals, within budgetary constraints, including the backlogs from 2009/2010

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Key Performance IDP Goal/Objective: To ensure legal compliance Area

Sound Governance

Planned

Actual

Variance

Legal Division to verify all organisational contracts and policies for compliance.

100%

75%

25%

Strengthen law enforcement and establishment of a municipal Court.

100%

0%

100%

Development of by-law and policy units

100%

0%

100%

Reason for Variance:

Lack of commitment (implementation)

Improvements for Next Year: It is anticipated that the municipality will be able to meet its 2010/2011 goals, within budgetary constraints, including the backlogs from 2009/2010

IDP Goal/Objective: To Ensure the effectiveness and efficiency of the Key Performance Council’s decision making system and improving communication and Area understanding

Sound Governance

Planned

Actual

Variance

1. Effective and efficient management of information within the organization

100%

60%

40%

2. Ensuring efficiency and effectiveness of committee system

100%

75%

25%

3. Put in place at least five service level agreements, Maintain at least 80% availability, Document SLA performance management meetings with at least five providers, implement IT infrastructure library best practice

100%

40%

60%

4. Extend LAN/WAN infrastructure to newly acquired Buildings, Clinics and Halls - on going

100%

100%

0

5. Asset renewal Programme (Servers, Plotter & Computers)

100%

100%

0

6. Address ICT security risks identified

100%

60%

40%

7. Create integration framework for Council, align existing Council wide ICT initiatives with the integration framework

100%

30%

70%

Reason for Variance:

Lack of budget and departmental skills

Improvements for Next Year: It is anticipated that the municipality will be able to meet its 2010/2011 goals, within budgetary constraints, including the backlogs from 2009/2010

  Key Performance IDP Goal/Objective: To encourage innovation & service excellence Area

Sound Governance

218

Planned

Actual

Variance

1. Strategic alignment of leadership with Batho Pele

100%

0%

100%

2. Institutionalization of Batho Pele into normal business of the Municipality

100%

0%

100%

Reason for Variance: Improvements for Next Year: It is anticipated that the municipality will be able to meet its 2010/2011 goals, within budgetary constraints, including the backlogs from 2009/2010

Lack of planning and support


Overtime

Medical Aid

Other

(specify)

Arrears Owed to Municipality R’000

Other Benefits and Allowances R’000

Loans and Advances R’000

Housing Benefits and Allowances R’000

Subsistence

Accommodation

Travel and Motor Car

Allowances R’000

Pensions

Contributions R’000

Normal

13,448.91

28,333.99

31,871.7

31,871.6

104,780.4

14,193

139,707.2

13,740.2

N/A

14,400

44,579.88

324,167.16

CLLR TI ZUNGU

Executive Councillors ( list individually)

309,817.6

Salaries and Wages R’000

Mayor

Description

HR DISCLOSURES TABLE

11,620.17

25,497.36

107,612.51

38,783.52

247,036.75

CLLR A SHELEMBE

12,490.36

38,246.04

132,793.95

28,245

44,720.28

286,615.5

CLLR M DIRKS

9,915.05

38,246.04

126,564.48

10,995

38,759.13

271,873.2

CLLR TI DLAMINI

10,666.67

N/A

50,625.72

N/A

54,477.7

383,241.84

CLLR WF LAMBERT

11,231.02

38,246.04

126,564.48

N/A

40,825.18

286,110.72

CLLR RP ASHE

11,805.61

28,684.53

107,579.76

18,043.2

33,092.65

229,873.8

CLLR K CHETTY

10,417.87

N/A

63,282.24

16,968

50,898.34

357,570.12

CLLR GJN MEYER

10,482.4

28,684.53

108,378.96

36,458.64

33,420.43

232,938

CLLR FN MBATHA

11,361.64

28,684.53

106,992.66

10,722.66

37,044.57

236,689.05

CLLR BS NGUBANE

9,986.74

38,246.04

30,375.48

18,072

50,260

351,991.26

CLLR DP ZONDI

Disclosures Concerning Councillors, Directors and Senior Officials for the period 1 July 2009 to 30 June 2010

Disclosures

Function: Human Resources

26,333.74

N/A

N/A

58,063.86

13,787.2

N/A

863,226.05

Municipal Manager

25,596.99

N/A

N/A

100,465.75

14,011.2

60,258.14

631,913.8

Chief Financial Officer

19,020.54

N/A

N/A

186,359.37

N/A

N/A

725,181.57

MR K PERUMAL

Other Senior Managers (list individually)

N/A

N/A

N/A

28,000

N/A

N/A

432,379.16

MR P MASHOKO

61,597.61

N/A

N/A

250,970.92

N/A

N/A

631,781.7

MR Z HULANE

Total

219

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 5.4 DEVELOPMENT SERVICES 5.4.1 Sub Function: Economic Development OVERVIEW: • • • • • • • •

Investment Attraction Business Retention and Expansion Black Economic Empowerment and Entrepreneurial Development SMME Development and support Informal Trade Management Forestry Services Management Tourism Promotion and development Monitoring the City’s economy, creating and economic data base

DESCRIPTION OF THE ACTIVITY: The function of economic planning/development within the municipality is administered as follows and includes: 1. 2.

An Investment Attraction Retention & Expansion unit with two sub-units, viz. Investment Attraction and Municipal Enterprises (Airport, Market, Forestry) Black Economic Empowerment & Entrepreneurial Development Unit (including SMME Development and Informal Trade Management)

The municipality has a mandate to: Promote sustainable economic development and job creation.

The strategic objectives of this function are the: • • • • •

Promotion and Attraction of inward Investment Promotion of the retention and Expansion of local business Promotion of Black Economic Empowerment Establish of a socio-Economic data base Promotion of key sectors within the economy of the city

The key issues for 2009/10 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

220

Completion of phase 2 of the Freedom Square Project Increase in turnover and profitability of the Municipality Market Formulating and implementing an Informal Trade Management plan Promoting development projects in the Edendale valley Township regeneration Local economic development strategy Poverty alleviation plan Management of street trading


221 Analysis of Function: 1

Number

R (000s)

- Professional (Directors / Managers)

1

419,016.24

- Non-professional (Clerical / Administrative)

39

5,353,804.9

- Temporary

6

74,000.00

- Contract

0

0

2

Number and cost to employer of all economic development personnel:

Detail and cost of incentives for business investment:

Number

Electricity discounts only

Note: list incentives by project, with total actual cost to municipality for year

1,503,043

3

Detail and cost of other urban renewal strategies:

4

Detail and cost of other rural development strategies:

R (000s)

Food Security Project/ Community Work Programme

No cost to Council

5

Information not available

Number of people employed through job creation schemes:

Number

- Short-term employment

1,070

- Long-term employment

218

6

R (000s)

Type and number of grants and subsidies received:

Number

Neighbourhood Partnership Development Grant /Provincial Grant Freedom Square Hub

2

R (000s) 9,450,665

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Performance Highlights 09/10 Key Performance Area

Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved and Plans to Improve Performance IDP Goal/Objective: Establish a dedicated sub-unit for the management and regulation of street trad-

Social Economic ing Development and Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Achieved Growth Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): N/A Reason for Variance: N/A

IDP Goal/Objective: Development of a Street Trading Policy with specific programmes and projects.

Social Economic Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Achieved Development and Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Nil Growth Reason for Variance: N/A Improvements for Next Year: Policy to be reviewed.

IDP Goal/Objective: To address the inequalities in the city’s economy by increasing Broad Based Black Ownership, control and management of businesses/enterprises by developing policy and medium term strategy with specific programmes and project.

Social Economic Development and Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Not Achieved Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 100% Growth

Reason for Variance: Bulk of the Funding was reallocated to airport Improvements for Next Year: A BBBEE Policy will be developed in-house.

IDP Goal/Objective: To provide support for the establishment and development of SMMEs

Social Economic Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Achieved Development and Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Nil Growth Reason for Variance: N/A Improvements for Next Year: Establish the Msunduzi SMME service Provider Forum

222


223 5.4.2 Sub Function: Housing OVERVIEW: Includes all activities associated with the provision of housing.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ACTIVITY: The function of provision of housing within the municipality is administered as follows and includes: 1)

PLANNING AND PACKAGING OF PROJECTS PHASE: Identification of beneficiaries; land identification; Council’s support for project; applications to DoHS (Department of Human Settlements) for Conditional Approval; Social Compacts; Feasibility Application; Proposal Calls; as follows: a)

b) c) d) e) f)

Identification of Beneficiaries: members of public apply for inclusion on the waiting list; community members living in an in-situ project area are ring fenced as potential beneficiaries; informal settlements located on unsuitable land for development identified for relocation to a housing project. The Beneficiary list discussed with PSC’s and requires approval of Council. Beneficiary lists forwarded to DoHS for approval on National Data Base. Strategic Objective - To provide access to adequate and safe housing for low income families (i.e. less than R3500 pm) and the “gap market” (i.e. between R3500 and R7500 pm) i.t.o. Constitution and Housing Act. Key Issues - Council to approve projects and beneficiaries lists. Land Identification: Identification of land for housing from land audit and confirm location in terms of the Spatial Development framework and restructuring Zones; prioritize and report to Council for Approval and inclusion in the IDP (requirements by DoHS). Strategic Objective - to develop suitably located land which is viable and sustainable to develop, in line with the policy of an integrated City which brings communities closer to job creation opportunities. Key Issues - Council to prioritize sites from land audit. Council’s Support: Council must resolve:- To be the developer; to accept the outer figure of the project; beneficiary identification; level of services and funding for their design and construction. Strategic Objective - Council commits to the project. Key Issues - To address disputes with regard to beneficiary allocations and services levels, and to secure necessary funding for the services. Conditional Approval Application: Initial application to DoHS for funding to appoint service providers to undertake environmental scoping report, geotechnical analysis and social survey and approve reports. Package documents with bulk services analysis to DoHS for Conditional Approval. Strategic Objective - DoHS to include proposed project on DoHS data base for future funding. Key Issues - Conditional Approval Application process is lengthy. Social Compacts: Consultation with the community to support the proposed project and agree on the type of project to be developed. SC to be signed by community reps. Document requirement by the DoHS. Strategic Objective - To ensure that the community “buys into” the project. Key Issues - To sign SCs for projects. Feasibility Applications: Compiling all relevant documentation required by the DoHS related to a specific project for the DoHS to approve funding for the project. DoHS approve funding and submit Tripartite Agreement (TA) to municipality to be signed by the Council and the IA (Implementing Agent). TA discussed with the legal section and reported to Council for authority to sign. Strategic Objective - To secure subsidy funding for the project in order for project to be implemented. Key Issues - Sourcing documentation.

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 g) 1)

IMPLEMENTATION PHASE: Managing implementing agent and coordinating activities of service providers. a)

Manage Implementation: Co-ordination of the processes for approval by Council in consultation with Ward Councillor and community representatives, and implementation of:

- Layout planning - Identification and location of beneficiaries - Building plans - Services constructed - Houses constructed - Resolving constraints causing delays - Invoices/claims - Quality control and resolving snags - Budget monitoring

Strategic Objective - To ensure the delivery of an appropriate level of services to a site in an approved layout which is sustainable and transferable to an approved beneficiary, on which a house has been built in terms of the DoHS norms and standards and acceptable quality. Key Issues - Ensuring delivery within the approved budget and programme, and resolving technical and social constraints which impact on the delivery process.

2)

CLOSE OUT PHASE: Confirmation of taking over of services by the municipality; allocation of sites and issuing title deeds a) Monitoring acceptances, 1 year maintenance, and taking over of services. b) Monitoring the allocation, occupation and transfer process of sites. c) Ongoing interaction with community structures to address missing beneficiaries.

3)

Strategic Objective - To ensure the provision of appropriate rental housing to people on the waiting list. Key Issues - Non-payment of rent; maintenance of buildings; implementation of the Enhanced Extended Discount Benefit Scheme (EEDBS) transfers.

DEVELOPMENT FACILITATION ACT APPLICATIONS (DFAs) FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENTS: Private sector applications - evaluate proposals; draft services agreement and co-ordinate comments from sub-unitsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; report to Council for authority to sign agreement; attend Tribunal hearings.

224

Strategic Objective - To ensure the correct beneficiary occupies and takes title to the site they have been allocated. Key Issues - Delays caused by illegal occupation of sites.

MANAGEMENT OF RENTAL STOCK: Management and maintenance of Council Housing Rental Stock; sale and transfer to tenants of certain units.

4)

Proposal Calls: Compilation of relevant documentation necessary to invite tenders from implementing agents and service providers to implement a low income housing project. Adjudication process followed and IA appointed. Strategic Objective - To appoint an IA to implement the project. Key Issues - Sourcing documentation and Council resolutions required for the Proposal Call.

Strategic Objective - To enable private sector to provide housing for the middle and upper income groups. Key Issues - Capacity of bulk services to meet the needs of the developer; negotiate contribution from developers; meet deadlines set by the DFA.


225 5)

STRATEGIC HOUSING PLAN INCORPORATING THE HOUSING SECTOR PLAN: Prepare an ongoing review of the SHP.

6)

HOUSING CONSUMER EDUCATION PROGRAMMES: Facilitate the introduction of this programme into the municipality; train Council officials; train community members.

7)

Strategic Objective - To provide the Council and the DoHS with a regular update on the demand for housing. Key Issues - Data base needs to be revised and then kept up to date.

LAND RELEASE PRIORITIZATION: Council land to be identified for housing development for all incomes, including Bank Charter Housing and Community Residential Units; declaring Residential Zones in terms of the SDF and the GEDI (Greater Edendale Development Initiative) programmes; ongoing interaction with the Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sub-units responsible for managing the SDF and GEDI programmes; Council to approve the programme; prepare proposal calls.

9)

Strategic Objective - To capacitate communities with regard to their responsibilities as new home owners. Key Issues - Dedicated resources required to implement this programme; communities to have ongoing involvement with programme.

HOUSING DATA BASE: Set up and manage relevant information required for a data base of housing needs as defined by the DoHS; data required by surveying informally settled community areas.

8)

Strategic Objective - Meet requirements of the IDP and DoHS. Key Issues - Keeping up to date with Council and DoHS policies; outstanding matter to be addressed.

