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WIZZ AIR

CABIN ATTENDANT MANUAL

Revision 14 - AUG 2014 | Wizz Air


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Section A ADMINISTRATION OF THE MANUAL

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Record of revisions REVISION NUMBER

ISSUE DATE

REV 1 REV 2 REV 3 REV 4 REV 5 REV 6 REV 7 REV 8 REV 9 REV 10 REV 11 REV 12 REV 13 REV 14

20/02/2008 01/09/2008 01/03/2009 01/09/2009 01/03/2010 01/09/2010 01/03/2011 01/10/2011 01/04/2012 01/07/2013 01/08/2014

DATE FILED

INITIALS


Section A CABIN ATTENDANT MANUAL

ADMINISTRATION OF THE MANUAL

DATE: 01AUG 2014 REVISION 14

Index to parts 0.

GENERAL INTRODUCTION

1.

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES

2.

SAFETY EQUIPMENT

3.

SAFETY PROCEDURES

4.

EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

5.

SURVIVAL GUIDELINES

6.

SECURITY

7.

DANGEROUS GOODS

8.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

9.

FIRST AID

10.

AIRBUS A-320

11.

APPENDIX

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Table of contents List of effective pages ............................................................................................... 3 Record of revisions .................................................................................................... 7 Index to parts............................................................................................................ 8 Table of contents ....................................................................................................... 9 Administration and Control of CAM .......................................................................... 22 0 GENERAL INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................24 0.1

Reference ........................................................................................................ 24

0.2

Index for CAM ................................................................................................. 24

0.3

Wizz Air Operations Manual ............................................................................ 25

0.4 Purpose of CAM ............................................................................................... 26 0.4.1 Structure .......................................................................................................................................................26 0.4.2 Revisions ......................................................................................................................................................26 0.4.3 Pagination.....................................................................................................................................................27 0.4.4 Copyright .....................................................................................................................................................27 0.4.5 Location .......................................................................................................................................................27 0.4.6 Abbreviations ............................................................................................................................................... 28 0.4.7 Definitions ....................................................................................................................................................32 0.5 Guideline for Cabin Attendants through the CAM ............................................ 35 0.5.1 Authorization - Company Management and Organization ...........................................................................35 0.5.2 Authorization – Cabin Operations Department Organization ...................................................................... 36 0.5.3 Responsibilities and Authorities of Crew Members .....................................................................................49 0.5.4 Reporting procedures ...................................................................................................................................50 CRF (Crew Report Form) ........................................................................................................................50 WICORP ..................................................................................................................................................51 Injury/Illness Form ...................................................................................................................................51 FDIR and Final Warning ..........................................................................................................................52 Birth on Board Report ..............................................................................................................................52 Death on Board Report .............................................................................................................................52 0.5.5 Monitoring of the schedule ..........................................................................................................................52 0.5.6 Commander (CDR) responsibilities and authorities .....................................................................................53 0.5.7 First Officer (F/O) responsibilities and authorities ......................................................................................53 0.5.8 (Acting) Senior Cabin Attendant ([A] SCA) responsibilities and authorities ..............................................53 0.5.9 (Junior) Cabin Attendant (J)CA ...................................................................................................................55 0.6 Crew incapacitation......................................................................................... 57 0.6.1 Flight Crew incapacitation ...........................................................................................................................57 0.6.2 Cabin Crew incapacitation ...........................................................................................................................57 0.7 Training........................................................................................................... 59 0.7.1 General ......................................................................................................................................................... 59 0.7.2 Initial Cabin Crew Training ......................................................................................................................... 59 0.7.3 Conversion and Differences Training ..........................................................................................................59 0.7.4 Recurrent Training and checking .................................................................................................................60 Validity of Recurrent Training .................................................................................................................60


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0.7.5

0.7.6

0.7.7 0.7.8

0.7.9 0.7.10 0.7.11 0.7.12

Regular proficiency checking ..................................................................................................................... 60 Flight check ............................................................................................................................................. 60 Briefing check ......................................................................................................................................... 61 Grooming Check ..................................................................................................................................... 61 Safety Consultation ..................................................................................................................................... 62 General .................................................................................................................................................... 62 Assignment .............................................................................................................................................. 62 Voluntary Safety Consultation ................................................................................................................ 62 Cabin Crew Attestation Validity ................................................................................................................. 62 Refresher Training and Checking................................................................................................................ 63 Recency of Experience ............................................................................................................................ 63 Interruption of Recency ........................................................................................................................... 63 Familiarization and Line Training ............................................................................................................... 63 Release of a Junior Cabin Attendant after familiarization........................................................................... 64 Release of Senior Cabin Attendant.............................................................................................................. 65 Cabin Attendant returning after an absence from flying duties of 6 months or more ................................. 65

0.8 Cabin Crew composition .................................................................................. 66 0.8.1 Reference..................................................................................................................................................... 66 Minimum number of Cabin Crew Members ........................................................................................... 66 Reduction of the number of Cabin Crew ................................................................................................. 67 0.9 General rules and regulations for Crew Members ............................................ 68 0.9.1 Behaviour in public ..................................................................................................................................... 68 0.9.2 Personal documents ..................................................................................................................................... 68 0.9.3 Crew health precautions .............................................................................................................................. 69 General .................................................................................................................................................... 69 Alcohol .................................................................................................................................................... 69 Narcotics and/or Drugs ............................................................................................................................ 70 Medication ............................................................................................................................................... 70 Blood donation ........................................................................................................................................ 70 Deep sea diving ....................................................................................................................................... 70 Sleep and rest .......................................................................................................................................... 70 Anesthetics .............................................................................................................................................. 71 0.9.4 Dress rules ................................................................................................................................................... 71 0.9.5 Travelling as DeadHead Crew (DHC)......................................................................................................... 71 0.9.6 Non-commercial flight ................................................................................................................................ 72 0.10 Other Cabin Crew related procedures ........................................................... 73 0.10.1 Request policy rules .................................................................................................................................... 73 General ................................................................................................................................................ 73 Flight requests ..................................................................................................................................... 73 School requested day OFF................................................................................................................... 73 Schedule change after publish date ..................................................................................................... 73 HP (holiday paid) request .................................................................................................................... 74 0.10.2 Reporting sick leave .................................................................................................................................... 75 0.10.3 Reporting personal data’s changes .............................................................................................................. 76 Passport Number Change .................................................................................................................... 76 Telephone Number Change ................................................................................................................. 76 Bank Account Change ......................................................................................................................... 76 Address Change ................................................................................................................................... 76 Qualification Change ........................................................................................................................... 76 Name Change: ..................................................................................................................................... 76 0.11 1

Flight and duty time limitations – rest requirements .................................... 78

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES ........................................................................................... 80


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1.1 Pre-flight duties .............................................................................................. 80 1.1.1 Briefings .......................................................................................................................................................80 Safety briefing ..........................................................................................................................................80 General briefing .......................................................................................................................................82 1.2 At 1.2.1 1.2.2 1.2.3 1.2.4 1.2.5 1.2.6

the aircraft .................................................................................................. 82 Admission of auditors or other Authority personnel to Wizz Air A/C ......................................................... 82 Admission of the Cabin Crew to Wizz Air A/C ...........................................................................................83 Stairs positioning ..........................................................................................................................................83 Door safety straps .........................................................................................................................................85 Main door operation responsibility assigned to Cabin Crew duty position ..................................................85 Crew Baggage ..............................................................................................................................................86

1.3 Pre-flight check ............................................................................................... 88 1.3.1 Definitions ....................................................................................................................................................88 1.3.2 First flight pre-flight check ..........................................................................................................................88 1.3.3 Turn-around pre-flight and security check when there is immediate Crew change .....................................93 1.3.4 Pre-Flight Checklist .....................................................................................................................................94 1.4 Security check ................................................................................................. 97 1.4.1 Security check procedures ............................................................................................................................97 1.4.2 Duties and responsibilities in case of immediate Crew change ....................................................................99 1.5 Cabin – Cockpit communication procedures .................................................. 100 1.5.1 General communication rules between cabin and cockpit ......................................................................... 100 1.5.2 Body cover procedure ................................................................................................................................ 100 1.5.3 Sterile cockpit concept ............................................................................................................................... 101 1.6 Boarding procedures ..................................................................................... 101 1.6.1 General ....................................................................................................................................................... 101 Active boarding – CBAD ....................................................................................................................... 103 Refusal of embarkation .......................................................................................................................... 103 1.6.2 Smoking on board ...................................................................................................................................... 104 1.6.3 PEDs (Portable Electronic Devices)........................................................................................................... 105 1.6.4 Allowable cabin luggage ............................................................................................................................ 105 1.6.5 Stowage of cabin luggage .......................................................................................................................... 106 1.6.6 Unruly/offensive passenger ........................................................................................................................ 107 1.6.7 Animals ...................................................................................................................................................... 108 1.6.8 Passengers with Reduced Mobility (PRMs) ............................................................................................... 109 Boarding procedure for PRMs ............................................................................................................... 109 1.6.9 Inadmissible or deported passengers (INAD, DEPU, DEPA).................................................................... 112 1.6.10 Seating procedures ..................................................................................................................................... 113 Wizz Reserved Seat ............................................................................................................................ 113 XXLong passengers seating procedure .............................................................................................. 114 Emergency exits ................................................................................................................................. 115 First row seating restrictions (emergency row) .................................................................................. 115 Last row seating restrictions ............................................................................................................... 115 Infants ................................................................................................................................................. 115 Young passengers ............................................................................................................................... 116 1.6.11 Distribution of passengers .......................................................................................................................... 116 1.6.12 Counting of passengers .............................................................................................................................. 117 1.6.13 Baggage check inside the aircraft............................................................................................................... 117 1.6.14 Baggage check outside the aircraft ............................................................................................................. 118 1.6.15 Boarding With Less Than Minimum Crew ................................................................................................ 118 1.7 Before taxi .................................................................................................... 119 1.7.1 Cabin report to the Commander ................................................................................................................. 119


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1.7.2 1.7.3

Door closing ............................................................................................................................................. 119 Slide arming .............................................................................................................................................. 119

1.8 Taxi-out......................................................................................................... 120 1.8.1 Passenger announcement, safety briefing and demonstration ................................................................... 120 1.8.2 Passenger safety demonstration ................................................................................................................. 121 General .................................................................................................................................................. 121 Safety demonstration step by step ......................................................................................................... 122 1.8.3 Cabin preparation ...................................................................................................................................... 124 1.8.4 Cabin Attendant seating ............................................................................................................................ 125 1.8.5 Cabin ready procedure before take-off ...................................................................................................... 125 1.8.6 Silent review / 30 seconds review ............................................................................................................. 126 1.9 Take-off......................................................................................................... 126 1.9.1 During take-off .......................................................................................................................................... 126 1.9.2 After take-off ............................................................................................................................................. 126 Catering announcement ......................................................................................................................... 126 No smoking sign .................................................................................................................................... 126 Seat belt sign procedure after take-off ................................................................................................... 126 1.9.3 First call of SCA to the cockpit after take-off ........................................................................................... 127 1.10 During flight ............................................................................................... 127 1.10.1 Admittance to the cockpit .......................................................................................................................... 128 Passengers ......................................................................................................................................... 128 Cabin Crew Members ........................................................................................................................ 128 1.10.2 Serving the Flight Crew ............................................................................................................................ 129 1.10.3 In-flight Sales and Catering procedures .................................................................................................... 129 General Catering procedures ............................................................................................................. 130 Catering service on ground ................................................................................................................ 130 Missing Crew Meal procedure .......................................................................................................... 130 Serving Alcohol ................................................................................................................................. 131 1.10.4 Cockpit-cabin communication during the cruise ....................................................................................... 131 1.10.5 Flight Crew controlled rest ........................................................................................................................ 131 1.10.6 Turbulence management ........................................................................................................................... 132 1.11 Descent – cabin preparation ....................................................................... 135 1.11.1 Go around .................................................................................................................................................. 137 1.12 After landing .............................................................................................. 138 1.12.1 Taxi-in ....................................................................................................................................................... 138 1.12.2 At the parking position – Disarming slides/opening doors........................................................................ 138 Disarming the slides .......................................................................................................................... 138 Opening of the doors ......................................................................................................................... 139 1.12.3 Disembarkation / embarkation of passengers ............................................................................................ 141 1.13 Turn-around procedures ............................................................................. 141 1.13.1 General ...................................................................................................................................................... 141 1.13.2 Closure of 4L door during turn-around ..................................................................................................... 142 1.13.3 Cabin cleaning ........................................................................................................................................... 142 1.13.4 Aircraft change procedures ....................................................................................................................... 142 1.13.5 Aircraft security check during transit flights/diversion due to unforeseen circumstances ........................ 143 1.13.6 Cabin cleaning with passengers on board.................................................................................................. 144 1.13.7 Refuelling with passengers on board ......................................................................................................... 144 1.14 Post-flight duties ........................................................................................ 146 1.14.1 After the last duty sector of the operating Crew ........................................................................................ 146 1.14.2 After the last commercial flight of the A/C ............................................................................................... 146


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1.14.3 2 2.1

Debriefing .................................................................................................................................................. 146

SAFETY EQUIPMENT ...........................................................................................................................147 Safety equipment – General .......................................................................... 147

2.2 Safety equipment – Fixed equipment ............................................................ 147 2.2.1 Fixed oxygen system in the Flight Deck .................................................................................................... 147 2.2.2 Fixed oxygen system in the cabin .............................................................................................................. 149 2.2.3 Emergency lighting .................................................................................................................................... 153 2.2.4 Evacuation visual sign and aural signals .................................................................................................... 155 Cockpit (On the overhead panel)............................................................................................................ 155 Cabin - touchscreen FAP panel .............................................................................................................. 155 Cabin - classic FAP panel (HA-LPD, LPE, LPF) .................................................................................. 156 Cabin - AAP ........................................................................................................................................... 156 2.2.5 Escape slide / floating device ..................................................................................................................... 157 2.2.6 Smoke detection system in lavatories ........................................................................................................ 159 2.2.7 Automatic fire extinguisher in lavatories ................................................................................................... 162 2.2.8 ELT – Emergency Locator Transmitter ..................................................................................................... 163 2.3 Emergency equipment – Loose equipment .................................................... 165 2.3.1 BCF Fire extinguisher ................................................................................................................................ 165 2.3.2 Crash-axe/Fire-axe ..................................................................................................................................... 167 2.3.3 Protective gloves ........................................................................................................................................ 167 2.3.4 Smoke hood ................................................................................................................................................ 167 Scott/Avox smoke hood ......................................................................................................................... 167 Drager smoke hood ................................................................................................................................ 169 2.3.5 Flashlight .................................................................................................................................................... 171 2.3.6 Portable oxygen bottle ................................................................................................................................ 172 2.3.7 Megaphone ................................................................................................................................................. 176 2.3.8 Life-vest ..................................................................................................................................................... 177 Passenger / Crew life-vest ...................................................................................................................... 178 Infant life-vest ........................................................................................................................................ 180 2.3.9 Seat belts .................................................................................................................................................... 181 Passenger seat belts ................................................................................................................................ 181 Baby belts (infant belts) ......................................................................................................................... 182 Extension belts ....................................................................................................................................... 182 Spare passenger seat belt ........................................................................................................................ 183 2.3.10 Demonstration kit ....................................................................................................................................... 183 2.3.11 First Aid Kit ............................................................................................................................................... 183 2.3.12 Life lines .................................................................................................................................................... 185 2.3.13 Portable ELT .............................................................................................................................................. 185 3

SAFETY PROCEDURES .......................................................................................................................189

3.1 Fire................................................................................................................ 189 3.1.1 Fire - general .............................................................................................................................................. 189 3.1.2 Fire prevention ........................................................................................................................................... 189 3.1.3 Circuit breaker procedure ........................................................................................................................... 190 3.1.4 Fire fighting procedures ............................................................................................................................. 190 General - Fire fighting team ................................................................................................................... 190 Fire fighting – Class “A” fire ................................................................................................................. 191 Fire fighting – Class “B” fire ................................................................................................................. 192 Fire fighting – Class “C” fire ................................................................................................................. 192 Lithium Battery fires .............................................................................................................................. 192 Lavatory fire ........................................................................................................................................... 193 Overhead compartment fire .................................................................................................................... 194


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Open fire in the cabin ............................................................................................................................ 194 Galley electrical equipment fire ............................................................................................................ 194 Fire re-ignition................................................................................................................................... 195 3.2 Smoke ........................................................................................................... 195 3.2.1 General ...................................................................................................................................................... 195 3.2.2 Procedure in a smoke field area................................................................................................................. 195 3.2.3 Awareness of smoke/fire in a hidden area ................................................................................................. 196 3.2.4 Lavatory smoke detector ........................................................................................................................... 197 3.3 Decompression .............................................................................................. 198 3.3.1 General ...................................................................................................................................................... 198 3.3.2 Types of decompression ............................................................................................................................ 198 3.3.3 Decompression procedures........................................................................................................................ 201 3.3.4 Post-decompression procedures ................................................................................................................ 201 3.4 4

Communication between cabin and entry areas ............................................ 202 EMERGENCY PROCEDURES ............................................................................................................. 203

4.1 Emergency – General .................................................................................... 203 4.1.1 Prepared and unprepared emergency......................................................................................................... 203 4.1.2 General knowledge .................................................................................................................................... 203 Emergency calls and following actions ................................................................................................. 203 4.2 Prepared emergency ..................................................................................... 204 4.2.1 After the emergency call in flight .............................................................................................................. 204 4.2.2 Senior Cabin Attendant briefing to Cabin Attendants ............................................................................... 205 4.2.3 General Announcement ............................................................................................................................. 205 4.2.4 Passenger Briefing Announcement ........................................................................................................... 205 4.2.5 Cabin safety check .................................................................................................................................... 208 4.2.6 Galley preparation and safety check.......................................................................................................... 208 4.2.7 Able Bodied Passenger (ABP) .................................................................................................................. 209 ABP briefing to the main cabin doors ................................................................................................... 209 ABP briefing to the overwing exits ....................................................................................................... 211 ABP briefing in case of reduced number of Cabin Crew ...................................................................... 211 4.2.8 Personal preparation of Cabin Attendants ................................................................................................. 212 4.2.9 Final check ................................................................................................................................................ 212 4.2.10 Cabin secured ............................................................................................................................................ 212 4.2.11 Emergency stations ................................................................................................................................... 212 4.2.12 Brace positions for impact ......................................................................................................................... 213 4.2.13 Cabin Attendants actions and commands after landing ............................................................................. 214 4.2.14 Emergency evacuation procedures ............................................................................................................ 215 4.2.15 Procedure at emergency exits .................................................................................................................... 216 4.2.16 Ditching procedures (emergency landing on water) .................................................................................. 217 Landing on water ............................................................................................................................... 218 4.2.17 Crowd control techniques and flow management ..................................................................................... 219 4.2.18 Flight Crew evacuation duties ................................................................................................................... 222 4.2.19 Cabin crew evacuation .............................................................................................................................. 222 4.2.20 Post evacuation duties ............................................................................................................................... 222 4.3

Rejected take-off (RTO) ................................................................................ 223

4.4 Unprepared emergency ................................................................................. 225 4.4.1 General ...................................................................................................................................................... 225 4.4.2 Emergency during take-off or landing ...................................................................................................... 225 Unprepared emergency landing on water (ditching) ............................................................................. 225


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Unprepared emergency landing on land ................................................................................................. 226 4.5

Refuelling during embarkation ...................................................................... 228

4.6 Additional facts and knowledge about emergencies ...................................... 228 4.6.1 Panic ........................................................................................................................................................... 228 4.6.2 Buddy system ............................................................................................................................................. 229 4.6.3 General Crew behaviour............................................................................................................................. 229 4.6.4 Crew communication ................................................................................................................................. 229 4.6.5 Announcements to passengers ................................................................................................................... 230 4.6.6 Cabin Crew initiated evacuation ................................................................................................................ 230 4.6.7 Deviation from standard procedures .......................................................................................................... 230 5

SURVIVAL GUIDELINES ......................................................................................................................232

5.1 Survival – Generalities .................................................................................. 232 5.1.1 General ....................................................................................................................................................... 232 5.1.2 The human body......................................................................................................................................... 232 5.1.3 Four principles for survival ........................................................................................................................ 232 Protection ............................................................................................................................................... 232 Location ................................................................................................................................................. 233 Water ...................................................................................................................................................... 234 Food ....................................................................................................................................................... 235 Conclusion ............................................................................................................................................. 235 5.2 Water survival guidelines .............................................................................. 236 5.2.1 General ....................................................................................................................................................... 236 5.2.2 Survival when no slide rafts are available .................................................................................................. 236 5.2.3 Rescue following ditching (by helicopter) ................................................................................................. 236 5.3 Winter survival guidelines ............................................................................. 238 5.3.1 General ....................................................................................................................................................... 238 Protection ............................................................................................................................................... 238 Location ................................................................................................................................................. 238 Water ...................................................................................................................................................... 238 Food ....................................................................................................................................................... 238 5.3.2 Hazards....................................................................................................................................................... 239 5.3.3 Immediate Actions for Winter Survival ..................................................................................................... 239 5.4 Desert survival guidelines ............................................................................. 240 5.4.1 General ....................................................................................................................................................... 240 Protection ............................................................................................................................................... 240 Location ................................................................................................................................................. 240 Water ...................................................................................................................................................... 240 Food ....................................................................................................................................................... 241 5.4.2 Hazards....................................................................................................................................................... 241 5.4.3 Immediate Actions for Desert Survival ...................................................................................................... 241 5.5 Jungle/tropical survival guidelines ............................................................... 241 5.5.1 General ....................................................................................................................................................... 241 Protection ............................................................................................................................................... 242 Location ................................................................................................................................................. 242 Water ...................................................................................................................................................... 242 Food ....................................................................................................................................................... 242 5.5.2 Hazards....................................................................................................................................................... 242 5.5.3 Immediate Action for Jungle Survival ....................................................................................................... 243


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5.6 6

Search And Rescue (SAR).............................................................................. 243 SECURITY............................................................................................................................................. 244

6.1 Security – General ......................................................................................... 244 6.1.1 Threat levels .............................................................................................................................................. 245 Cabin Crew actions ............................................................................................................................... 245 6.1.2 Preventive measures .................................................................................................................................. 246 6.1.3 Observing irregularities ............................................................................................................................. 246 6.1.4 Pre-flight check ......................................................................................................................................... 247 6.2 Bomb threat .................................................................................................. 247 6.2.1 General ...................................................................................................................................................... 247 6.2.2 Bomb threat on ground .............................................................................................................................. 248 6.2.3 Bomb threat in flight ................................................................................................................................. 249 6.3

