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MARCO SOSA MSAUD 2014 | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY URBAN DESIGN PORTFOLIO


MARCO SOSA URBAN DESIGN PORTFOLIO

MSAUD. Columbia University GSAPP Contact: cel. 646-256-8008 email: marcososa_1986@yahoo.com mas2426@columbia.edu


CONTENTS 4 Red Hook Fragmentations 10 The Wind Pavillion 12 Exchange of Assets 22 San Diego Dimished Capacity 24 Social Capital(ize) 26 New Rochelle 36 East Harlem 46 Cultural Waterscape


RED HOOK FRAGMENTATIONS BETTY FAN, MARCO SOSA, DU YOUNG YOON, YU ZHANG COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GSAPP URBAN DESIGN STUDIO I, SUMMER 2013 Red Hook is a neighborhood in Brooklyn, in the city of New York. It was one of the major shipping corridors in the US, it had the advantage of being surrounded by the Atlantic Basin and Erie Basin.Upland people used surface rail to commute to the rest of the city. By 1930s, the basin had more than 7,000 employees, mostly generations of immigrants. Later, the city begun implementing green into the tough neighborhood and more railways were constructed. In 1938, Red Hook houses were built originally for the dock workers families. It was the first high rise public housing built in the city. Massive recreational facilities were also constructed in the neighborhood. Additionally, Robert Moses imposed the BrooklynQueens expressway which cut Red Hook off from the rest of the Brooklyn. The Subway system was also constructured at the same time, however, it didnt not cross the BQE into Red Hook. Therefore, it did not provide enough incentive for businesses to be in this Brooklyn sector. Red Hook remained in isolation, this was mainly caused by the BQE massive infrastructure. Thus, the population in the area dropped from 18,875 to 10,485. In the late 1960s, there was a major zoning regulation where artists discovered inexpensive places to rent through a city program. Around the 2000’s, Ikea & Fairway were built in Red Hook. They were established in the area due to cheap rent, and were supposed to promote local employment and hire locally. Additionally, both businesses add other means of transportation to and from Manhattan, making Red Hook a more accessible neighborhood. Even so, the neighborhood remains a self-contained zone, with gaps in the programmatic flows which in turn creates an accesibility and security issue within the neighborhood to the different nodes of possible social interaction and integration. Despite this problematic, during Hurricane Sandy, residents and businesses demonstrated social cohesion through solidarity to the most affected areas in the neighborhood.

FACTS ABOUT RED HOOK

Occupation | 5.2% Unemployment Rate Business & Arts Service

Construction Production

Age Group |

Average 37.2 Age

0-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-74 75+

Commuting to Work | Average 24.3min Travel to Work 120 519 3918

FORMAL AND PROGRAMMATIC EVOLUTION

1870 Heavy Industrial/ Manufacture Era 4

1910 Industrial Culture Maintenance

1940 Major Infrastructure and downfall

1970 Isolation

2000 Commercial Interventions


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MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY


DISCONTINUITY INTERSTICES IN PROGRAM

USER FLOWS

WATERFRONT EDGES ACCESIBLE COMMERCIAL & RECREATIONAL

RESTRICTED INDUSTRIAL G

Sandy High Tide

A

Low Tide

Sandy

A

High Tide Low Tide

G Sandy High Tide Low Tide

Sandy High Tide Low Tide

Discontinuity Zone H

Sandy High Tide Low Tide

B

Sandy

B

High Tide Low Tide

H

Overall Sandy High Tide

Sandy

Low Tide

High Tide Low Tide

Commercial Sandy High Tide Low Tide

C

Sandy

C

I

High Tide Low Tide

I Sandy Sandy

High Tide Low Tide

High Tide Low Tide

Residential

Weekenders

J

Sandy High Tide

D

Sandy

Low Tide High Tide

D

Low Tide

J Sandy

Parks & Parking

Sandy

High Tide Low Tide

High Tide Low Tide

K

Sandy High Tide

Residents

Sandy

E

High Tide

Low Tide

Low Tide

E

Industrial

K

Sandy Sandy

High Tide High Tide

Low Tide

Low Tide

Sandy High Tide

Sandy

F

F

L

High Tide

Low Tide

Low Tide

L

Flood Zone Sandy

Sandy

High Tide

High Tide

Low Tide

Low Tide

Artists

Sandy High Tide Low Tide

6

F

Sandy

F


POTENTIAL CONNECTORS

20 min bus ride to downtown Brooklyn

PARK | RECREATIONAL waterfront park swimming pool

Brooklyn Queens Expressway 11.6mile | 155,000 vehicle/day | 45 mph

COMMERCIAL food vender portrait studio

COMMERCIAL Red Hook Crab artist studio Fairway market IKEA

FAIRWAY MARKET

IKEA

MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

private owned waterfront open to public park closes at 10pm

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CONNECTORS

ARTISTS CORRIDOR The Creamer street artist corridor became the gathering hub for vari- ous types of people in red hook: there are artists, residents, week- ender, etc. Studios are elevated to minimize damages from future cata- strophies, this once abandoned warehouses street is now serves as a pedistrian only corridor for cultural exchange. 8


INTERACTION ZONE

WATERFRONT EDGE The boardwalk in Red Hook serves as a linear path along the water edge and continues through out the neighborhood. Wetlands are restored to help mitigate flooding, which also gradually merges with the upland landscape.

MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Plaza at the corner of Hicks and Commerce street is turning into a night gathering zone for people from Red Hook and community nearby. By installing the advanced pave- ment called Pavegen in the plaza, people create electricity by walking, dancing, jumping on the ground. The kinetic energy turns into electricity, then will be stored for emergency use. Improvement of light fixtures under the Brooklyn Queens Express Highway will eventually promote more crowds coming to Red Hook in the evenings through the existing pedestrian bridge.