Strategic Objective - To prioritize a roll-out of land to be developed by the private sector and agents of Council. Key Issues - Approval by Council of a list of sites to be advertised.

INNER CITY RESIDENTIAL STRATEGY: Co-ordinate the activities required for the conversion of buildings for residential accommodation.

Strategic Objective - Part of the CBD Revitalization programme and ties in with Social Housing Policy. Key Issues - Approval of Provisional Restructuring Zones.

10) INFORMAL SETTLEMENT RELOCATIONS AND EMERGENCY HOUSING: Identification of options for the relocation of families living in vulnerable situations; linked to housing project programme, Emergency Housing Programme and Community Residential Unit programme.

Strategic Objective - To relocate into suitable accommodation, families who are located on land required for other purposes, do not qualify for a housing subsidy, or affected by a disaster. Key Issues - Solutions being developed to implement this initiative.

11) HOUSING STATISTICS AND INFORMATION: Deal with ongoing enquiries for statistics and information related to housing delivery by other Business Units; research information.

Strategic Objective - To meet the operational requirements of Council. Key Issues - Up to date data base now in place, but information required is sometimes additional to the data in the data base.

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 ANALYSIS OF THE FUNCTION: 1

Number and cost of all personnel associated with provision of municipal housing:

R (000s)

• Professional (Directors / Managers)

2

1,297

• Professional (Architects/Consultants)

1

1,165

• Field (Supervisors/Foremen)

8

2,262

• Office (Clerical/Administration)

14

2,115

• Non-professional (blue collar, outside workforce)

11

681

• Temporary

0

0

• Contract

1

286

Total

37

7,806

2

Number and total value of housing projects planned and current:

Number

R (000s)

• Current (financial year after year reported on)

9

131,603

• Planned (future years)

9

2,016,000

Note: provide total project and project value as per initial or revised budget

Number

R (000s)

3

Total type, number and value of housing provided:

Low Income Housing

850

Emergency Housing

0

0

Rental Housing

0

0

Note: total number and total value of housing provided during financial year

4

Total number and value of rent received from municipal owned rental units

47,600

Number

R (000s)

367

5

659

Estimated backlog in number of (and costs to build) housing:

Number

Low Income Housing

11,310

R (000s) 633,360

Social Housing

1,700

40,800

CRU - Affordable Rental

3,000

720,000

Bank Charter Housing

3,000

1,050,000

Emergency Housing

2,500

117,500

Serviced Sites

2,000

100,000

Note: total number should appear in IDP, and cost in future budgeted capital housing programmes

226


227 6

Type of habitat breakdown:

Number

• number of people living in a house or brick structure

81,746

• number of people living in a traditional dwelling

26,775

• number of people living in a flat in a block of flats

13,960

• number of people living in a town/cluster/semi-detached group dwelling

3,030

• number of people living in an informal dwelling or shack

3,870

• number of people living in a room/flat let

4,650

The above figures are as per Census Community Survey 2007.

7

Type and number of grants and subsidies received:

Number

KZN Department of Human Settlements: Low Income

Note: total value of specific housing grants actually received during year to be recorded over the five quarters - Apr to Jun last year, Jul to Sep, Oct to Dec, Jan to Mar, Apr to Jun this year.

8

Total operating cost of housing function

850

R (000s) 47,600

Number

R (000s) 15,000,000

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS: Key Performance Area

Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved and Plans to Improve Performance

Current

Target

1200

850

Reason for Variance: Long Approval process by DOHS.

Improvements for Next Year: Regular meetings with DOHS for faster approval. Process has began.

IDP Goal/Objective: Provisional Restructuring zones have been approved by Council. To be submitted to Deot of Human Settlements for approval

8

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Achieved

8

Improvements for Next Year: Interact with SHI to improve delivery of Rental Housing. Negotiate with Rental Housing Organisations to prioritise Msunduzi for funding

IDP Goal/Objective: To Plan and Initiate 500 Community Residential Units (CRUs) by 2010

500

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 0

500

Reason for Variance: Legal dispute with the SHI

Improvements for Next Year: Legal Dispute with SHI now resolved through Settlement. Planning of new Rental Housing to proceed in 2010/2011.

IDP Goal/Objective: To Plan and Initiate 2000 Rural Housing Units in Vulindlela, Sweetwaters, Nxamalala, Enadi & Ximba

0

2000

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 0

IDP Goal/Objective: To provide Emergency Housing to people who have suffered or are victims of Natural Disasters

0

1000

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 0

Reason for Variance: No funding to implement the project.

Improvements for Next Year: Application to be revised to include 1 000 units for Jika Joe. Funding has been approved by DOHS.

IDP Goal/Objective: to provide shelter for all people living in slum conditions by 2014 Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 850

Basic & Sustainable Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 350 Service Delivery

Basic & Sustainable Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Nil Service Delivery Reason for Variance: N/A

Basic & Sustainable Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 500 Service Delivery

Basic & Sustainable Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 2000 Service Delivery Reason for Variance: DOHS did not respond to requests for joint evaluation on tenders received. And did not support process followed by Msunduzi. Improvements for Next Year: Revised Plan to be submitted to DOHS as an Intervention Priority. Plan approved with Pre-Feasibility funding.

Basic & Sustainable Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 1000 Service Delivery

228


229 5.5 COMMUNITY SERVICES 5.5.1 Sub Function: Fire & Rescue Service OVERVIEW: Provide a fire, rescue and humanitarian aid service

DESCRITPION OF THE ACTIVITY: The function of provision of a fire & rescue service within the municipality is administered as follows and includes: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Firefighting, rescue & humanitarian aid (24/7 service from 3x fire stations, viz. Central, Oribi & Airport) Crisis Communications Centre (24/7 emergency call-centre) Fire prevention & protection Fire training academy & public education

These services extend to include the uMgungundlovu District Municipality Fire Serviceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s emergency communications and control, but do not take account of the firefighting & rescue service which resides within the jurisdiction of the fire stations in the District.

The municipality has a mandate: To receive all emergency calls, dispatch resources and record data of incidents for the District.

The strategic objectives of this function are to: a) b) c) d) e)

prevent the outbreak or spread of a fire; fighting or extinguishing a fire; the protection of life or property against a fire or other threatening danger; the rescue of life or property from a fire or other danger; the performance of any other function connected with any of the matters referred to in paragraphs;

The key issues for 2009/2010 are: 1. 2. 3.

Appointment of additional 36 firefighter staff Replacement of obsolete vehicles and equipment Compliance with relevant SANS fire standards and ACAA legislation

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 ANALYSIS OF FUNCTION: 1. Number and cost to employer of all personnel associated with fire & rescue services:

Number

R (000s)

Professional (senior management ): Chief Fire Officer

1

428,496.27

Principal Administrative Officer

1

229,376.78

Operations Manager (Deputy Chief Fire Officer)

1

281,436.17

Senior Divisional Officer

4

966,277.48

Divisional Officer

4

917,507.04

Station Officer

22

4,667,001.68

Firefighter

100

12,478,803.54

Office(clerical/Administration)

7

General worker

4

258,118.40

Volunteer/ comms

9

1,132,897.71

Temporary

3

303,195.08

Total cost for all staff

2. Total annual number of call-outs attended: Fire rescue call-outs

156

22,358,158.24

Number 1800

3. Average response time to call-outs: Emergency call outs

695,048.57

R (000s) 10 minutes

Number and total operating cost of fire engines servicing population:

33

696,000

- Aged less than 10 years

6

126,000

- Aged 10 years or greater

27

569,000

Total operating cost of Fire & Rescue function (less basic salaries)

230

14,105,841


231 PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS: Key Performance Area

Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved and Plans to Improve Performance IDP Goal/Objective: To decentralize fire stations. Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Decentralization of fire stations could

Basic & Sustainable not be achieved due to lack of capital & operating budget. Still require Edendale an Vulindlela fire Service Delivery stations. Improvements for Next Year: Should our Business Unit be provided with sufficient funds, the 2009/2010 objectives will be realized.

IDP Goal/Objective: To fill critical vacant firefighter posts

Basic & Sustainable Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Most vacant firefighter posts filled. However unable to fill vacant Communications centre posts Service Delivery Improvement for the next year: Should the process be successful then the vacant Control Centre posts will be filled.

IDP Goal/Objective: Public awareness basic life safety program Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Program in place but insufficient opera-

Basic & Sustainable tional budget and vacant Public Education Officer posts … no staff to do effective public education Service Delivery Improvement for the next year: Improvement could be achieved provided that the staff vacancies are filled and budget is provided

5.5.2 Sub Function: Parks, Sport and Recreation OVERVIEW: This sub unit is divided into four functions, namely: Horticulture, Conservation & Environment, Sport & Recreation and Support Services.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ACTIVITY: The function and management responsibilities of Parks, Sport & Recreation are as follows: HORTICULTURE: Maintenance and development of parks, open spaces, play lots, cemeteries, road islands, city entrances in the city. Planting and maintenance of street trees. Initiate garden projects. Urban Agriculture (ploughing). (ii) SPORT & RECREATION: Maintenance, development and management of all municipal sports facilities including swimming pools. Management provision and hire of halls. Hosting and attracting major events (events coordination). Sports development. (iii) CONSERVATION & ENVIRONMENT: Management, maintenance and development of conservation areas. Burning and control of fire breaks. (iv) SUPPORT SERVICES: Management of Cemeteries and Crematoria. Provide an administrative support service (human resources, finance, secretarial, Information control and assets control. (i)

The services of Horticulture, Sport and Recreation, Conservation and Environment and Cemeteries and Crematoria are provided within the jurisdiction of the Msunduzi Municipality.

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 The strategic objectives of this function are to: • • •

Promote sustainable social development Basic services Environment

The key issues for 2009/2010 are: • • • •

Eradication of Alien invasive plants. Development of a new cemetery. Provide an integrated maintenance grass cutting programme. Develop Alexandra Park as a Sports Hub.

ANALYSIS OF FUNCTION: 1. Number and cost to employer of all Parks, Sport and Recreation staff

Number

R (000s)

• Professional (Managers)

5

2 158 250

• Field (Supervisors/Groundsman etc)

46

8 598 141

• Office (Clerical/Administration)

16

3 095 797

• Non-professional (brush cutter operators, tractor drivers etc)

322

32 174 593

• Temporary

4

553 866

• Contract

30

1 649 079

TOTAL

2. Total operating cost of Parks, Sport and Recreation (2009/2010)

423

48 239 726 76 187 410

3.Total number of users (hall facilities)

1 000 000

4.Total number of users (pool facilities)

120 000

5.Total number of users (sporting facilities)

232

4 000 000


233 Performance Highlights: Key Performance Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved and Plans to Improve PerArea formance IDP Goal/Objective: New cemetery to accommodate burials for 50 years Actual Performance Achieved 2008/2009: Development of Hollingwood cemetery (50000 Burials) approx: 10 years burial space. Work in progress

BASIC SERVICES

Variance between Planned & Actual Performance: Need to acquire land for future burial space for 50 years Reason for Variance: Land Issue Sobantu Residents .Insufficient land Improvements for Next Year: Need to plan for other cemeteries to accommodate burials in Edendale area. IDP Goal/Objective: 25000 Seater soccer stadium

ECONOMIC & SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Upgraded Harry Gwala Stadium, work in progress Variance between Planned & Actual Performance: Incomplete, Roof on South side stand and new stands on East and West sides with roof. Reason for Variance: Insufficient funds Improvements for Next Year: Secure additional funding to complete stands and roof. IDP Goal/Objective: All sports facilities and halls maintained to an acceptable standard

ECONOMIC & SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: One sport facility and hall in Vulindlela has been refurbished Variance between Planned & Actual Performance: Unable to complete all the repairs in the sports facilities as planned; Ntembeni. Reason for Variance: Insufficient funds Improvements for Next Year: Secure funding to complete planned maintenance on sports and hall facilities IDP Goal/Objective: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;State of the artâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; crematoriums Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Refurbishment of Cremator no2 completed.

BASIC SERVICES

Variance between Planned & Actual Performance: Cremator no1 still needs to be refurbished or replaced Reason for Variance: Insufficient funds Improvements for Next Year: Replace Cremator no1 or refurbish once funds are available IDP Goal/Objective: Poverty eradication/Integrated maintenance programme

ECONOMIC & SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Created opportunities for employment. Temporary grass cutting programme Variance between Planned & Actual Performance: Integrated maintenance programme not achieved Reason for Variance: Insufficient funds to employ more temps to clean gutters and pick up letter and grass cutting Improvements for Next Year: Increase capacity temporary grass cutting programme

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 5.5.3 Sub Function: Health & Social Services (Clinics) OVERVIEW: • • •

Includes all activities associated with the provision of community and social services. Provision of Comprehensive and Holistic Primary Health Care to residence of the Msunduzi Municipality and surrounding areas. The Primary Health care offered is free, accessible and of a high quality.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ACTIVITY: The function of provision of various community and social services within the municipality is administered as follows:

Primary Health Care (PHC): • • • • •

Management of Sexually Transmitted Infections HIV/AIDS/TB Immunisation Antenatal and Post Natal Care Anti- Retroviral therapy Voluntary Counselling and testing (VCT) Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV/Aids (PMTCT).

Municipal Clinics are Located at the following: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

234

Ashdown Azalea Central City Clinic (CBD Msunduzi) Copesville Eastwood Esigodini Glenwood Grange Impilwenhle Khan Road (Bombay Heights) Masons (SWAPO, Haniville) Northdale Oribi Scottsville Sobantu Snathing Stott Rd (Prestbury) Woodlands Willowfountain Moths (Northern Park) St John’s (CBD Msunduzi) Deccan Road


235 Mobile Clinic Points • • • • • • • • • • • •

Ashdown Ambelton Ashburton/Smero Cramond Dambuza Thornville Trustfeed Bishopstowe Slangspruit Mkhondeni Nhlazatshe Ezinketheni

The strategic objectives of this function are to: • •

To maintain quality health care within the Msunduzi Municipality. The Municipality has a mandate to render Primary Health Care to all residents within the Msunduzi area and surroundings.