Hijack ............................................................................................................ 252

6.4

Unruly/offensive passenger .......................................................................... 254

6.5 Protection of an aircraft ................................................................................ 256 6.5.1 Opening an aircraft door............................................................................................................................ 256 6.5.2 Bomb search of an aircraft ........................................................................................................................ 256 7

DANGEROUS GOODS ......................................................................................................................... 257

7.1 Dangerous goods - Generalities .................................................................... 257 7.1.1 Definition of dangerous goods .................................................................................................................. 257 7.1.2 Dangerous goods in the cabin ................................................................................................................... 257 7.2 Classification of dangerous goods ................................................................. 258 7.2.1 Classification and labelling ....................................................................................................................... 258 7.3

Dangerous goods incident in-flight procedures ............................................. 263

7.4

Weapons ....................................................................................................... 265

8

ANNOUNCEMENTS ............................................................................................................................. 267

8.1

General rules ................................................................................................. 267

8.2

Announcements on ground............................................................................ 267

8.3

Safety demonstration by Cabin Crew............................................................. 268

8.4

Announcements in flight ............................................................................... 269

8.5

At the destination announcement ................................................................. 270

8.6

Transit flight announcement ......................................................................... 271

9 9.1

FIRST AID ............................................................................................................................................. 272 Introduction .................................................................................................. 272


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9.1.1 9.1.2 9.1.3

Cabin Crew responsibilities ....................................................................................................................... 272 Basic rules .................................................................................................................................................. 272 Areas of Responsibility .............................................................................................................................. 273

9.2 Life-Saving Medical Measures ....................................................................... 273 9.2.1 Behaviour & Action to be taken ................................................................................................................. 274 Symptoms and procedure ....................................................................................................................... 274 Notification of injury on board............................................................................................................... 274 9.3 General conditions on board ......................................................................... 275 9.3.1 Air pressure ................................................................................................................................................ 275 Hypoxia .................................................................................................................................................. 276 9.3.2 Relative humidity ....................................................................................................................................... 276 9.4 Pressure compensation ................................................................................. 277 9.4.1 Barotrauma ................................................................................................................................................. 277 9.4.2 Decompression Sickness ............................................................................................................................ 277 9.4.3 AAltitude Meteorism ................................................................................................................................. 278 9.5 BAP Rule (Brain, Airway, Pulse) .................................................................... 278 9.5.1 Vital questions ............................................................................................................................................ 278 Brain ....................................................................................................................................................... 279 Airway (Breathing) ................................................................................................................................ 279 Pulse (Circulation) ................................................................................................................................. 280 9.6 Unconsciousness ........................................................................................... 280 9.6.1 Immediate actions ...................................................................................................................................... 280 9.6.2 Assessing the Unconsciousness ................................................................................................................. 281 9.7

Recovery position .......................................................................................... 282

9.8 Breathing and Resuscitation ......................................................................... 284 9.8.1 Breathing – Respiratory Problems ............................................................................................................. 284 9.8.2 Procedure for Mouth-to-Mouth Respiration ............................................................................................... 285 Procedure ............................................................................................................................................... 285 Sources of error ...................................................................................................................................... 286 Clearing an obstruction .......................................................................................................................... 286 When to discontinue Artificial Respiration ............................................................................................ 286 Procedure after the successful resuscitation ........................................................................................... 286 9.9 Cardiopulmonary Reanimation (CPR) ............................................................ 287 9.9.1 General Information ................................................................................................................................... 287 9.9.2 The technique of chest compression .......................................................................................................... 287 9.9.3 Cardiopulmonary Reanimation (CPR) Methods ........................................................................................ 288 Two Rescuers ......................................................................................................................................... 288 Single Rescuer ........................................................................................................................................ 289 Paediatric basic life support ................................................................................................................... 289 Risk of chest compression ...................................................................................................................... 292 Discontinue Reanimation ....................................................................................................................... 292 9.10

Unconsciousness Summary (Flowchart) ..................................................... 293

9.11 Secondary survey-gathering information ................................................... 293 9.11.1 SAMPLE .................................................................................................................................................... 293 9.11.2 DCAPBTLS ............................................................................................................................................... 294 9.11.3 External clues ............................................................................................................................................. 294


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9.12 Disorders of airway and breathing ............................................................. 294 9.12.1 Choking ..................................................................................................................................................... 294 Chocking Adult ................................................................................................................................. 295 Chocking Child.................................................................................................................................. 296 Chocking Infant ................................................................................................................................. 297 9.12.2 Hyperventilation ........................................................................................................................................ 298 9.12.3 Asthma ...................................................................................................................................................... 299 9.13 Disorders of the circulation ........................................................................ 299 9.13.1 Shock ......................................................................................................................................................... 300 9.13.2 Fainting ..................................................................................................................................................... 300 9.14

Chest pain – Angina pectoris/Heart attack ................................................. 302

9.15 Epilepsy ...................................................................................................... 303 9.15.1 Febrile seizures – children ......................................................................................................................... 303 9.15.2 Epilepsy – Major Epileptic Fit – seizure ................................................................................................... 304 9.15.3 Epilepsy – Minor – Absence seizure ......................................................................................................... 305 9.16

Stroke......................................................................................................... 306

9.17

Head injury – concussion............................................................................ 307

9.18 Emergency childbirth .................................................................................. 307 9.18.1 General Information .................................................................................................................................. 307 9.18.2 The first stage ............................................................................................................................................ 308 9.18.3 The second stage ....................................................................................................................................... 308 9.18.4 The third stage ........................................................................................................................................... 309 9.18.5 Reporting birth on board ........................................................................................................................... 309 9.19 Trauma ....................................................................................................... 309 9.19.1 Wounds ..................................................................................................................................................... 309 9.19.2 Bleeding .................................................................................................................................................... 310 Types of bleeding .............................................................................................................................. 310 External bleeding ............................................................................................................................... 310 Internal bleeding ................................................................................................................................ 311 Nosebleed .......................................................................................................................................... 311 9.19.3 Injuries....................................................................................................................................................... 311 Eye ..................................................................................................................................................... 311 Head .................................................................................................................................................. 312 9.19.4 Sprained joints, dislocation ....................................................................................................................... 312 9.19.5 Fractures .................................................................................................................................................... 313 9.20

Burns .......................................................................................................... 314

9.21 Medical effects of heat and cold ................................................................. 314 9.21.1 Sunstroke ................................................................................................................................................... 314 9.21.2 Heatstroke ................................................................................................................................................. 315 9.21.3 Frostbite ..................................................................................................................................................... 315 9.21.4 Hypothermia .............................................................................................................................................. 316 9.22 Other sickness ............................................................................................ 317 9.22.1 Allergy mild .............................................................................................................................................. 317 9.22.2 Allergy – sever. Anaphylactic shock ......................................................................................................... 318 9.22.3 Diabetes Mellitus – Hyperglycaemia ........................................................................................................ 319 9.22.4 Diabetes Mellitus – Hypoglycaemia ......................................................................................................... 320 9.22.5 Diarrhoea, vomiting .................................................................................................................................. 321


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9.22.6 9.22.7 9.22.8 9.22.9

Airsickness ................................................................................................................................................. 321 Cramp ......................................................................................................................................................... 321 Abdominal pain .......................................................................................................................................... 322 Hysteria ...................................................................................................................................................... 322

9.23

Death on board ........................................................................................... 323

9.24

First Aid Kit ................................................................................................ 323

10

AIRBUS A-320 ...................................................................................................................................325

10.1 General ....................................................................................................... 325 10.1.1 Cockpit ....................................................................................................................................................... 326 10.1.2 General layout – Main Deck ...................................................................................................................... 327 10.1.3 Crew seats .................................................................................................................................................. 328 10.1.4 Cabin Attendant seating ............................................................................................................................. 332 10.1.5 Cabin Attendant stations ............................................................................................................................ 333 10.1.6 Galleys ....................................................................................................................................................... 335 10.1.7 Lavatories ................................................................................................................................................... 341 10.2 Doors and Exits .......................................................................................... 344 10.2.1 General ....................................................................................................................................................... 345 10.2.2 Main doors / Exits ...................................................................................................................................... 345 General ............................................................................................................................................... 345 Normal operation of main doors ........................................................................................................ 347 Arming / disarming slides of main doors ........................................................................................... 349 Emergency operation of main doors................................................................................................... 350 Main door slide operation................................................................................................................... 352 10.2.3 Overwing Exits (2 and 3 L / 2 and 3 R) ..................................................................................................... 356 General ............................................................................................................................................... 356 Procedure for emergency opening of the overwing exits ................................................................... 357 Operation of overwing exits slides ..................................................................................................... 358 10.2.4 Cockpit sliding windows ............................................................................................................................ 360 10.2.5 Cockpit door ............................................................................................................................................... 363 10.2.6 Lavatory door ............................................................................................................................................. 365 10.3 CIDS and Control Panels............................................................................. 367 10.3.1 CIDS .......................................................................................................................................................... 367 10.3.2 FAP (Forward Attendant Panel) ................................................................................................................. 369 FAP on HA-LPD/LPE/LPF ................................................................................................................ 369 FAP on all aircrafts except for HA-LPD/LPE/LPF ............................................................................ 371 FAP functions..................................................................................................................................... 376 10.3.3 AAP (Additional Attendant Panel)............................................................................................................. 378 10.4 Lighting ...................................................................................................... 379 10.4.1 Cabin lights ................................................................................................................................................ 379 10.4.2 Emergency lighting .................................................................................................................................... 382 10.5 Air Conditioning.......................................................................................... 383 10.5.1 Passengers individual outlets ..................................................................................................................... 384 10.5.2 Lavatory ventilation ................................................................................................................................... 385 10.5.3 Galley ventilation ....................................................................................................................................... 385 10.6 Communications ......................................................................................... 386 10.6.1 Communication handsets ........................................................................................................................... 386 10.6.2 Passenger Address system (PA) ................................................................................................................. 387 10.6.3 Interphone system ...................................................................................................................................... 389


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10.6.4 10.6.5 10.6.6 10.6.7 10.6.8

Cabin calls general - AIP and ACP ........................................................................................................... 390 Passenger call system ................................................................................................................................ 391 Lavatory call system .................................................................................................................................. 393 Emergency call .......................................................................................................................................... 393 Passenger Lighted Signs system ................................................................................................................ 394

10.7

Safety equipment cabin .............................................................................. 394

10.8

Safety equipment cockpit ........................................................................... 396

10.9

Seating instructions configuration 180 ....................................................... 397

10.10 10.10.1 10.10.2 10.10.3

11

Cabin Emergency Checklist (C.E.C.) ......................................................... 398 Cabin Attendant duties during emergency preparation ......................................................................... 398 Passenger preparation announcements .................................................................................................. 401 Able Bodied Passenger briefing (ABP briefing) ................................................................................... 403

APPENDIX ......................................................................................................................................... 405

11.1

Appendix 1 – Cash bag ............................................................................... 405

11.2 Appendix 2-Crew Report Form (CRF) .......................................................... 406 11.2.1 Crew Report Form (CRF) Guide ............................................................................................................... 407 11.3

Appendix 3 – Lost/Damage Property Form ................................................. 408

11.4 Appendix 4 – Flight Disturbance Incident Report ....................................... 409 11.4.1 Flight Disturbance Incident Report Guide................................................................................................. 410 11.5 Appendix 5 – Final Warning ........................................................................ 412 11.5.1 Final Warning Guide ................................................................................................................................. 413 11.6 Appendix 6 – Injury/Illness Report ............................................................ 415 11.6.1 Injury/Illness Report Guide ....................................................................................................................... 416 11.7

Appendix 7 – Manual Sales Report ............................................................. 418

11.8

Appendix 8 – First-Aid Kit Contents ............................................................ 419

11.9

Appendix 9 – First-Aid Kit Medicines .......................................................... 420

11.10

Appendix 10 – Unpaid leave request form ............................................... 421

11.11

Appendix 11 – Briefing check report ........................................................ 422

11.12

Appendix 12 – Flight check report ........................................................... 424

11.13

Appendix 13 – Statement ........................................................................ 427

11.14

Appendix 14 – Birth on board report ....................................................... 428

11.15

Appendix 15 – Death on board report ...................................................... 429

11.16

Appendix 16 - Luggage tags .................................................................... 430


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11.17

Appendix 17 - Flight time limitations ....................................................... 431

11.18

Appendix 18 - Extracts from the General Conditions of Carriage ............. 442

11.19

Appendix 19 – Bomb on board search checklist A320 .............................. 444

12

INFORMATION FOR HIJACKING PERSONS ..................................................................................447

English .................................................................................................................. 447 French ................................................................................................................... 448 Hungarian .............................................................................................................. 449 Czech ..................................................................................................................... 450 Polish .................................................................................................................... 451 Bulgarian ............................................................................................................... 452 Ukrainian ............................................................................................................... 453 Romanian .............................................................................................................. 454 Serbian .................................................................................................................. 455 Lithuanian ............................................................................................................. 456 Spanish ................................................................................................................. 457 Arabic .................................................................................................................... 458 Japanese ............................................................................................................... 459 Korean ................................................................................................................... 460 Latvian .................................................................................................................. 461 Albanian ................................................................................................................ 462 Macedonian ........................................................................................................... 463


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R

Administration and Control of CAM Introduction Cabin Attendant Manual (CAM) is the exclusive property of Wizz Air. Every Crew Member is in possession of a copy of CAM during the time of her employment with Wizz Air via the company server at S:\CabinCrew\Bulletin\CAM, via WizzPort and via AIMS system accessible on the internet. One hard copy is available at every WIZZ Air office and on board of all Wizz Air aircrafts (for details refer to CAM 0.4.5). General The content of the Cabin Attendant Manual is confidential and must be treated accordingly. Each Cabin Crew Member must be familiar with its content and must make a continuous effort to remain up-dated. All content and procedures in this manual are in English language, as one is being considered, as common language by Wizz Air. This manual applies to both male and female Crew Members, operations personnel, passengers and other persons, although references in the text are made to feminine gender only as a matter of simplification.

R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

Compliance Cabin Attendant Manual is based on the following regulations and fulfils all relevant requirements therein: -

Annex IV to COMMISSION REGULATION (EU) No 1178/2011(Air Crew Part MED)

-

Annex V to COMMISSION REGULATION (EU) No 1178/2011 (Air Crew Part CC)

-

COMMISSION REGULATION (EU) No 965/2012 (Air Operations)

All rules set out in CAM and its sub-manuals are to be strictly followed by all Wizz Air Cabin Crew Members at all times.

CAM incorporates a number of sub-manuals, which include as follows: -

Wizz Air Work Wear Regulations

-

Cabin Attendant Service Manual

CABIN ATTENDANT MANUAL IS APPROVED BY: Gรกbor Tiba :

Signature :

Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group


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INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK


Section 0 CABIN ATTENDANT MANUAL

GENERAL INTRODUCTION

24

DATE: 01 AUG 2014 REVISION 14

0 GENERAL INTRODUCTION 0.1

Reference IN THIS MANUAL, THE TERM „WIZZ AIR” REFERS TO WIZZ AIR GROUP LTD.

0.2

Index for CAM 0.

GENERAL INTRODUCTION

1.

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES

2.

SAFETY EQUIPMENT

3.

SAFETY PROCEDURES

4.

EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

5.

SURVIVAL GUIDELINES

6.

SECURITY

7.

DANGEROUS GOODS

8.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

9.

FIRST AID

10.

AIRBUS A-320

11.

APPENDIX


Section 0 CABIN ATTENDANT MANUAL

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25

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0.3

Wizz Air Operations Manual

Wizz Air Operations Manual complies with: R R R R R R R

-

Annex IV to Regulation (EC) No 216/2008

-

COMMISSION REGULATION (EU) No 965/2012

-

The terms of its Certificate of Airworthiness and within the approved limitations contained in its Airplane Flight Manual

-

the terms and conditions of the Wizz Air AOC (Air Operator’s Certificate)

-

the Hungarian Law where applicable

The manual is for the use and guidance of all company operating staff, which is to ensure that all commercial air transport flights are planned and executed in accordance with its policies and requirements. All Wizz Air employees and contract staff shall comply with the laws, regulations and procedures of those States in which operations are conducted and which are pertinent to the performance of their duties; they must also be familiar with the laws, regulations and procedures pertinent to the performance of their duties as reported in this Manual. Wizz Air OM incorporates a number of sub-manuals which include: -

The Airplane Flight Manual (AFM)

-

Flight Crew Operating Manual (FCOM)

-

Minimum Equipment List (MEL)

-

Configuration Deviation List (CDL)

-

Quick Reference Handbook (QRH)

-

Cabin Attendant Manual

-

Compliance Monitoring System Manual

-

Flight Safety Manual

-

Low Visibility and Cold Weather Operations Manual

-

All Weather Operations Manual

Wizz Air OM is broadly subdivided into the following parts: Part A General/Basic information Part B Type specific operating procedures and requirements Part C Route Manual – Comprising of AIP information provided by the Chart/Nav provider, and the company produced Airport Briefings Part D Training (Flight and Cabin Crew) Wizz Air OM can be accessed: -

digitally (in the form of a security protected PDF file) to all interested parties via E-mail and a copy is placed in the OBDB on each occasion when a new revision is available

-

It is downloadable on the company server ftp://193.226.203.73:5466/OUT/

-

Wizz Air uses electronic documentation for all manuals with the exception of the QRH called Less paper cockpit (LPC)

-

Electronic documentation is available through the aircraft's Electronic Flight

-

Bag (EFB), the company intranet and also on the internet via the company ftp server

-

Internal company server: S:/CorporateCommon/FlightOpsDoc/OnBoardDB


Section 0 CABIN ATTENDANT MANUAL

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0.4

Purpose of CAM

The Content of CAM is covering the standard, safety and emergency procedures, equipment and aircraft features and the medical general knowledge, which must be known by all Crew Members in order to ensure safe flights or to be able to adequately deal with abnormal situations of every kind.

0.4.1

Structure

Wizz Air Cabin Attendant Manual consists of parts refered to in CAM section 0.2 In addition, Appendixes to this Manual may contain information required by law or information deemed necessary by Wizz Air.

0.4.2

Revisions

Revisions of this Manual or of its part will be issued as soon as necessary, but not later than once every calendar year. Only official amendments in printed form are acceptable. The correct insertion of revised pages is the responsibility of Cabin Crew Regional Managers and will be fulfilled by the Cabin Crew Base Managers. Revised pages will be annotated to show portion of the text that has been revised, as indicated by letters ‘R’ (“Revision”) adjacent to the changes. Revisions to the CAM that may be urgently required in the interests of flight safety, or instructions/information that are supplementary to the operations manual, will be distributed as Crew Orders/Crew Info. These will be incorporated into the Cabin Attendant Manual when it is next amended, except Crew Order/Info being issued with temporary validity. Crew Order/Info with temporary validity remains valid until revoked. All Wizz Air Cabin Crew Members are obliged to comply with instructions defined of such Crew Order/Crew Info from the date it becomes effective. It is the responsibility of each Crew member to familiarize herself with its content upon receipt. Crew Orders are being issued by Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group, Cabin Crew Regional Managers, Cabin Crew Training Manager and Cabin Crew Service Manager. Crew Info are divided in five main categories and are being issued by Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group, Cabin Crew Regional Managers, Cabin Crew Training Manager, Cabin Crew Service Manager and/or by Safety Senior Cabin Attendant, Technical Senior Cabin Attendant and Security Senior Cabin Attendant according to their delegated responsibility in the relevant field as follows: -

Crew Info General: Cabin Crew Service Manager, Cabin Crew Training Manager, Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group, Cabin Crew Regional Managers

-

Crew Info Service: Cabin Crew Service Manager, Cabin Crew Training Manager, Head of Cabin Opertions Wizz Air Group, Cabin Crew Regional Managers

-

Crew Info Safety: Safety Senior Cabin Attendant, Cabin Crew Training Manager, Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group, Cabin Crew Regional Managers

-

Crew Info Technical: Technical Senior Cabin Attendant, Cabin Crew Training Manager, Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group, Cabin Crew Regional Managers


Section 0 CABIN ATTENDANT MANUAL

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R R R

- Crew Info Security: Security Senior Cabin Attendant, Cabin Crew Training Manager, Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group, Cabin Crew Regional Managers Crew Orders and Crew Info are available for all Cabin Crew Members on the company computer server at S:/Cabin Crew/Bulletin at Wizz Air home base offices and Crew Orders are available on tablet PC [TPC] in the cockpit.