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THE WIND PAVILION COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GSAPP DIGITAL MODELING FOR URBAN DESIGN I SUMMER 2013 The energy pavilion provides an outdoor space for culture and recreation in an empty under utilized lot in the neighborhood Red Hook, in NYC. The pavilion’s deployable fabric acts as a canopy during normal weather conditions, creating niches in between the stalks meandering path. At the same time, the movement of the flexible stalks caused by the wind activates the energy system, which consists in the compression of elastomeric piezoelectric toroids around a copper shaft. This could provide a source of clean energy useful for power shortages and blackouts during storms. WIND PAVILION VIDEO SEQUENCE http://vimeo.com/69835836

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LOCATION


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MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY


EXCHANGE OF ASSETS JULIANA AZEM RIBERO, JIMENA GONZALEZ, ABHIJEET SHIRVASTAVA, MARCO SOSA COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GSAPP URBAN DESIGN STUDIO I, SUMMER 2013 Red Hook used to be an import important port whose urban fabric and economy was shaped by the water industry. The industrial historic buildings that are in the waterfront define Red Hook´s character and represent an important value and identity for the inhabitants. During the last 50 years the economic activity has changed. Although it still has an industrial character, the industries that occupy the waterfront no longer use the water for its activities. Nowadays, the historic buildings hold other programs such as residential, storage, small light manufacturing, commercial and galleries. These small businesses represent an important economic support for the area. Considering its physical conditions and topography, Red Hook is a peninsula that floods. According to FEMA´s 500-year storm projection the whole peninsula will be under water. During Hurricane Sandy almost all of the peninsula was flooded. Water covered up to 5 ft. height of the waterfront ground level including these historical buildings. Tenants lost properties, took business loans and returned to the same location without any flooding protection and no flood insurance, due to the expensive policy. To protect Red Hook´s value, the department of city planning has proposed a citywide scale project that consists in a temporary floodwall that will be display in case of Hurricane threat. However, the locations for this proposal leave most of Red Hook´s historic buildings outside the wall. The historical buildings have limitations in what kind of measures they can apply to become flood proof. Therefore, if storm hits again, the property owners and the ground level tenants will suffer economical losses. In parallel but independent to the floodwall proposal, there is another project for the area. The Greenway is a 14 mile route to connect Brooklyn’s Waterfront. However, X percent of Red Hook´s Waterfront is privately owned forcing the “waterfront” bike path to be inland. This project departs from these two independent city proposals, and intends to rethink their intentions and combined them in order to address the heritage and economic issues that have been left aside.

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MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY


HISTORIC ASSETS

OWNED BY O’CONNELL ORGANIZATION

OWNED BY O’CONNELL ORGANIZATION

OWNED BY O’CONNELL ORGANIZATION

OWNED BY O’CONNELL ORGANIZATION

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BROOKLYN WATERFRONT GREENWAY PROPOSAL BY THE BROOKLYN GREENWAY INITIATIVE

500 YEAR FLOOD

WATERFRONT PUBLIC ACCESIBILITY ONLY 25% IS PUBLICLY ACCESSIBLE

MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

“THE FLOOD WALL” INTEGRATED FLOOD PROTECTION SYSTEM PROPOSAL BY PLANYC

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EXCHANGE OF ASSETS

PHASE 1 MERGING LEISURE AND PROTECTION BROOKLYN GREENWAY INITIATIVE

HISTORIC BUILDINGS

ECONOMIC VALUE

WATERFRONT ACCESS DEPARTMENT OF CITY PLANNING

INTEGRATED PROTECTION SYSTEM

Taking into consideration four different players: the building owners, the tenants, the department of city planning and Red Hook´s inhabitants, this project suggests, moving the development rights of the ground level of the historical buildings to safe areas inside the temporary floodwall. This will protect the economic value, considering their activity has no relation with the water. A new zoning policy that contemplates exchange of assets will be implemented. Property owners will have the right of built in a rate of 2:1 in the vacant lots inside the “safe area” that share the same zoning in order to maintain the economic activity of their business. Tenants will have the option to relocate inside the wall, with safer renting options. This will increase the density of the area, and will contemplate adjusting zoning inside the wall to accommodate this grow. Moreover, ground level of the historical buildings will then become indoor public spaces that will give access to the waterfront. The Green Way will become the main spine of the project. Public spaces will be incorporated to this path extending the bike lane to the waterfront. Historical buildings will become a transition between the waterfront and inland and will allow inner and outdoor public spaces, and temporary activities. In order to include small business in the protected area we propose aligning and incorporating the floodwall to the Green Way. In addition, green areas, flexible paths and new temporary programs will be integrated to the greenway extending it to the water edge throughout the new historical buildings inner public spaces. The different temporary programs that will occur in the waterfront public spaces will serve and complement the inland activity: Culture, Markets, Transportation and Sports.