The key issue for 2009/2010 are: TB and HIV/Aids • • • • •

To improve the cure rate and turnaround time Reduce the spread of HIV/Aids Improve accessibility of ARV’s Reduce and alleviate Poverty Improve the number of clients testing for HIV

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 ANALYSIS OF THE FUNCTION: 1. Number and cost to employer of all Health and Social Services: • Professional (Doctors/Specialists)

Number

(R’000)

1

225965

• Nursing Service Manager

VACANT

• Deputy Nursing Service Managers

2

959 683

• Pharmacist

1

249 121

• Pharmacist Assistant

1

169 800

• PHC Coordinator

0

282 547

• PHC Trainer

0

0

• EPI Trainer/ Infection Control Trainer

0

344 795

• Radiographer (5/8th)

1

159 784

• Senior District Nurses

4

1 552 373

• Senior Clinic Sisters

26

7 085 183

• Clinic Sisters

20

3 924 158

• Enrolled Nurses

17

2 802 992

• Auxiliary Nursing Ass.

2

329 323

• Auxiliary Nursing Ass.

0

0

• Clinic Clerks

25

3 318 209

• Clinic cleaners Total

2. No. of Facilities

12

1 069 522

112

22 473 456

22

3. No of Users 4. Total operating cost of community and social services function (Admin, Enviro Health, Nursing Services, HIV & AIDS)

236

559 165

46 880 523


237 PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS: Key Performance Area Basic & Sustainable Service Development

Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved and Plans to Improve Performance

Current

Target

75%

75%

40%

40%

45%

100%

IDP Goal/Objective: Improve TB cure rate Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Achieved Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): N/A Reason for Variance: N/A Improvements for Next Year: Employing and training of Tracer Teams IDP Goal/Objective: Reduce the HIV prevalence rate by 5%

Basic & Sustainable Service Development

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Achieved Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): N/A Reason for Variance: N/A Improvements for Next Year: HIV/ HCT/Campaigns/Workshops - Partnership with KZN Health for the secondment of staff for ARV clinics IDP Goal/Objective: Reduce and Alleviate Poverty

Basic & Sustainable Service Development

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 45% Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 55% Reason for Variance: Budget Constraints Improvements for Next Year: Sustainable Programmes e.g. Garden Projects.

5.5.4 Sub Function: Traffic and Security Services OVERVIEW: The overview of this Unit is to alleviate Traffic congestion wherever this occurs and to prevent road Traffic collisions wherever possible and to reduce accidents rate in the Msunduzi Municipality jurisdiction. To protect council life and property, providing a 24/7 security service operating on a four shift system. This Unit has the staff compliment of 74 law enforcement and 153 security officers.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ACTIVITY: The policing and traffic control functions of the municipality are administered as follows and include: 1.

To control and regulate all forms of traffic, attend scenes of motor vehicles collisions and assist with traffic control, preventing second re-collisions and safe guard the scene of the collision. Eliminate points of congestion, obstruction, hindrance, interference or damage to vehicles and pedestrians. Cordon off areas where emergencies have occurred and control traffic. Promote education and training of all age and race groups in road and traffic safety. Remove dangerous and unlicensed drivers from the road. Provides special operations dealing with informal settlers,, land invasions, informal street traders, vagrants and street children. Assist disaster management with post emergency recovery and operation. Provide V.I.P protection as and when required. Provide protection of council’s forests, and prevent theft of timber.

2.

High visibility of control, traffic control, law enforcement and the bylaws and to ensure the recovery of outstanding

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 The strategic objectives of this function are to: 1.

To promote traffic safety, driver compliance and fostering harmonious road relations (preventing road rage) and enhancing traffic policing/ community relations. Zero tolerance attitude towards errant drivers and those who fail to pay traffic fine or appear in court.

The key issues for 2009/2010 are: Arrest Negligent and reckless driving, and driving under the influence of alcohol. Dangerous driving and or inconsiderate driving, roadworthiness and warrants of arrests. Conducting road blocks, suspensions and the escorting of abnormal loads, programs for child in traffic education, training of student traffic officers at RTI training college for points duty. 100% compliance with firearms control Act, criminal procedure Act and National Transportation Act. By law enforcement.

ANALYSIS OF THE FUNCTION: 1

Number and cost to employer of all personnel associated with policing and traffic control: Number

R (000s)

• Professional (Senior Management)

8

2 026 066

• • • • • •

Field (Detectives/Supervisors)

18

3 260 538

Office (Clerical/Administration)

24

2 397 163

Non-professional (visible police officers on the street)

201

29 684 025

       

2  

3  

238

Volunteer

0

0

Temporary

0

0

Contract

110

Total number of call-outs attended: • Emergency call-outs • Standard call-outs

Number

Average response time to call-outs: • Emergency call-outs • Standard call-outs

Number

692 2133

15 minutes 2 minutes

475 200


239 4

5

Total number of targeted violations e.g.: traffic offences:

Number

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

2,369 1,413 296 4,306 76 410 110 426 34 1,986 161 434 171 2 1,459 293 215 14,161 8,361

Speed No driving license fail to carry seat belt stop sign robot barrier line inconsiderate driving passenger overloaded Other driving offences lights tyres brakes steering vehicle license registration plates Other vehicle offences Section 56 notices Section 341 notices

Total

36,683

Total number and type of emergencies leading to a loss of life or disaster:

Number

Collision, fire explosion, brake system failing, drunk and driving and speed

6

Type and number of grants and subsidies received: We don’t receive grants in this Business Unit

7

Total operating cost of police and traffic function

13

Number N/A

R (000s) <value> R98 082 960

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS: Key Performance Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved Area and Plans to Improve Performance IDP Goal/Objective: To increase output of speed enforcement

Current

Target

0

acquisition of pro-laser

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Not achieved

Economic & Social Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 100% Reason for Variance: Lack of funds Development

Improvements for Next Year: We are intending to have our own camera section Unit and fixed sites cameras and removable cameras as well to enhance our revenue.

IDP Goal/Objective: Road safety education for school children

Renovated Renovation Junior of Junior Traffic Traffic Training Training Centre Centre

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Achieved

Economic & Social Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): N/A Development Reason for Variance: No variances

Improvements for Next Year: To strengthen our man power and equipments to achieve our objectives more. IDP Goal/Objective: To detect drivers under the influence for evidential value and reduction of drunk drivers

0

Purchase Drager Alcohol Testing Machines

0

Purchase Alcometer Readers

Economic & Social Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Not achieved Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 100% Development Reason for Variance: Lack of funds Improvements for Next Year: Provision of funds. IDP Goal/Objective: To detect drivers under the influence for evidential value and reduction of drunk drivers

Economic & Social Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Not achieved Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 100% Development Reason for Variance: Lack of funds Improvements for Next Year: Provision of funds.

5.5.5 Sub Function: Library Services OVERVIEW: Includes all activities associated with the provision of a comprehensive public library and legal deposit service to the local and wider community.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ACTIVITY: Adult Lending, Children’s Lending, Mobile and Housebound Service, Adult Reference, Children’s Reference, Periodicals, Cataloguing and Music Departments as well as free Internet access.

These services extend to include the functional area of Msunduzi Municipality: Branches are located at Bessie Head, Northdale, Ashburton, Ashdown, Georgetown, Eastwood, Woodlands, Sobantu and Alexandra Road Library.

240


241 The strategic objectives of this function are to: To satisfy the educational, recreational and information needs of the population of Msunduzi.

The key issues for 2009/2010 are: Expand usage by all sectors of the population and to increase membership.

ANALYSIS OF THE FUNCTION: 1

Number and cost to employer of all personnel associated with Library

Number

R (000s)

Management

6

1,912,907.28

Professionals

18

3,960,413.42

Support Staff

61

7,451,293.74

Administration

7

805,279.90

Total (excluding temps)

92

14,129,894.34

Temps

12

823,412.46

 

2

Number and cost to employer of all personnel associated with each community services function:

6

R(000s)

- Library services

91

17,782,657

Total operating cost of community and social services function

22,181,216

PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS: Key Performance Area

Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved and Plans to Improve Performance

Current

IDP Goal/Objective: To secure Alexandra Road Library by installing a fence

Target

Fencing Complete complete fencing

Basic & Sustainable Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 100% Service Delivery Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Nil Improvements for Next Year: N/A

IDP Goal/Objective: Refurbish Ashdown library

Library Refurbish Refurbished Library

Basic & Sustainable Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 100% Service Delivery Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Nil

Improvements for Next Year: N/A

IDP Goal/Objective: Expand storage capacity

Shelving Installed

Basic & Sustainable Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 100% Service Delivery Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Nil

Install Shelving

Improvements for Next Year: N/A

IDP Goal/Objective: Refurbish toilets Northdale

Toilets Repaired

Basic & Sustainable Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 100% Service Delivery Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Nil

Refurbish Toilets

Improvements for Next Year: N/A

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 IDP Goal/Objective: To secure Sobantu Library by installing security fencing

Nil

Install Security Fencing

Actual Performance Achieved: Nil

Basic & Sustainable Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 100% Service Delivery Reason for Variance: No funds

Improvements for Next Year: No budget for 2010/2011 financial year

IDP Goal/Objective: Secure Municipal Property

Nil

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Nil

Basic & Sustainable Variance between Planned & Actual Performance : 100% Service Delivery Reason for Variance: Shortage of Money

Install Security Gate

Improvements for Next Year: Not possible -no money allocated for 2010/2011

5.5.6 Sub Function: Area Based Management OVERVIEW: Includes all activities associated with the provision of Area Base Management (ABM) service to the community.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ACTIVITY: These services extend to include the 5 managerial areas of the Msunduzi Municipality which resides within the jurisdiction of Msunduzi Municipality’s Vulindlela, Imbali, Edendale, Northern, Central and Eastern Areas.

The strategic objectives of this function are to: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Increasing community participation. Improving service delivery. Forming a link between communities and local government. Poverty alleviation.

ANALYSIS OF THE FUNCTION: 1

Number and cost to employer of all public bus service personnel:

R (000s)

• Professional (Directors / Managers)

6

3,077,883.16

• Professional (Social workers/Consultants)

11

2,351,734.11

• Field (Supervisors/Foremen incl inspectors)

0

0

• Office (Clerical/Administration)

6

460,767.09

• Non-professional (blue collar, outside workforce incl drivers)

0

0

• Temporary

0

0

• Contract

0

0

23

5,890,384.36

2

Number and total operating cost of ABM staff servicing population:

3

Number of self help projects facilitated and assisted

Number 300

4

242

Total number of incidents relating to Disaster Management:

Number 192


243 5

Total number of people participating in Local Government activities:

Number

Number of people attended Budget/IDP Izimbizo

23,352

6

Type and number of grants and subsidies received:

R (000s)

7

Total operating cost of area base management function

R (000s)

PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS: Key Performance Area

Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved and Plans to Improve Performance IDP Goal/Objective: Attend to service delivery queries from communities.

Good Governance and Public Participation

Current

Target

150 queries

200 queries

IDP Goal/Objective: Lima Project (Agriculture and Facilitation)for 1000 participants around Pmb, facilitated through COGTA

1000 participants 1000

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Ongoing in all wards. Facilitated 150 queries attended by different SBUs 50 variance Reason for Variance: We did more than 200 but our recording was not good and follow up was not perfect. Improvements for Next Year: We planned to do 500 more and improve recording and follow-up

Economic and Social Development

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 100% Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): N/A Reason for Variance: N/A Improvements for Next Year: N/A

5.5.7 Sub Function: Disaster Management OVERVIEW: Provide a Disaster management service.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ACTIVITY: The function of the Disaster Management section is to assist with the safety and security of citizens within the municipal area and to provide emergency relief aid if needed. 1. 2. 3.

To ensure safe events, marches and gatherings. Crisis response on a 24 hour basis. Emergency aid relief when needed.

These services are offered within the Msunduzi Municipal area. We work closely with other emergency staff and institutions, including uMgungundlovu District Municipality, EMRS, and SAPS to make the municipality a safer place. The municipality has a mandate: to receive all disaster relief calls, dispatch resources, and record data of incidents for the District.

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 The strategic objectives of this function are to: a) b) c) d) e)

Prevent or reduce risk which results in injury loss or damage. To reduce the severity or consequences of crisis or disaster. To ensure disaster preparedness. Ensure the rapid and effective response of disaster management resources. Assist with post disaster recovery.

The key issues for 2009/2010 are: a) b) c)

Develop a disaster management plan. Implement a disaster management advisory forum. Develop a disaster response protocol.

ANALYSIS OF THE FUNCTION & PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS: 1. Number and cost to employer of all personnel associated with disaster management services:

Number

R (000s)

Professional (senior management ): Disaster Manager

1

Administrative assistant/clerical worker

1

Disaster Officials

2

General worker

1

Total cost for all staff

1,149,537

2. Total annual number of incidents responded to:

192

3. Total number of special events

52

4. Total number marches and gatherings

44

5. Number and total operating cost of assets population:

Number

R (000s)

- Aged less than 10 years

1

95,000

- Aged 10 years or greater

1

45,000

6. Total operating cost Disaster Management (less basic salaries)

3,777,643

Performance Highlights: Key Performance Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved and Plans to Improve PerArea formance IDP Goal/Objective: To provide a pro active and reactive Disaster management service

Basic Service Delivery

Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Staff and budget restrictions prevented the undertaking of a risk assessment Improvements for Next Year: If budget provision is made the risk assessment can be undertaken

IDP Goal/Objective: To develop a comprehensive disaster plan and data base with all role-players,

Basic & service providers and suppliers Sustainable Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Work in progress Service Delivery

Improvement for the next year: Should be completed within the 2010/2011 year

244


245 5.6 INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES 5.6.1 Sub Function: Bulk Water Management, Water Supply and Reticulation, Water Drainage OVERVIEW: The water services delivery unit is, in the main, responsible for the bulk water purchase, distribution, management, monitoring and control of water, as the Water Services Authority.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ACTIVITY: The water purchase and distribution functions of the municipality are administered as follows and include: 1.1 Management of the Water Services Authority (WSA) functions; design, construction and maintenance of new reticulation mains, reservoirs and pump stations. 1.2 The Bulk Water Function is administered through a Bulk Water Services Agreement with Umgeni Water for the supply and provision of Bulk Water. 1.3 In-house design, construction and maintenance of water distribution assets. Due to capacity constraints most work is outsourced to competent service providers. In line with ASGISA desired outcomes, the Sub-unit subcontracts most of its work to emerging contractors and engages local community for the provision of labour.