0.4.3 Pagination The header of each page contains: - The name of the Manual - Section title - Section number and page number - Revision number and date of effectiveness

0.4.4 Copyright No part of the Cabin Attendant Manual may be reproduced without the written permission of Wizz Air.

0.4.5 Location A hard copy of Cabin Attendant Manual is available: - at every Wizz Air office - on each aircraft in the overhead compartment above row 1DEF A digital version of Cabin Attendant Manual is available: - on internal company server S:/CorporateCommon/FlightOpsDoc/OnBoardDB and S:/CabinCrew/Bulletin/CAM R R R R R

- on company server ftp://193.226.203.73:5466/OUT/ - on tablet PC [TPC], on-board the A/C (available in the cockpit) - via the AIMS system (it will divert the user to WizzPort) - via WizzPort


Section 0 CABIN ATTENDANT MANUAL

GENERAL INTRODUCTION

DATE: 01 AUG 2014 REVISION 14

0.4.6

28

Abbreviations A AAP A/C ACARS ACAS ACP AFL AFM AIP ALT AMC AML AOC APU A/S ASD ATA ATC ATD ATIS ATL ATPL ATR ATS ATT AVNCS

Aft/Additional Attendant Panel Aircraft Aircraft Communication Addressing and Reporting System Airborne Collision Avoidance System Area Call Panel Aeroplane Flight Log Aeroplane Flight Manual Attendant Indication Panel Altitude Acceptable Means of Compliance (EASA regulations) Aircraft Maintenance Log Air Operator Certificate Auxiliary Power Unit Airspeed Accelerate Stop Distance Actual Time of Arrival Air Traffic Control Actual Time of Departure Automatic Terminal Information Service Aircraft Technical Log Airline Transport Pilot License Audio Tape Recorder Air Traffic Service Route Network Attitude Avionics

B BRK BRT

Break Bright

C CAA C/A CAB CAM CAPT CAT CAT CAT II/III CAUT CAVOK C/B CBT CC CDSS CIDS CKPT C/L CLG CLSD CM CO COO CPL CRM CVR

Civil Aviation Authority Cabin Attendant Cabin Cabin Attendant Manual Captain Clear Air Turbulence Category Category II/III - All Weather Operations Caution Ceiling and Visibility OK Circuit Breaker Computer Based Training Cabin Crew Cockpit Door Surveillance System Cabin Intercommunication Data System Cockpit Check List Ceiling Closed Crew member Crew Order Chief Operating Officer Commercial Pilot License Crew Resource Management Cockpit Voice Recorder

D DA DHC DEPA DEPU DGR DH DIM

Decision Altitude Dead Heading Crew Deported passenger with an escort Deported passenger without an escort Dangerous Goods Regulations Decision Height Dimming


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DATE: 01 AUG 2014 REVISION 14

DIR

Deferred Item Record (Maintenance logbook)

E ECAC ECAM ENG EOD EPOS EPSU ETA ETD ETOPS

European Civil Aviation Conference Electronic Centralized Aircraft Monitoring Engine Explosive Ordinance Disposal Electronic Point of Sale Emergency Power Supply Unit Estimated Time of Arrival Estimated Time of Departure Extended Twin Engines Operations

F FAP FCL FDIR FDP FL FMGC FMGS F/O FT/ft FW FWD

Forward Attendant Panel Flight Crew Licensing Flight Disturbance Incident Report Flight Duty Period Flight Level Flight Management Guidance Computer Flight Management Guidance System First Officer Feet (1 ft = 0,3048 m) Final Warning Forward

G GENDEC GND GPU GPS

General Declaration Ground Ground Power Unit Global Positioning System

H HP

Holiday Paid

I IATA ICAO ICE ID ILS INAD INOP INT IR ISA ISO

International Air Transport Association International Civil Aviation Organization Dry ice Identity (number) Instrument Landing System Inadmissible passenger Inoperative Interphone Injury/Illness Report International Standard Atmosphere International Standards Organization

J JAA JAR

Joint Aviation Authorities Joint Aviation Requirements

K Kg(s) Km KMH KT

Kilogram(s) Kilometre(s) Kilometres per Hour Knot(s)

L LAV LOEP LMC LRBL LSU LT LTC LVP LVTO

Lavatory List of Effective Pages Last Minute Changes Least Risk Bomb Location Lavatory Service Unit Local Time Line Training Captain Low Visibility Procedures Low Visibility Take-Off


Section 0 CABIN ATTENDANT MANUAL

GENERAL INTRODUCTION

DATE: 01 AUG 2014 REVISION 14

M m M MAAS MAST MAX/max. MEL MET METAR MHz MMEL MORA MRT MSG

Metric, meters (1m = 3,2808ft) Mach Meet and Assist Minimum Achievable Sales Target Maximum Minimum Equipment List Meteorological Aviation Routine Weather Report Megahertz Master Minimum Equipment List Minimum Off-Route Altitude Manual Release Tool Message

N NAV NIL NM NOTAM NTSB

Navigation No Items Listed (Nothing) Nautical Miles Notice to Airmen National Transportation Safety Board (USA)

O OAT OCC OM OPS OXY

Outside Air Temperature Operation Control Centre Operations Manual Operations Oxygen

P PA PAX PBE PED PF PIC PIL PRM PSU PTP PTT

Passenger address System Passenger(s) Protective Breathing Equipment Portable Electronic Devices Pilot Flying Pilot-in-Command Passenger Information List Person with Reduced Mobility Passenger Service Unit Programming and Test Panel Push To Talk

Q QDM QRH

Quick Donning Mask Quick Reference Handbook

R RF RHP RL RNAV RVR RWY

Requested Free (day OFF) Recreation Holidays, concerns only WAU Runway Edge Lighting Area Navigation Runway Visual Range Runway

S SAR SAT SNOWTAM SOP SPD STD SW SYS

Search and Rescue Static Air Temperature Snow Notice To Airmen Standard Operating Procedures Speed Schedule Time of Departure Switch System

T TAF TAS TCAS T/O

Terminal Area Forecast True Airspeed Traffic Collision Avoidance System Take-Off

30


Section 0 CABIN ATTENDANT MANUAL

GENERAL INTRODUCTION

DATE: 01 AUG 2014 REVISION 14

TOC TOD TPC

Top of Climb Top of Descent Tablet PC [pentablet]

U UM UN U/S UTC

Unaccompanied Minor United Nations Unserviceable Universal Time Coordinated

V VENT VFR VMS VNAV VOL

Ventilation Visual Flight Rules Vacation Management System Vertical Navigation Volume

W WAH WAU WHO WO

Wizz Air Hungary Wizz Air Ukraine World Health Organization Work Order

Z ZFM/W

Zero Fuel Mass/Weight

31


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GENERAL INTRODUCTION

32

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0.4.7

Definitions

AIRPLANE Airplane and aircraft are considered to be equivalent in this manual. AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL (AFM) A document approved by the CAA that contains information (limits, procedures, data etc.) required operating the aeroplane at the level of safety established by the airline’s certification basis. AIR OPERATOR CERTIFICATE (AOC) A certificate authorizing an operator to carry out specified commercial air transport operations. Wizz Air Group consists of two AOC which are: Wizz Air Hungary (WAH) and Wizz Air Ukraine (WAU). APPROACH Phase of a flight, when the aircraft decreases its altitude and aims to land on the airport. AUTHORITY “The Authority” means the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) which is issuing the AOC. “An Authority” means the Civil Aviation Authority of a foreign State. CABIN ATTENDANT (C/A) A Cabin Crew Member to be carried on a flight for the purpose of performing duties assigned by the operator or the Commander under supervision of Senior Cabin Attendant, in the interest of safety of passengers, but who is not a Flight Crew Member. CAPTAIN A pilot qualified and approved by the company to be a Commander. CLIMB Transition period of a flight, between the take-off and the cruise. COMMANDER (CMD) The pilot designated by the operator to be in command on an aircraft for which more than one pilot is required. CREW MEMBER A person assigned by an operator to duty on the airplane during flight time. CRUISE It occurs between climb and descent phases and is usually the majority of a journey. Technically, cruising consists of heading (direction of flight) changes only at a constant airspeed and altitude. It ends as the aircraft approaches the destination where the descent phase of flight commences in preparation for landing. DANGEROUS GOODS Articles or substances, which are capable of posing significant risk to health, safety or property when transported by air and which are classified according to EU-OPS.


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DESCENT Transition period of a flight, between cruise and approach. ESTIMATED OFF-BLOCK TIME The estimated time at which the airplane will commence movement associated with departure. FINAL APPROACH That part of an instrument approach procedure which commences at the specified final approach fix or point, or where such a fix or point is not specified: -

At the end of the last procedure turn, base turn or inbound turn of a racetrack procedure, if specified; or

-

At the point of interception of the last track specified in the approach procedure, and ends at a point in the vicinity of an aerodrome from which:

A landing can be made; or a missed approach procedure is initiated. FIRST OFFICER (FO) The title for a qualified flight Crew member that is designated by the operator to be the Commander’s deputy on an aircraft for which more than one pilot is required. FLIGHT TIME (BLOCK TIME) The time between an airplane first moving from its parking place for the purpose of taking off until it comes to rest on the designated parking position and all engines are stopped. HANDLING AGENT An agency which performs some or all of the operator’s functions on behalf of the operator, including receiving, loading, unloading, transferring or by other means processing passengers or cargo. HOME BASE The home base of Wizz Air is Budapest Liszt Ferenc International Airport. Crew home bases are assigned individually. LANDING Landing is the last part of a flight, where an airplane returns to the ground by deceleration on a runway. MASTER MINIMUM EQUIPMENT LIST (MMEL) A list established for a particular airplane type by the manufacturer with the approval of the State of Manufacture containing items, one or more of which is permitted to be unserviceable at the commencement of a flight. The MMEL may be associated with special operating conditions, limitations or procedures. MINIMUM EQUIPMENT LIST (MEL) Means a list (including a preamble) which provides for the operation of aircraft, under specified conditions, which particular instruments, items of equipment or functions inoperative at the commencement of flight. This list is prepared by the operator for his own particular aircraft taking account of their aircraft definition and the relevant operational and maintenance conditions in accordance with a procedure approved by the Authority.


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OPERATOR A person, organization or enterprise engaged, or intending to be engaged, in an aeroplane operation. In the context of this manual the operator is always Wizz Air. PASSENGER A person other than a Crew member travelling or about to travel on an airplane. PILOT-IN-COMMAND (PIC) A pilot who for the time being is in charge of piloting the airplane, without being under the direction of any other pilot in the airplane. RAMP HANDLING AREA The area is the perimeter of the aeroplane plus 2 metres. SCA Senior Cabin Attendant (SCA) is responsible to the Commander for the conduct and coordination of cabin safety and emergency procedure(s) specified in the Operations Manual and CAM. For details refer to CAM 0.5.3. SPARE UNIFORM ITEMS Spare uniform items are those accessories of the uniform that are used in case of the planned flight duty is longer than expected. TAKE-OFF Phase of flight in which an aircraft goes, by acceleration on a runway, through a transition from moving along the ground (taxiing) to flying in the air. TAXI Movement of an airplane under its own power on the surface of an airport. VDL Limitation on medical certificate which requires wearing of corrective lenses and carriage of a spare set of specatcles.

NOTE: For further description of the definitions refer to OMA 0.3.2 - Definitions.


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0.5

Guideline for Cabin Attendants through the CAM

General Cabin Attendants must be familiar with those parts of the company’s operations manuals and operations specifications which are necessary for the performance of the assigned duties and with the whole content of the CAM and have to adopt it in the standard operation or in emergency situations. Should any deficiency in knowledge be observed (e.g. during pre–flight briefing or when solving a certain situation on board), the occurrence will be solved by SCA (e.g. removing the C/A from the duty) and reported to the Cabin Crew Base Manager. NOTE: All abbreviations found in CAM are listed at 0.4.9.

0.5.1

Authorization - Company Management and Organization

The operational organizational structure is represented below in chart format, which provides the reporting lines within and between departments in safeguarding the safety of flight operations.

R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R


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R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

0.5.2

36

Authorization – Cabin Operations Department Organization


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CABIN OPERATIONS DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION Positions Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group Head of Cabin Crew WAU

Names Gabor TIBA Aleksandra TESLENKO

Cabin Crew Regional Manager North

Bartosz SOWISLO

Cabin Crew Regional Manager South

Bogumila KALUS

Cabin Crew Regional Manager East

Zsuzsa KANYA

Cabin Crew Training Manager Wizz Air Group

Adam BOGDANOWICZ

Cabin Crew Service Manager Wizz Air Group

Alexandra, AVADANEI

BEG Base Manager

Michal WYLIGALA

BUD Base Manager

Adrienn, KURUCZ

CLJ Base Manager

Ramona TICA

CRA Base Manager

Marek KAWKA

GDN Base Manager

Iga DOLEWSKA

KTW Base Manager

Dagmara GONDOROWICZ

OTP Base Manager

Teodora BURCA

POZ Base Manager

Magdalena PALCAT

PRG Base Manager

Zdenka SUCHARDOVA

RIX Base Manager

Ewa DANECKA

SKP Base Manager

Nevena TODOROVIC

SOF Base Manager

Ralitza GEORGIEVA

TGM Base Manager

Anna KURNICKA

TSR Base Manager

Nicoleta RADU

VNO Base Manager

Giedre PETRASIUNIENE

WAW Base Manager

Sabina KOWALOWSKA

WRO Base Manager

Adam PIOSIK

Safety Senior Cabin Attendant

Bianca VARTIC

Regional Safety Senior Cabin Attendant

Arune ZIDOVAINYTE

Regional Safety Senior Cabin Attendant

Adam RZANCA

Compliance Senior Cabin Attendant Technical Senior Cabin Attendant Security Senior Cabin Attendant Deputy Technical Senior Cabin Attendant

Erika POCZIK Karolina REISINGER Andrea BATTA Arnoldas RASYMAS

Cabin Crew Standardization Instructor

Carla STRUBERT-STOIAN

Cabin Crew Standardization Instructor

Roxana CASU

Cabin Crew Standardization Instructor

Konrad NIEDOJADLO


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Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group POSITION IN THE ORGANIZATION The Head of Cabin Operations is responsible for all Cabin Operations Department matters and reports to the Chief Operating Officer (COO) and, whenever necessary, on Flight Operations regulatory matters – to the Head of Flight Operations. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FUNCTION The Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group shall: -

Act as a liaison between COO and Head of Cabin Crew WAU, Cabin Crew Regional Managers, Cabin Crew Base Mangers, Cabin Crew Training Manger, Cabin Crew Service Manager and Cabin Crew

-

Manage the Cabin Crew in clear, transparent way (regarding the structure as well as process) build team with honest, respect and integrity

-

Ensure provision of required number Cabin Crew Members to perform all flights

-

Coordinate activities with the Head of Safety & Compliance and ensure that safety and compliance requirements are met, being supervised/coordinated by the Safety SCA during daily operation

-

Maintain the information distribution of accident, incident, and other occurrence reported by Safety SCA

-

Ensure the required standards of safety and service by the Cabin Crew

-

Establish a hiring policy, planning scheme and selection process to meet the present and future required number of Cabin Attendants, maintain recruitments and career opportunity for Crew with the same rules in all bases

-

Define the Standard Operating Procedures for Cabin Crew, create the same standard and service in all bases

-

Implement legal requirements into the Wizz Air OM Part D, in coordination with the Cabin Crew Training Manager

-

Take part in OPS meetings and organize meetings min. once per three month with Cabin Crew Training Manager, Cabin Crew Base Managers, Cabin Crew Service Manager, Safety SCA, Technical SCA, Cabin Crew Regional Managers and Head of Cabin Crew WAU to discuss current issue, operation problems, procedures etc.

-

Participate in Flight Operation Post holder meetings on a regular basis in cooperation with Post holder Crew Training and Post holder Flight Operations

-

Maintain communication between Cabin Crew and Flight Deck-Head of Flight Operations

-

Maintain regular meetings between Cabin Crew Regional Managers, Head of Cabin Crew WAU, Cabin Crew Training Manager and Post holders – Head of Flight Operation, Training Manager to update and review safety and training in Cabin Operations Department

-

Cooperate with OCC and Operations Planning Department for rostering (rostering system, publish date, changes, sufficient number of CC, standby, HP system)

-

Cooperate with HR regarding employment, corporate polices which are established together with HR

-

Cooperate with Marketing Department about branding on (announcements consistent with company policies and operations etc.)

-

Manage ongoing Crew performance and motivation

board


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-

Be familiar with those parts of the company’s operations manuals, air operator certificates and operations specifications as they are necessary for the performance of the assigned duties

-

Prepare, maintain and revise all trainings and operational SOP manuals and relevant parts of OM Part A, B, and D in cooperation with Cabin Crew Training Manager

-

Supervise issuing of new Crew Orders and Crew Info to the CC, as required

-

Assure a current and approved Cabin Attendant Manual is at the dedicated place, available for all Cabin Crew during performing duty as a Crew Member

-

Actioning and distribution of accident, incident, and other occurrence reports

-

Assure a current and approved Cabin Attendant training program

-

Supervise and ensure cooperation between Cabin Crew Regional Managers and Head of Cabin Crew WAU to keep the same group standards, as much as local CAA requirement and law allows

-

Assume any responsibilities delegated by the Chief Operating Officer (COO)

-

Act as liaison between Cabin Ops and other departments of the organization

AUTHORITIES OF THE FUNCTION The Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group has the authority to: -

Take all measures, within the company budget, to fulfil his responsibilities

-

Hire, reposition or discharge Cabin Attendants with the approval of the Accountable Manager

-

Maintain relations with the competent Authority regarding the standards of Cabin Crew training

Cabin Crew Regional Manager (CCRM) POSITION IN THE ORGANIZATION The Cabin Crew Regional Manager is responsible for Cabin Crew of WAH AOC bases according to her assigned region and reports to the Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group. Cabin Crew Regional Manager North: Latvia, Lithuania, Poland R R

Cabin Crew Regional Manager South: Czech Republic, Hungary, Macedonia, Serbia Cabin Crew Regional Manager East: Bulgaria, Romania RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FUNCTION The Cabin Crew Regional Manager shall: -

Act as liaison between HCO Wizz Air Group and WAH Base Managers

-

Manage the WAH Base Managers in clear, transparent way regarding the structure and process, dividing equally task distribution and responsibility per base, build team with respect and integrity, monitoring performance and motivate them as well

-

Keep regular conference call, meeting and cascade communication with team and bases

-

Maintain the recruitment according company’s plan for A/C allocation, control the fluctuation and demand in the bases, including right number of Base Managers, Instructors, Line Trainers, Senior Cabin Attendants, Cabin Attendants with approval of Head of Cabin Operations WIZZ Air Group


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-

Monitor the performance of Base Managers regarding level of the standard in the bases and ensure Crew’s service according internal procedures and safety

-

Cooperate with Operations Planning and OCC regarding Crew roster, holiday, duty and rest time management on monthly basis

-

Monitor and correct daily operation regarding Key Performance Indicators [KPI (punctuality, level of sickness, discipline etc.)], monitor the weekly trends of demand, KPI and report to HCO Wizz Air Group

-

Cooperate with CC Training Manager concerning Crew training and training records concerning WAH bases

-

Cooperate with HR with any Crew related issues e.g. holidays, disciplinary cases, contracts, promotions, terminations etc.

-

Define the standard procedures for Cabin Crew by issuing Crew Order, Crew Info,

-

Cooperate in opening new bases, support and supervise establishment of new office in new WAH bases in cooperation with Facility Managers

-

Implement new, improved solution, which can support logistic and organization in the bases

-

Be responsible for opening new bases, support and supervise establishing new office in new WAH bases

-

Cooperate with Service Manager regarding sales and service related issues concerning WAH bases

-

Act as an official deputy of Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group, when required

-

Ensure guidance and supervision to newly appointed CC Base Managers

Cabin Crew Training Manager (CCTM) POSITION IN THE ORGANIZATION The Cabin Crew Training Manager reports to the Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group/dotted line to the Post holder Crew Training. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FUNCTION The Cabin Crew Training Manager is responsible for the following: -

To ensure that Cabin Crew Standard Operating Procedures comply with National and International Aviation Regulations and in particular, the terms and conditions laid down in the AOC

-

To act as described in CAM for Cabin Crew Instructor during flight duty

-

To ensure that all initial and recurrent training programs are carried out in line with the current requirements

In conjunction with Instructors and Cabin Crew Base Managers, is responsible for issues relating to Company Operating procedures and Cabin Crew checking, including: -

Standardization and monitoring of Cabin Crew training and checking

-

Techniques, including any third party training

-

Maintenance of Cabin Crew training records under the terms of the relevant AOC of Wizz Air Group


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-

Amendment/revision of training programs, examinations and Proficiency Checks, in line with changes in EASA regulations and/or AOC relevant Aviation Law

-

To act as liaison with the CAA

-

To maintain a good communication among Cabin Crew Instructors\Line Trainers (meeting each base every six month to discuss current problems, procedures)

-

To maintain a system to control the validity of all trainings and coach flights in cooperation with Operations Planning and OCC

-

To inform CC about changes of safety and emergency procedures via Crew Orders and liaise with Flight Operation Department (Training Manager/Head of Flight Operations) for aligned implementation

-

To ensure that CC is scheduled for the required training as per relevant regulations

-

To cooperate with OPS planning and OCC regarding the schedule of Cabin Crew Instructors\Line Trainers

-

To audit training programs, training materials, and Cabin Crew Instructors\Line Trainers

-

To order training materials and facilities in cooperation with Operations Logistic Assistant and Cabin Crew Base Managers, if applicable

-

To prepare, maintain and revise all training and Operational Manuals relating to Cabin Operations

-

To recruit and timely select Senior Cabin Attendants for promotion to Cabin Crew Line Trainers and Instructors

-

In conjunction with Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group to issue Cabin Crew Orders/Info pertaining to operational matters

-

To record details of the training undertaken by the Cabin Crew Members, together with the results of the recurrent checks and qualifications. These records shall be retained throughout the period of employment of the Crew member concerned

-

To manage Cabin Crew Instructors/Cabin Crew Line Trainers

-

To contact third parties for Cabin Crew training

-

To cooperate with Head of Cabin Crew WAU, Cabin Crew Regional Managers regarding training and training related issues concerning relevant AOC

Cabin Crew Service Manager (CCSM) POSITION IN THE ORGANIZATION The Cabin Crew Service Manager reports to the Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FUNCTION The Cabin Crew Service Manager is responsible for the following: -

To create proper culture of excellent Customer Service and onboard sales attitude among Crew

-

To act as described in CAM for SCA during flight duty

-

To create, improve and monitor procedures concerning Customer Service and sales on board in cooperation with the Cabin Crew Training Manager


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-

To create service/catering procedures and manuals in cooperation with Cabin Crew Training Manager, issue Crew Info and Crew Orders

-

To create and update On Board Announcements for all the bases in cooperation with Cabin Crew Base Managers

-

To monitor and inform about sales results in all bases, distributing awards

-

To plan and organize sales trainings accordingly to the needs in all bases

-

To create new and update all existing onboard forms according to standards and regulations

-

To maintain, update and supervise all Cabin Operations Department related pages of the company Intranet site in liaison with Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group

-

To cooperate with the internal Purchasing Department and external companies in terms of onboard accessories; to be responsible for branding related issues in the aspect of design of Cabin Crew uniform in cooperation with Marketing Department

-

To cooperate with Ground Handling Department and external ground maintenance in terms of A/C cleaning and loading accessories on board the A/C

-

To cooperate with catering supplier and Commercial Department in terms of on board sales with the specification to variety of goods, special offers, tools necessary for selling purpose

-

To follow up and maintain the contracting issues with the external suppliers of uniforms and Onboard catering

-

To cooperate and monitor, together with Cabin Crew Base Managers, the Crew meal variety and delivery at all bases

-

To conduct flight/grooming/briefing checks

-

To cooperate with Head of Cabin Crew WAU and Cabin Crew Regional Managers regarding sales and services related issues concerning relevant AOC

Cabin Crew Base Manager POSITION IN THE ORGANIZATION The Cabin Crew Base Manager reports to Cabin Crew Regional Manager. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FUNCTION The Cabin Crew Base Manager is responsible for the following: -

To manage Cabin Crew on her base on behalf of the HCO

-

To supervise and give leadership to all Cabin Crew Members, both on and off duty, whilst maintaining good moral standards, social standards and high standard of discipline and conduct

-

To monitor day to day running of operations, liaising with Cabin Crew Instructors/Line Trainers and other department superiors to foresee and eliminate any problems

-

To act as a liaison between Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group and Cabin Crew Members

-

To act as described in CAM for SCA during flight duties

-

To lead and direct Cabin Crew in personal development and prepare periodical reports

-

To approve and/or monitor non-flight related Cabin Crew roster concern items

-

To prepare pre-flight schedule for CC according to required flight checks, briefing checks, grooming checks


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-

To ensure compliance of CC with standard and expected performances

-

To consider and undertake necessary actions according to the reports received from the Cabin Crew

-

In conjunction with Cabin Crew Instructors/Line Trainers to be responsible for issues relating to company Operating Procedures and Cabin Crew proficiency checks, including monitoring of proper execution of Standard Operating Procedures

-

To ensure the required standard of safety and service by the Cabin Attendants

-

To manage ongoing Crew performance, motivation

-

Liaising with Base Captain where appropriate

-

In conjunction with Cabin Crew Regional Managers to prepare the proposals for Crew Order/Crew Info

-

To conduct checks on Cabin Crew performance both during ground and flight duties according to company procedures in order to control the level of service and safety on board

-

To do a consistent application of corporate policies which are established together with HR:

o

To assure the maintenance of performance management program in conjunction with Cabin Crew Regional Manager and HR

o

To manage certain Cabin Crew requests related to HR administration

o

To support in updating documents, company ID Cards, contract distribution, daily allowance etc

o

In cooperation with HR to manage daily Cabin Crew related matters

o

To collect and verify the accuracy of the documents in the process of hiring Cabin Crew

o

To update personal files of cabin Crew members in the base, in accordance with training and HR requirements

-

To control number of Cabin Crew in the base, Cabin Crew fluctuation and report it to Head of Cabin Operations in weekly reports

-

To order all uniform parts and accessories for Cabin Crew in the base

-

To nominate and communicate her deputy and period of absence to all Cabin Crew Members of the concerned base(s), when the absence is longer than 4 calendar days

-

To act as a deputy of another Base Manager, when nominated

-

To have a valid Cabin Crew Attestation and to be qualified to operate as a Crew Member

-

Each CCBM can have individual project regarding Cabin Operations Department

Safety Senior Cabin Attendant (SSCA) POSITION IN THE ORGANISATION The Safety Senior Cabin Attendant Wizz Air Group reports to the Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group and in dotted line to Head of Safety and Compliance. In her absence, the Regional Safety Senior Cabin Attendant will deputize unless an alternative specific nomination is made.