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PHASE 2 TRANSFER OF DEVELOPMENT RIGHTS TDR

X Sq. Ft. (M) MULTIPLIER

X Sq. Ft. OF GROUND FLOOR AREA

EXISTING FARFA + 2X Sq.Sq. Ft. Ft. EXISTING + XM

TRANSFER

HISTORIC BUILDING’S GROUND FLOOR AREA

PROPERTY OWNERS: RIGHT OF BUILT M TIMES THEIR GROUND FLOOR AREA INSIDE THE PROTECTED AREA

VACANT LOT WITH SIMILAR ZONING IN SELECTED AREA OF RED HOOK

PHASE 3 RETERRITORIALIZATION OF PUBLIC SPACE

NEW INNER PUBLIC SPACE IN HISTORIC BUILDING’S GROUND FLOOR PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

EXTENSION OF PUBLIC SPACE TO THE WATERFRONT THROUGH HISTORIC BUILDINGS’ GROUND FLOOR


MAP TITLE

FAIRWAY MARKET

X Sq. Ft. OF GROUND FLOOR AREA

X Sq. Ft. (M) MULTIPLIER

EXISTING FARFA + 2X Sq.Sq. Ft. Ft. EXISTING + XM

TRANSFER

52,000 (2) = 104,000 SQ FT

VACANT LOT + FAR OF 2 BUILDING IS ABLE TO GROW TWICE AS TALL

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CULTURAL

1

EXHIBITION/ PERFORMANCE HALL INNDOOR/ OUTDOOR AUDITORIUM MOVIE PROJECTION

2

COMMERCIAL

FLEA MARKET FARMERS MARKET

3

FARMING GROUND

4

SPORT

SKATE PARK SPORT CENTER KAYAKING

5

WATER FILTERING

4

EXISTENT PARKS

2 3

4

4

MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

52,000 SQ FT.

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THE WATERFRONT PARK EXTENSION OF GREENWAY TO THE WATERFRONT

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MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY


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20 STRATUM


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MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY


d Goo

n cati o Ed u

Population Increase

Bu i l di n g

De m

an

ds

Distribution Increase

s Foo tpri nt + Usag of Natu ral Resou rce e

for Tal e n

ts

Res

earc

h

Education

Technology

Fo o d

Transportation i bu str

n ti o

uc e

cti o n

tory Resp i ra

Pr od

Environmental Issue -Air Pollution -Soil/Water Contamination

ty esi /Ob

Manufacturing

oo d Fast F

Di

rch sea

Re Pro du

e eas Di s

Use of Chem i c l a

er nc Ca

l ta en M

Military

He al

th /D ru g

Ab

us e/A gi n

gP op.

Health Issue UNITED STATES MEXICO

500

Naval Base Established Camp Matthews Established

450

Pearl Harbour

Camp Matthews Transferred to UCSD Campu

400 350

Transcontinental Railroad Reaches San Diego

I-5 Initiated

I-5 Los Angelas to San Diego Section Co

I-5 C 300

UCSD Medical Center

250

Salk Institute

Hybritech Estab

Scripps Institute of Oceanography

200 150

1890

22

USD

UCSD

1900

National Universtiy

573,538

17,700

50

Economic

PLMU

SDSU

100

1910

1920

1930

1940

1950

1960

1970

198


SAN DIEGO

DIMINISHED CAPACITY

Community Garden

Higher Education

K-12

Public Transport

Traffic

Telecom

Research Institute

Walkability

Software

Situated by the boarder of United States and Mexico, San Diego is a pleasant coastal city located in the heart of Southern California - Tijuana region. Both interstate 5 and interstate 15 run through downtown San Diego, connecting the city from Mexico all the way through California towards Canada. Home for a variety of educational and research institutes, the city is also a hotspot for technology and innovation advancement as well as production manufacturing facilities.

VMT

Life Science

I-5 And I-15 provide easy access for industries to choose their home location, shaping the city growth towards the direction of the two freeways. The city development is migrating towards north, due to the existing military base near downtown pushing them out, while the educational facilities in northern San Diego attracting them. At the same time, the city population has significantly increased, demanding more food and transportation necessities. As a result, already congested highways are pressured, causing side effects on the environment and health of the people. The city is growing, but in a diminishing capacity

Cold War Ends

1.4M

Naval Base Point Loma

us

1,322,553

TECHNOLOGY/INNOVATION INDUSTRY CLUSTER

1.2M

MILITARY AREAS I-5 Extension Planned

ompleted

Canada to Mexico Section Completed

1M

San Diego

UCSD Established First Bio-Engineering Dept. Scripps Research Institute

600K

400K

200K 0

1990

2000

2010

EPA’S RISK SCREENING ENVIRONMENTAL RISK INDICATOR

800K

US Tyson’s Food Processing Plant

blished by UCSD Professor

80

EDUCATION/ TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION/ PRODUCTION & MANUFACTURING/ FOOD/TRANSPORTATION

Food Transportation

2020 Population

Technology

Education

Food

Transportaton

Manufacture

MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Fast Food

KU HUN CHUNG, XIN FU, MARCO SOSA, FAN WANG, SHIXIU WANG COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GSAPP URBAN DESIGN STUDIO II FALL 2013

IT MFG

Defence MFG

BioTech

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SOCIAL CAPITAL(ize) TYLER CUKAR, OLIVIA GIBBESON, YU-HSUAN LIN, NIA-JI, MARCO SOSA COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GSAPP URBAN DESIGN STUDIO II, FALL 2013 Social Capital is critical to the physical, mental and economic health of a community. The networks and interactions between people add value (capital) to place, adding strength, equity and resources. Working collectively allows cities to achieve greater goals, goals that could not be achieved individually. Social Capital is a scalar network that has multiple stages: bonds, bridges and links. These stages are where East Harlem and New Rochelle diverge from each other and set up unique situations within the region.