The services extend to include: The services extend to include the whole of the Msunduzi area including Vulindlela (including Operating and maintenance costs until the “handover” of this area from Umgeni Water to the Msunduzi Municipality is complete.

The strategic objectives of this function are to: • • • • • • •

To improve operational effectiveness Improve cost recovery for water ensure that water quality for all consumers meets and surpasses the minimum standards in the SABS 240 Supply all households with a basic water supply and the poor with free basic water supply in accordance with DWAF Strategic Guidelines. Reduce water losses aggressively Maintaining and improving the existing Infrastructure. Ensure that the provision of the water service is sustainable.

THE KEY ISSUES FOR 2009/10 •

To implement Section 78 assessment of the sector

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 ANALYSIS OF THE FUNCTION: 1

Number and cost to employer of all personnel associated with the water distribution function:

Number

R (000s)

• Professional (Directors / Managers)

1

748

• Professional (Engineers/Consultants)

6

1,857

• Field (Supervisors/Foremen)

6

1,884

• Office (Clerical/Administration)

7

1,563

• Non-professional (blue collar, outside workforce)

146

17,464

• Temporary

0

0

• Contract

0

0

Total

166

Percentage of total water usage per month

Month

Monthly water usage

Jul

4759134

Aug

4909142

Sep

4544080

Oct

4476192

Nov

4666950

Dec

4279798

Jan

4768148

Feb

4841177

Mar

4802811

Apr

4896389

May

4685038

Jun

6863150

Total

58492009

Note: this will therefore highlight percentage of total water stock used per month

2

3

246

Total volume and cost of bulk water purchases in kilolitres and rand, by category of consumer Msunduzi Municipality

kl

 

23,516

kl 58,492,009

R (000s) 194,165


247 4

Total volume and receipts for bulk water sales in kilolitres and rand, by category of consumer:

kl

R (000s)

Domestic

11,388,380

94,270

flats/simplexes

2,102,520

18,540

Out of Borough

88

0

Standpipes

888,366

8,294

Low cost housing

6,844,335

64,089

Domestic indigent

2,780,309

23,149

Indigent

613,583

3,737

Commercial

7,232,424

71,619

Commercial Non-rate able

15,636

0.189

Builders

83,403

1,712

Churches

122,315

1,096

Clubs

172,613

1,669

Departmental

535,967

4,684

19,233,312

63,806

5

Total year-to-date water losses in kilolitres and rand

6

Number of households with water service, and type and cost of service:

Number

• Piped water inside dwelling

79,719

129,543

• Piped water inside yard Vulindlela

22,217

14,441

• Piped water on community stand: distance < 200m from dwelling

18,139

29,476

• Piped water on community stand: distance > 200m from dwelling

565

• Borehole

0

0

• Spring

0

0

• Rain-water tank

0

0

7

Number and cost of new connections:

Number

240

8

Number and cost of disconnections and reconnections:

Number 5,415

R (000s)

848

R (000s) 471

R (000s) 15,000

Note: Water is only disconnected on request. Water can only be restricted.

9  

Number and total value of water projects planned and current: • Current (financial year after year reported on) • Planned (future years)

Number 4

R (000s) 24,000

28

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 10            

11    

Anticipated expansion of water service: • Piped water inside dwelling • Piped water inside yard • Piped water on community stand: distance < 200m from dwelling • Piped water on community stand: distance > 200m from dwelling • Borehole • Spring • Rain-water tank Estimated backlog in number (and cost to provide) water connection: • Piped water inside dwelling ( idp) • Piped water inside yard ( 2009/2010) • Piped water on community stand: distance < 200m from dwelling (

Number

R (000s)

400

0

0

15

150

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Number

760

R (000s)

22,498

37,121.7

10,000

16,500

9,000

90,000

• Piped water on community stand: distance > 200m from dwelling (

16,000

To be confirmed

• Borehole • Spring • Rain-water tank

0

0

0

0

0

0

2009/2010)

2008/2009)

   

12

Free Basic Service Provision: Note: Refer to Table 3, page 201

13

 

Type and number of grants and subsidies received:

Number

R (000s)

Mig

1

61,344

DOH

1

1,939

DWAF

1

463

equitable share

1

68,471

265,145

14

248

Total operating cost of water distribution function


249 PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS: Key Performance Area

Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved and Plans to Improve Performance

Current

Target

IDP Goal/Objective: Water loss reduction/non-revenue reduction

32.88%

20%

6 Stand Pipes

10 Stand Pipes

IDP Goal/Objective: Asset renewal and Water loss reduction

Nil

5000m

Approved

Initial phases to be effectively implemented

Ongoing

To replace many faulty meters for revenue efficiency

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Not achieved

Basic & Sustainable Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): +12.88% Service Delivery Reason for Variance: Staff and financial limitations, old infrastructure Improvements for Next Year: Water losses team, accurate analysis, consultants to assist with NRW

IDP Goal/Objective: Provide basic water supply to all Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 6 Stand Pipes

Basic & Sustainable Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 4 Service Delivery Reason for Variance: Financial and staff constraints

Improvements for Next Year: A planned program to be devised

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Nil

Basic & Sustainable Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 100% Service Delivery Reason for Variance: Financial and staff constraints Improvements for Next Year: Provision of Funds

IDP Goal/Objective: Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) Actual Performance Achieved 2007/2008: Partially Achieved

Basic & Sustainable Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Ongoing Service Delivery Reason for Variance: Delayed approval Improvements for Next Year: To aggressively implement important phases of this plan

IDP Goal/Objective: Replacement and installation of water meters Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Ongoing

Basic & Sustainable Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Ongoing Service Delivery Reason for Variance: Ongoing Improvements for Next Year: Replace more faulty meters for effective revenue enhancement

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 5.6.2 Sub-Function: Roads & Transportation OVERVIEW: The backlog of road needing upgrade, road safety, road infrastructure rehabilitation and maintenance continues to be are a major challenge for the Municipality in the current financial going forward. There are still huge backlogs for construction of new roads and upgrading of gravel roads in the Greater Edendale, Vulindlela and Northern Eastern parts of Msunduzi (i.e. Thembalihle, Tamboville, Copesville, etc). These areas continue to grow since there are new low-cost housing programme being provided with sub-standard road services. However, in the 2009/10, another vital project in N3 Corridor kicked in with the completion of design and commencement of the N3 / Chota Motala Road Interchange construction project. This project, once complete, will ease the traffic congestion experienced on the South-bound peak-hour traffic from the Northern Areas into the CBD in the morning and vice-versa in the evenings. The project is funded by SANRAL and Msunduzi in approximately 60/40 funding split. The Roads and Transportation Sub-Units perform the following activities for the provision of efficient road network: a] b] c] d] e] f] g] h]

Transportation network planning Road planning and design Road construction and maintenance Road infrastructure condition monitoring Public transportation planning Road safety and improvements Road marking and signage Municipal Building Maintenance

ABOVE: Machibisa, Dambuza Road Project

250


251

ABOVE: Harry Gwala Road in Dambuza

ABOVE: Storm water channel cleaned by Drainage Maintenance Team

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 DESCRIPTION OF THE ACTIVITY: The road maintenance programmes for all areas within the jurisdiction boundary of Msunduzi Municipality, except Vulindlela, which is the responsibility of the Department of Transport and include the following activities: 1.

Planned Maintenance [Operating Budget]: [a] [b] [c] [d] [e] [f] [g]

Pothole Repairs & Crack Sealing - 6 construction units [7 employees per unit] Verge Infrastructure (i.e. Sidewalks) Maintenance - 7 construction units [7 employees per unit] Stream Overgrowth Clearing - no dedicated construction units. Catch pit Clearing - 6 construction units [7 employees per unit] Railways - 1 construction unit [7 employees] Road Weed Control Spraying - 2 units [3 employees per unit] Gravel Road Maintenance - 3 construction units

Most of road maintenance activities are performed internally by construction the abovementioned units created for this purpose. However, the number of employees per unit still remains insufficient to meet the Occupational Health and Safety requirements. The stream overgrowth clearing activity still has no dedicated construction unit. Unit members are still being pulled from various construction units to undertake this function when the need arises. In the previous years except the 2008/9 financial year, community members were engaged to undertake this function in Edendale. However, this was discontinued due to logistical challenges that were encountered. Therefore, due to huge backlogs in road maintenance more reactive work was carried out as opposed to the planned maintenance work. No Pavement Management System (PMS) - [i.e. road rehabilitation] work was undertaken in this financial year and the previous year which is a matter of great concern since the road infrastructure is decapitating. The Department of Transport [DoT] is responsible for all provincial and district roads that traverse the area. 2.

Pavement Management System [PMS] [Resurfacing] Capital

The Sub-Unit undertakes road condition assessments every five years with the assistance of specialists and develops a pavement resurfacing programme. This has not been done in the past two years due to financial constraints. The programme prioritizes the road to be resurfaced under the capital budget. Resurfacing of roads is a function that is outsourced to specialist contractors through annual supplies contracts. The PMS system covers all Pietermaritzburg suburbs, CBD, Northern Areas and Greater Edendale. 3.

Upgrading of Gravel Roads, Storm water, Bridges & Rail Lines under the Capital Budget

The Municipality is aware and acknowledges its responsibility to provide road network services to its communities. However, inadequate funding for bulk services is increasingly becoming a retarding factor for development. To this end the user-pays principle for new developments has been adopted. Investors pay for their investment initiatives and the Sub-Unit facilitates or creates an enabling environment for such initiatives to succeed. If the road so developed is a public road serving many other community services, the Municipality would contribute financially or in land to the development. Be that as it may, the Sub-Unit is embarking on road capacity expansion and new major road developments. A transportation plan is being developed to provide indicative road extension, expansion and new road requirement priorities. This Comprehensive Transportation Plan has started in the 2009/10 financial year to complete in 2010/11. The Spatial Development Framework which is being developed is critical for providing an indicative future developmental scenario. The prioritization of this road development programme should also be informed by the Economic Development Plan.

252


253 4.

Roads to serve New Developments [Capital]

The planning activities include developing transportation plans, public transport plans, road safety plans, road infrastructure investment plans, design for road infrastructure and conducting feasibility studies for various options. The Sub-Unit makes it mandatory for all projects to comply with the provisions of the Environmental Management Act by conducting Environmental Impact Assessments when required to do so. These services extend to so-called old Pietermaritzburg, Greater Edendale and Vulindlela. In terms of roads, Vulindlela also resides within the jurisdiction of provincial government which also plans and constructs roads. The Municipality liaises with the Department of Transport [DoT] in addressing problems in Vulindlela in an integrated way. The figures above do not include expenditure by DoT. 5.

Planning Function

The planning activities include developing transportation plans, public transport plans, road safety plans, road The planning activities include developing transportation plans, public transport plans, road safety plans, road infrastructure investment plans, design for road infrastructure and conducting feasibility studies for various options. The Sub-Unit makes it mandatory for all projects to comply with the provisions of the Environmental Management Act by conducting Environmental Impact Assessments when required to do so. These services extend to so-called old Pietermaritzburg, Greater Edendale and Vulindlela. In terms of roads, Vulindlela also resides within the jurisdiction of provincial government which also plans and constructs roads. The Municipality liaises with the Department of Transport [DoT] in addressing problems in Vulindlela in an integrated way. The figures above do not include expenditure by DoT.

The strategic objectives of this function are to: The strategic objectives of this function are to ensure that the existing road networks within the Municipalityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s area of jurisdiction are maintained at useable levels whilst simultaneously upgrading sub standard infrastructure and constructing new links to support new development.

The key activities for 2009/10 are: a) b) c) d) e) f)

Design of eleven projects; Commence with the development of Comprehensive Intergrated Transportation Plan (CITP) Obtain a solution to inadequate funding for roads; Complete designs for the N3/Chota Motala Interchange upgrading; Implementation of various road upgrade, pedestrian bridge, drop-offs or laybys and bus shelter projects Evaluation of road safety issues, such as traffic calming, road signs & marking and problematic intersections.

The key issues for the 2009/2010 financial year are to undertake the activities set out above in the most cost effective manner and from the backlogs develop programmes to address these in the IDP. Beside projects mentioned in the table below, some of important project that were undertaken in 2009/10 are listed follows: 1)

Developed a Non-Motorized Transport Plan (NMT) to promote safe walking and cycling areas. The plan identifies and prioritizes locations for these projects (i.e. highly pedrestenized and cycling friendly routes).

2)

Commence with the development of the CITP

3)

25 intersection counts were conducted to determine traffic volumes. These counts assist in determining warrants for traffic intersection controls such as stop signs, traffic lights, traffic circles, etc.

4)

Construction of 6 passenger lay-byes and drop-off zones in various Wards within Msunduzi.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 5)

Design and construction of a shelter in Queen Street Taxi rank to an amount of R820 000.

6)

Construction of 20 bus shelters for public transport commuters, as identified by various Ward Councillors.

7)

Design of a concrete lined canal between Greytown and Baijoo Roads, to prevent scouring of banks in the Northdale area.