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RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FUNCTION -

To oversee safety related issues within the company regarding cabin operation and liaise with other departments if necessary

-

To cooperate on the development of documentation and procedural definition upon request of the Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group or Cabin Crew Training Manager

-

To make operational-safety related recommendation in relation to Cabin Operations in liaison with HCO/CCTM

-

To communicate supplementary safety related information with operational relevance

-

To coordinate with CCTM and Head of Safety and Compliance in regards of the training materials updates

-

To research and involve Cabin Operations Department in the introduction of emerging technology that provides possibility of increasing safety level and cost benefits to Wizz Air

-

To act as described in CAM for SCA during the flight duties

-

To take part in development and maintenance of Wizz Air’s flight safety management system

-

To perform safety investigation related to Cabin Operations

-

To be responsible for editing and distributing the weekly reports and safety quarterly updates

-

To collect and take action on the voluntary reports received from Cabin Crew

-

To perform flight safety training for Cabin Crew

AUTHORITIES OF THE FUNCTION -

To make recommendations to the HCO regarding safety related matters

-

To make operational-safety recommendation in relation to cabin operation to HCC

Compliance Senior Cabin Attendant (CSCA) POSITION IN THE ORGANISATION The Compliance SCA Wizz Air Group is accountable to the Head of Safety and Compliance when performing safety and compliance duties defined by the Compliance Monitoring System Manual and reports also to the Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FUNCTION -

To monitor industry legislation changes, compliance and safety trends and concerns that may have an impact on flight operations and to develop revisions to OM A and CAM according to these changes

-

To lead Operations compliance monitoring audits

-

To co-operate in Wizz Air compliance and safety policy and systems development

-

To ensure that the relevant compliance and flight safety information is promulgated throughout Compliance and Safety trainings within Wizz Air


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-

To provide recommendations to the Head of Safety and Compliance and Nominated Personnel regarding continuing improvement of operations compliance and flight safety

Compliance Auditor SCA POSITION IN THE ORGANISATION The Compliance Auditor SCA is accountable to the Head of Safety and Compliance when performing safety and compliance duties defined by the Compliance Monitoring System Manual and reports also to the Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FUNCTION - Compliance monitoring auditors perform their assigned compliance-related duties in addition to their functional tasks - Prepare and execute audits - Identify, record and report any non-conformities - Verify corrective actions - Remain independent in all circumstances Compliance monitoring auditors appointed may not have any day-to-day task in the area and should not be directly responsible for the activity to be audited.

Technical Senior Cabin Attendant (TSCA) POSITION IN THE ORGANIZATION The Technical Senior Cabin Attendant reports directly to the Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group, but has the right to approach the Wizz Maintenance department directly without maintaining the official chain of command in all technical matters if he/she deems it necessary. In his/her absence, the Deputy Technical Senior Cabin Attendant will deputize unless an alternative specific nomination is made. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FUNCTION -

To oversee technical issues within the company regarding Cabin OperationS and liaise with Airbus wherever necessary

-

To cooperate in the development of other flight documentation on the Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group or Cabin Crew Training Manager's request

-

To answer the questions regarding technical aspects of operations

-

To give operational-technical advice to other departments within Wizz Air in regards of cabin operation in liaison with HCO WAG/CCTM

-

To review the contents and to give Cabin Crew a regular update on the important changes of the Airbus Operations Manuals in liaison with the CCTM

-

To communicate relevance

-

To coordinate with CCTM in regards of the training materials updates

-

To perform various aircraft delivery tasks and company A/C interior checks and to prepare documentation regarding cabin interior and emergency equipment configuration

-

To coordinate and to communicate between Wizz Air Cabin Operations and Engineering Departments

supplementary

technical

information

with

operational


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-

To research and involve Flight Operations/Cabin Operations Department in the introduction of emerging technology that provides safety, operational and cost benefits to Wizz Air

-

To liaise with Wizz Air Engineering in the specification of Aircraft interior and systems

-

To provide support for incident and accident investigations

AUTHORITIES OF THE FUNCTION -

Provide recommendations to the HCO WAG regarding type related technical matters

-

Provide recommendations to Cabin Crew Training Manager and Safety SCA with respect of training and/or flight safety related technical matter

Cabin Crew Standardization Instructor (CCSI) POSITION IN THE ORGANISATION The Standardisation Instructor reports to the Cabin Crew Training Manager in all training related issues and to the Cabin Crew Base Manager of their home base in all other duty related matters. When performing duty on board the aircraft the Standardization Instructor is reporting to the Commander. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FUNCTION Standardization Instructors are responsible for standardization of all Instructors on bases placed under their responsibility in accordance with instructions provided by the Cabin Crew Training Manager, such as, but not limited to: -

Ensure that all Instructors understand and comply with company SOPs

-

Ensure that all Instructors understand and comply with company training policy

-

Ensure that all Instructors apply similar standard as defined by Cabin Crew Training Manager

-

Perform flight checks of Instructors and Line Trainers

-

Chair regular Instructor base meetings according to schedule define by Cabin Crew Training Manager

-

Provide feedback to Cabin Crew Training Instructors and Line Trainers

Manager on performance of

AUTHORITIES OF THE FUNCTION The Standardization Instructor may propose to the Cabin Crew Training Manager: -

Procedures and practices to raise standards of Crew training

-

Remove from schedule or remove all or part of training duties and privilege from individual Instructors

The Standardization Instructor may propose to the Head of Cabin Operations: -

Procedures and practices to ensure safe operations

The Standardization Instructor may remove from the schedule, or change the scheduling of, individual Crew Members


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Cabin Crew Instructor (INS) POSITION IN THE ORGANISATION The Cabin Crew Instructors report to the Cabin Crew Base Manager and Cabin Crew Training Manager via Cabin Crew Standardization Instructor on all training related duties. When performing duty on board the aircraft the Cabin Crew Instructor is reporting to the Commander. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FUNCTION The Cabin Crew Instructor is responsible for the following: -

To act as described in CAM 0.5.3

-

To act as the liaison between Cabin Attendants and the Cabin Crew Base Manager and Cabin Crew Training Manager

-

To cooperate with and support Cabin Crew Base Managers in ensuring the highest level of performance of Cabin Crew

-

To provide help to her superior managers for the revisions of the Cabin Attendant Manual

-

To train multiple subjects according to her abilities and skills both in the classroom and on the aircraft

-

To ensure that the training standards are maintained at the highest level as specified by the Cabin Crew Training Manager

-

To provide training services and checks to new and experienced Cabin Crew members. When new procedures are introduced, it is her duty to ensure that all Cabin Crew Members are fully skilled in executing these procedures on board the aircraft

-

To cooperate and support the Cabin Crew Training Manager in terms of proper documentation of training records

-

To apply JUST culture and highest ethical conduct when providing feedback on performance to the Crew Members

-

To make sure that any conflict of interest during training and assessing sessions is communicated to Cabin Crew Training Manager

-

To prepare training material on given subjects based on the request from Cabin Crew Training Manager or Cabin Crew Standardization Instructors

-

To cooperate with and support the Cabin Crew Training Manager in terms of proper documentation of training records, administrative tasks related to trainings as well as respecting the assigned time constraints regarding any specific responsibilities of the function

-

To be constantly updated with company manuals (CAM, OM A, OM D, CCQM) and EASA regulations (cabin crew training related responsibilities)

Cabin Crew CRM Instructor (CRM INS) POSITION IN THE ORGANIZATION The Cabin Crew CRM Instructor reports to the Cabin Crew Training Manager in all training related issues and to the Cabin Crew Base Manager of their home base in all other duty related matters. NOTE: For detailed description of the CRM Instructor functions refer to OM Part D 1.3.15.


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RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FUNCTION A CRM Instructor is entitled to conduct: -

The Operator initial CRM course for Cabin Crew Members

-

The recurrent modular CRM course part of the recurrent training/checking program of the Company

-

The CRM module of the Operator Senior Cabin Attendant, Cabin Crew Line Trainer and Cabin Crew Instructor course

For qualification requirements for Cabin Crew CRM Instructor position refer to Wizz Air OM A 1.3.15

Cabin Crew Line Trainer (CCLT) POSITION IN THE ORGANIZATION The Cabin Crew Line Trainers report to the Cabin Crew Base Manager and Cabin Crew Training Manager via Cabin Crew Standardization Instructor on all training related duties. When performing duty on board the aircraft the Cabin Crew Line Trainer reports to the Commander. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FUNCTION The Cabin Crew Line Trainer is responsible for the following: -

To act as described in CAM for SCA during flight duties

-

To act as the liaison between the Cabin Attendants and the Cabin Crew Base Manager and Cabin Crew Training Manager

-

To ensure that the training standards are maintained at the highest level as specified by the Cabin Crew Training Manager

-

To provide training services and checking to new and experienced Cabin Crew Members. When new procedures are introduced, it is her duty to ensure that all Cabin Crew Members are fully skilled in executing these procedures on-board the aircraft

-

To cooperate and support the Cabin Crew Training Manager in terms of proper documentation of training records


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0.5.3

Responsibilities and Authorities of Crew Members

General responsibilities of Cabin Crew Members R R

Cabin Crew Members are responsible for the proper execution of their duties that are related to the safety of the aeroplane and its occupants as described in this manual including Onboard sales activities, which is specified in the Cabin Crew Service Manual. It is Cabin Crew responsibility: -

To maintain familiarity with relevant national and international air legislation and agreed aviation practices and procedures

-

To maintain familiarity with those parts of the company’s operations manuals and operations specifications which are necessary for the performance of their assigned duties

-

To direct the attention of the other Crew Members if observing deviation from the standard procedures

-

To comply with any customs, health or immigration regulation

-

To maintain such a lifestyle that keeps Crew Member fit while performing her duties

-

To attend the General Briefing held by the Commander at the beginning of the duty period

-

To comply with the internal HR policies

-

To ensure personal compliance with the Flight Time Limitations scheme

-

To be reachable by mobile phone within 3 hours prior to scheduled reporting time. They may be contacted via direct call or via SMS

-

To report on duty 70 minutes (unless otherwise scheduled) prior to the scheduled departure time in a healthy condition

-

To follow the prescribed rest period, not being under influence of drugs or alcohol

-

To wear the company uniform in accordance with the Grooming Manual

-

The fact of checking-in for duty is a confirmation by the Crew Member that she is ready and fit for the intended duty

-

The prevention from being fatigue is the responsibility of the Crew Member. Being fatigue affects most aspects of a Crew Member’s ability to do her job. It therefore has implications for safety

-

To board the aircraft 45 minutes before STD for the first flight of the day, or ‘cold’ aircraft rotation, and to be ready at the appropriate apron stand or terminal gate 35 minutes before STD, or notified revised departure time, for a turnaround, or if reporting time is less than 70 minutes prior to STD

-

To undergo an alcohol test if randomly selected

-

To receive manuals of Wizz Air in electronic format

-

To prepare for the execution of a flight

-

To cooperate with contracted parties and services involved in the execution of a flight

-

To conduct On-board Sales activities as part of their Cabin Attendant duties according to the service standards and sales procedures defined in Cabin Attendant Service Manual / Cabin Attendant Manual and related company policies

-

On board sales performance is measured by average EURO sales per passenger achieved by each Cabin Crew Member during a calendar month. Wizz Air sets a


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Minimum Achievable Sales Target (MAST), which is 0,75 EURO per passenger (For details refer to S://HR/Bulletin/HR policies/Sales on board)

R

R R R R

0.5.4

-

Cabin Crew Members performing On-board Sales below the expected level shall face performance measure

-

To maintain excellent customer service and sales attitude in order to achieve the sales targets defined by superior management and relevant company policies

-

To aim her actions and performance to secure and safe conduct of the flight/ground duty

-

To aim her actions and performance in accordance with the highest ethical standards

-

To avoid acting intentionally in a way that it will result in any sort of damage, fine, penalty, financial loss etc. incurred by Wizz Air or any third party legally connected to Wizz Air

-

To wear the company ID card whilst on duty and not in the aircraft

-

To keep service secrets

-

To carry valid personal documents required on duty (for details refer to CAM section 0.9.2)

-

To be familiar with the content of the latest Crew Orders/Crew Info prior to every briefing, therefore, Crew Members have to check their email prior to every flight duty. Otherwise, to check personal e-mail box at least every 72 hours is a must (except when on holiday). The Company common language is English, thus Company correspondence has to be done in English language

-

To keep constantly updated the AIMS information related to personal data and this shall include mandatory fields such as: address, mobile phone number, next of kin, passport details 1 (and passport details 2 when applicable)

-

To possess valid European Health Insurance Card

-

To report any irregularities and deviations from the standard procedures

-

Crew Members requiring the use of corrective lenses shall have a spare set of corrective glasses/lenses readily available

Reporting procedures

General information Any non-standard /unusual situation/occurrence experienced while on duty must be reported. “Occurrence� means an operational interruption, defect, fault or other irregular circumstance that has or may have influenced flight safety and that has not resulted in an accident or serious incident. Reports must be submitted right after the completion of duty but not later than 24 hours after completion of the duty of the particular day. There are several ways of reporting:

CRF (Crew Report Form) Any non-standard /unusual situation/occurrence experienced while on duty must be reported using CRF via Wizz Port according to the matter of relevance. It is possible to submit one report to several departments by selecting not only one field of relevance at the same time. Should the CRF system be inoperative, the report shall be sent via e-mail as follows:


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-

Safety-related matters must be reported to the Safety SCA with copy to Base Manager

-

Service and Catering related matters to CC Service Manager with copy to Base Manager (e.g. missing crew meal, suspended hot beverages service during light turbulence)

-

Training-related matters to CC Training Manager with copy to Base Manager

-

Technical related matters to Technical SCA with copy to Base Manager

-

Ground Operations-related matters to the respective Operations Manager with a copy to Base Manager, using the CRF

-

Security-related matters to Security SCA with a copy to Base Manager

-

Any other matters not related to the above listed area of competence must be reported to Base Manager

Ground

The written e-mail report shall contain the followings:

R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

-

Date,

-

Flight Number

-

Aircraft registration

-

Crew

-

Problem

-

Actions Taken

-

Summary/Personal account of the situation

WICORP -

Reporting system maintained by Safety Department with the aim of gathering information about human factors which might influence flight safety

-

Anonymity is ensured by the system, no record is kept about the identity of the reporter

-

Optional feature of the system is to submit personal details or opinion regarding the reported case (in case the reporter wishes to receive feedback from the Safety Department)

-

Incidents that are considered to influence flight safety might be reported, including but not limited to the followings:

-

o

Crew activity

o

Wizz Air Operations activities

o

Other Organizations activities like Ground Handling, Medical Services or Maintenance

o

any practices that are considered to be unsafe

The sysem is available at: o

https://webmail.wizzair.com/wicorp

o

User name: flightsafety Password: NoName19 (case sensitive)

o

normal personal company login username and password shall not be used

Injury/Illness Form Situations when Cabin Crew must fill the Injury/Illness Form are as listed below but not limited to the following: -

all type of CC sickness, injury or incapacitation


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-

whenever passenger loss of consciousness occurs

-

opening of FAK

-

administration of Oxygen

-

whenever PA for doctor is made or medical assistance is required upon arrival

-

NOTE: Translated versions of INJURY/ILLNESS report can be found on S://CabinCrew/Bulletin/On-Board forms translation/

-

The filled On-board form after being returned to the office or briefing room must be faxed to the OCC fax number +36/1 777 94 50

FDIR and Final Warning Situations when Cabin Crew must fill out the FDIR and FW as listed below but not limited to the followings: -

Whenever dealing with an unruly passenger who shows PHYSICALLY ABUSIVE BEHAVIOUR (i.e. level 2 threat) or more serious signs of threat

The report shall: -

be filled by SCA

-

mark whether passenger obeyed the Crew’s requests/commands/instructions

-

contain witness data whenever possible

Captain must inform OCC as soon as possible of all disruptive events. SAMS report and CRF (and FDIR) must be submitted right after the completion of the duty (CRF must also be sent to Safety Senior Cabin attendant and relevant Base Manager on copy).

R R R R

-

FDIR must be filled in detail giving time, date, flight number, passenger details and precise description of the alleged offence including whether a warning notice had been issued to the passenger by ground staff.

-

Under no circumstances it is allowed for Crew Members to give their full name and any other personal data to passengers, especially when dealing with an unruly passenger

-

NOTE: Translated versions of FINAL WARNING S://CabinCrew/Bulletin/On-Board forms translation/

can

be

found

on

Birth on Board Report The Commander shall fill in the Birth on Board Report (refer to CAM Appendix 14) The procedure is similar to the procedure of death on board, except that, apart from the two witnesses, also the father of the child (if possible) must sign the report (refer to CAM 9.23 Death on board)

Death on Board Report The Death on board report shall be filled by the Commander of the flight. For details refer to CAM Appendix 15

0.5.5

Monitoring of the schedule

Each Crew Member shall monitor the monthly schedule. It is delivered by e-mail to the personal e-mail boxes 7 days prior to the end of the previous month. It is the Crew Member’s responsibility to gather information of the actual schedule from the Operations Control Centre. She shall confirm the receipt of the information to the Duty Manager (Crew Dispatcher). These responsibilities are normally completed through AIMS.


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NOTE: Definitions used in the AIMS system are to be found on the individual roster of the Crew Member.

0.5.6

Commander (CDR) responsibilities and authorities

The position in the organization, responsibilities and authorities of the function are defined in OM Part A, Section 1, and 1.5

0.5.7

First Officer (F/O) responsibilities and authorities

The position in the organization, responsibilities and authorities of the function are defined in OM Part A, Section 1, and 1.5.1.

0.5.8

(Acting) Senior Cabin Attendant ([A] SCA) responsibilities and authorities

PLACE IN THE ORGANIZATION The SCA is responsible to the Commander and emergency procedure(s) specified in discontinuing non safety-related duties Departmental Superior to whom she is Commander is her Cabin Crew Managers.

for the conduct and coordination of cabin safety the Operations Manual and CAM, including for for safety or security purposes. The SCA’s responsible when not reporting directly to a

General SCA responsibilities The SCA shall: -

Be responsible for cabin safety from the time the airplane is accepted for flight, until the end of her duty

-

Maintain familiarity with such provisions of Wizz Air OM and Cabin Attendant Manual as necessary to fulfil her function

-

Assist the Commander in the managing of safe and efficient conduct of the flight by performing her duties and general responsibilities

-

Coordinate and supervise all tasks of the Cabin Attendants that are related to the flight

-

Ensure a safe coordination and execution of flight as related to cabin affairs

-

Avoid interfering with Cockpit Crew tasks and/or (inter) cockpit communication

-

Give such an advice, information and assistance to the Commander as may contribute favourably towards the safe and efficient conduct of flight

-

Ensure at regular intervals not exceeding 30 minutes the physical well being of the Cockpit Crew is at a proper standard (to be done by Interphone)

-

Prevent unauthorized persons from entering the aircraft

-

Inform the Commander of her whereabouts at outstation layovers when leaving the assigned rest facility to ensure immediate accessibility

-

Carry valid licenses whilst on flight duty or when required by the company (for details refer to CAM 0.9.2)

-

Carry a valid passport whilst on flight duty and when expecting to cross international borders when on other company duties


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Specific SCA responsibilities The SCA shall: R R R

Conduct safety briefing for Cabin Crew Members 70 minutes prior the scheduled flight - Check presence of documents of the Crew required for flight according to CAM 0.9.2 - Assess/interview concerning the health condition of the other Cabin Attendants. When in doubt of any of the Cabin Crew Members’ fitness to fulfil their duty, SCA is required to refuse the Crew Member and request replacement Crew

-

Report to the Commander 60 minutes prior to the scheduled departure time

-

Act as the liaison between the other Cabin Attendants and the Commander

-

Coordinate all tasks and duties of and give effective leadership to the Cabin Attendants under her supervision; (including familiarization with the a/c for observer Crew Members) Supervise and assist the Cabin Attendants in the execution of their tasks

-

Ensure any Cabin Attendant under her supervision is familiar with relevant Hungarian and International air legislation and agreed aviation practices and procedures as laid down in the OM and the Cabin Attendant Manual

-

Inform the Commander as requested, concerning duties in relation to the passengers, cargo, or cabin (emergency) equipment during the flight

-

Supervise the preparation and checking of the passenger cabin before a flight by the Cabin Attendants in relation to: o

Presence and functionality of emergency equipment

o

Absence of any foreign object

o

Functionality of passenger amenities

o

Presence of catering as per flight instructions

o

Inform the Commander when checks are completed, report discrepancies (if any), and confirm that cabin is prepared for boarding

o

Inform the Commander of any PRMs and any associated requirements (e.g. wheelchair assistance)

o

Volunteer such advice, information and assistance to the Commander that may contribute favourably towards the safe and efficient conduct of the flight

-

Make best efforts to ensure that passengers are seated equally throughout the cabin and report uneven seating pattern (e.g. majority of passengers in the front half of the cabin) to the Commander

-

Seek and receive such information and/or explanation from the Commander, as may be necessary to enable herself and C/As to fulfil their functions

-

Maintain a high personal standard of discipline, conduct and appearance as a representative of Wizz Air; and thereby support the Commander, by active example, in the development and maintenance of a high standard of professional expertise and morale amongst the Crew

-

Command all Cabin Attendants and passengers on the Commander’s behalf during emergency situations

-

notify other Crew Members if observing deviation from standard operating procedures

-

Carry the necessary On-board Forms while on duty (Lost/Damaged Property Form, Injury/Illness Report, Flight Disturbance Incident Report, Final Warning,


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Cabin Condition Feedback Form (2 copies) – refer to CAM Appendix 3, Appendix 4, Appendix 5, and Appendix 6)

R R

0.5.9

-

Must carry the updated announcement booklet, while on duty

-

Must send the written report, after accomplishment of the duty, (within specified time period-refer to reporting procedures CAM 0.5.3) to Safety SCA and CCBM in case the On board form(s) where filled while on duty (Injury/Illness Report, Flight Disturbance Incident Report, Final Warning) with the exception to Lost/Damaged Property Form, and in case any occurrences appearing while on duty.