SOCIAL CAPITAL

NEW ROCHELLE

EAST HARLEM

Interest Group Bonds Bridges Links

Individual thought Individual interest

Alliance + interaction Shared interest Greater return

COMPARATIVE FORMATIVE PATTERNS OF SOCIAL CAPITAL YONKERS_SPROUTING Singular space with investment from various groups Get Fresh Yonkers

Citizen Farmer

NEW HAVEN_CYCLICAL Focused around a single entity

NY State Department Environmental Conservation

Yale homebuyers program

CARE

Yonkers Downtown Waterfront BID

Groundwork Hudson Valley

New Haven works

New Haven free clinic

Van der Donck Park

Wholefoods

City of Yonkers

Community Foundation for New Haven

City of New Haven

Wednesday evening clinic

Yonkers Community Development Agency

New Haven Chamber of Commerce

Unions at Yale Yale university properties

Jerome N. Frank legal services

New Haven Economic Development Corporation

Yale university

SFC Development Blue Door Arts Center

elmseed enterprise fund Yonkers Riverfront Library

Arts Westchester

Yonkers Public Schools

Westhab Sarah Lawrence College

market New Haven music in schools program

urban resource initiatvie

Yale reading corps

Elm Street Garden

New Haven reads book bank

EAST HARLEM_BRAIDED Intertwined network with multiple inputs + returns

Existing West Chester art organizations Art Programs

Art Westchester

YMCA After School

New Haven public schools

NEW ROCHELLE_LINEAR Little return or interaction between major actors

NYCHA

NYCHA EDU Services

Universal Pre-K

New Haven Promise

Department of Education

After School Programs

Existing New Rochelle art organizations

New Rochelle Council on the Arts

New Rochelle Public Library

Fine + Performing Arts College Iona College Iona Council of the arts

11 New Rochelle Art Galleries

Food Pantry Public Schools

Markets Dream Charter School

City of New Rochelle

Churches

College of New Rochelle

Health Care Harlem RBI

Human Services

Clinic for the uninsured

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New Rochelle B.I.D Mt. Sinai

Adolescent Health Center

Bronx Campus

Art Center

New Rochelle Campus

Art Department

B.I.D Board of Directors Monroe College

New Rochelle Campus

Art Club


VOICES OF EAST HARLEM East Harlem Community Workshop “What’s your favorite place in East Harlem?”

MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

ART BY U New Rochelle Community Workshop “What’ characterizes New Rochelle?”

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NEW ROCHELLE New Rochelle finds itself at an earlier stage, still building bonds and failing to create bridges between groups. New Rochelle has distinct groups within the city and each has a strong contingent. The city has 3 colleges: Monroe College, College of New Rochelle and Iona, as well as a burgeoning art scene. The key is to develop intra relationships within these groups and create an inter relationship between these groups, thus creating a symbiotic relationship both physical in the urban core and economically and culturally out into the extents of the city. This connection comes in the form of a collaborative Art campus expansion within the downtown which works directly with the artists and their fabrication space. These two cores would serve as tightened anchor points to the downtown and be linked through a series of laneways establishing a physical link between the nodes. This new inter-relationship would act as an attractor for students from the other schools, the general public of New Rochelle, and allow the city to standout within the region.

BARRIERS BARRIERS Income EDUCATION College of New Rochelle Iona college

Income EDUCATION College of New Rochelle Iona college Monroe college

Monroe college LATENT OPPORTUNTIES LATENT OPPORTUNTIES art program open space

art program open space

MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

SPATIAL PATTERNS OF SOCIAL CAPITAL

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MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY


EXISTING NETWORKS OF

SOCIAL CAPITAL

Huguenot and New Roc Historical Association

African-American Art & Culture Council

The Moonlight Theater, Inc.

New Rochelle Opera

Ajkun Ballet Theatre

Songcatchers

Municipal Arts Commission City of New Rochelle

Media Loft Gallery

Westchester Chamber Symphony

Backstreet Gallery

Thomas Paine Cottage

New Rochelle Council on the Arts 1975

Sound Shore Chorale

transFORM Gallery

Lumen Winter Gallery

Museum Editions LTD. New Rochelle Art Association 1912

Webster Bank

New Rochelle Chevrolet

Metro Medical

The Friends of New Rochelle Public Library

Art Westchester

New Rochelle Public Library

City of New Rochelle

New Rochelle City Hall

Westchester County Government New York State Senators

NYS Council on the Arts National Endowment for the Arts Westchester County Board of Legislators

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New Rochelle Downtown Business Improvement District BID 2000 non-profit

BID Board of Directors

Kaufman Realty Corporation

Cornell Pace, Inc.

Diamond Glass Corp.

Exxon Corporation

Avalon Bay Communities, Inc.

Talner Fine Jewelry & Giftware

Resident Representative

Cappelli Enterprises

dp Business Center

Howard Rattner Commissioner of Finance, City of New Rochelle

M. Christina Selin New Rochelle City Council Representative

Charles B. Strome III City Manager, City of New Rochelle

Marc M. Jerome Monroe College Chairman


Fine and Performing Arts

Iona College New Rochelle High School

The Poets Corner

NRCA Rotunda Gallery

Museum of Art and Culture

Pelham Art Center

Brother Chapman Gallery

Stage Management and Direction

Fine and Performing Arts Marketing

Curatorial Studies

Entertainment Management

Movement Studies

Entertainment Law

Sound Engineering

Fine and Performing Arts Journalism Dance, Music, Theater and Visual Arts Education Art, Music, Drama or Dance Therapy

The Iona Council of Art

Castle Gallery

The College of New Rochelle

Gordon A. Parks Gallery and Cultural Arts Center

John Cardinal O’Connor Campus, Bronx

Main Campus New Rochelle

Studio Art

Art Education

Art Therapy

Art History

Art Department

Mooney Center Gallery

Bridge Gallery

Monroe College

Queens Site

Bronx Campus

Art Club

St. Lucia Campus

New Rochelle Campus

Monroe Dancers

MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

chelle n

Arts Administration

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EXISTING DISCONNECTED GROUPS

Building on the latent social and economic potential of New Rochelle this project proposes the development of arts campus for Monroe college and an artist’s fabrication district in the city’s downtown. These two nodes are linked physically by a series of pedestrian scale laneways, and socially by an integrated teaching agreement, creating a flow of activity and knowledge that will drive the development of a vibrant downtown and identify New Rochelle as a place for arts within the region. In addition to the new arts campus, this project seeks to fortify and develop the existing arts district in the west of downtown. Anchored by the creation of a new sculpture garden for the display of their work, this district would seek to attract permanent and visiting artists, craftsmen and makers to the area.