Analysis of the Function: 1. Number and cost to employer of all personnel associated with road maintenance and construction:

Number

R (000s)

Professional (Managers)

4

2,343

Professional Engineer/Technologist

5

2,516

Technicians (Chief, Principal, Senior & Tech)

12

3,591

Field (Superintendants, Foremen)

12

3,525

Office (Clerical / Administration / Support)

15

2,741

Non-Professional (Artisans, Supervisor, Handymen, Operators, etc))

58

10,086

Elementary (Artisans Assistants, General Workers, etc)

194

17,487

2. Total number, kilometers and total value of road projects planned and current: Planned: N3/Chota Motala interchange; Burger Street ext.; P120 Road through Bisley Game Reserve; Caluza internal Rds; D2019 (Mthalane Rd); D1122 Rd; Malala Rd; Waterfall Rd; Hlathini Rd; New Road in Imbali Unit 13; Link Rd between Thembalihle & Tamboville (estimated km’s and cost are 34,7km and R180,0 mil, respectively), and Current projects (competed and under construction in 2009/10): Machibisa, Dambuza Roads R10,5mil; D1140 - R8,5mil; Shayamoya Rd - R2,3mil; Martins Way Rd - R2.1mil; Road in Unit H, Edendale - R4,0mil (total km’s and project cost are 10.3km and 27,0 mil, respectively):

3. Total kilometers and maintenance cost associated with existing roads provided Surfaced Roads [Planned Maintenance Operating] Gravel Roads [Planned Maintenance Operating]

4. Average desirable frequency and cost of re-surfacing roads [PMS]

KM’s 45

KM’s

R (000s) 207,000

Total Budget 2009/10

1282km

21,520

425km

4,840

Total Budget per Annum

Surfaced [once every 10 years Capital Programme]

15,000

Gravel [4 times/year Operating Programme]

10,500

254


255 5. Estimated upgrading backlogs showing kilometers/number and capital cost [a] Number of Watercourse crossings;

Total Budget 2009/10

16

55 mil

b] Backlog to new roads, storm water & footpaths upgrade of existing substandard low-cost housing - km

33km

114 mil

[c] New & upgraded roads, including proposals from MTAB Transportation Plan;

85km

275 mil

[d] Upgrading of gravel roads in Vulindlela in liaison with DoT;

549km

1,36 bil

[e] Upgrading of gravel roads in Edendale;

444km

1,12 bil

[f] Upgrading of City Centre streets. Widening carriageway/footpaths. Replacing inefficient storm water;

Various

22,5 mil

[g] New footpaths, kerbs & channeling;

33km

20 mil

[h] Drainage & Catchment management system for natural and man-made storm water management;

Various

25 mil

[i] Flood attenuation measures – rivers;

Various

25 mil

[j] Capital maintenance of tarred roads using Pavement Management System [PMS];

230km

55 mil

[k] Bridge asset maintenance. Prioritize bridge repairs from

various

[l] Capital maintenance, storm water drainage & rehabilitation of watercourses. Storm water drainage repairs. Watercourses subject to erosion.

various

[m] Capital maintenance of Council’s railway sidings. Replacement of worn tracks, sleepers etc.

various

[n] Ashburton, Lynnfield Park Shorts retreat industrial area

5,0km

15 mil 5 mil

6. Total operating cost of road construction and maintenance function

20 mil

R40,390

PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS: Key Performance Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved Area and Plans to Improve Performance

Actual

Target

Completion of Planned Mtce Schedules

Potholes Repairs & Crack Sealing

10%

80%

Verge Infrastructure Maintenance - mostly reactive

15%

80%

Stream Overgrowth Clearing - reactive maintenance only

70%

Catch pit Clearing

40%

100%

90%

100%

80%

IDP GOAL / OBJECTIVES: To provide an acceptable Planned Maintenance Programme for Roads & Storm water

Sustainable Ser- Railways vice Road Weed Control Spraying - reactive maintenance only Delivery Gravel Road Maintenance - reactive maintenance

30%

Reason for Variance: The Planned Maintenance in some areas does not meet the targets due to underfunding at budget time and excessive reactive work. Staff losses during the year were not replaced adding to underperformance in certain areas.

Improvements for Next Year: Plans to improve this situation relate to increased funding, outsourcing of work and improved operational techniques.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Key Performance Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved Area and Plans to Improve Performance

Actual

Target

3,5

Reason for Variance: Many horse-shoe access were rehabilitated. Other rehabilitation work was stopped because funding issues

Improvements for Next Year: To source funding to maintain the targets of the Asset Management Plan. However, the funding was still inadequate to meet the PMS requirement, but was adequate to surpass the budget driven target.

10,7km

22,34km

Reason for Variance: Inadequate budget and poor performance by contractors. Project cycle of design and implement in one year is unrealistic.

Improvements for Next Year: Adopt a 3 year project cycle, i.e. designs in the first year, and construction in years 2 and 3, and seek further funding, e.g. MIG.

IDP Goal/Objective: Design eight gravel road upgrades. Designed roads: N3/Chota Motala interchange; Burger Street ext.; P120 Road through Bisley Game Reserve; Caluza internal Rds; D2019 (Mthalane Rd); D1122 Rd; Malala Rd; Waterfall Rd; Hlathini Rd; New Road in Imbali Unit 13; Link Rd between Thembalihle & Tamboville

11

10

Reason for Variance: The one design was not completed because the Department requested re-tender. Tenders submitted were not responsive. At request for re-tender, the project was stopped due to financial constraints. Although 10 designs were complete, two tenders were not paid for and Malala Rd design has outstanding payment. Hopefully, the outstanding payments will be honored in 2010/11 FY.

Improvements for Next Year: Continue with more road designs through utilisation of any funding that might be available.

IDP Goal/Objective: Secure MIG funding for road upgrading / rehabilitation projects, namely D1140 and Machibisa, Dambuza Roads; and for final payments of D1131, D1125 and Unit P.

R7,744

R7,744

Reason for Variance: D1140 running over two financial years.

Improvement for Next Year: Apply for MIG funding for all planned and designed road projects.

IDP Goal/Objective: Construct 25 traffic calming measures in various wards

25

8

Improvement for Next Year: Incorporate traffic calming measures for all new roads in the road construction contract. More funding is required to address the backlog which is growing every day.

IDP Goal/Objective: To Maintain by Capital Expenditure 50km surfaces roads via PMS if funding is made available

Sustainable Service Delivery

Sustainable Service Delivery

IDP Goal/Objective: To reduce the backlog in road upgrading by 100 km per annum.

Sustainable Service Delivery

Sustainable Service Delivery

Reason for Variance: No funding was allocated for this purpose at the beginning of the financial year. A reallocation was requested and approved. However, before a contractor could be engaged, the Municipality was placed under Section 139 of MSA. When Intervention team arrived expenSustainable diture was frozen and project that had not started were stopped. This projService Delivery ect was one of them. There more that 120 approved traffic calming on the waiting list. The eight calming achieved were constructed with new roads, as part of those projects.

256


257 Key Performance Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved Area and Plans to Improve Performance Access to basic services: Road marking and signage reinstatement is carried out each year, but inevitably it is not possible to adhere to the planned Sustainable programme due to financial constraints. Reactive work requested by CounService Delivery cillors and the public was undertaken. However, thermoplastic road marking on highly trafficked roads was introduced in 2009/10 for durability and visibility, especially at night,

Community Participation

Customer and People Focus: Traffic calming measures request, received and evaluated, are more than 120 as at the end of June 2010.

Social & Economic Development & Growth

Create job opportunities: The Municipality embarked on Zibambele project which is a job creation opportunity where member of public are contracted to Municipality, for a year to undertake storm water side channel maintenance in their area. These contract employments are Ward based and are engaged through the Ward Councillor.

Actual

Target

± 40% (as per annual of target programme)

120

R3 000

6

-

5.6.3 Sub-Function: Electricity Distribution OVERVIEW: Includes the bulk purchase and distribution of electricity.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ACTIVITY: The electricity purchase and distribution functions of the municipality are administered as follows and include: Planning, Installation, Commissioning, Distribution and Maintenance: These services extend to include Msunduzi Electricity License Area, but do not take account of Wards which resides within the jurisdiction of Eskom License Area. The municipality has a mandate to: Work within the objectives of the IDP and SDBIP.

THE STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES OF THIS FUNCTION ARE TO: •

Provide Electricity to residents of Msunduzi Municipality. To ensure customer satisfaction through the provision of efficient and effective infrastructure services.

THE KEY ISSUES FOR 2009/2010 ARE: •

Ageing infrastructure, inadequate funding and limited resources.

ANALYSIS OF THE FUNCTION: 1

Number and cost to employer of all personnel associated with the electricity distribution function:

R (000s)

• Professional (Directors / Managers)

32

9,785,368.03

• Professional (Engineers/Consultants)

0

0

• Field (Supervisors/Foremen)

45

10,228,730.4

• Office (Clerical/Administration)

26

4,543,508.08

• Non-professional (blue collar, outside workforce)

161

17,027,531.1

• Temporary

0

0

• Contract

6

333,792

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 2

Total quantity and cost of bulk electricity purchases in kilowatt hours and rand, by category of consumer

1,735,836,294

568,068,510

• Residential

371,357,454

142,505,502.4

• Commercial

75,842,701

29,317,703.15

• Industrial

894,037,604

245,208,211.1

• Mining

0

0

• Agriculture

0

0

• Other

39,029,589

Total quantity and receipts for bulk electricity sales by category of consumer: Categories Paid June 2010 Description Receipts ACB/Sal.

Total

3

Unallocated GENERAL DEBIT/CREDIT

-7,310,986.19

-1,036.87

Int./Coll 0.00

-1,003,876.56

-945.29

-1,004,821.85

-26,338.59

-30,408,381.14

-101,197.16

-30,509,578.30

-514,540.91

-62,347.87

0.00

-62,347.87

-22,148.54

BUSINESS RENTAL

-397,179.98

0.00

-397,179.98

0.00

DEPOSIT

-530,535.15

0.00

-530,535.15

0.00

-1,006,309.38

-2,522.95

-1,008,832.33

-39,475.10

ASSESSMENT RATES RATES HANDED OVER

ELECTRICITY - FIXED CHARGES ELECTRICITY BASIC

-13,278,327.72

-41,410.33

-13,319,738.05

-79,172.00

ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION

-65,093,321.41

-63,513.45

-65,156,834.86

-207,683.16

-25,137.16

0.00

-25,137.16

0.00

-112,757.11

-17,826.41

-130,583.52

0.00

REFUSE

-4,394,023.53

-23,711.86

-4,417,735.39

-45,782.97

SEWERAGE

-6,972,483.27

-35,132.00

-7,007,615.27

-99,627.51

-380,368.52

0.00

-380,368.52

-1,693.06

SERVICES - BALANCE B/FWD

-14,659.95

0.00

-14,659.95

-13,509.95

SUNDRY - SERVICES

-13,712.02

0.00

-13,712.02

0.00

-18,620,691.53

-102,868.73

-18,723,560.26

-300,026.56

-945,722.29

0.00

-945,722.29

-12,337.85

-150,570,820.78

-390,165.05

-150,960,985.83

-1,362,336.20

215,236,204

99,574,574

HOUSING PURCHASED HOUSING RENTAL

TRADE EFFLUENT

WATER CONSUMPTION SUNDRY

4

Total year-to-date electricity losses in kilowatt hours and rand

5

Number of households with electricity access, and type and cost of service:

• Electrified areas

• Municipal

• Eskom

-7,312,023.06

37,163,919.04

• Alternate energy source

R (000s) 3,577

19,540,000

274

1,370,000

3,303

18,170,000

nil

nil

Note: The above figures indicate new connections in the 2009/10 financial year

• Non electrified (Gel Stoves)

6

258

Number and cost of new connections: 100

3,000,000

Number 100

R (000s) 2,447,588


259 7

8

Number and cost of disconnections and reconnections

Number 

35726

35,726

Number and total value of electrification projects planned and current:

Number

R (000s)

R (000s)

Current (financial year after year reported on)

2

2,900,000

Planned (future years)

9

31,500,000

9

Anticipated expansion of electricity service:

Number (households)

7,000

10

Estimated backlog in number (and cost to provide) electricity connection:

7,000

11

Free Basic Service Provision:

R (000s) 38,500,000

R (000s) 38,500,000

Note: Refer to Table 3, page 201

12

Type and number of grants and subsidies received:

R (000s)

Department of Minerals and Energy

12,000,000

Municipal Infrastructure Grant

13

Total operating cost of electricity distribution function

7,900,000

R (000s) 652,000,000

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS: Key Performance Area

Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved and Plans to Improve Performance IDP Goal/Objective: To provide 1,000 households with electricity connections. Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 78

Actual

Target

822  

1,000    

Basic & Sustainable Reason for Variance: Electrification was carried out in wards which fall Service Delivery under Eskom’s area of supply. Eskom was limited with funding. Improvements for Next Year: Anticipate electrifying the infill’s of the various wards within the Eskom area of supply.

Key Performance Area  

Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved and Plans to Improve Performance IDP Goal/Objective: To provide 1073 streetlights and 32 high masts lighting in wards 21/22.

Current

Target

1073 and 32

1073 (Street lights)

Basic & Sustainable Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 100% Service Delivery Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): N/A

32 (High masts)

Reason for Variance: N/A Improvements for Next Year: N/A

IDP Goal/Objective: To refurbish two Transformers that faulted.

2

2

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 100%

Basic & Sustainable Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): N/A Service Delivery Reason for Variance: N/A

Improvements for Next Year: N/A

260


261 5.6.4 Sub-Function: Electricity (Street Lighting) OVERVIEW Includes all activities associated with the provision of street lighting to the community.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ACTIVITY Street lighting responsibilities of the municipality are administered as follows and include: Planning, installation, commissioning and maintenance. These services extend to include the Msunduzi Electricity License Area, but do not take account of Wards which resides within the jurisdiction of Eskom License area. The municipality has a mandate to: Provide street lighting in accordance with SABS 098.

THE STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES OF THE FUNCTION ARE TO: •

Have functioning streetlights.

The key issues for 2009/2010 are: •

Manpower, Machinery, Finance.

ANALYSIS OF THE FUNCTION 1

Number and total operating cost of streetlights servicing population:

Number

R (000s)

20,736 2.400.000

2

Total bulk kilowatt hours consumed for street lighting:

Kwh 10,751,206,4

PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS Key Performance Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved and Area Plans to Improve Performance IDP Goal/Objective: To replace and upgrade 1073 Streetlights in various Wards.

Current

Target

1,073

1,073

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 100%

KPA 1

Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): N/A Reason for Variance: N/A Improvements for Next Year: N/A

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 5.6.5 SUB-FUNCTION: Sewerage OVERVIEW The function includes the planning, design implementation and maintenance of sewerage facilities and networks; inherent within the activities is function of preventing sewage contamination of watercourses and groundwater, Incorporating Vulindlela.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ACTIVITY The sewerage functions of the municipality are administered as follows and include: • • • • •

Provision of bulk sewer pipelines Provision of sewerage network extensions Condition assessment of sewerage facilities Maintenance of sewerage assets Provision of basic sanitation and other on-site sanitation

The municipality has a mandate to: • • • • • • •

Blockage clearing Conservancy tanks and VIP emptying, Pump maintenance Sewer connections Infiltration inspections Sewer flow measurement The planning, design and implementation of sewer projects.