(Junior) Cabin Attendant (J)CA

PLACE IN THE ORGANISATION: C/A is responsible to the SCA or, in absence thereof to the Commander. She shall assist the Commander in the managing of safe and efficient conduct of the flight by performing her general responsibilities. The C/A’s Departmental Superior, to whom she is responsible when not reporting directly to a SCA or to the Commander, is her Cabin Crew Base Manager. When a SCA becomes incapacitated during flight one of the C/A will assume her tasks and responsibilities. General C/A responsibilities The C/A shall: -

Maintain familiarity with such provisions of Wizz Air OM and Cabin Attendant Manual as necessary to fulfil her function

-

Ensure safe execution of the flight as related to cabin affairs

-

Avoid interfering with cockpit Crew tasks and/or cockpit communication

-

Assist the Commander in maintaining a proper standard of Crew discipline, conduct and personal appearance

-

Ensure at regular intervals (in principle not exceeding 30 minutes) the physical well being of the cockpit Crew is at a proper standard (to be done by Interphone, in case the SCA is incapacitated)

-

Inform the Commander of her whereabouts at outstation layovers when leaving the assigned rest facility to ensure immediate accessibility

-

Notify other Crew Members if observing deviation from standard operating procedures

-

carry valid licenses whilst on flight duty or when required by the company

-

carry a valid passport whilst on flight duty and when expecting to cross international borders when on other company duties

-

NOTE: The holders of new type Cabin Crew Attestations (issued after 08/04/2013 in accordance with EASA part CC) have to possess all the documents stated in CAM 0.9.2.

Specific C/A responsibilities The C/A shall: -

Prepare and check the passenger cabin before a flight in relation to: o

Presence and functionality of emergency equipment

o

Absence of any foreign object

o

Functionality of passenger amenities


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o

Presence of catering as per flight instructions

-

Volunteer such advice, information and assistance to the SCA and/or the Commander, as may contribute favourably towards the safe and efficient conduct of the flight

-

Seek and receive such information and/or explanation from the SCA and/or the Commander, as may be necessary to enable her and other C/A’s to fulfil their functions

-

Maintain a high personal standard of discipline, conduct and appearance as a representative of Wizz Air and thereby support the Commander, by active example, in the development and maintenance of a high standard of professional expertise and morale amongst the Crew

-

Command all passengers on the Commander’s behalf during emergency situations, when instructed so by the SCA


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0.6

Crew incapacitation

Incapacitation is defined as any condition affecting the physical or mental health of a Crew Member during the performance of her duty, which renders her incapable of proper performing those duties. Incapacitation of a Crew Member can have many forms, ranging from sudden death to partial loss of mental or physical capabilities. Since it is impossible to cover all variables surrounding the incapacitation of a Crew Member, the following must be regarded as a guideline:

0.6.1

-

Request assistance from any medically qualified passenger, without granting an access to the cockpit

-

Make use of any suitable qualified extra Crew on board

-

Under certain circumstances an early landing may be necessary.

Flight Crew incapacitation

When the Commander becomes incapacitated, the succession of command will take place in the following order: -

By default, the first officer or senior first officer becomes the commander of the flight

-

If another Wizz Air pilot qualified as a captain is on board and fit to fly and ready to take over responsibility of the flight he will become the commander of the flight

ACTION FOLLOWING RECOGNITION -

Care for the incapacitated Crew Member by asking the assistance of other Crew Member

-

Restrain incapacitated Crew Member so that cannot interfere with essential controls or switches: Fasten seat belt and shoulder harness with arms secured under harness, lock the shoulder harness, move the seat completely backwards, move legs away from pedals, recline the seatback

-

Administer oxygen at 100% (from Quick Donning Mask)

-

Revise crew duties and where travelling Wizz Air Crew is available she should be asked to assist according to his/her qualifications

-

NOTE: For security reasons, no access to cockpit should be considered for passengers holding or pretending to hold a pilot license, including in case of pilot incapacitation. Incapacitation may have been caused on purpose, in order to access the cockpit and take control of the aircraft.

-

Removal of the incapacitated Crew Member from the flight deck area is rarely practical but can be considered if the process will not endanger safe operation of the aircraft

-

In case of suspected food poisoning, ALL Crew Members must obtain medical clearance before their next flight

0.6.2

Cabin Crew incapacitation

If unforeseen circumstances occur and one of the Cabin Crew is not able to continue her duties, the series of flights may continue under following conditions:


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Cabin Crew incapacitation out of home Base In case of unforeseen circumstances occur out of a Crew base: -

The maximum number of sectors with reduced number of Cabin Crew is limited to 2 sectors

-

The number of passengers carried is limited to 150

-

If the nominated SCA becomes incapacitated during the flight duty, the SCA will be replaced by another qualified SCA from the Crew

-

If there in no other qualified SCA on the particular flight, the most experienced CA will take over the role of SCA until after landing

-

In exceptional circumstances, a CA may assume the responsibility of the SCA for the maximum of 2 flight sectors if she has minimum 1500 flight hours experience with Wizz. Prior to this taking place an approval must be obtained from Head of Flight Operations and Head of Cabin Operations

-

The Commander must be informed (in such circumstances the Commander shall fill an ASR)

-

The Commander and the acting SCA must review if changes in safety and equipment procedures are necessary

Note: A pilot current qualified and current on type may undertake the duties of a Cabin Attendant which are relating to safety. This only applied as far as he meets all the flight and rest time limitations. In this role he is under the supervision of the SCA. Cabin Crew incapacitation at home Base If Cabin Crew incapacitation appears at home base, replacement Crew Cabin Crew must be assigned. For the details of conducting activities on ground with reduced number of Cabin Crew refer to CAM section 0.8.1.2. Cabin Crew procedures

-

The Incapacitated/Injured Cabin Crew must be seated in passenger seat, except ABP related seats and overwing exit rows. The jumpseat of the incapacitated Crew Member must be left unoccupied

-

ABP must be appointed and instructed for the operation of the main door belonging to the duty position of the Incapacitated/Injured Cabin Crew, but must remain seated in the ABP related passenger seat

-

In case of cabin preparation for an emergency landing, the appointed ABP must be seated on the Crew seat of the Incapacitated/Injured Cabin Crew Member; consequently, another ABP shall be selected and briefed for the respective ABP seat

-

Injury/Illness Report must be filled (for reference see CAM 11.6.)

-

Injury/Illness Report and CRF must be sent to Safety Senior Cabin Attendant and respective Cabin Crew Base Manager after completion of the duty During emergency or if a Cabin Crew Member becomes incapacitated, the order of command shall be the following:

-

o

Other qualified Senior Cabin Attendant on duty

o

Other Cabin Attendant on duty

o

Junior Cabin Attendant on duty

The change of command shall be reported both to the Commander and to the Operations Control Center and shall be recorded on the Journey Log.


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In case of injury during duty or any other sickness ending in crew incapacitation, the Cabin Crew Member, who is concerned, must undergo medical check in official Aviation Medical Institution before returning to flight duties. In case of any kind of sickness which ended up in Cabin Crew incapacitation (incapacitation means: Crew Member cannot fulfil the procedures in case of emergency), the Cabin Crew Member, who is concerned must undergo medical check in the official Aviation Medical Institution before returning to flight duty. In other types of sickness’ except above mentioned, during duty, including those with Crew replacement by SBY Crew, the sick Cabin Attendant must immediately proceed to family doctor/hospital/medical point at the airport (depends on the week day and daytime) to receive certificate/note that she has health problem and cannot perform duty. When the Crew Member is ready to return to flight duties she should obtain written confirmation from the doctor that she is fit to fly.

R

0.7

Training

0.7.1

General

Each Cabin Crew Member must participate and successfully complete/pass training, checking and examination as scheduled or instructed by its authorized training and checking personnel in accordance with the relevant EASA regulation requirements. All Flight and Cabin Crew Members joining Wizz Air shall follow an appropriate Wizz Air training program as specified in OM Part D and Cabin Crew Qualification Manual. The successful participation in all training shall be documented and filed at the Cabin Operations Department. Each Cabin Crew Member on flight duty must have with her a valid Proficiency Certificate with full qualification for the aircraft in question during the whole flight duty. For documentation to be carried, refer to CAM 0.9.2. It is the responsibility of each Cabin Crew Member to check that her certificate is valid with the needed qualification and must report to her direct superior in case any discrepancy occurs prior to reporting for duty. All Cabin Crew Members are obliged to check in AIMS the e-Crew schedule (personal roster, training field) before each day of ground duty to get all the necessary information about the planned training (e.g. location, date, hour, name of the trainer).

0.7.2

Initial Cabin Crew Training

Initial training is combined with Conversion and Differences training and is organized by WIZZ Air for all new candidates who wish to become Crew Members for WIZZ Air. Initial training (see Cabin Crew Qualification Manual) is organized with a purpose of obtaining the Cabin Crew Attestation. To obtain Cabin Crew Attestation each candidate shall undergo the full Initial training and pass the required examination. The required subjects of Initial Training are listed in Cabin Crew Qualification Manual. Should a Crew Member fail the examination, one more exam at the Authority can be granted by WIZZ Air. Should the second exam is failed, the candidate will be excluded from the licensing process.

0.7.3

Conversion and Differences Training

Each Crew Member has to complete appropriate training as specified in the Operations Manual before undertaking assigned duties as follows:


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-

-

Conversion Training: Conversion training must be completed before being: o

First assigned by Wizz Air to operate as a Cabin Crew Member or

o

Assigned to operate another aeroplane type

Differences Training: Differences training must be completed before operating: o o

On a variant of an aeroplane type currently operated or With different safety equipment, safety equipment location, or normal and emergency procedures on currently operated aeroplane types or variants

Wizz Air determines the contents of the conversion and differences training taking account of the Cabin Crew Members previous training as recorded in the Cabin Crew Members training records. Conversion and if necessary differences training, includes the use of all safety equipment and all normal and emergency procedures applicable to the type or variant of aeroplane and involves training and practice on either a representative training device or on the actual aeroplane.

0.7.4

Recurrent Training and checking

To ensure the proficiency of every Crew Member, she has to undergo every year a recurrent training with a check. For details of the required recurrent training and checking of Cabin Crew Members, refer to Operations Manual Part D 2.2.6, Training syllabi and checking. Recurrent training covers the actions assigned to each Cabin Crew Member in normal and emergency procedures and drills relevant to the aeroplane on which she operates. R R R R R R R R

Should the Crew Member fail the examination at the end of a recurrent training the Crew Member will be removed from flight duties and a safety consultation and written exam will be assigned with a Cabin Crew Instructor. For details refer to CAM 0.7.6 NOTE: In such circumstances the cabin Crew Member is to refuse any flights before being re-trained and re-examined.

Validity of Recurrent Training The period of validity of a Recurrent Training shall be 12 calendar months in addition to the remainder of the month of issue. If issued within the final 3 calendar months of validity of a previous emergency and safety check, the period of validity shall extend from the date of issue until 12 months from the expiration date of that previous emergency and safety check; The period of validity of a 3-yearly recurrent check shall be three calendar years respectively, in addition to the remainder of the month of issue. If issued within the final three calendar months of validity of a previous check, the period of validity shall extend from the date of issue until three calendar years from the expiry date of that previous check.

R R

0.7.5

Regular proficiency checking Flight check

R R R

To confirm the proficiency of every Crew Member for flight-operations, she has to undergo minimum once per 12 calendar months a flight check, consisting of at least 2 sectors. Flight check duties are are part of Cabin Crew annual practical training and checking. Flight Checks are considered to be valid when appropriately documented and signed by the Cabin Crew Line


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Trainer/Cabin Crew Instructor conducting the check. For relevant documentation, refer to Appendix 12. The Trainee’s Licence or Cabin Crew Attestation, type qualification certificate, professional validity statement, Passport and Medical Certificate validity needs to be verified by Instructor or Line Trainer during safety briefing before Training Flight by visual verification of the the Trainee’s documents. The physical verification of documents is only applicable for Trainee on the flight, the rest of the cabin crew confirm the validity of their documents verbally. Besides the annual flight check, additional flight check may be assigned and conducted. Besides of Cabin Crew Instructor and Line Trainer the additional check can be performed also by Cabin Crew Base Manager. The flight check must be announced to the concerned Crew Member latest at the safety briefing by the Cabin Crew Instructor/Line Trainer/Cabin Crew Base Manager conducting the check. Such flight check will not be indicated in advance in the AIMS system. During the flight check the Cabin Crew Member is to demonstrate that she is familiar with and applies properly all procedures defined: in the CAM, in those parts of the company’s operations manuals and operations specifications which are necessary for the performance of the assigned duties and in Crew Orders/Crew Information. Should the Crew Member fail the flight check, the Crew Member will be removed from flying duties she will be assigned for a Safety Consultation with a Cabin Crew Instructor. After successful completion of the Safety Consultation, another flight check will be assigned at the earliest possibility. Should the Crew Member fail two consecutive flight checks, the Crew Member will be removed from flight duties and Safety Consultation will be assigned with a Cabin Crew Instructor. After successful completion of the Safety consultation the Crew Member will be scheduled for another flight check with the Instructor. If the Crew Member fails this flight check, he/she will be dismissed from flight duties and further disciplinary actions are to be initiated up to termination of the employment contract. NOTE: In such circumstances the cabin Crew Member is to refuse any flights before being re-trained and re-examined.

Briefing check To confirm the proficiency of every Crew Member for flight-operations, she has to undergo minimum once per 12 calendar months a briefing check. Briefing Checks are considered to be valid when appropriately documented and signed by the Cabin Crew Instructor or Cabin Crew Base Manager conducting the check. For relevant documentation, refer to Appendix 11. During the briefing check the Cabin Crew Member is to demonstrate that she is familiar with all procedures defined in the CAM, in those parts of the company’s operations manuals and operations specifications which are necessary for the performance of the assigned duties and in Crew Orders/Crew Information. The Cabin Crew Member is assessed on her general and technical knowledge of SOPs, emergency procedures, aircraft type related matters, and compliance with Wizz Air Grooming Manual. Should the cabin Crew Member fail a Briefing check due to lack of knowledge concerning safe execution of flight duties, the Crew Member will be removed from the relevant flight. A Safety Consultation with a Cabin Crew Instructor and a flight check will be assigned at the earliest possibility.

Grooming Check Cabin Crew Members are being assessed on their compliance with Wizz Air Work Wear Regulations on a non-regular basis in the form of grooming checks. Grooming checks are being conducted by Cabin Crew Base Managers and appointed Cabin Crew Instructors.


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0.7.6

Safety Consultation General

The purpose of the safety consultation is to give the opportunity to the Cabin Crew Members to review their knowledge on the necessary theory concerning safe execution of their Cabin Attendant duties and receive an explanation/clarification on that procedures/knowledge where discrepancies were discovered by themselves or their superiors. To confirm that discrepancies were eliminated, the Safety Consultation (except Voluntary Safety Consultation) will be followed by a written examination at all times. Crew Members are required to attend to the Safety Consultation with appropriate self preparation based on the contents of CAM, Crew Orders, Crew Information and those parts of the company’s operations manuals and operations specifications which are necessary for the performance of the assigned duties. Safety Consultation is considered to be “successfully completed” when the exam is passed and the relevant document is signed by the Cabin Crew Member, the Instructor conducting the Safety Consultation and the Cabin Crew Base Manager. Safety Consultation is considered to be “unsuccessful’” when the written exam following the Safety Consultation is failed. In such case another Safety Consultation will be assigned with a Cabin Crew Instructor at the earliest opportunity. The Crew member cannot be assigned for any flight duties until successfully completing the Safety Consultation and he/she is obliged to refuse any flight duty. Should the Crew Member participate in two consecutive unsuccessful Safety Consultations, further disciplinary actions are to be initiated, up to termination of the employment relationship. For the relevant document refer to Appendix 13.

Assignment Safety consultation may be assigned: -

due to failed flight check

-

due to failed line check

-

due to failed briefing check

-

due to failure of the Recurrent Training examination

-

based on written report of SCA, LT, INS to her Cabin Crew Base Manager with copy to Cabin Crew Training Manager

Voluntary Safety Consultation According to the general principle of the Safety Consultation, Cabin Crew Members have the right to request voluntary Safety Consultation any time when they deem it necessary in writing (via e-mail) from their Base Manager. Attendance on Voluntary Safety Consultation has no further consequence on the Crew Members performance evaluation irrespectively from the number of Voluntary Safety Consultation attended.

0.7.7 R R

Cabin Crew Attestation Validity

Cabin Crew is licensed based on EASA part CC regulations (alternatively EU-OPS regulations). The Cabin Crew Attestation is valid for lifetime unless revoked by the Authority (alternatively: EU-OPS license is valid for 2 years and will be exchanged into Cabin Crew Attestation based on WIZZ Air application approximately 3 months before the expiry). Each Cabin Crew member on flight duty must have with him/her a valid EASA compliant Cabin Crew Attestation (or alternatively EU-OPS compliant Cabin Crew License), type qualification


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certificate issued by WIZZ Air (or alternatively Type qualification page in EU-OPS license), professional validity document printed from a crewmember e-Crew AIMS Expiry Dates page (alternatively professional validation page in EU-OPS compliant Cabin Crew license).

0.7.8

Refresher Training and Checking

Each Cabin Crew Member who is absent from flying duties for more than 6 months is to undergo a refresher training as described in Operation Manual Part D 2.2.7. After the theoretical refresher training the Crew Member needs to pass the required examination. After passing of theoretical examination the Crew Member will be re-trained on line as well. The number of required line sectors is 8 (the last 2 sectors are treated as line check). Additionally, refresher training is to be assigned for each Crew Members who has expired on one or more of the subjects of Recurrent Training Program. In such situation, the subject of refresher training will be directly connected with the expired training subject. In such an occasion no line training sectors are necessary.

Recency of Experience A Cabin Crew Member shall not be assigned to a flying duty unless she has carried out at least 1 line flight in the preceding 90 days.

Interruption of Recency Any Cabin Crew Member who has been absent from flying duties for more than 3 months shall fulfill the following requirements prior to being scheduled again: R R R R R R R

Time period of interruption

Requirements

From 3-6 months

- Flight check with an instructor

6-12 months or more

- Refresher training and exam - Line training/check with an instructor

0.7.9

Familiarization and Line Training

Following the completion of the basic training, each Cabin Crew Member undertakes familiarization prior to operating as one of the minimum number of Cabin Crew required by the aeroplane type. The minimum number of familiarization / observer flights is 4 sectors. A familiarization flight shall be operated with the Cabin Crew Member wearing the applicable uniform, as an additional Crew Member to the minimum required number of Cabin Crew. The observing Cabin Crew Member should be seated on C/A5 jumpseats, with the exception to cabin seat inoperative procedure, refer to CAM 10.1.4. when the observer should be seated on a passenger seat. It is advisable to undertake one out of 4 sectors familiarization / observer flights in the flight deck when the permission of the Commander is granted during pre-flight briefing. In such case, the person may fly the entire leg in the flight deck and shall not ‘visit’ the cabin during flight, except for physiological, safety or training reasons.


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R R R R R R R R

Each Cabin Crew Member shall either participate in a visit to the aeroplane to be operated or participate in a familiarization/observer flight prior to operating as one of the minimum required number of Cabin Crew. The airplane visit/familiarization/observer flight shall provide an overview of the aeroplane’s exterior, interior and systems including the following: interphone and public address system, evacuation alarm system if provided, emergency lighting, smoke detector and lavatory fire extinguisher, safety/emergency equipment, flight crew compartment, cabin crew stations, toilet compartment, galleys, galley security and water shut-off, circuit breaker panels, exit location and its environment, passenger signs, and lighting panels. NOTE: The familiarization process of the new Cabin Attendant is documented on the relevant “Aircraft Familiarization Checklist” form which needs to be filled out accordingly during the familiarization process by the observer Crew Member. The completed form is required to be possessed by the trainee on her first line training day (for trainer’s verification). NOTE: The familiarization checklist can be found on S-drive: S:\CabinCrew\Bulletin\AIRCRAFT VISIT AND FAMILIARIZATION CHECKLIST

The Cabin Crew Member shall participate in all safety duties concerning the flight under supervision of the Senior Cabin Attendant. This includes: -

Safety and general briefing

-

Pre-flight check procedures

-

In-flight procedures (Crew under familiarization/observer flight should only observe the duties of Active Crew; no activities related to Safety procedures are permitted during this time)

-

Post-flight procedures, and

-

Debriefing

NOTE: The sole responsibility of the flight and the flight related standard procedure execution remains with the active Cabin Crew assigned for the duty.