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DISCONNECTED SPACE MONROE

IONA

people

$

$

artist group

$ instructor exposure job

$ increase curriculum exposure

College of New Rocheelle

school of arts

$ $ $

city of New Rochelle

$ skill/entertainment public

POTENTIAL STAKEHOLDERS Mixed Use Student Housing

Existing Housing

Main Building

Auditorium/Lecture Hall

Library

Drawing/Painting

Classrooms

Print/Press

Commercial Photography New Elementary School

Cafe Art Supply Clay/Pottery

INTEGRATING THE CORE THROUGH CAMPUS INSERTION


PROPOSED NODES

NODAL CONNECTION VIA LANEWAYS mixed use

metals studio glass blowing large production studio wood

photography

commercial

laneway

main building drawing library

mixed use+gallery main gallery mixed use

commercial elementary school

PROPOSED PROGRAM + PHASING IONA College

College of New Rochelle

POTENTIAL SOCIAL CAPITAL: REINFORCED BONDS + NEW BRIDGES MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

artist live/work studio

student housing print/press clay/pottery art supply cafe

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ART NODE | SCULPTURE PARK | STUDIOS | GALLERIES

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MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

LANEWAYS | ART CORRIDORS | TEMPORARY EXHIBITIONS | AMENITIES

COLLEGE EXTENSION | ART GALLERIES AND SHOPS | PLAZAS | AUDITORIUM

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EAST HARLEM

BARRIERS BARRIERS

110th st.

housing Blocks

super Blocks

income/Ownership

housing Blocks income/Ownership

super Blocks

103rd st.

EDUCATION primary/secondary schools

EDUCATION LATENT OPPORTUNTIES

primary/secondary schools

buildings LATENT OPPORTUNTIES buildings open space

96th st.

open space

MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

A neighborhood steeped in a history of diverse cultures and ethnic groups, now enters into a new phase in time in which the very peoples and culture that define it are at their most vulnerable. East Harlem is one of the poorest neighborhoods in the country and suffering from some of the highest asthma and associated health risks; meanwhile, being one of the richest and cultural diverse neighborhoods in New York City, drawing visitors and tourists from around the world. However, the area is one of the largest food deserts in the city and has some of the poorest access to health care. The vacancy rate is at 2% and is in ever growing need of land, housing, and space for its new residents. The current planning and development heavily favor outside developers and residents with sales of apartments at 50 times the median income of various blocks. New Infill projects focusing on high income housing and the continued development of “affordable housing” assists 0% of the existing population. These plans lead to a lack in housing stock and increased pressure on surrounding businesses to re-invent themselves leaving the current residents unable to afford not only housing but living in the neighborhood at all. This is turn deteriorates the cultural of the neighborhood and has begun eating away at the social capital of the place. East Harlem has a strong social capital that has manifested itself in the urban fabric with neighborhoods inside neighborhoods, pockets of boundaries that can serve as opportunities to build upon and enrich the vitality and character of the area.

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38


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MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY


NYCHA

RF Wagner Houses Community Center

EXISTING NETWORKS OF

SOCIAL CAPITAL

Jackie Robinson Community Center

Herbet H. Lehman Community Center

De Witte Clinton Community Center NYCHA Education Services Unit

JHS 50

Union Settlement Association

Thomas Jefferson Rec. Center

East River Community Center

East Harlem Little League

Y after school Falu Foundation

ACE 117

Boys and Girls Club

PS. 57

Department of Education

East Harlem Tutorial Program

PS. 83

PS. 197

Harlem Children’s Zone

PS. 171

Central Park East

PS. 146

PS. 96

PS. 30

PS. 112

PS. 108

Mosaic Prep Academy

Universal Pre-K

Dream Charter School

Esperanza Prep Academy

JHS 99

Harlem RBI

PS. 155 PS. 7

PS. 38

PS. 112

Mt. Sinai

Mt. Sinai EHHOP

Mt. Sinai Adolescent Health Center

Americorps

SUNY - Old Westbury

East Harlem Human Services Consortium Center for food and the Environment

Rennaissance Health Care Network

Institute for Family Health

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Metropolitan Hospital

Harlem United

Center for Comprehensive Health Practice

Settlement Health and Medical Service


Dance Theater

Art Programs

Museo del Barrio

Harlem School of the Arts

Museum of the City of New York Northside Center for Childhood Development Children’s Aid Society

Boys and Girls Harbor Inc.

After School Programs

Association to Benefit Children

Salvation Army at Manhattan Citadel

Scan NYC

Beth Hark Christian Counciling

Grow NYC Fresh Market

A new Beginning International Ministry

All Saints R.C. Church Good Neighbor Presbyterian

Food Pantry and Markets

Macedonia Church Assembly of God

Fraternity Notre Dame

Friendly Hands University

Samuel Temple Church

Church Mt Zion AME Church St. Cecilia Parish

Friendly Hands Ministry

Iris House East Side

2 Cardinal McClosky

MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Bailey House Inc.

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mental barrier physical/ visual barrier existing connection proposel connection

EXISTING BARRIERS

East Harlem stands at a more “complete” stage of Social Capital. East Harlem has strong bonds, good connections between groups but a potentially vulnerable set of links to the “greater sphere” of the city. In East Harlem barriers, both physical like metro north or super blocks and mental like fully separated NYCHA blocks, are what are creating this vulnerability. The focus is to break these East/West barriers, by establishing a connection from Central Park to Randall’s island, and design and develop urban program that encourages interaction and openness creating a shared idea of community between all groups. The physical connection East/ West being in the form of a bike path, the program would alter based on existing conditions on site; these would vary from urban farms in the grow zone, interactive play space in the play zone and a gateway and public space above the FDR in the destination zone.