THE STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES OF THE FUNCTION ARE TO: • • • •

To ensure basic sanitation to all by 2015 Upgrade of existing sewer infrastructure to accommodate demand Education in sanitation to all households by 2012 To improve operational efficiency to obtain a financially sustainable service.

The key issues for 2009/2010 are: • • • •

262

continuing with the implementation of section 78 assessment To comply with the sanitation requirements of the WSDP Continue with asset maintenance Elimination of VIP to achieve water borne sewers


263 ANALYSIS OF THE FUNCTION Reporting Level 1

Detail

Total

Cost

Number and cost to employer of all personnel associated with sewerage functions:

Number

R (000s)

• Professional (Directors / Managers)

1

637

• Professional (Engineers/Consultants)

3

911

• Field (Supervisors/Foremen)

2

609

• Office (Clerical/Administration)

3

487

• Non-professional (blue collar, outside workforce)

85

8,949

• Temporary

0

0

• Contract

1

144

2

Number of households with sewerage services, and type and cost of service:

Number

R (000s)

• Flush toilet (connected to sewerage system)

57,147

215,444.19

• Flush toilet (with septic tank)

5,015

215,444.19

• Chemical toilet

• Pit latrine with ventilation

• Pit latrine without ventilation

0

0

• Bucket latrine

0

0

• No toilet provision

Note: if other types of services are available, please provide details

3

Anticipated expansion of sewerage: • Flush/chemical toilet

4

71

80,000

29,446

175,645

6,454

38,724

Number

R (000s)

500

1,000

80,461

Free Basic Service Provision: Note: Refer to Table 3, page 201

5

Total operating cost of sewerage function

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS Key Performance Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved Area and Plans to Improve Performance

Current

Target

29,145

35,000

none

as per program      

IDP Goal/Objective: Monitor pump stations minimize contamination

11

11

IDP Goal/Objective: all households to have water borne sewer

66

as per Individual Applications

IDP Goal/Objective: Provide basic sanitation - VIPS Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 29,145 Basic & Sustainable Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 5,855 Service Delivery Reason for Variance: Insufficient Capital Budget Improvements for Next Year: Revise targets

IDP Goal/Objective: Asset renewal- replace old pipes

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Nil Basic & Sustainable Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Nil Service Delivery Reason for Variance: No Capital Budget Improvements for Next Year: Apply for MIG funding

Basic & Sustainable Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Nil Service Delivery Reason for Variance: N/A Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 100%

Improvements for Next Year: all pump stations to be on telemetry

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: 66

Basic & Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Nil Sustainable Service Delivery Reason for Variance: Nil (Dependant on applications)

Improvements for Next Year: to undertake a Waste Water Treatment Plan for the Municipality

5.6.6 Sub-Function: Waste Management OVERVIEW Includes refuse removal, solid waste disposal and landfill, street cleaning and recycling.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ACTIVITY Basically 3 services apply: • • •

Domestic refuse collection. Industrial and commercial refuse collection. Organic garden waste removal.

The key issues for 2009/2010 are: Attain a 100% collection rate in terms of rostered collections.

264


265 ANALYSIS OF THE FUNCTION 1

Number and cost to employer of all personnel associated with refuse removal:

Number

• Professional (Engineers/Consultants)

0

• Field (Supervisors/Foremen)

19

• Office (Clerical/Administration)

14

• Non-professional (blue collar, outside workforce)

459

• Temporary

0

• Contract

0

2

Number of households receiving regular refuse removal services, and frequency and cost of service:

Number

R (000s)

• Removed by municipality at least once a week

61,950

3,097,500

• Removed by municipality less often

• Communal refuse dump used

• Own refuse dump

0

• No rubbish disposal

0

3

0

0

Yes

0

Total and projected tonnage of all refuse disposed:

Weight (Tons)

• Domestic/Commercial

68,629

• Garden

6,202

4

Total number, capacity and life expectancy of refuse disposal sites:

• Domestic/Commercial (0ne)

• Garden (9)

5

Years 1,709,400

6-7 Years

60m3

indefinite

Anticipated expansion of refuse removal service:

R (000s)

• Domestic/Commercial

Nil

Nil

• Garden

Nil

Nil

Note: Currently working on the Strategy Document to expand the refuse removal service within the Msunduzi Municipality

6

Free Basic Service Provision:

Note: Refer to Table 3, page 201

7

Total operating cost of solid waste management function

45,000,000

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS Key Performance Area

Performance During the Year, Performance Targets Against Actual Achieved and Plans to Improve Performance IDP Goal/Objective: To ensure that all types of waste are collected on time without backlogs

Basic & Sustainable Service Delivery

Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 1,800 Reason for Variance: Unreliability of vehicles and medical health of staff Improvements for Next Year: It is anticipated that the municipality will be able to meet its 2009/2010 goals including the backlogs from 2007/2008 IDP Goal/Objective: To reduce the need for contractors and increase the no of industrial and commercial users by 5%

Basic & Sustainable Service Delivery

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Not Achieved Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 100% Reason for Variance: Lack of funds to purchase skips Improvements for Next Year: Once funds are available to purchase skips to increase customer usage

IDP Goal/Objective: To increase the area of service in previously disadvantaged areas

Basic & Sustainable Service Delivery

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Nil Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): 100% Reason for Variance: Quality of service deteriorated but no extension of service- inadequate staff and reliable vehicles Improvements for Next Year: Currently working on strategy document to expand refuse removal service within the Municipality.

IDP Goal/Objective: Reduce actual costs by reducing overtime and breakdowns

Basic & Sustainable Service Delivery

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Not Achieved Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Actual increase in overtime requirements Reason for Variance: Excessive overtime as a result of poor vehicle maintenance Improvements for Next Year: Significantly reduce overtime

IDP Goal/Objective: Reduce littering and illegal dumping

Basic & Sustainable Service Delivery

Actual Performance Achieved 2009/2010: Community cleanup campaigns did make a little difference Variance between Planned & Actual Performance (if any): Reason for Variance: No application of bylaws resulted in increased dumping Improvements for Next Year: Public education and prosecution of offenders

266


267

CHAPTER SIX: REPORT ON THE MUNICIPAL INFRASTRUCTURE GRANT THE MSUNDUZI MUNICIPALITY MIG PROGRAMME ANNUAL REPORT: 2009/10 1)

Expenditure on the MIG programme for 2009/10 is reflected at Annexure A.

2)

In 2009/10 the programme spent R70, 738,722 - only 76% of the annual allocation. R66, 769,313 was spent on capital infrastructure. The remainder covered PMU operating costs.

3)

The MIG flagship for 2009/10 was the Vulindlela VIP installation project which delivered R43, 207,545 worth of VIPs by early 2010. It had to be interrupted at that time because the funds allocated had already been spent. Decisions taken by the Provincial Intervention Team in order to restore the Municipalityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finances prevented the allocation of additional funds to the project in 2009/10 and limited it allocation in 2010/11. As a result the elimination of basic sanitation backlogs in Vulindlela will now be delayed until well into the 2011/12 financial year.

4)

The installation of high mast lights in Edendale eventually commenced and by the end of the financial year, construction had been almost completed.

5)

The installation of street lights in Vulindlela was stalled by a lengthy objection process that had still not been resolved by the end of the financial year.

6)

Overwhelmingly, under-expenditure on the MIG programme for 2009/10 resulted from Council decision making either being delayed or not taking into consideration the recommendations of officials.

7)

Excessively bureaucratic processes (especially in the payment of invoices) also contributed.

8)

The under-expenditure of R24 836,369 by the end of June 2010 also resulted from :-

a) b) 9)

Attempts by the Executive Management Committee and Provincial Intervention Team to reserve as much MIG funding as possible for revenue protection projects. This prevented the reallocation of MIG funds from underspending projects to those that could use the money by financial year end Implementation by the Provincial Intervention Team of control processes that significantly disrupted the awarding of contracts, payment of invoices and other administrative procedures

Resulting from these factors, some contracts could not commence during the financial year, others only got underway late in the year, and all projects were slowed down by contractors experiencing cash flow problems that caused them to withdraw or withhold resources from projects

10) Other delays were caused by inexperienced/unsuitable contractors being unable to perform 11) Project delays that could perhaps be put down to inadequate planning and preparation were :a) b)

The Caluza Sports Ground not being able to commence due to the requirement for a new EIA The Community Halls not getting started until very late in the financial year because they were not even identified as MIG projects at the beginning of the financial year

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Annexure A: PROJECT

BUDGET 2009/10

EXPENDITURE 2009/10

VARIANCE

Sewerage Pipes Azalea

2,000,000

601,758

1,398,242

Sewerage Pipes Unit H (Ward 16)

2,000,000

490,741

1,509,259

550,000

210,345

339,655

Shenston / Ambleton Toilets VIP Installation - Vulindela

45,308,059

43,207,545

2,100,514

Elim of Conservancy Tanks - Sewer

2,714,000

1,174,225

1,539,775

Elim of Conservancy Tanks - Water

2,714,000

951,463

1,762,537

Sanitation Infrast. Feasibility Study

1,612,004

-

1,612,004

170,885

170,885

-

Kwanoshezi Hall

4,120,944

963,050

3,157,894

Kwaqanda Hall

2,951,446

753,407

2,198,039

Sinathingi Hall

3,261,089

1,292,453

1,968,636

Street Lighting Vulindela & Edendale

7,953,381

5,811,845

2,141,536

Edn Proper New Mains & Reticulation

919,192

749,703

169,489

Midblock Service Eradication - Water

1,600,000

892,975

707,025

Midblock Service Eradication - Sewer

1,630,151

824,361

805,790

Caluza Sports Ground

Elimination of Water Tankers

107,254

100,368

6,886

Basic Water Supply

300,000

300,000

-

Shenston/Ambleton Roads & S/Water

204,643

204,629

14

2,877,609

2,877,608

1

Unit P

889,293

889,293

-

Rehab of District Road D1125

869,849

869,786

63

3,107,254

3,107,254

-

628,033

325,619

302,414

3,116,596

-

3,116,596

91,605,682

66,769,313

24,836,369

Rehab of District Road D1131

Machibisa Dambuza Roads Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Halt MPCC Street Lighting Vulindela Ph 3 TOTALS

268


269

SAFE CITY ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 2009 / 10 REPORT SUBMITTED BY: CEO: SAFE CITY (PMB) – Ms NUTAN BHIKA (Association incorporated under Section 21) (Registration Number: 2002/007386/08) CONTENTS Chairman’s report Independent auditors’ report Report of the directors Statement of financial performance Statement of financial position Statement of cash flows Notes to the statement of cash flows Notes to the annual financial statements Detailed statement of financial performance List of contributors

PAGE 269 - 277 278 - 279 280 281 281 282 282 - 283 283 - 289 288 - 289 289

APPROVAL OF THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS The annual financial statements and other financial information set out in this annual report were prepared by the directors in conformity with International Financial Reporting Standards applied on a consistent basis. The manner of presentation of the annual financial statements, the selection of accounting policies and the integrity of the financial information are the responsibility of the directors. The directors are also responsible for the systems of internal control. These are designed to provide reasonable but not absolute, assurance as to the reliability of the financial statements, and to adequately safeguard, verify and maintain accountability of assets, and to prevent and detect material misstatement and loss. The systems are implemented and monitored by suitably trained personnel with an appropriate segregation of authority and duties. Nothing has come to the attention of the directors to indicate that any material breakdown in the functioning of these controls, procedures and systems has occurred during the year under review. The annual financial statements are prepared on a going concern basis. Nothing has come to the attention of the directors to indicate that the association will not remain a going concern for the foreseeable future. The annual financial statements set out on pages 281 to 289 and the supplementary schedules on pages 288 to 289 were approved by the Board of Directors on 15 July 2010 and are signed on its behalf by:-

DIRECTOR - Z D SOKHELA

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER - N K BHIKHA

DIRECTOR - P WARMINGTON

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 BACKGROUND Safe City Pietermaritzburg was formally constituted as an Association incorporated under section 21 of the Companies Act on 28 March 2002. Its establishment followed a long period of research and planning undertaken under the guidance of Mr Des Winship and colleagues who constituted the Board of the local organisation known as Business Against Crime. Initially, the organisation’s Board, conceptualised as a partnership between the Municipality and the private sector, was chaired by the Mayor at the time, Cllr Hloni Zondi. Other representatives of the Municipality also sat on the Board. In the course of time, legislation prohibited these representatives from holding directorships and Safe City Pietermaritzburg lost the advantage of having direct Municipal input into decisionmaking. Representation on the Board aside, the partnership was governed by an agreement by which the Municipality would make the necessary financial resources available for the operation of the organisation as well as the capital expenditure required to extend the CCTV surveillance to other parts of the city. The Municipality regarded Safe City Pietermaritzburg as a „municipal entity’, although this status was contested by Safe City itself. Changes in the municipal administration and the legislative paradigm resulted in confusion and some breakdown in relations between the two partners. Municipal funding was no longer secure and some elements within the Municipality overtly questioned several aspects of the operations of Safe City Pietermaritzburg. The organisation took steps to meet the expectations of the Municipality by terminating the contract of the service provider that had managed the operation from the company’s inception and assuming the management role itself as a means of saving costs. Later, at the request of the city’s administration team, the section 21 status was changed so that the relationship between the organisation and the Municipality would be aligned to legal requirements. While it is understood that the Board cannot include representatives of the Municipality, the organisation has felt for sometime that its work is hampered by a lack of regular and constructive communication with its funding body. The Safe City operation has earned high praise for its professional effectiveness in meeting its objectives which are fundamentally concerned with reducing crime in the city. All the people who have directed this project through both the planning and operational phases have done so on a voluntary basis and it remains a principle of the Board that there is no remuneration to directors.