0.7.10 Release of a Junior Cabin Attendant after familiarization The minimum number of sectors on a release/line training flight is 8 (out of which the last 2 are counted as a Line Check sectors). The cabin crew composition during line-training of Junior Cabin Attendant requires the following as a minimum: -

Cabin Crew Instructor or Cabin Crew Line Trainer

-

Senior Cabin Attendant

-

CA/JCA

-

JCA (trainee)

After completion of 8 sectors the Cabin Crew Instructor/Line Trainer will suggest to Cabin Crew Training Manager whether the performance of the trainee is satisfactory or additional line training sectors are required. Additionally 4 sectors (out of which last 2 are Line Check sectors) can be assigned by the Cabin Crew Training Manager in cooperation with the OCC. If the performance of the trainee after all 12 sectors will be unsatisfactory, the trainee, after decision of Cabin Crew Training Manager will be dismissed, or if performance is close to satisfactory, one can be exceptionally scheduled for Safety Consultations on ground and maximum 4 additional sectors (out of which last 2 are Line Check sectors) as second and last


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re-training. In case of unsatisfactory performance after second re-training process the trainee will be dismissed.

NOTE: In such circumstances the Cabin Crew Member is to refuse any flights before being re-trained and re-examined. NOTE: Maximum 2 JCA can be planned per flight, except if special permission of Head of Cabin Operations Wizz Air Group is granted. NOTE: in case there are 3 JCA planned for a flight duty, they can be accepted if at least one Cabin Crew Member of the 3 JCA has a minimum of 100 sectors or 200 hours of flight experience. NOTE: From safety perspective a Cabin Crew Member is considered to be JCA until she reaches 100 sectors or 200 hours of flight experience.

0.7.11 Release of Senior Cabin Attendant After completing the Senior Cabin Attendant Training and Exam successfully, the Cabin Crew Member must complete 8 line training sectors with the Cabin Crew Instructor/Line Trainer. After completion of 8 sectors the Cabin Crew Instructor/Line Trainer is to suggest to Cabin Crew Training Manager whether the performance of the trainee is satisfactory or additional line training sectors are required. Maximum 4 additional sectors (out of which last 2 are counted as Line Check sectors) can be assigned by the Cabin Crew Training Manager in cooperation with the OCC. After completion of the additional line-training sectors, the Line Trainer/Instructor will suggest to Cabin Crew Training Manager whether the trainee’s performance is satisfactory for being released for line operation as Senior Cabin Attendant. In case the performance is not satisfactory the Trainees will not be promoted to the Senior Cabin Attendant position.

0.7.12 Cabin Attendant returning after an absence from flying duties of 6 months or more The minimum number of sectors on a release/line training flight is 8 (out of which the last 2 are counted as a Line Check sectors). This applies for company experienced returners. Responsibilities during line training: The cabin crew composition during line-training of Cabin Attendant requires the following as a minimum: -

1 Cabin Crew Instructor or Cabin Crew Line Trainer

-

1 Senior Cabin Attendant

-

1 CA/JCA

-

1 JCA (trainee)

When line trainings are conducted on board, the training personnel has the responsibility of taking all appropriate actions to preserve the safety and the legality of the flight. Despite the above statement, the training personnel should not override the Senior Cabin Attendant in her role (if applicable), including the communication with other Crew Members. The Senior Cabin Attendant and the training personnel shall liaise in case and safety concerns arise. After completion of 8 sectors the Cabin Crew Instructor/Line Trainer will suggest to Cabin Crew Training Manager whether the performance of the trainee is satisfactory or additional line training sectors are required. Additional 4 sectors (out of which last 2 are Line Check sectors) can be assigned by the Cabin Crew Training Manager in cooperation with the OCC.


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If the performance of the trainee after 12 sectors is not satisfactory, the Cabin Crew Training Manager may recommend the dismissal of the Crew Member from further training. If the performance is close to satisfactory, one can be exceptionally scheduled for Safety Consultation on ground and maximum 4 additional sectors (out of which last 2 are Line Check sectors) as a second and last re-training. In case of unsatisfactory performance after the second re-training process the trainee will be dismissed. NOTE: In such circumstances the cabin Crew Member is to refuse any flights before being re-trained and re-examined. R R R R R

NOTE: In case the returning Cabin Attendant is a Senior Cabin Attendant, she needs to be first retrained for the Cabin Attendant position and after completion of 75 flight hours in C/A position she may be retrained on line for the Senior Cabin Attendant position (see the rules of SCA line upgrade description process).

0.8

Cabin Crew composition

0.8.1

Reference A/C Type

Max PAX seats

Min CC (EASA)

Wizz Air regular CC

Airbus A-320

180

4

4

For the type A320 operated by Wizz Air the required number of Cabin Crew is 4. The Cabin Crew may include additional Cabin Crew Members when required by the type of operation. Under exceptional circumstances additional Cabin Crew Members to be carried may be required by the Authority. One Cabin Cttendant will be designated to be the Senior Cabin Attendant for a particular flight or series of flights. This will be indicated in the Journey Log. In case there are two qualified SCA among the active Cabin Crew Members and one of them is assigned to perform training duties during the flight or series of flights (Instructor(s) and/or Line Trainer), she can delegate SCA duties to the other SCA. Such a change must clearly appear on the journey log (after coordination with OCC) and has to be communicated to the Commander by the General Briefing. The number of passenger seats on Wizz Air A320 aircraft is 180. The maximum number of adult and children (excluding infants) is 180. The maximum number of infants on board is 18. The maximum souls on board are 180 adults or children plus 18 infants (excluding operating Crew).

Minimum number of Cabin Crew Members The required number of Cabin Crew onboard during ground operations is the same as the minimum number of Cabin Crew in flight. It means that whenever any passengers are present in the passenger cabin the number of Cabin Crew cannot be reduced below unless in unforeseen circumstance. (For details refer to CAM section 0.8.1.2)


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Reduction of the number of Cabin Crew Unforeseen circumstances during flight If unforeseen circumstances occur during flight, and one of the Cabin Crew Members is not able to continue her duties, the flight may continue for the length of maximum 2 sectors with 3 Cabin Crew Members under the conditions specified in Operations Manual. For details refer to CAM 0.6.2.

Ground operation activities with reduced number of Crew R R R R

If there are reduced number of Cabin Crew present on board during conducting activities on ground, the Senior Cabin Crew Member must perform a pre-boarding safety briefing to the Cabin Crew as per follow: - changes in the pre-flight and security check - responsibility of the door operation - boarding position NOTE: A JCA under training is under the supervision of a Cabin Crew Instructor or Cabin Crew Line Trainer. During observer flights the candidate may not be part of the minimum number of Cabin Crew required.

R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

R R R

Boarding with reduced number of Cabin Crew may be commenced as per follows: -

The operating Senior Cabin Attendant must be present

-

Pre-flight safety briefing to the Cabin Crew is performed by SCA

-

All the pre-flight and security checks are completed

-

electrical power is available on the aircraft

-

at least one member of the Flight Crew is in the Flight Deck

-

Cabin Crew is aware of the position of servicing and loading vehicles at and near the exits

-

No re-fuelling is taking place

-

One Cabin Crew Member must be present at the front (fwd. doors) and one Cabin Crew Member must be at the rear of the cabin (to guard the rear doors)

-

A maximum of 50 passengers can board per Cabin Crew Member present. The remaining passengers can board once the full complement of Cabin Crew are present

-

In case of an evacuation, a member of Flight Crew will assist at the front of the cabin

-

Cabin Crew should be aware that they may be responsible for more than 1 exit during an emergency situation and should adapt their emergency procedures where necessary

-

Cabin Crew must remain aware of the position of servicing and loading vehicles at and near the exits

NOTE : For the details of preparing the cabin for emergency landing with reduced number of Cabin Crew refer to CAM section 4.2.7.3


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0.9

General rules and regulations for Crew Members

0.9.1

Behaviour in public

Every Crew Member must bear in mind that people will identify her appearance with those of Wizz Air, especially when on duty and wearing the uniform. Crew Members have to be aware that they are the most visible representatives of Wizz Air and should behave accordingly. For the purpose of proper customer service image, when on board, with passengers presented in the cabin, the Cabin Crew is not allowed to:

0.9.2 R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

-

Eat and drink in the direct public view (e.g. seating on the front jumpseat(s))

-

Sit in a passenger seat, with an exception to the inoperative Cabin Attendant jumpseat procedure (CAM section 10.1.4), Cabin Crew incapacitation procedure (CAM section 0.6.2) and deadheading procedure (CAM section 0.9.5).

Personal documents

When on flight duty, the following documents have to be possessed, carried and be ready to be presented: -

-

For the holders of Cabin Crew Licence (issued before 08/04/2013 in accordance with EU-OPS): o

Valid Cabin Crew Licence (signed by the holder)

o

Medical Certificate JAR-FCL 3 class 2 (signed by the holder)

o

Valid passport and company ID

o

Valid medical certificate (signed by the holder)

o

Visa if required

o

Vaccination card if required

o

On-board documents as per follows:



Lost/Damaged Property Form and updated booklet (carried by ALL Crew Members)

announcement



Injury/Illness Report, Flight Disturbance Incident Report, Final Warning and 2 copies of the Cabin Condition Feedback Form (carried by SCA only)

For the holders of the Cabin Crew Attestations (issued after 08/04/2013 in accordance with EASA part CC) o

Valid Cabin Crew Attestation (signed by the holder)

o

Valid type qualification certificate

o

Printed professional validity statement (from AIMS/Expiry Dates) with all training withing validity period

o

Valid passport

o

Valid medical cabin crew report (signed by the holder)

o

Company ID

o

Visa if required

o

Vaccination card if required

o

On-board documents as per follows:



Lost/Damaged Property Form and updated booklet (carried by ALL Crew Members)

announcement


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Injury/Illness Report, Flight Disturbance Incident Report, Final Warning and 2 copies of the Cabin Condition Feedback Form (carried by SCA only)

It is Crew Member’s responsibility to keep her personal documents in proper condition and to monitor their validity. If the company ID is not in possession of the Crew Member at the time of check-in, the standby Crew shall be called. With Captain’s permission, if calling of the standby Crew would generate a delay of the flight, the Crew Cember may be accepted for the flight based on the valid license and passport.

0.9.3

Crew health precautions General

The well being of Crew Members is essential in accident prevention. A Crew Member must be fit and alert, to be able to respond to any situation in the correct manner. In connection with accident prevention, it is important for Crew Members to be aware of possible influence on their well-being. This will help to control human errors caused by body rhythm disturbance, sleep deprivation, health performance and stress. A Crew Member’s sickness/illness, her feeling unwell/indisposed or the impairment of her senses and reflexes by narcotics, drugs or pharmaceutical products have often contributed to incidents and accidents. Therefore Crew health is of the highest importance and has a direct impact upon flight safety. This is reflected in strict requirement for regular medical examinations and medical certificates. A Crew Member must not perform duties on an aeroplane if she is in any doubt of being able to accomplish her assigned duties, or if she feels unfit.

Alcohol The purpose of the policy is to describe the principles and administrative procedures regarding the consumption of alcohol prior to and during duty period, including standby duties. -

Aviation safety requires the full decision making ability of all Wizz Air employees, therefore all employees are expected to perform their job with clear mind, free of the influence of alcohol.

-

Wizz Air applies the relevant EASA rule. This means that no employee is permitted to perform their job in Wizz Air with higher than 0,2 promille blood alcohol level. To be able to meet this requirement, employees shall not consume any alcohol for a minimum period of 8 hours before standby or reporting for duty. This time limit may need to be longer for some employees based on the individual sensitivity, body weight etc. Therefore each employee has to be aware of her personal sensitivity for alcohol, and ensure lower than 0,2 promille blood alcohol level by the start of her duty.

-

Any violation of the above principles, i.e. exceeding the 0,2 promille blood alcohol level any time during duty period will result in the extraordinary termination of the employment relationship of the affected employee.

NOTE: Crew Members are not allowed to consume alcohol or any drinks which might be identified as alcohol (e.g.: alcohol-free beer) while in uniform.


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Administrative procedures To ensure that all Wizz Air Crew Members are in full compliance with the rules and principles described above, the following measures applied: -

Random alcohol checks shall be carried out by an external professional or authorized Wizz Air employee at any time and any place during duty period. Each Wizz Air employee is expected to cooperate with the person performing the alcohol testing. Refusal of the alcohol testing is considered to be a serious violation of this policy; therefore it has the same consequence as having positive blood-alcohol level

-

In case of positive alcohol test, the affected employee may ask for a second testing, performed by a medical institution, directly from blood measurement. The second check will be performed immediately after the first one. In this case the results of the direct blood testing will be taken into consideration

-

Any employee who found to be under the influence of alcohol (blood alcohol level higher than 0,2 promille), shall be immediately suspended from duty pending further investigation and disciplinary action where necessary

Narcotics and/or Drugs The use of narcotics and/or drugs that have not been prescribed by a medical practitioner is expressly forbidden at any time. This also applies to sleep inducing drugs.

Medication Many medications may have adverse effects on the nervous system, which may be more marked in flight than on the ground. As a general rule, if a Crew Member finds it necessary to take, or has been prescribed some form of medication, her fitness to fly must be reconsidered, and she shall seek aero-medical advice before commencing or continuing flying duties. Cabin Crew Members must, without undue delay, report to her supervising manager, the following medical circumstance: -

hospital or clinic admission for more than 12 hours, or

-

surgical operation or invasive procedure

-

pregnancy

Blood donation Crew Members should not normally act as blood donors. Should circumstances require differently, Crew Members who are scheduled for flight duties must not don blood within 24 hours prior to scheduled start of duty.

Deep sea diving Crew Members who are scheduled for flight duties shall not exercise such sport activities which include deep sea diving within 24 hours prior to scheduled start of duty. Diving to a depth exceeding 10 meters implies refraining from flying duties up to 48 hours.

Sleep and rest Although the controls on flight and duty periods are intended to ensure that adequate opportunities are provided for Crew Members to obtain rest and sleep, individuals should ensure that proper advantage is taken of such opportunities.


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Anesthetics Crew must not operate: - Within 48 hours following a general anesthetic -

0.9.4

Within 24 hours following any local, including dental anesthetic

Dress rules

The uniform of Wizz Air is a part of the Wizz Air company identity. All Crew Members have to wear their uniform as prescribed in the latest Wizz Air Grooming Manual. All Crew Members are required to carry yellow safety jacket when assigned for flight duties. Safety jackets are to be worn on at all times outside the aircraft, unless the crew is moving directly from aircraft steps to the crew transport vehicle or vice versa. The Company ID must always be worn in a visible manner when outside the A/C.

0.9.5

Travelling as DeadHead Crew (DHC)

When a Cabin Crew Member is deadheading/positioning, she is recorded on the journey log. This ensures that the positioning time is taken into account for the associated duty and rest periods. In addition, according to circumstances, the Crew Member may have a booked ticket as well; a Crew Member that is in possession of both a booked ticket, and is registered on the journey log also, has the option of travelling either as a passenger (uniform not required) or as being registered on the journey log only (wearing of uniform is a must). If Cabin Crew is registered on the journey log only, the following rights and requirements apply: -

Cabin Crew Member is considered to be an additional Crew Member and not a passenger

-

Cabin Crew Member must wear uniform

-

Cabin Crew Member must report to the Crew briefing room at the correct check in time and participate in the general briefing (unless positioning starts in different time and/or place than the operating Crew shift)

-

Crew Members may travel anywhere in the passenger cabin but will not take priority over passengers choice of seating

-

Crew Members shall not block rows for other colleagues

-

Crew Members shall clearly declare to the Commander if they are checked-in or not, as this has an influence on the load-sheet and on the records for the total number of persons on board the aircraft

-

Cabin Crew in uniform may be seated in any row subject to permission of SCA of the flight, taking passenger convenience into consideration as first priority

-

When in uniform and in order not to be confused by the passengers with the operating Cabin Crew, deadheading Cabin Crew members must:

-

o

remove the Company ID card

o

not impede the active Cabin Crew in their duties

o

not occupy required Cabin Crew assigned stations

o

remove the name tag and Wizz Wing from their uniform

At the discretion of the Commander, a Crew Member travelling ‘on the journey log’ may be admitted to the flight deck. In such a case, she will fly the entire


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leg in the flight deck and shall not ‘visit’ the cabin during flight, except for physiological or duty reasons -

Cabin Crew Members travelling as DHC are required to wait in the cabin area until the doors are disarmed and opened for disembarkation to avoid any distraction of active crews’ attention from door operation procedures

NOTE: Deadheading Crew is not allowed to take over any kind of duties of the active Crew under normal operation. -

R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

If a Crew Member is travelling out of uniform she may only travel as a ticketed passenger – placing her name on the journey log as well does not give any extra privileges. This means that she is not permitted to do anything a normal passenger could not do, including changing aircraft by crossing the apron – she must go through arrivals, check in again and come back to the aircraft through the normal passenger route. If she is trying to connect with another flight and thinks the timings will not allow her to follow the above procedure, then the only option is to travel in uniform and be on the journey log. She will also need to make sure that her put their name is put on the journey log for the flight she is transferring to.

The following procedure is valid only for outbound positioning from Budapest Base:

0.9.6

-

Only the active Crew shall be shown on the load sheet as part of the Crew composition regardless of the journey log records. (Active Crew: including Cabin Crew Instructor, Line Trainer, Cabin Crew Observer, Line Checker Captain, Pilot Observer, etc.)

-

All DeadHeading Crew Members must have printed boarding card and the following process must be maintained when positioning:

-

Positioning Crew Member in uniform may proceed with the active Crew through security lane, but must present boarding card to the ramp agent when entering the aircraft

-

Positioning Crew not in uniform must pass security, border control (if applicable) and must enter the aircraft with the passengers (this already applies to every base)

-

Those Crew Members who do not have a boarding card printed (only flight ticket), should proceed to check-in desk 48 at Terminal 2B for boarding card

-

If there is a DeadHeading Crew Member joining another flight (if it is not the first flight of the active Crew) and if wearing uniform, they can proceed to the aircraft as Crew, but must present boarding card to ramp agent (applies in BUD only).

Non-commercial flight

Due to operational requirement Crew might be assigned for flight or series of flights with no passengers on board. In such circumstances the Cabin Crew is to follow standard operating procedures with exception to duties related to passengers. Flights carrying Wizz Air personnel only may be operated with less than minimum number of Cabin Crew Members or with no Cabin Crew Members if occupants on board are Crew Members or maintenance personnel and are familiar with the emergency procedures. The Commander is responsible for ensuring that occupants are familiar with those procedures.


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0.10

Other Cabin Crew related procedures

0.10.1 Request policy rules General R R

Planning of the Cabin Crew roster is within the responsibility of Operations Planning. CRDO (Crew requested OFF days) CRDO Days have to be requested via the AIMS system. The system: -

Accepts only two CRDO Days per month

-

Accepts only CRDO Days for the month following the month of the last published roster

-

Accepts only the request when it is done in the period defined as: o

Beginning of the period: 31 days before the end of the month of the last published roster

o

End of the period: 22 days before the end of the month of the last published roster

Example: To request two CRDO Days for September accounted time period starts (by counting back from the end of August 31 days) on 1st of August and finished (by counting back from the end of August 22 days) on 9th of August. Request in the AIMS system for two chosen days in September should be done between 1st and 9th August.

R R R

Flight requests Maximum two flight requests per month can be sent via company e-mail to the Operations Planning with a copy to Cabin Crew Base Manager.

School requested day OFF Request will be accepted only for the exam day after providing the following documents: -

Official paper from the school (with stamp and signature) that the person is enrolled

-

Official paper stating the number and dates of the exam (monthly or yearly)

NOTE: The above defined requirement may vary depending on the country specification.

Schedule change after publish date Each Cabin Crew, after schedule has been published, can make a swap request via the Trip Trade module of the AIMS system. System will always check FTL limitations, should the swap be against the FTL, the system will refuse it and send the notification to the requestor. Operations Control Center shall not be contacted for swap requests. R R R R R

NOTE: Cabin Crew might be notified by Operations Control Center via an automated system that sends sms out from a server (i.e requiring no answer). Crew Dispatch can directly be contacted via their mobile phones: +36 70 777 9351 and +36 70 777 9395


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HP (holiday paid) request 0.10.1.6.1 General Number of entitled HP days is counted proportionally for calendar year taking into account the “Starting Date” of an employee. All HP days are planned on Friday-Monday basis.

0.10.1.6.2 Annual holiday R R

R R R

WIZZ AIR HUNGARY / POLISH BRANCH / CZECH BRANCH/ LITHUANIAN/ LATVIA BRANCH Employees are under Hungarian labour law system therefore Hungarian rules on vacation entitlement applying, which means that the basic entitlement is defined by the age of the employee. NOTE: Based on Hungarian Labour Code, long sick leave (more than 30 calendar days) can reduce the eligibility. AGE

BASIC

25

28

31

33

35

37

39

41

43

45

HOLIDAY ENTITLEMENT

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

WIZZ AIR ROMANIAN BRANCH Employee’s holiday entitlement is 21 days per annum WIZZ AIR BULGARIAN BRANCH Employee’s holiday entitlement is 25 days per annum Wizz Air SERBIAN BRANCH Employee’s holiday entitlement is 20 days per annum WIZZ AIR MACEDONIAN BRANCH Employee’s holiday entitlement is 20 days per annum REQUEST PROCEDURE FOR ANNUAL HOLIDAY R

An employee requests HP by recording it via WizzPort Vacation Management System. CC Base Manager plans HP in her base according to HP demand specified according to the operational needs.

R R

Weekends, bank holidays are not to be counted as HP days but need to be inserted into VMS system as HP days. During high season (internal company’s rule) only 7HP days can be requested by CC. The high season, as agreed is the period between 15.06-30.09 and 20.12-04.01. Annual holiday will be planned based on the yearly holiday plan that shall be submitted by the employee via WizzPort Vacation Management System until the 1st day of the last month of the previous year and will be granted according to operational needs specified by the company. Unpaid leave request / unpaid leave The Unpaid Holiday is optional and is at the discretion of the company whether a person will receive it or not. The request is considered strictly on individual basis and can be granted only if a substantial and acceptable reason is given or when it is agreed mutually between employer and employee. In each case Cabin Crew Base Manager is to be informed.