42

PROPOSED WEST-EAST LINK NYCHA

people

people

land/space

land/space

people land/space

increase program

point of distribution food

Cultivate East Harlem

people City Museum of NY

people $ training

exposure

skills/knowledge

$

Active! East Harlem

facilities increasing housing

Department Of Education

tax incentive maintenance

people

people

tax incentive

$

East River Hill

physical health facilities

Harlem RBI facilities

exposure Private Developer

people NYC Parks & Recreation

Private Developer Grow NYC

Harlem Children’s Zone

POTENTIAL STAKEHOLDERS NYCHA Infill Zoning: Market Rate housing up to 300’ high Ground floor must have revenue based program Commercial Space Anchor Restaurant Zoning: Must be glazed facing the path and have exterior program

Teaching/Performance Space

Urban Farming Crop placement based off sun exposure + spatial articulation High Intenstiy-Nearest Nycha Medium Intensity-North of Bike Path Low Intgenstiy-Nearest Infill Towers Fresh Food Grocer Zoning: Must be atleast 1 grocerry store within all NYCHA blocks with infill tower Commercial/Food Service Community space/Auditorium

BREAKING BARRIERS THROUGH PROGRAM + GUIDELINES


EXISTING + DESIRED ROUTES

PROPOSED ZONES + CORRIDORS

GROW ZONE

ACTIVE ZONE

DESTINATION ZONE

public square+vendor station mixed use community farm headquarter commercial mixed use

mixed use community farm bike lane infill tower//restaurant infill tower//fresh food grocery store

infill tower//community space

community green urban playground infill tower//grocery

public plaza infill tower//restaurant infill tower//grocery east river hill

affordable housing expansion affordable housing dream charter school

PROPOSED PROGRAM + PHASING

POTENTIAL SOCIAL CAPITAL: REINFORCED BONDS + NEW BRIDGES

MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

rain garden education farm

public stage community farm cafe/bar

43


GROW ZONE | NYCHA INFILLS | COMMUNITY GARDENS + MARKET

44


MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

PLAY ZONE | RE ADAPTING + CONNECTING + EXPANDING THE PLAYGROUND

DESTINATION ZONE | NEW HOUSING | INTEGRATED MARKET + RESTAURANTS | CONNECTION TO RANDALLS ISLAND

45


RIDGE

S

COLLECTOR NODE ECO-SOCIAL NODE PROTOTYPE FILTRATION SYSTEM

AGRASEN KI BAOLI RAJ PATH

COLLECTOR NODE

ECO-SOCIAL NODE PROTOTYPE

GROUNDWATER RECHARGE

CULTURAL WATERSCAPE BELEN AYARRA, ZAHRAA ALWASH, MARCO SOSA, SILVIA VERCHER COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GSAPP URBAN DESIGN STUDIO III, SPRING 2014 The project proposes to reorient delhi’s future growth by addressing infrastructure issues concentrating on lack of water, seasonal flood and pollution. Furthermore, the project aims to reestablish the relationship between the city and the Yamuna River using water as a productive landscape that will generate social spaces. Through the lenses of culture and water the project imagines Lutyens Plan transformed from an imperial symbol of power and inequality, to a democratic space allowing social interaction. Finally, water is the catalyst for future growth of services and densification that will support the city at a regional scale.

46

It starts with a bottom-up approach by reactivating existing water nodes (Baolis and Hauz) to stimulate a network system for collection, retention, filtration and recharge of water. Through creating ecological zones, it aims to gen-

erate more culturally public spaces that would support future growth. The first ecological zone, the Baolis will work as a recharging unit and social catalyst. The second ecological zone aims to provide a new rain and gray water collection system while activating the core of the block. The top-down approach in the third ecological zone, the Raj Path, a democratic national symbol in Lutyens’ Plan, will work as to collect, filtrate, retain, and discharge clean water to the Yamuna River. By reapplying the traditions learned from India, we imagine New Delhi as part of a larger regional network. The new infrastructure will contribute to cleaning the Yamuna River, while recharging the ground water and providing cultural spaces for social and economic interactions. We imagine that by bringing water and culture back to the city.

Z


SURPLUS WATER SUPPLY

YAMUNA RIVER PARANA QILA

RIVER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

WATER INFRASTRUCTURE

SOCIAL INTEGRATION + DENSIFICATION

POPULATION SUPPORT

ZOO NATIONAL PARK

SURPLUS WATER SUPPLY

MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

THE CULTURE OF WATER

47


INTERTWINED INFRASTRUCTURE Air Pollution

Sulfuric Acid

CO2

40%

Ammonia

Increase In Population By 2021

6 Cars/household 45% Without Sewage CO2

SPRAWL

Methane Industrial Waste

9 New Energy Sub-stations r

Pb

un ar ive

Chromium

DRAINS DISCHARGE IN THE RIVER

Hg

Groundwater Depletion 2m/year

Ya m

Soil Contamination

Sulfur Dioxide

22

31

Wazirabad Barrage

LPCD

ad

hdr

201 277 103 202 337 426 509 148

carc

LPCD

ity 25% not conn to wate ected r

rain

Discharge

ain

h dr

fgar

Naja

cut

Sha

274

Water S

don

Hin

LPCD

LPCD

LPCD

LPCD

LPCD

Water intake for cooling

LPCD

100%

of Yamuna River is distributed before reaching Dlehi

Delhi imports

74

LPCD

LPCD

LPCD

55%

of water

40%

of water is wasted

29

70%

s to Delhi contributen of river pollutio

LPCD

Toxic Food

Lost of Ecology

48

Various systems in Delhi depend greatly in water for their functions, such as energy production, industrial processes and human consumption. With a growing population, these systems expand all over the city and state with an exponential demand for more water. The sprout brings along negative side effects such as air, ground and water pollution, all of them intrinsically connected. With the lack of an adequate infrastructure, not all sectors benefit

from the distribution of water. As a result other forms of water collection and distribution have arisen: pumping, tankers, tube wells, canals, ponds, among others. Some of these methods generally end up being illegal, corrupted and unhealthy. Moreover, the inequality of distribution shown in the map to the image, expresses the political injustice by Delhi Jal Board over water supply to wealthy and less dense areas such as Lutyens’ Delhi. In addition, water