1. DIRECTORS The following people are directors of the Company. There are several vacancies on the Board that will be filled in due course. Mrs Z Sokhela

Director of BP Cascades, Ex President and Member of PCB, UFET Council, UKZN Council, Deputy Chair BFC

Mr D Winship

Retired CEO: Huletts Aluminium, Retired Executive Director of Tongaat Hulett Group, Member of BFC, Director of Life Line

Mr P Warmington

Director: Warmingtons Inc, Member of BFC

Mr D Kambouris

Chairperson of BFC, Member of Community Chest

Mr V C Biggs

Retired Director: McCarthy, Member of Allison Homes, Member of SAVS/NCVV, Member of BFC

Mrs D Harrison

Director: Lifeline PMB T/A Lifeline and Rape Crisis, Member of BFC, Member of Community Chest

Mr K Vorster

Financial Planner for PSG, Member of BFC

Adv R P Stuart

Deputy Director of Public Prosecution, Chairman of KZN Wildlife Crime Working Group (WCWG)

Major General P Maharaj Cluster General of SAPF of Pietermaritzburg Central

270


271 2. PARTNERS For various reasons, Business Against Crime in Pietermaritzburg reconstituted itself as Business Fighting Crime and is an important strategic partner of Safe City. BFC has borne the costs of marketing an SMS crime alert campaign that was initiated by Safe City in 2008. BFC has also contributed financially in several other ways, including a grant of R10 000 towards the cost of a commercial van purchased during the year. This purchase was made possible by a generous donation of R50 000 by Hulamin (Pty) Ltd. The organisation considers its partnership with the SAPF to be one of its notable strengths, while it also enjoys constructive relationships with the National Prosecuting Authority and various Community Police Forums.

3. STAFFING Safe City took over the control of the CCTV Control Room operation as well as the maintenance of cameras on 1 March 2010. Ivision Technologies, the contractor who had formerly managed the Control Room operation, took legal action in terms of Section 197 of the LRA. This concerns the conditions of service and the rights of employees when a transfer from one employer to another is effected. The Safe City Board decided not to challenge Ivision Technologies’ contention and took over all 29 of the former Ivision employees, despite the fact that the additional cost of salaries could not be catered for in the budget. In addition, at the time of the termination of its contract, Ivision Technologies faced a claim made by 4 (four) other former employees that they had been dismissed unfairly. Safe City faced this charge as a respondent alongside Ivision Technologies. By agreement between Ivision Technologies and Safe City, a monetary settlement was negotiated with the four Ivision Technologies disaffected employees who then dropped their claim for re-instatement. This cost Safe City an unexpected R75 000 plus its share of the legal costs incurred to the point of settlement of R20 000. At the time of writing, the Safe City staff comprises • • • • • • • • •

A CEO A General Manager A Control Room Manager 3 Supervisors 18 Control Room Operators 7 Control Room Operators [Relievers] A Technician Manager A Technician An Assistant Technician

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 4. PARTICULAR MATTERS RELATING TO THE YEAR 2009/10 4.1. A Number Plate Recognition System, to enable the city to generate income from outstanding fines, was introduced by Safe City. A Memorandum of Understanding between the Msunduzi Traffic Department and Safe City Pietermaritzburg has been drafted and submitted to the New Administrator for perusal to enable this project to proceed. 4.2 At the request of the city’s administration team, the organisation co-operated in the formation of a Safe City Development Committee to provide a platform for ongoing dialogue between the Municipality and Safe City regarding all matters concerning safety and security in the city. An enhanced role for Safe City in this sphere is expected to emerge through the discussions in this committee. 4.3. In partnership with BFC, SAPF and the NPA, Safe City exhibited at the Royal Show in a hall dedicated to the agencies responsible for crime and justice. The theme of the exhibition was “The Winning Nation” in conjunction with a slogan “Blow Vuvuzela to Fight Crime” and it secured a Gold Medallion award for being an outstanding display. In addition to showcasing the effectiveness of the CCTV camera system, Safe City used the exhibition to market its SMS Crime Alerting and Cell phone Panic Alert services that are monitored in the Safe City control room and feed directly to the SAPF.

5. FINANCE 5.1. The audited financial statements of the organisation are attached to this report. 5.2. Safe City’s capital expenditure proposal of R4.48 million, as well as the request for R2.2 million for the upgrade of the recording system were declined due to lack of funds by Council. This was disappointing since the organisation has an urgent desire to extend its CCTV protection services, especially into Edendale, and to maintain the highest level of efficiency by ensuring that its technology is up to date. 5.3. Safe City is also hoping to install cameras to provide a CCTV security facility at the Harry Gwala Stadium which will also cover Alexandra Park. An initiative of the First Lady of the Province, Dr May Mkhize, is to revitalise the Park as a recreational centre where children can be taken to play and be entertained in safety. The presence of digital surveillance is considered essential for this.

6. PERFORMANCE OF THE CONTROL CENTRE The 24/7 surveillance operation is the core of Safe City’s business. It is ISO 9001:2008 certified and SABS approved. The primary core function is: • • • • •

The prevention of crime. The detection of crime. The maintenance of existing CCTV system. Advise municipality on expansion of CCTV system. Oversee the design, specification and installation of new CCTV equipment.

The secondary function is: • • • •

272

The monitoring of traffic bylaws and motor vehicle accidents. Monitoring of Municipal bylaws such as littering, street gambling, and illegal trading. Facilitating the Disaster Management JOC. The monitoring of gatherings, marches and events of public interest within the camera visual area.


273 6.1. Standard Procedure

The crime statistics for Pietermaritzburg are submitted to the control room every morning by the SAPF. These are compared with our statistics and thereafter plotted on street maps in order to identify where crimes were committed without any detection by the control centre. This enables operators to be more crime prevention orientated.

Every suspicious incident noted on camera is regarded as an â&#x20AC;&#x153;Incident detectedâ&#x20AC;?. The police officer (present in the control room 24/7) will determine whether a SAPF vehicle needs to be despatched to the scene of the incident. The yearly target for SAPF dispatches is 90% of Incidents Detected. A record is maintained of vehicle despatches as compared with Incidents detected. An arrest is made when the suspect is apprehended. Frequently the progress of a crime is fully observed and followed via the camera network. There is a recording capacity of 21 days after which footage is automatically over-written.

6.2. Summary of Operational Performance Description

Total for Year Target for Year

Diff

No of Incidents Detected

3067

2796

271 (+9.6%)

Response by SAP Units

1550

2516

-960 (- 38%)

Arrests Effected

181

360

179 (-49.7)

SAP Response Time

5.4

4

-1 (-25%)

% Camera down time

2.8

1

-1.8 (-130%)

6.3. Incidents Detected 3200

3067

3000

2800

2800 2600

2488

NO. OF ARRESTS

2400

2153

2200 2000

1871

1800

1625

1600

1447

1400

1208

1200

984

1000

745

800 600 400

547 344 203

200

198

239

224

239

282 178

328

320 267

246

Monthly

JUNE

MAY

APRIL

MAR

FEB

JAN

DEC

NOV

OCT

SEPT

AUG

JULY

0

Accumulative

The total number of incidents detected was 3067 compared to 2796 previous year. The target was exceeded by 271 (+10%) incidents. These incidents include all matters detected such as fighting, crime, suspicious behaviour and motor vehicle accidents. Some of the incidents detected are as follows: Fighting Suspicious behaviour Motor vehicle Accidents Bylaw Infringements

1120 431 245 121

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 6.4. Responses by the SAPF 2800 2600 2400

NO. OF ARRESTS

2200 2000 1800

1589

1600

1424

1400

844

724

800 600 200

1071

947

1000

400

1317

1182

1200

585

432 164

131

295

137

120

139

153

96

135

111

131

126

107

Monthly

JUNE

MAY

APRIL

MAR

FEB

JAN

DEC

NOV

OCT

SEPT

AUG

JULY

0

Accumulative

The total number of responses of the SAP was 1550 compared to 1623 for the previous year. The target for the year of 2516 (- 38%) was not met. Theft of motor vehicles has shown a sharp increase in the Pietermaritzburg area but most occurred outside of the area monitored by cameras. It is also known that tow truck operators are involved in the theft of vehicles especially those fitted with immobilisers or gear locks. It was therefore decided to monitor all vehicles being towed by tow truck and to record their details for possible investigation purposes. These incidents do not require immediate SAP response. 6.2. Arrests Effected 360 340 320 300 280 260 240

NO. OF ARRESTS

220 200

181

180 160 140 93

100

69

80 60 20

144

134

124

111

120

40

164

154

24

75

43 26

19

18

6

18

13

10

10

12 8

17

Monthly

JUNE

MAY

APRIL

MAR

FEB

JAN

DEC

NOV

OCT

SEPT

AUG

JULY

0

Accumulative

The number of arrest made was 181 compared to 193 for the previous year. The target of 360 was not met. It has become increasingly clear that criminals are avoiding the area covered by the cameras and are committing their crimes in unmonitored areas.

274


275 6.3. SAPF Response Time 18 16

RESPONSE TIME

14 12 10 8 6

6.8 5.1

5.5 5.35

4.8 5.1

4.2

5.5

4.9 4

4

4.7

4.9

6.6 5.1

6.4

6 5.3

5.5

5.3

5.4

5.6

6.2 5.4

2

Monthly

JUNE

MAY

APRIL

MAR

FEB

JAN

DEC

NOV

OCT

SEPT

AUG

JULY

0

Accumulative

The average response time for SAPF vehicle to respond from the time of notifying the SAPF Emergency Control Room until a vehicle arrived on the scene was 5.4 min compared to 5 min. for the previous year. This is 1.4 min. more than the target of 4 min. The availability of patrol vehicles during peak times and traffic congestion have had a negative effective in this regard. 6.4 Camera Downtime 6.00

CAMERA DOWN TIME

5.50

5.00 4.50 4.00 3.50 3.00 2.50 2.00 1.50 1.00 0.50

JULY

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV DEC JAN

FEB

MAR

APRIL MAY

JUNE

The average camera downtime was 2.8%. The Safe City target has always been 1%. It will be noticed that during July to October 2009 the downtime was above 4%. This high number can be attributed to the delay in obtaining crucial spares from the United Kingdom. Most of the spares used in maintaining the CCTV system have to be imported.

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 6.5 Reported Crime Statistics Please note that the statistics as provided by the SAP Pietermaritzburg is for operational evaluation and is not for public consumption. Jul 08 to Jun 09

Jul 09 to Jun 10

Inc/Dec

%

Murder

42

33

-9

-21%

Att. Murder

22

17

-5

-23%

Ass. Com

278

391

+113

41%

Ass. GBH

278

391

+113

41%

Rape

44

64

+20

45%

Rob with F/A

106

63

-43

-41%

Rob Other Weapon

278

202

-76

-27%

Rob Com

194

154

-40

-21%

Bus. Rob

92

56

-36

-39%

Hi Jacking

12

14

+2

17%

Theft from M/V

137

152

+15

11%

Theft out of M/V

221

211

-10

-5%

Theft of M/V

310

213

-97

-31%

Burglary Bus.

284

234

-50

-18%

A Crime

7801

7932

+131

2%

It is very evident that crimes which show an increase are those that are committed primarily indoors or that are domestic by nature i.e. Assault Common, Assault GBH and Rape. These types of crime are difficult to prevent and are related mainly to socio economic factors such as unemployment, family violence and drug or liquor abuse. Crimes that have decreased are mainly street related crimes such as Robberies, Burglary Business, Murder, Attempted Murder etc. These crimes can be prevented by intelligence-driven crime prevention operations, CCTV detection or SAP patrols. The increase in reported A Crime may be attributed directly to the increase in assault related cases.

276


277 7. CONCLUSION The year 2009/10 has been one of many challenges, not the least of which was the take-over of the management and administration after the termination of the service contracts. This was followed by difficulties in Safe Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x;s engagement with the Municipality and threats that the funding would be withheld. While the relationship with the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x;s new administration has been a great deal more constructive, it has posed the additional challenge of having to deregister the section 21 company and register a full-blown company. We thank the Mayor and Johan Mettler and his administration team for their constructive support for the Safe City project and for revitalising our belief that our organisation performs a valuable community service. We thank all partners including BFC, SAPF, CPF, NPA and several others who are, to a lesser or greater extent, stakeholders in our operation. The members of the Safe City Board are thanked and commended for their support and commitment. Among these, Messrs Peter Warmington, the former chairperson of the Board, Des Winship and Dem Kambouris, the chairperson of BFC, have earned special thanks for their particular and loyal support. The Board expresses its thanks to the CEO, management and staff of Safe City, as well as the Project Engineer, Mr Pieter Janse van Rensburg of Dihlase Consulting. We reserve our particular gratitude to the Msunduzi Municipality, the main funders of this operation. We acknowledge, too, the financial and moral support of Business Fighting Crime and Hulamin, as well as the valuable assistance rendered by legal advisors, Venn Nemeth & Hart, our auditors, Deloitte and Touche, and the Witness for continuously reporting on safety statistics.

ZINHLE SOKHELA CHAIRPERSON OF THE BOARD 15 JULY 2010

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Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10

P.O. Box 365 Deloitte & Touche Pietermaritzburg Registered Auditors 3200 Audit - KZN South Africa Deloitte & Touche House 181 Hoosen Haffejee Street (formerly Berg Street) Pietermaritzburg 3201 Docex 14 Pietermaritzburg Tel: +27 (0)33 345 0271 Fax: +27 (0)33 345 0285 ww.deloitte.com

REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT AUDITORS TO THE MEMBERS OF SAFE CITY PIETERMARITZBURG Report on the Financial Statements We have audited the annual financial statements of Safe City Pietermaritzburg which comprise the statement of financial position as at 30 June 2010, the statement of financial performance and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory notes, as set out on pages 281 to 287.

Directors’ Responsibility for the Financial Statements The company’s directors are responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards. This responsibility includes: designing, implementing and maintaining internal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error; selecting and applying appropriate accounting policies; and making accounting estimates that are reasonable in the circumstances.

Auditor’s Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the directors, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.

National Executive GG Gelink Chief Executive AE Swiegers Chief Operating Officer GM Pinnock Audit DL Kennedy Tax & Legal and Risk Advisory I. Geeringh Consulting I. Barn Corporate Finance CR. Beukman Finance TJ Brown Clients & Markets NT Mtoba Chairman of the Board CR Quality Deputy Chairman of the Board Reginal Leader: GC Brazier A full list of partners and directors is available on request.

B-BBEE rating: Level 3 contributor/AA (certified by Empowerdex) Member of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu

278


279 Basis for Qualified Opinion â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Cash Collections and Donations In common with similar organisations, it is not feasible for Safe City Pietermaritzburg to institute accounting controls over cash collections and donations prior to initial entry of the collections in the accounting records. Accordingly, it was impractical for us to extend our examination beyond the receipts actually recorded.