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R R

The employee applying for unpaid holiday needs to fill out “Unpaid leave request form” that can be found on S:\HR\Bulletin\Forms\Unpaid leave request form or S:\HR\Bulletin\HR for CREW\Forms\HP. After initial acceptance of the request by Base Manager the form must be accepted and approved by signature of both Head of CC Wizz Air Group and Head of HR, otherwise it is unapproved and not valid. For the relevant form, refer to Appendix 10. Occasional leave (OHP) The table below contains the additional holiday days as defined in the Labour Code or Internal Policies of the applicable countries. POLAND/ HUNGARY/CZECH REPUBLIC

ROMANIA

BULGARIA

DEATH (close relatives)

2 days holiday

1 day holiday (grandparents, brother, sister) to 3 days holiday (husband, child, parents, parents-in-law)

2 days additional HP

BIRTH

5 days HP for father which needs to be use during first 2 months after birth.

0

0

CHILDREN**

1 child = 2 days additional off (must be planned as a regular HP). 2 children = 4 additional days off. 3 children or more = 7 extra days off.

0

0

BLOOD DONATION

1 day off (planned as a regular HP).

1 day off

2 days off

MARRIAGE

0

5 days off

2 days HP

EVENT

Positive deviation from the above specified is on the employer’s discretion. NOTE – close relatives are considered to be: - husband/wife - spouse, partner without marriage, direct line relatives, direct line relatives of the spouse, children (own, adopted, step), adopting parents, stepparents, sisters/brothers. SERBIA and MACEDONIA: Paid absence from work with compensation (Paid Leave, OHP) is regulated as maximum 7 working days in the course of one calendar year, in cases stipulated in the relevant labor law and applicable regulations (e.g. getting married, spouse`s childbirth, death of family members, natural disaster).

0.10.2 Reporting sick leave Each Crew Member shall report as soon as possible to the Crew Dispatch Officer by telephone call and at first opportunity confirm via e-mail any circumstances which prevent him/her from performing his/her duty in order to provide for substitution in a timely manner. At the same time Cabin Crew Base Manager must be informed by the means defined by the Cabin Crew Base Manager (e-mail, sms, telephone call). If possible, advice the Crew Dispatch Officer of the expected length of absence. Crew Member involved in any training activity (trainer or trainee) has also to confirm unavailability by email to the Cabin Crew Training Manager.


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Cabin Crew Member shall obtain an appropriate sick leave document. This document must be scanned and sent by email to the Base Manager, relevant HR and payroll provider e-mail account as soon as possible (for more details refer to Base Procedure). The original sick leave certificate must be placed in the dedicated location at the home base of the Crew member latest by the first working day following the sick-leave. It is not allowed to take a duty during reported sick leave time. It is not allowed to do corrections on the Sick Leave Certificate. If corrections must be made, due to incorrect data’s, a new Sick Leave Certificate must be issued by the doctor. Before returning to work, the Crew Member must advise the Crew Dispatch Officer that she is ready to return to his/her duties.

NOTE: For a sick leave procedure following cabin crew incapacitation refer to CAM 0.6.2.

0.10.3 Reporting personal data’s changes In case of personal data’s change (e.g.: address, phone number, name etc.) the following procedures apply:

Passport Number Change The scanned copy of the new passport must be send to Cabin.Training.Documents@wizzair.com, with a copy to her Base Manager. It is the responsibility of the Crew member to insert the new passport data in the AIMS system

Telephone Number Change It must immediately be reported to the Crew Dispatch Officer, Cabin Crew Base Manager. It is the responsibility of the Crew member to insert the new number in the AIMS system Marital Status Change (including number of children): must be reported to the relevant HR Assistant and Cabin Crew Base Manager as soon as possible, but not later than 10 days after the applicable date of change

Bank Account Change It must be reported to the relevant HR Assistant and Cabin Crew Base Manager

Address Change It must be reported to the relevant HR Assistant and Cabin Crew Base Manager. It is the responsibility of the Crew member to insert the new address in the AIMS system

Qualification Change Qualification change can be for example receiving of a university degree. It must be reported to the relevant HR Assistant and Cabin Crew Base Manager.

Name Change: R R R R R

The following items must be filled out in hard copy (with capital letters) and given to the Base Manager: - LA-09 form - Declaration (authorization for WIZZ Air to represent Crew Member in front of the Authority) The following items must be sent by e-mail to Cabin.Training.Documents@wizzair.com (the e-mail should contain the following sentence as subject: “Name Change- plus full name of suppliant):


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R R R R R

-

Scanned passport with new name on it Scanned Starting Datasheet with new name* Scanned previous medical certificate (with old name) Signature form (scanned and sent in pdf format!) Type Certificate Data (filled out and sent in excel format)

The following items must be send by post to Cabin Crew Training Manager (Wizz Air Group, 1185 Budapest, BUD International Airport, Building 221, Hungary): R R R

-

Family attestation form filled out and signed in original * Starting Datasheet form filled out and signed on original) 1 photo passport style (shoulders covered) for new company ID

NOTE: It is Crew Member responsibility to deliver all the above mentioned documents to Cabin Crew Training Manager. The process of License/Medical Certificate or Cabin Crew Attestation / Medical Report name change will not be started until all the documents are delivered to WIZZ Budapest office. Whenever all the requested documents are possessed (ID, license, medical certificate CC Attestation, Type Qualification Certificate, Medical Report), the employee shall contact Cabin Crew Training Manager. The name change in AIMS and e-mail system will be requested by CC Training Manager or CC Base Manager (after consultation with CC Training Manager).

NOTE: Only after completion of all above steps one can start using new documents *The relevant forms to be found on the company server S:/HR/Bulleting/Forms/Starting datasheets.


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0.11

Flight and duty time limitations – rest requirements

For full text of all general rules, terminology, flight and duty time limitations, rest requirements and irregularities refer to OM part A Section 7, for extracts refer to CAM Appendix 17.


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INTENTIONNALY LEFT BLANK


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1 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES General cautions Cabin Attendant duties are generally executed in a safe environment. However, it is an individual’s responsibility to be pre-cautious and take all necessary actions to avoid any harm or injuries at all times.

1.1

Pre-flight duties

1.1.1

Briefings

70 minutes prior to every flight duty each Cabin Crew Member has to check-in via the AIMS self check-in system. The computer is located in the Crew briefing room. Delayed reporting for duty by Cabin Crew is not accepted, as it reduces the time for the appropriate crew briefing, and may lead to insufficient preparation for flight duty. In case the Cabin Crew Member fails to report latest 5 minutes after the reporting time the SCA has to inform the Crew Dispatcher and the Commander. The Crew Dispatcher takes the necessary action.

NOTE: When operational irregularities make it necessary to modify Crew check-in time on short notice, OCC will inform the involved Crew by SMS. Successfully delivered SMS will be considered by the Crew dispatcher as the Crew member being notified. All Cabin Crew Members have to be present at the briefing in appropriate uniform specified in the Wizz Air Grooming Manual. R R

All Cabin Attendants have to check the presence and validity of all the required personal documents specified in CAM 0.9.2.

R R R

All Crew Members have to check their email prior to each flight duty for the latest Crew Orders and Crew Infos and for any other current information relating to the execution of the flight duty

All Cabin Crew Members must be familiar with the content of the latest Crew Orders and Crew Info prior to every briefing.

Briefings are identified as being a crucial ingredient of effective Crew Resource Management and should: -

Ensure open communication between the Flight Crew and the Cabin Crew

-

Promote teamwork

-

Set the expectations for the flight

A successful briefing should be short, interesting and detailed, and should include teamwork, communication, and coordination, planning and anticipating possible unplanned events. Briefing should provide a clear picture of the flight ahead, and build a common understanding amongst the crew of expectations of the flight. The briefing should be relevant, and appropriate to series of flights.

Safety briefing Safety briefing must immediately be started after check-in via the AIMS self check-in system. Prior to every flight duty a Cabin Crew Safety Briefing must be held. In case any of the Crew Members is not a native speaker the briefing has to be held in English. Basic courtesy rules apply when interlocutors have different native languages. Crew Members are to remember that good CRM may be impaired when deliberately using a language unknown to one member of a group and this concern it to be observed at all times while on duty.


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Before starting Safety briefing SCA has to ensure that all Cabin Crew Members have their mobiles phones switched off. SCA must conduct the briefing and: -

Present flight details: flight numbers, aircraft registration

-

Assign each C/A to a specific duty (assigned area). Should any of the C/A not be present at the safety briefing, she will automatically be assigned to C/A 3 position. (C/A 2 has to be a native speaker in order to be able to substitute the SCA regarding the On-Board Announcements, in case SCA is not a native speaker)

-

SCA is to take into account the operating experience of the Cabin Crew Members when distributing the duty position. Two Junior C/As being assigned on the C/A3 and C/A4 position is to be avoided whenever Crew composition allows

-

Encourage the Cabin Crew Members to immediately report and communicate any unusual, abnormal or emergency situations to the Captain and SCA

-

Check the Cabin Crew Members regarding fulfilment of documentation, rest time requirements, being fit to fly, Wizz Air work wear regulation (defined in Wizz Air Grooming Manual)

-

Check the Cabin Crew Members regarding rest time requirements and being fit to fly. If any of the C/As deemed to be unfit to fulfil the duty, SCA is required to refuse to take the C/A for the duty

-

Discuss the latest Crew Order and Crew Info – it is also important to provide the Cabin Crew Members with the opportunity to ask questions

-

Encourage the Cabin Crew Members to perform the highest service standards

-

Check the Cabin Crew Members on their safety, emergency procedures and equipment knowledge. By exposing Cabin Crew to safety procedures and equipment issues by briefing questions on a regular basis, a high standard of safety can be maintained

-

In case of a C/A having unsatisfactory knowledge of safety, emergency procedures and emergency equipment specification, the SCA may decide, after consultation with the Commander, not to accept this C/A on the flight. In that case the SCA must call the Crew Dispatch Officer for a Cabin Attendant on SBY duty. The SCA must inform the Base Manager and/or Cabin Crew Training Manager with full details, in written form preferably before, but not later than after the last duty sector. Failure of sufficient knowledge of safety equipment and procedures is endangering flight safety, therefore it may lead to further consequential actions up to the termination of the employment contract

Short safety briefing must be provided, in case of any change of the Cabin Crew composition onboard during duty (minimum requirement for such briefing is revision of the main door operation responsibility assigned to cabin crew new position onboard).

NOTE: A Cabin Crew safety briefing must always be held in case the time period between landing and next take-off is more than 24 hours or in case the Cabin Crew composition has changed. Cabin Crew, who was not participating in the safety/general briefing, is to be briefed by SCA, immediately when she joined the Crew on duty. The briefing should include the following: flight details (flight number, aircraft registration - if applicable), check fulfilment of documentation, rest time requirements, being fit to fly. SCA should encourage the Cabin Crew Member to immediately report and communicate any unusual, abnormal or emergency situations to the Captain and SCA, and to perform the highest service standards. NOTE: SCA must respect time constrains while conducting the Safety Briefing


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General briefing Once the safety briefing is completed, the Commander will conduct a general Crew briefing. The general Crew briefing must include a review of information relevant for the Cabin Crew to perform their duties: -

Number of passengers

-

Flight time for each sector

-

Routing, if relevant

-

Expected weather conditions, possible turbulence and how this could affect the service in the cabin

-

Necessity of the Life Vest Demo

-

Refuelling procedures

-

Security and safety reminders

-

Extra information he deems necessary

Elements of good CRM should be observed. Time should be allowed for questions and answers. All Crew Members should take time to state questions or concerns at this time. Correct rest time must be observed by all Crew Members - otherwise situation clearly stated to the Commander. General Briefing must include a Security Briefing. The Security part of the briefing must emphasize importance of security checks, task sharing of security inspection for cabin and cockpit, specifics of the destinations and major threats (object left on board by a disembarking passenger, object placed on board by unidentified ground personnel coming on board during turn around). Basic courtesy rules apply when interlocutors have different native languages. Crew Members are to remember that good CRM may be impaired when deliberately using a language unknown to one member of a group and this concern it to be observed at all times while on duty. After the General Briefing, the Cockpit Crew and Cabin Crew shall proceed to the airport terminal. At the terminal the Crew has to pass the security check and the passport control (if applicable). The whole Crew has to move together.

1.2

At the aircraft

1.2.1

Admission of auditors or other Authority personnel to Wizz Air A/C

A Flight Operations Inspector (FOI) of the relevant Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) or Department of Transport (DfT) Security Inspectors may carry out inspection of Wizz Air A/C. Full cooperation on the ground as well as on board shall be given to all inspectors. The inspector should not be refused admittance to compartments indicated as “Crew Only”. CAA FOI’s may travel on flights at short notice. They have priority to occupy the observer seat over extra Crew Members that are on board. Notwithstanding the above the final decision with regard to admission to the flight deck rests solely with the Commander. CAA FOI’s shall have access to all flight documentation that are required to be carried on board during flight. The following procedure must be applied in all case of authorised personnel seeking to enter the A/C: -

Authorized inspectors are permitted to enter the A/C via any accessible door


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1.2.2

-

The identity of the person(s) is to be challenged and confirmed immediately after recognition of her presence on board

-

After proper identification, Crew Members are to return to their normal duties

-

SCA should inform the Commander at the earliest opportunity, but entry must not be denied or delayed while waiting for the Commander to be informed

-

All required support must be given to the authorised person(s), as well providing any necessary documents requested

-

After the authorised personnel have left the A/C, a second security check must be conducted

Admission of the Cabin Crew to Wizz Air A/C

After a night stop or when the A/C was closed and the doors were sealed, the Commander shall open the main cabin door, remove and check the seal number. For details refer to CAM 6.5.1.

1.2.3

Stairs positioning

General As per company standards 2 sets of stairs are required to be provided for every Wizz Air departure (in case of any discrepancy on that matter, the CRF must be sent to Ground Operations after completion of the duty sectors). Whenever only 1 set of stairs is available OR the A/C is parked at the jet bridge, the stair/jet bridge must be positioned at the FWD door of the A/C (1L) and boarding and disembarking are to be carried out accordingly. Stairs must be in a good mechanical condition, have full buffer/rubber protection on all surfaces that could potentially come into contact with the aircraft (any others must be removed from service immediately). Whenever Cabin Crew Members notice stairs which are unbalanced, without rubber protecting part on the platform end, or any other discrepancy of the stairs, it needs to be reported immediately to the SCA, Commander and Handling Agent and by the end of duty by CRF format to Ground Operations. Correct positioning of the stairs are as follows: -

Correct height of the stairs is 20-25cm below the floor level to the main doors. This will allow sufficient room for any movement of the aircraft fuselage during boarding/loading/fuelling in both upward and downward directions

-

Stairs should not be positioned directly against the fuselage and in a permanent contact with the aircraft’s skin

-

A small gap (3-5cm) between the stairs and the aircraft is to be maintained

-

Handrails of the stairs shall be adjusted to the safe distance from the A/C body, to avoid any person falling from the stairs

Airports equipped with the automatic stairs positioning system/jetbridge might require different adjusting distance than stated above. For steps with automatic levelling systems, these steps shall be positioned according to the ground personnel instructions to ensure that the integrity of this system remains. In case of concerns, confirmation from the ground handling personnel is to be requested (the Commander must be informed).


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Pre-flight check of the stairs -

When arriving at the aircraft, SCA (1L) and C/A 4 (4L) have to check if the fuselage of the aircraft around the doors is clear of scratches. In case any scratch is being observed it needs to be immediately reported to SCA (by C/A4) and to the Commander (by SCA)

-

Particular attention should be given to a night-stopping aircraft for first departures as boarding/fuelling/loading into an empty aircraft is potentially likely to cause more movement

-

During winter season, Cabin Crew shall check that the stairs/gates are free of ice, snow and frost. SCA should not hesitate to ask for de-icing after consulting with the Commander

-

During pre-flight check SCA (1L) and C/A 4 (4L) have to carefully check that the stairs/gates and also the handrails are positioned correctly. Adjustment of the handrail by the Cabin Crew is not allowed

-

If stairs positioning is NOT correct, before starting boarding, SCA should advise Handling Agent that corrective actions are needed. Stairs are not to be adjusted whilst in position next to the aircraft. When, after initial positioning, adjustments are required, Cabin Crew needs to be informed

-

After closing of the door, stairs must be removed from the aircraft completely, readjusted, and repositioned. After ground staff knocks on the door, Cabin Crew will open the door again and will confirm that the stairs are positioned correctly or will request further adjustment

Stairs during embarkation During embarkation, Cabin Crew should not hesitate to stop the boarding process if any concern – regarding correct stairs status/positioning – might arise and should request readjustment of the stairs.Prior to repositioning of the stairs the side guide rails should be fully retracted to ensure that no contact can be made between the side guide rails and the aircrafts’ fuselage, additionally the door needs to be closed. Cabin Crew will confirm that the stairs are positioned correctly or will request further adjustments to be done. NOTE: Cabin Crew is to pay special attention to stairs with wider platform being positioned at the AFT main door due to shape of the aircraft fuselage. After the completion of embarkation, right before closing the doors, Cabin Crew must make a visual inspection of the door surrounding for any new scratches visible. Before departure the doors will be closed only when the stairs are in position. Ground staff responsible for removing the stairs must check with the Crew verbally that the stairs are to be removed. Any earlier removal of the stairs needs immediately to be reported to SCA and Commander, as a safety threat. Stairs during disembarkation Upon arrival each Crew Member should pay extra attention during the stairs positioning process and report to SCA when aircraft movement was caused by the stairs touching the aircraft skin. SCA is to report to the Commander. When the aircraft doors are opened according to the relevant procedures, a visual check of correct stairs positioning must be performed by Cabin Crew to assure that stairs are positioned properly. In case requirements of the safe stairs positioning are not met, handling agent should be asked to reposition the stairs as per Wizz Air instructions. Cabin Crew shall also check if the fuselage of the aircraft around the doors is clear of scratches. In case any scratch is being observed it needs to be immediately reported to SCA and Commander.


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Whenever 2 sets of stairs are used passengers must disembark from the FWD and AFT doors simultaneously to avoid aircraft movement. R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

In case of jet bridge being in use for disembarkation or whenever AFT stairs are positioned with delay (i.e. disembarkation starts through door 1L only), a significant A/C nose movement may take place. Therefore, a special attention to active disembarkation must be maintained by Cabin Crew to prevent the sudden nose-up movement of the A/C caused by the possible unbalanced passenger flow. In such a situation, Cabin Crew is required to act as follows: -

Prior starting the disembarkation, SCA has to announce to passengers via PA to proceed to forward section of the cabin

-

The announcement is to be repeated at least once and further on as often as situation requires

-

CA2 has to observe the cabin staying in the 1DEF row to make sure that continuous flow of passengers is maintained towards cabin “section A�

-

In case the flow of disembarking passengers' is obstructed or not enough passengers queuing in the front, CA2 has immediately inform SCA to stop disembarkation

-

If disembarkation is stopped, SCA has to make appropriate announcement via PA to ask passengers to proceed to the forward section

-

During passengers' disembarkation SCA has to actively monitor the stairs/jet bridge level

-

In case SCA notices that the step from a/c to the stairs/jet bridge is unsafe, she has to immediately STOP DISEMBARKATION, report to the Commander and ask for readjustment of the stairs

-

In case of concerns, disembarkation must be stopped and the Commander must be informed

NOTE: When the aircraft is parked at jetbridge with automatic adjustment system, Cabin Crew is only to monitor the status of the jetbridge position. Additional guidance for the stairs positioning can S://CabinCrew/Bulletin/TRAINING/STEPS POSITIONING AWARNESS.

1.2.4

be

found

on

Door safety straps

Door safety straps are located in the frame of each main door. The door safety straps must be placed across the doorway:

1.2.5

-

whenever the doors are open and stairs/gate are not in position (to avoid the possibility of persons falling out of the A/C)

-

whenever the doors are open, stairs are provided BUT none of the following are taking place (to avoid unauthorised access; concerns 4L door mainly): o

boarding

o

disembarkation

o

fuelling

Main door operation responsibility assigned to Cabin Crew duty position

The area of responsibility in regards of door handling during normal operation is as follow: -

SCA is responsible for door 1L


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-

C/A2 is responsible for door 1R

-

C/A3 is responsible for door 4R

-

C/A4 is responsible for door 4L

NOTE: Each Crew Member is to operate their assigned door only, unless emergency situation requires differently and to fulfil the security check requirements.

1.2.6

Crew Baggage

General R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

-

The Crew bags and other Crew belonging items must be placed in the overhead compartments

-

Small “Travelite” Crew bags may be placed behind the last passenger row 30 seats: A, B and E, F only. Attention must be paid to secure stowage against movement. No items can be stored in the lavatories at any times

-

Stowing of any items behind the row 30 seats C, D is strictly prohibited (this refers also to any part of the bag, e.g. strap) and the bags must not be visible from the cabin area

-

The trolley type Crew bags should be placed only in the overhead compartments, it is strongly suggested to assure the security of the bag by using a locker

-

The Crew bags must not block the aisle or door area during any phase of the flight

-

The front galley Crew’s bags (all types) should be placed in the overhead compartments, it is strongly suggested to assure the security of the bag by using a locker

-

Stowing of bags in the trolleys is not allowed

NOTE: When on duty, unless the night stop rotation, it is not allowed to carry both the uniform handbag and uniform trolley bag. The Cabin Crew has a choice of carrying the uniform handbag or uniform trolley bag. CAUTION: Attention must be paid to avoid any inadvertent access, to the Cabin Crew members’ personal belongings. It is recommended to use the locker attached to the uniform handbag/uniform trolley bag. CAUTION: Attention must be paid to avoid Crew or passenger injury while opening overhead compartments for placement or removal of any items. PASSENGER LOAD GREATER THAN 140 Whenever the predicted customer load, on any sector of a Crew rotation, is greater than 140, the following bags only may be taken on board the aircraft by Crew Members, whether they are operating or positioning: -

Pilots: Pilot case or equivalent

-

Cabin Attendants: Wizz Air uniform handbag/uniform trolley bag

Any other Crew baggage is to be labelled with Wizz Air Crew baggage tag and loaded into Hold 5 and the following procedure applied: -

The Crew Member has to take her baggage through the security check point and to leave it at the bottom of the front aircraft steps

-

The Ramp Agent is to be informed, by the Commander, that there is crew baggage to be loaded


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-

Baggage in Hold 5 will not be off-loaded without specific instruction from the Crew. After off-loading, crew baggage will be placed at the bottom of the front steps for collection by the Crew

PASSENGER LOAD LESS THAN 140 When the expected passenger load is less than 140 for all the sectors of a Crew rotation, Crew Members may take additional baggage aboard. However, individual items are not to exceed the allowed rule for customers (56x45x25cm or smaller). Larger items are to be loaded as described above for Hold 5.