*LPCD: liters per capita per day

scarcity is worsen by the inefficiency of its management: while 55% of the water is imported from other areas inside and outside of the state of Delhi, 40% of this water is wasted by leakages in the pipe system and by illegal tapping on this system, and by water contamination with sewage water when there is water runoff during rainy seasons.


THE CULTURE OF WATER THE OLD CITY

GARDEN

SOCIAL NODE

CASTLE

FARMING

RELIGION

POLLUTION

DUMP

PRIVATE

TRANSPORTATION

VISUAL

Historic City Node Main road Connections

Throughout the history, the locations of Delhi’s seven cities have been strongly defined by landscape and natural elements, such as the river and the ridge. The main example is the Old City, which was established along the river and using water as the main element that is considered sacred and pure in Indian culture. On the other hand, Lutyens’ plan imposes itself to express authority and power and uses the natural elements only as visual con-

nectors rather than integrating them with the fabric of the city. Lutyens’ Plan turns its back towards the river and neglects most of the existing streams in the area with total disregard for cultural life of the city. India’s is a place where water has always been an integral part of the culture, the proposed project aims to bring that lost relationship between water and culture back to people, while democratizing the water and open space.

MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

LUTYENS’ DELHI

49


IDENTIFYING NETWORK SYSTEMS EXISTING ABANDONED WATER INFRASTRUCTURES

OLD CITY

LUTYENS PLAN

NULLAH

RESERVOIR

YAMUNA RIVER PROPOSED ECOLOGICAL ZONES AND CONNECTIONS TO THE EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE CENTRAL RIDGE

LUTYENS PLAN

NULLAH BAOLI

RESERVOIR YAMUNA RIVER

ASOLI WILD LIFE SANCTUARY PROPOSED ECOLOGICAL ZONES ABANDON WATER SYSTEM: BAOLIS & RESRVOIRS NATURAL STREAMS: NULLAHS

SOUTHERN RIDGE

METRO LINE ANCIENT SETTLEMENTS LOST WATER COLLECTOR SYSTEM: BUNDH

50

The project involves two-way strategy, first, a bottom-up approach by reactivating the baolis and hauz structures by engaging the communities, the Delhi Jal Board, and organizations such as “Water.org” through a participatory process. This will help to activate larger natural network infrastructure of collection and filtration of water defined by existing nullahs (streams). Secondly, we propose to create new ecological zones (cultural

waterscape) for supporting the growth based on different patterns such as wind, social flows, water connections, transportation, and programmatic interventions. Lastly, we propose to use Raj Path, the symbol of democracy as a main collector and filtration system that will help discharge clean water to Yamuna River and potentially decrease its pollution.


PROPOSED ECOLOGICAL ZONES

+728 +728

ZONE 1: BAOLI

+722

+744 +744

+722

+730 +730

+717

+718

+714

+735

+714 +717

+735

+717

+717

+718

+706 ZONE 3: RAJPATH

+712

+712 +706 +712 A +706 A

+706

+712

B

+706 C

B

+706 C +704

+706 +709 +724

+706

+707

+704 ZONE 2: BUNGALOW ZONE

+709 +707

+734

+723 +723

+704

+720 +720

+730

+704

+715 +715

+710 +710

+730

SCALE OF WATER’S PROGRAMS

ECOLOGICAL ZONE: STORAGE NODES

ROUNDABOUT: COLLECT AND TRANSPORT

RAJ PATH: RECEIVE AND FILTRATE

MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

+734

+724

51


ECOLOGICAL ZONE: RECHARGING UNIT ECOLOGICAL ZONES

EXISTING CONDITIONS

1

1- DOHBI COMMUNITY

2- HIGH RESIDENTIAL

3- COMMUNITY

4- NEGLECTED BAOLI

3 2 1

3

4 2

OPEN UP THE BLOCK

METHODOLOGY

5 1

1

2

5 4 2

3

1 2

DESIGN APPROACH

2

4

4

CONNECTION TO SURROUNDING BLOCKS FREE UNDERUTILIZED BUILDINGS FOR OPEN SPACE

3 1

1 2 3 4 5

SOCIAL AND CULTURAL NODES POTENTIAL RECHARGE OF WATER POTENTIAL BUNGALOW REACTIVATION SUMMER AND WINTER WINDS PEOPLE PATHS