Qualified opinion In our opinion, except for the effect on the annual financial statements of the matter described in the Basis for Qualified Opinion paragraph, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the association as at 30 June 2010, and of its financial performance and its cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards, and in the manner required by the Companies Act of South Africa.

Other matters Without further qualifying our opinion we draw attention to the fact that the supplementary information set out on pages 288 and 289 does not form part of the annual financial statements and is presented as additional information. We have not audited these schedules and accordingly we do not express an opinion thereon.

Deloitte & Touche Per D McArthur (Registered Accoutant and Auditor) Partner Pietermaritzburg 21July 2010

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS for the year ended 30 June 2010 The directors have pleasure in presenting their report for the year ended 30 June 2010.

REVIEW OF THE OPERATIONS FOR THE YEAR The financial position of the association at 30 June 2010 is set out in the attached annual financial statements. The statement of financial performance reflects an operating (deficit)/surplus for the year of (R14 434) (2009: R12 239).

SUBSEQUENT EVENTS No material fact or circumstances has occurred between the reporting date and the date of this report.

DIRECTORS The following members acted as directors during the year under review: Z D Sokhela P Warmington W D Winship V C Biggs M Ghela R P Stuart P Maharaj N K Bhikha J A Vorster D Harrison D Kambouris I Dugmore N.P Dlangisa CHAIRMAN Z D Sokhela

(Chairman)

(retired in February 2010) (CEO)

(retired in March 2010) (retired in February 2010) (appointed in October 2009)

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER N K Bhikha

PLACE OF BUSINESS

City Hall Chief Albert Luthuli Road PIETERMARITZBURG 3201

NATURE OF BUSINESS

An Association between business, the local authority, the community, government and non-government organisations to proactively combat crime in Pietermaritzburg.

AUDITORS

Deloitte & Touche

BANKERS

First National Bank

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Deloitte & Touche for their engagement in carrying out a partly honorary audit for Safe City.

280


281 STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE for the year ended 30 June 2010 Notes Revenue

2010

2009

R

R

2 715 969

2 642 582

111 298

63 460

Total income

2 827 267

2 706 042

Operating expenses

2 841 701

2 693 803

(14 434)

12 239

14 434

(12 239)

(14 434)

12 239

-

-

Interest received

Operating (deficit)/surplus for the year

4

Transfers to reserves - Non-distributable reserve - General DEFICIT/SURPLUS for the year

5

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL Position for the year ended 30 June 2010 Notes

2010

2009

R

R

ASSETS NON-CURRENT ASSETS Property, plant and equipment

7

CURRENT ASSETS Accounts receivable

8

Cash on hand and balances with banks TOTAL ASSETS

88 526

51 321

795 024

826 534

8 332

27 080

9 786 692

799 454

883 550

877 855

853 989

868 423

29 561

9 432

29 561

9 432

883 550

877 855

EQUITY AND LIABILITIES EQUITY RESERVES Non-distributable reserve - general

5

CURRENT LIABILITIES Accounts payable TOTAL EQUITY AND LIABILITIES

11

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 STATEMENT OF Cash Flow for the year ended 30 June 2010 Notes

2010

2009

R

R

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash receipts from donors

2 674 717

2 683 462

(2 798 777)

(2 991 646)

(124 060)

(308 184)

111 298

63 460

-

(199)

(12 762)

(244 923)

Additions to property, plant and equipment

-

(7 198)

Net cash flow used in investing activities

-

(7 198)

NET DECREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

(12 762)

(252 121)

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the year

799 454

1 051 575

786 692

799 454

Cash paid to suppliers and employees Cash utilised in operations

A

Interest received Interest paid Net cash generated from/(utilised in) operating activities INVESTING ACTIVITIES

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AT END OF THE YEAR

B

Notes to the statement of Cash Flow for the year ended 30 June 2010 Notes

2010

2009

R

R

A. RECONCILIATION OF OPERATING (DEFICIT)/SURPLUS FOR THE YEAR TO CASH UTILISED IN OPERATIONS Operating (deficit)/surplus for the year

(14 434)

12 239

(111 298)

(63 460)

Adjustment for:

Interest received

Interest paid

Non-cash donation received

Depreciation

Working capital changes

-

199

(60 000)

-

22 795

25 967

(162 937)

(25 055)

Decrease/(increase) in accounts receivable

18 748

(22 581)

Increase/(decrease) in accounts payable

20 129

(260 548)

(124 060)

(308 184)

Cash utilised in operation

282


283 Notes

2010

2009

R

R

786 692

799 454

B. CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash on hand and balances with banks. Cash and cash equivalents included in the cash flow statement comprise the following balance sheet amounts: Bank

NOTES TO THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ended 30 June 2010 1.

Basis of preparation

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the South African Statements of Generally Accepted Accounting Practice (“GAAP”) including any interpretations of such Statements issued by the Accounting Practices Board, with the effective Standards of Generally Recognised Accounting Practice (“GRAP”) issued by the Accounting Standards Board replacing the equivalent GAAP Statement as follows: Standard of GRAP GRAP 1: GRAP 2: GRAP 3:

Replaced Statement of GAAP

Presentation of financial statements AC I01: Presentation of financial statements Cash flow statements AC 118: Cash flow statements Accounting policies, changes in AC 1O3: Accounting policies, changes in accounting estimates and errors accounting estimates and errors

The recognition and measurement principles in the above GRAP and GAAP Statements do not differ or result in material differences in items presented and disclosed in the financial statements. The implementation of GRAP 1, 2 & 3 has resulted in the following changes in the presentation of the financial statements: A.

Terminology differences:

Standard of GRAP

Replaced Statement of GAAP

Statement of changes in net assets Net assets Surplus/deficit for the period Accumulated surplus/deficit Contributions from owners Distributions to owners Reporting date

Statement of changes in equity Equity Profit/loss for the period Retained earnings Share capital Dividends Balance sheet date

B. C.

The cash flow statement can only be prepared in accordance with the direct method. Specific information such as: (a) (b) (c)

D.

Receivables from non-exchange transactions, including taxes and transfers. Taxes and transfers payable. Trade and other payables from non-exchange transactions must be presented separately on the statement of financial position.

Amount and nature of any restrictions on cash balances is required to be disclosed.

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 2.

Adoption of new and revised International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”)

In the current year, the directors have adopted all the new and revised Standards and Interpretations issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (the IASB) and the International Financial Reporting Interpretations Committee (IFRIC) of the IASB that are relevant to its operations and effective for accounting periods beginning on 1 January 2009. The adoption of these new and revised Standards and Interpretations has not resulted in any changes to the association’s accounting policies. The following new standards, interpretations, technical corrections and amendments, with effective dates on or after 1 January 2010, have been issued: Number IFRS 8

Description Amendments resulting from April 2009 Annual Improvements to IFRS

Effective date Effective for annual accounting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2010.

IAS 1

Amendments resulting from April 2009 Annual Improvements to IFRS

Effective for annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2010.

IAS 7

Statement of cash flows - Amendments resulting from April 2009 Annual Improvements to IFRS

Effective for annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2010

IAS 17

Leases - Amendments resulting from Effective for annual periods beginning on or April 2009 Annual Improvements to IFRS after 1 January 2010.

IAS 36

Amendments resulting from April 2009 Annual Improvements to IFRS

Effective for annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2010

The directors anticipate that the adoption of these Standards and Interpretations in future periods will have no material financial impact on the financial statements of the organisation.

3.

SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

3.1 Revenue

Revenue comprises cash contributions from the Msunduzi Municipality and does not include contributions in specie.

3.2 Interest

Interest income is accrued on a time basis, by reference to the principal outstanding and at the interest rate applicable.

3.3 Property, plant and equipment

Property, plant and equipment are depreciated over their estimated useful life to an estimated residual value. Motor vehicles Furniture & fittings Computer equipment Other 5

284

Years 5 5 3


285 4.

OPERATING SURPLUS FOR THE YEAR 2010

2009

R

R

Operating surplus for the year is stated after: Audit fees - current year

6 600

10 250

- prior year under provision

4 900

-

22 795

25 967

2 147 226

2 222 795

-

199

Depreciation Administration salaries Interest paid

5.

NON-DISTRIBUTABLE RESERVE - GENERAL 2010

2009

R

R

Balance at beginning of the year

868 423

856 184

Operating (deficit)/surplus for the year

(14 434)

12 239

Balance at end of the year

853 989

868 423

The Association is registered under Section 21 of the Companies Act of South Africa as an incorporated association not for gain and, as such, no part of its income and property shall be transferred to members, directly or indirectly. All reserves of the Association are therefore non-distributable and may only be utilised towards the cost of projects and initiatives and meeting any shortfall in expenditure.

6.

TAXATION 2010

2009

R

R

2010

2009

R

R

No provision for taxation is necessary, as the income of the Association is exempt in terms of section 10(1) cB) of the Income Tax Act, 1962, as amended.

7.

PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

Motor vehicles

58 000

-

Furniture and fittings

26 838

39 761

3 688

10 412

Computer equipment Office equipment

-

1 148

88 526

51 321

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 2010 Reconciliation of net book value at beginning of the year to net book value at end of the year. Net Book value at beginning of year

Additions

Disposals

R

R

R

Motor vehicles

Net Book value at end of Depreciation year R

R

-

60 000

-

(2 000)

58 000

Furniture and fittings

39 761

-

-

(12 923)

26 838

Computer equipment

10 412

-

-

(6 724)

3 688

1 148

-

-

(1 148)

-

51 321

60 000

-

(22 795)

88 526

Office equipment Total - 2010

2009 Reconciliation of net book value at beginning of the year to net book value at end of the year. Net Book value at beginning of year

Additions

Disposals

R

R

R

Net Book value at end of Depreciation year R

R

Furniture and fittings

52 684

-

-

(12 923)

39 761

Computer equipment

14 858

7 198

-

(11 644)

10 412

2 548

-

-

(1 400)

1 148

70 090

7 198

-

(25 967)

51 321

Office equipment Total - 2009

8.

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

Trade and other receivables are classified as loans and receivables at amortised cost and their carrying amount approximates fair value. Trade and other receivables are predominately non-interest bearing. Accounts receivable are all current being receivable within 1 month. No amounts receivable are past due.

9.

CASH ON HAND AND BALANCES WITH BANKS

Balance

2010

2009

R

R

786 692

799 454

It is the intention of the board that the surplus funds be utilised to cover additional funding of any emergency requirements.

10. RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS Business Fighting Crime is a related party of Safe City and transactions conducted between these parties are at arms length.

286


287 11. ACCOUNTS PAYABLE Trade and other payables are measured at amortised cost and their carrying amount approximates fair value. Trade and other payables are predominately non-interest bearing.

12. FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT Interest rate risk In the normal course of business, the company is exposed to the effect of movements in interest rates. Decisions on the interest rates are made according to short, medium and long-term expectations. Management have obtained funding for bank overdrafts at a floating rate linked to the prime lending rate. Sensitivity analysis At year end the sensitivity to changes in interest rates on the operating profit is as follows: 2010 +10% -10%

11 130 (11 130)

2009 +10% -10%

6 346 (6 346)

Liquidity risk The company manages liquidity risk by monitoring forecast cash flows and ensuring that adequate borrowing facilities are maintained. The directors may from time to time at their discretion raise or borrow monies for the purpose of the company as they deem fit. The table below analyses the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x;s financial liabilities into relevant maturity groupings based on the remaining period at the balance sheet to the contractual maturity date. The amounts disclosed in the table are the contractual undiscounted cash flows. Balances due within 12 months equal their carrying balances as the impact of discounting is not significant. Company At 30 June 2010 Accounts payable At 30 June 2009 Accounts payable

Less than 1 year

Between 2 and 4 years

29 561

-

9 432

-

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 2010

2009

R

R

REVENUE Contributions received

2 715 969

2 642 582

111 298

63 460

2 827 267

2 706 042

(2 841 701)

(2 693 803)

20 756

16 989

8 973

-

2 147 226

2 222 795

160 534

289 997

1 396 578

1 932 799

590 115

-

Advertising and promotions

1 585

6 166

Assets written off

7 772

2 671

- current

6 600

10 250

- prior year underprovision

4 900

-

Bank charges

4 624

4 984

Interest received TOTAL INCOME Less: ADMINISTRATION EXPENDITURE Accounting fees Administration fees â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Pietermaritzburg Chamber of Commerce Salaries and wages Administration salaries: 8 months Control room consultancy fees: 8 months Safe City salaries/wages: 4 months

Audit fees

125

-

Cleaning

Casual Wage

8 652

7 215

Computer expenses

7 155

16 206

10 093

-

4 286

-

Conference and travel Consulting fees

109

133

Depreciation

Courier and postage

22 795

25 967

Electricity and water

18 764

16 191

661

2 098

General expenses

3 086

3 670

Insurance

1 090

-

Entertainment expenses

Interest paid

-

199

55 374

3 614

Motor vehicle expenses

3 014

192

Out of court settlement

50 000

-

6 173

-

17 737

25 338

Legal fees

Payroll set-up fees Printing and stationery Recruitment expense

19 989

-

360 405

554 088

20 417

-

3 100

-

Staff welfare

765

906

Subscriptions

-

(3 017)

Repairs and maintenance Royal show expense Staff petrol

Telephone and fax Write-back of VAT provision

288

25 474

30 916

-

(253 769)


289

OPERATING DEFICIT after administration expenditure OPERATING (DEFICIT)/SURPLUS FOR THE YEAR

2010

2009

R

R

(2 730 403)

(2 630 343)

(14 434)

12 239

Administration expenditure %

%

Personnel costs

79

83

Repairs and maintenance

13

21

Other

9

(4)

100

100

2010

2009

R

R

LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS for the year ended 30 June 2010

Msunduzi Municipality (inclusive of VAT)

3 000 000

3 000 000

Contributions by business are referred to in the Chairmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s report. Report submitted by CEO Safe City (PMB) - Ms Nutan Bhika

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Notes

290


291

Notes

The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


Msunduzi Municipality - Annual Report 09/10 Notes

292


The Dynamic, Caring Capital City of Choice


City Hall Chief Albert Luthuli Avenue 3201 Tel: 033 392 3000 Fax: 033 392 2397 Website: www.msunduzi.gov.za

Msunduzi AR 2010  
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