STRATEGY OF INTERVENTION

1 2 3 4 5

REPROGRAM BUNGALOWS NEW SOCIAL SPACES AND SERVICES HERITAGE REACTIVATION PERMEABLE SOIL SOCIAL INTEGRATION

POTENTIAL DENSIFICATION BAOLI REACTIVATION AND GROUND WATER RECHARGE

EXISTING DENSIFICATION

BENGALI MARKET REACTIVATION OF EXISTING SERVICE AREA

ACTIVATION OF EXISTING DOHBI COMMUNITY

HIGH SCHOOL

CONNAUGHT PLACE NEW SOCIAL SPACES AND SERVICES

MANDI HOUSE

PERMEABLE SOIL

WATER COLLECTORS

REPROGRAM BUNGALOWS 52


ECOLOGICAL ZONE: RECHARGING UNIT PHASE OF DENSIFICATION EXISTING FOOTPRINT FINANCIAL AREA

PHASE 01: BAOLI AND PERMEABLE SURFACE FOR FILTRATION

INTERNAL NODE BAOLI WATER COLLECTION AND SOCIAL POINT HERITAGE PRESERVATION

PHASE 02: SERVICE DENSIFICATION

ACTIVATION OF EXISTING DOHBI COMMUNITY

PHASE 03: BUNGALOW RE-PURPOSE AND HOUSING DENSIFICATION

POSSIBLE DENSIFICATION ARTERY BARAKHAMBA ROAD

COMMUNITY SPACE SERVICE DENSIFICATION

CHANGING TOPOGRAPHY COMMUNITY SUPPLY

ROUNDABOUT COLLECTION AND DISTRIBUTION

PERMEABLE SURFACE BIOSWALE

The fist node is characterized by an existing baoli, a neglected monument, and a dobhi community located within the block. This ecological zone aims to reactivate the baoli and use it as a rain water collector in order to recharge the water table. The surfaces of the core of the block will be permeable in order to help the same purpose. The activation of the baoli means bringing the unit back to life also as a social node, providing open space communities around,

while making the baoli more visible as a reflection of the past and traditions of Indian culture. The green spaces will be supported by reprogrammed densification of existing servants quarters areas at the rear of the bungalows to public ones. Some of the bungalows will be reprogrammed for institutional use.

70% COLLECTED WATER 25% RECHARGEABLE SURFACE

MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

WATER TABLE RECHARGE UNIT

53


ECOLOGICAL ZONE 2: COLLECTOR SYSTEM 1 NATIONAL SCHOOL 1

2

2 GANDHI SMRITIBIG

3 HUNGARIAN CENTER

1

3 2

3

EXISTING CONDITION bungalow

services

bungalow

neglected community

7,480” semi-private space

private space EXISTING FOOTPRINT PRIVATE BUNGALOW

PHASE 01 ECO-NODE/RESERVOIR + NEW PROGRAM

private space

private space

PHASE 02 SOCIO-ECOLOGICAL DENSIFICATION

round about

PHASE 03 HOUSING + SERVICES DENSIFICATION

WATER PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL PROGRAMS

FILTRATION

PUBLIC SPACE

SOCIAL FLOWS

COLLECTION DISTRIBUTION

54

The second ecological zone aims to provide a new rain and gray water collector system to activate the inner block. The block’s core is the engine that uses the water as a tool to create public spaces related to its tradition and culture, taking into account the climate change. The reservoir will strengthen the existing cultural and educational programs, providing a socio-ecological node that allows a sustainable densification in the surrounding area

of influence. The new typologies that we imagine recuperate their traditional construction to engage and enlarge the internal community.

TYPOLOGY A bungalow

METHODOLOGY private

TYPOLOGY B private - semipublic - public

community

EXTENSION HOUSING

SERVICES / WORKSPACE


ECOLOGICAL ZONE: COLLECTOR SYSTEM PROPOSAL

public building

typology A

typology B

67” private space

semi-private space

public space

public building

67” semi-public space

private building

public space

bioswale

YAMUNA RIVER N

RAJ PATH AVENUE

M

STRATEGY 01: SOCIO-ECOLOGICAL DENSIFICATION

- PUBLIC-SOCIAL NODE - WATER COLLECTOR SYSTEM - STRENGTHEN CULTURE & EDUCATIONAL

- SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE - MIX-USED BUILDINGS - MIX INCOME HOUSING

80% COLLECTED WATER 60% SUPPLY COMMUNITY 20% SUPPLY RAJ PATH SYSTEM M

CENTRAL NODE OF THE ECO-BLOCK DAILY: WATER COLLECTOR + SOCIAL SPACE + CULTURAL & EDUCATIONAL SERVICES

MONSOON TIME: WATER COLLECTOR + FILTRATION SYSTEM

MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

STRATEGY 02: HOUSING AND SERVICES DENSIFICATION

55


RAJPATH FILTRATION SYSTEM

NATIONAL CENTER OF ART

MAIN WATER COLLECTION POINT GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS

PROGRAMED SPACES

RAJ PATH ROAD

SERVICES

WATER FILTRATION TERRACES

THE NATIONAL MUSEUM

COLLECTION

Elevation

FILTRATION

+765 +751

SAND +735

GRAVEL

+717 +700

56

A.C.

A.C


FIRST COLLECTION POINT

RETENTION WETLAND

+693

+680

CLEAN WATER DISCHARGE

+660

MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

COLLECTION WETLAND

57


RAJ PATH FILTRATION SYSTEM

rain water rain water rain water

gray water

Collection and Recharching Unit

Roundabout Collector

58


Raj Path Pools Filtration System To storage unit and Yamuna River

The ecological zone of Raj Path will involve several moments of interaction. In the first instance, water ponds are located strategically keeping in mind the lowest topographic elevation, which will function as a water collection system. This water program will be the catalyst of social activities. The second moment is reinforcing the cultural and the art component, by facilitating the interaction between

existing public institutions such as Andera Gandhi Art center and The National Museum. In the third instance, the last stage of water filtration takes place, where clean water will be retained in a connected wetland around Purana Qila and through the Zoological Park before being discharged into the Yamuna River

MARCO SOSA | MSAUD 14’ PORTFOLIO | GSAPP | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

To Social Spaces

59



GSAPP MSAUD 2014 PORTFOLIO