R R R

NOTE: Crew departing from defined airports, whose uniform handbag/trolley bag includes liquids above 100ml must follow the regulation of the customer load greater than 140 and dispose bags in hold number 5 without any exception. NOTE: no personal items (coats, jackets) of Cabin Crew and no infant belts are allowed to be stored in compartments where emergency equipment is stored.


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1.3

Pre-flight check

1.3.1

Definitions

First flight pre-flight check is performed by Cabin Crew Members before the first commercial flight of the day (and also whenever there is NO immediate Crew change between two scheduled flights). The first flight pre-flight check always includes a complete security check as well. Turn-around pre-flight check is performed during the turn-around time by the outbound (departing) crew only. The outbound Crew has responsibility for checking of the lavatories, galleys, galley areas, entry areas and the equipment compartments ONLY. Security check The purpose of security check is to recognize and identify any non-standard, suspicious, unidentified items which are not belonging to the standard equipment. The procedure requires a particularly strict attention of all Cabin Crew Members. Whenever security check is carried out as part of the first flight pre-flight check, a complete check of the cabin, galleys, galley areas, entry areas and lavatories must be done by the Cabin Crew Members. Security check during turn-around time in case of immediate Crew change It is performed during the turn-around time of the aircraft by both the inbound and outbound crew, areas as follows: - Inbound (arriving) Crew: Inbound Crew is responsible for the security check of the main cabin area only. Inbound Crew Members must do the cleaning and the complete security check of the cabin (including the security check of all the overhead compartments) - Outbound (departing) Crew: Outbound Crew is responsible for the security check of galleys, galley areas, lavatories and entry areas. Outbound Crew has no responsibility for the main cabin area during turn-around time security check. NOTE: Whenever there is no immediate Crew change between two scheduled flights a complete security check must be completed by the inbound Crew.

1.3.2

First flight pre-flight check

Before the first commercial flight of the day, or whenever there is no immediate Crew change between two scheduled flights, each C/A must perform a first flight pre-flight check (i.e. first flight pre-flight check) in her designated area, which always includes a complete security check as well in the respective areas assigned to each Crem Member. Designated areas as per C/A duties: R R R R R

-

SCA

catering in FWD galley and FWD galley area

-

C/A 2 cabin section “A” (FWD entry area, main doors 1L and 1R, lavatory A, seat row 1-15)

-

C/A 3

-

C/A 4 cabin section “B” (AFT entry area, main doors 4L and 4R, lavatory D and E, seat row 16-30)

catering in AFT galley and AFT galley area


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The first flight pre-flight check includes: -

the check of the presence, condition and functionality of the safety and emergency equipment (and the equipment compartments)

-

the security check of the lavatories and condition/ functionality of the safety and emergency equipment present in the lavatories

-

the check of the galleys and galley areas

-

the check of entry areas and cabin

-

the verification of the presence of passenger information accessories (on board magazines, Safety Cards and emergency door opening instruction labels in the emergency exit rows)

-

additional service items (air sickness bags, waste bags, headrest covers, gloves and spare magazines)

-

the functionality of the water system (water in the lavatories, water heater etc..)

Procedures of SCA and CA3 FAP check R R R R

R

EMER lights are to be tested only in case of first commercial flight of the day Classic FAP o Cabin lighting  Lights ON: lights to be set to BRT/DIM1/DIM2 in the respective areas i.e. in main cabin area, FWD and AFT entry areas (to check if press buttons are operative)  SCA is to ensure that the cabin lights at all areas are set to BRIGHT, 100% mode for at least five minutes during pre-flight check  SCA is to check if all lighting tubes are operative in all areas. In case a lighting unit is found to be inoperative, Work Order shall be opened o Panel Light Test: all FAP diodes are illuminating when the pushbutton is engaged o If the CAUT button on the FAP illuminates the SYSTEM STATUS must be checked: check if all components are sending the appropriate message CIDS OK, LAV SMOKE DATA OK, SLIDE PRESS OK, DRAIN MASTS OK o IND ON: water and waste is within the respected limits (water not less than 25%, waste not more than 75%) o Main power ON o

R R R R R R R R R R

Touchscreen FAP o Cabin lighting: SCA is to ensure that the cabin lights at all areas are set to BRIGHT, 100% mode for at least five minutes during pre-flight check o SCA is to check if all lighting tubes are operative in all areas. In case a lighting unit is found to be inoperative, Work Order shall be opened o SYSTEM INFO page: CIDS internals OK, Ice protection OK o WATER/WASTE: Water not less than 25%, Waste no more than 75% o DOOR/SLIDE: Main Cabin Door in disarmed status, Emergency Over wing Exits in armed status o TEMPERATURE: set for the flight o CAUT: not illuminated neither flashing


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o CAUT (button not in illuminating mode) o NOTE: When CAUT is illuminating the Flight Crew must be notified. The SCA may use the System Status on the PTP to locate and identify the system error. Only in case the Commander deems it necessary and only with permission of the Commander, the reset of the CIDS may be conducted by SCA. (10.3.2.1) o EMER lights are to be tested only in case of first commercial flight of the day

R R

EPOS check - CA 3 is to check the availability and functionality of EPOS devices (all 3 devices) - Missing or inoperative EPOS(s) is/are to be reported via CRF after duty (CRF shall include EPOS’s serial number) - In case of an unserviceable device the non-working device shall be tagged with unserviceable tag and to be left in the EPOS foam insert. Caterers will take care of the replacement - EPOS device without a stylus is considered to be unserviceable and need to be tagged, as the screen must not be touched by any other object but the stylus Galley check R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

R R R R

- SCA and C/A3 are to check in their assigned galleys the interior of all compartments, containers, boxes, trolleys as well as area behind the catering equipment for any foreign object or loading discrepancies - Water heater – Cold A/C operation – Switch the heater ON, if LOW water indication is on, bleed the heater by opening the outlet and wait for water to dispense (pressure is required – APU on). Water heater procedure: o Confirm on FAP potable water is available o In all galleys – switch ON the water heaters o If the red “LOW WATER” light is illuminating it means that some air is trapped in the water system o When APU power is available, open the water faucet to bleed the accumulated air from the water system o When “CYCLE” light extinguishes, water heater is ready to use o Switch OFF the water heaters when preparing for take-off - Waste flapper door(s) blocked and not damaged - Security seal applied on the waste bin compartment door - SCA and CA 3 are to check of the proper operation of trolley brakes (including waste trolley brakes) and galley latches - SCA shall check if the waste trolley has the correct amount of waste bag holder frames - Should brakes be found non-operative the following procedure must be followed: o The inoperative trolley must remain latched in its stowage compartment throughout whole duration of the flight duty o SCA/C/A3 has to report the discrepancy via CRF according to reporting procedure (refer to CAM 0.5.4 Reporting procedures) stating the set and the trolley position number (the report to be sent after the last duty sector) o INOP sticker must be obtained from the Flight Deck Crew and applied on the inoperative trolley (only in case of failure of the trolley brake mechanism) Contents of the trolley with non-operative trolley brakes are to be used as regular sales items (excluding waste trolley); however removal of such trolley from its stowage compartment is not allowed, unless security related concerns o INOP sticker may be placed on catering trolleys as well as on the waste trolley, however, a Work Order entry only applies to the waste


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trolley since it is an aircraft part. When a waste trolley is inoperative or any waste bag frame missing, TECH CRF must be sent

R

-

In case a latch is found non-operative the relevant catering box has to be repositioned. In case the affected latch is on the stowage compartment position, the compartment must be emptied

-

Placing any stickers on the cabin equipment and cabin furnishing without Commander’s permission is strictly forbidden

-

SCA shall check the correct quality and quantity of headrest covers on board

-

SCA and CA 3 are to check of the waste bin compartment: o o o

o

R R R

Entry areas -

waste bin flapper door deactivated security seal applied on the door of the waste bin compartment the seal number of the security seal applied on the door of the waste bin compartment corresponds to the seal number on the security seal plate (located in the cockpit and to be confirmed with the Commander). If one of the above stated conditions is not met the following procedure must be followed:  the Commander must be informed about existing discrepancy  the security check inside the waste bin compartment must be performed  in case of discrepancy in sealing (seal damaged or numbers not corresponding), the new seal must be applied after completion of the security check of the compartment and the old seal (seal which was damaged or number was not corresponding) must be removed (seal to be obtained from the Commander)

SCA and C/A3 shall check the oxygen mask stowage in the galley and entry areas (visually)

Procedures of CA2 and CA4 Cabin area

R R R

-

functionality and security check of the amenities in the cabin (presence, condition and order of the passenger information accessories in the seat pockets)

-

check of the seat pocket itself (for any foreign objects) – 100%

-

check of all the tray tables and the area behind them (including the removal of the folding tray tables from their stowage in the first row) – 100%

-

visual and manual verification of life vest presence – 100 % o

NOTE: manual verification means touching of the life vest. Taking it out from the pouch is not needed

Equipment R R R R

-

security check of the equipment compartments verification of the equipment (properly stowed, strapped, correct location and quantity specific functionality indicator according to the pre-flight check list requirement) counting of the safety cards is required only before the first commercial flight of the day


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-

When performing PA function test attention must be paid not to overstretch the handset cradle

Lavatories R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

Functionality of the amenities and equipment (presence of passenger accessories) Full security check of the lavatory Check that the ashtrays on the lavatory doors are operative and are in the closed position After completing of the security check of the lavatory, door must be locked

Main doors -

CA2 and CA4 in order to open the main cabin door to fulfil the pre-flight check requirements must obtain the permission for the door opening from the SCA, who is to confirm with the Commander

-

Confirmation from C/A3 “ Door disarmed, you may open the door” is also needed when opening 4 L door for the first departure of the day

-

Pre-flight check of the Main Doors will be performed by checking the following:

Entry areas -

-

o

Check door locking indicator reads Locked (green)

o

Door is “in Park” – safety pin is fitted and red flag is visible

o

Observation window is clear

o

Check slide pressure indicator is in the green zone

o

No obstructions around the door

C/A jump seats o The seat pan automatically returns to be stowed position after being opened and released o Seatbelt/shoulder harness fully operable (after pulling down, shoulder harness retracts automatically) o Headrest not damaged/delaminated o NOTE: The lap belt must be stowed correctly in the cavity located bellow the backrest, in order to avoid a damage of the belt after retraction of the seat pan o For details regarding C/A jump seat refer to CAM 10.3.2 Interphone system o Interphone check between all C/A stations o Interphone check with the cockpit shall be done only before the first flight of the aircraft of the day; CPT call from every handset o For details regarding interphone system refer to CAM 10.6.3

When the first flight pre-flight check (which includes the security check) is completed in her area, each Cabin Attendant has to report it to the SCA (the report of C/A3 and C/A4 Cabin Crew Member must be given via Interphone P.A. (in order not to leave the opened AFT cabin door unattended): -

C/A 2 reports C/A 3 reports C/A 4 reports SCA confirms

verbally to SCA: via PA to SCA: via PA to SCA: reception of the report by

Pre-flight Check Completed C/A2 Pre-flight Check Completed C/A3 Pre-flight Check Completed C/A4 thumb up


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Prior to boarding passengers, SCA must confirm with to the Commander the completion of the pre-flight check (which contains the completion of the security check as well) and report all irregularities found. SCA reports verbally to the Commander: Pre-flight Check Completed, we are ready for boarding All cabin and cockpit defects will be recorded by the Commander/First Officer in the Work Order Book. During pre-flight check the Commander must inform SCA on all recorded cabin defects, and SCA must brief active cabin crew accordingly. At the end of each series of flights (rotation), SCA and the Commander are to crosscheck that defects have been recorded. Every technical problem even if it looks minor to the crew must be reported and recorded. A verbal report can only be complementary action to help troubleshooting and does not replace an appropriate work order entry. CAUTION: While initiating pre-flight or and security check strict attention must be paid to avoid injury such as being hit by equipment falling out of compartment or while accessing to passenger seats in passenger seat rows.

1.3.3

R R R R R R

R R

Turn-around pre-flight and security check when there is immediate Crew change

Outbound (departing) Crew will perform the pre-flight check of the equipment (including safety/emergency equipment) and security check in the relevant stowage compartments, galleys, galley areas, entry areas and lavatories. Turn-around pre-flight check of the water-heater is as follows: - Arriving on board SCA and CA3 are to switch all water heaters ON - If the potable water was uplifted during the turnaround, please perform the Cold A/C operation (refer to CAM 1.3.2) - Switch OFF the water heaters when preparing for take-off Note: Outbound Crew is responsible for the check of the equipment, galleys, galley areas, entry areas and the lavatories during the turn-around pre-flight check, including security checks in the mentioned areas. NOTE: checking of the numbers on the waste bin security seals shall be performed during the turn-around pre-flight checks.

Inbound (arriving) Crew must clean the cabin and perform the security check in the cabin area ONLY. The security check of the cabin includes the check of: - Overhead compartments – 100%

R R

-

Seat pocket interior – 100%

-

Area behind tray tables – 100% (including the removal of the folding tray tables from their stowage in the first row)

-

The area below and between passenger seats

-

Floor, windows, light recesses and ceiling – visual check only

-

The area between passenger seats and cabin wall

-

Life vest stowage pouch presence and the visual and manual check of 10% of the life vests under passenger seat


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-

First-aid kit (to be opened only if unsealed)

Inbound SCA will report the completion of the security check of the cabin to the outbound SCA. Inbound SCA will also report the completion of the security check of the cabin to the inbound Commander. Responsibility regarding the security check of the main cabin area during turn-around time is exclusively belonging to the Inbound (arriving) Crew. Any items found after the Inbound SCA has reported the completion of the security check will result in challenging the respective Crew Member of the Inbound Crew. R R R

NOTE: During turn-around time it is not required to check the EMER lights, only cabin lighting. NOTE: During turn-around checks verification of the presence of reasonable amount of safety cards is required only. The conduct of the security check, which is to be performed as part of the pre-flight check and on each turn-around before embarking passengers, is elaborated in CAM 1.4.

1.3.4

Pre-Flight Checklist

The cabin pre-flight checklists are different on board different A/C. This is due to different locations of the emergency equipment and different cabin layouts. The next pages show one version as a demonstrative example. For exact location per A/C refer to Emergency Equipment Location Map located under each C/A seat.

NOTE: The passenger Life-vests must be checked under each passenger seat by C/A 2 in cabin section „A” and by C/A 4 in cabin section „B” at all times during pre-flight check. During turn-around time the life-vest must be checked randomly (min. 10%). Removing the Over-Wing Exit Handle Cover during pre-flight check is strictly forbidden. CAUTION: During access to passenger seats and seat area attention must be paid to avoid any injury caused by sharp edges or improper access.

Senior Cabin Attendant

R R

EQUIPMENT Cabin Status Water & Waste quantity Cabin Lighting System Info Page PTP Catering Exit lights/sign Galley waste bin seal

LOCATION

STATUS

FAP FAP FAP FAP PTP on HA-LPD,LPE,LPF FWD galley doors/area 1L/1R On waste bin next to 1R

checked checked All units operative checked checked checked checked checked

LOCATION SCA and C/A2 seats

STATUS checked

C/A 2 Cabin section „A”

EQUIPMENT C/A seats & seatbelts


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1 Flashlight

under seat SCA

checked

1 Crew Life-vest

under seat SCA

checked

1 Manual Release Tool

under seat SCA

checked

1 BCF Fire Extinguisher

under seat SCA

checked

Emergency Equipment Location map

under seat SCA

checked

Cabin Emergency Checklist

under seat SCA

checked

Pre-flight Checklist

under seat SCA

checked

1 Escape Slide

door 1L

checked

1 Flashlight

under seat C/A 2

checked

1 BCF Fire Extinguisher

under seat C/A 2

checked

1 Crew Life-vest

under seat C/A 2

checked

1 Manual Release Tool

under seat C/A 2

checked

Emergency Equipment Location map

under seat C/A 2

checked

Cabin Emergency Checklist

under seat C/A 2

checked

Pre-flight Checklist

under seat C/A 2

checked

1 Escape Slide

door 1R

checked

Interphone System

between seats SCA & C/A2

checked

1 Megaphone

overhead comp.FWD face at 1L

checked

overhead compartment 1ABC

checked

toilet FWD

checked

1 Demo Kit (seat belt, life-vest, oxygen mask, safety card) Lavatory & Accessories Lavatory door

Toilet FWD locked

checked

Ashtray on lavatory door

checked

Lavatory call button

Toilet FWD ashtray operative and closed Toilet FWD call button

Smoke detector

checked

toilet FWD

checked

1 Automatic Halon Extinguisher

toilet FWD

checked

1 First Aid Kit

overhead compartment 1DEF

checked

2 Portable Oxygen Bottle & Masks

overhead compartment 1DEF

checked

2 Smoke Hoods

overhead compartment 1DEF

checked

50 Spare Safety Cards

overhead compartment 1DEF

checked

Spare Lavatory Accessories

overhead compartment 1DEF

checked

CAM hard copy

overhead compartment 1DEF

checked

Spare Airsickness Bags

overhead compartment 1DEF

checked

Safety Cards

PAX seats

checked

Airsickness Bags

PAX seats

checked

WIZZ Magazine

PAX seats

checked

2 Life lines

small compartment at 12ABC

checked

2 Life lines

small compartment at 12DEF

checked

Exit lights/sign

overwing exits/area

checked

C/A 4 CABIN SECTION “B”

EQUIPMENT

LOCATION

STATUS


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C/A seats & seatbelts

C/A4 and C/A 3 seats, forward facing C/A seat

1 Flashlight

under seat C/A3

checked checked

1 Crew Life-vest

under seat C/A3

checked

1 BCF Fire Extinguisher

under seat C/A3

checked

1 Manual Release Tool

under seat C/A3

checked

1 Pair of Protective Gloves

under seat C/A3

checked

Emergency Equipment Location map Cabin Emergency Checklist

under seat C/A 3

checked

under seat C/A 3

checked

Pre-flight Checklist

under seat C/A 3

checked

1 Flashlight

under forward facing C/A seat

checked

1 Manual Release Tool

under forward facing C/A seat

checked

1 Crew Life-vest

under forward facing C/A seat

checked

Emergency Equipment Location map Cabin Emergency Checklist

under forward facing C/A seat

checked

under forward facing C/A seat

checked

Pre-flight Checklist

under forward facing C/A seat

checked

1 Escape Slide

door 4R

checked

1 Flashlight

under seat C/A4

checked

1 Crew Life-vest

under seat C/A4

checked

1 Manual Release Tool

under seat C/A4

checked

1 BCF Fire Extinguisher

under seat C/A4

checked

Location map

under seat C/A 4

checked

Cabin Emergency Checklist

under seat C/A 4

checked

Pre-flight Checklist 1 ELT Interphone System 1 Escape Slide Exit lights/sign 1 Megaphone 2 Portable Oxygen Bottle & Masks

under seat C/A 4 behind seat C/A4 next to C/A4 & forward facing C/A seat door 4L doors/area 4L/4R overhead compartment 30ABC

checked checked checked checked checked checked

overhead compartment 30ABC

checked

overhead compartment 30ABC

checked

overhead compartment 30ABC above seat C/A3 next to seat C/A4 overhead compartment 30DEF overhead compartment 30DEF overhead compartment 30DEF toilets AFT L/R toilets AFT L/R locked Toilet AFT L/R ashtrays operative and closed Toilet AFT L/R call button Toilet AFT L/R in every seatpocket overhead compartment 30DEF overhead compartment 30DEF

checked checked checked checked checked checked checked checked checked checked checked Checked Checked Checked

1 Demo Kit (seat belt, life-vest, oxygen mask, safety card) 1 First Aid Kit 2 Smoke Hoods 1 Smoke Hood 18 Infant Seat Belts 18 Infant Life Vests 10 Spare Life-vest Lavatory & Accessories Lavatory door Ashtrays on lavatory doors Lavatory call button Smoke detector Airsickness Bags Spare Lavatory Accessories safety cards and Wizz magazines

C/A 3

EQUIPMENT

LOCATION

STATUS

Catering

AFT galley

Checked

EPOS

box AFT galley

Checked

Waste bin seal

On waste bins next to 4L and 4R

Checked


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NOTE: Interphone check with the Cockpit should be done only before first flight of the aircraft of the day. Interphone check between each cabin crew stations is to be completed during every pre-flight check. NOTE: In case of missing of reasonable number of Spare Safety Cards (more than 20), the Cabin Crew Base Manager must be informed (using on-board mobile phone with permission from the Commander). The next incoming Crew operating the aircraft will put the missing cards on board. NOTE: Pre-flight check of Cabin Emergency Checklist, Pre-flight Checklist, Emergency Equipment Location Map requires only visual inspection of the presence and condition of the documents.

1.4

Security check

The purpose of the Security Check is to recognize and identify any non-standard, suspicious, unidentified items which are not belonging to the standard equipment. The procedure requires a particularly strict attention of all Cabin Crew Members.

1.4.1

Security check procedures

On the aircraft’s turn-around, after disembarkation of all passengers, C/A2 and C/A4 have to walk through the passenger cabin and check the overhead compartments for any unidentified items (including the compartments with emergency equipment). Right after this check all four Cabin Crew Members have to start cleaning the passenger cabin starting from the middle of the A/C. While cleaning, all Crew Members must perform the security check in their below mentioned areas: -

SCA (ABC seats) and C/A 2 (DEF seats) starting from row 15 towards row 1

-

C/A 3 (DEF seats) and C/A 4 (ABC seats) starting from row 16 towards row 30

Security check in the main cabin area includes as follows: - Overhead compartments – 100% (including the compartments which contain emergency equipment)

R R R R R R

-

Seat pocket interior – 100%

-

Area behind tray tables – 100% (including the removal of the folding tray tables from their stowage in the first row)

-

The area below and between passenger seats

-

Floor, windows, light recesses and ceiling – visual check only

-

The area between passenger seats and cabin wall

-

Life vest stowage pouch; visual and manual check of 10% of the life vests under passenger seat

-

First-aid kit (to be opened only if unsealed)


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Galley areas (SCA and C/A 3) -

interior of all compartments, containers and trolleys as well as the area behind them

-

intact waste bin seal

-

the area behind containers/boxes and trolleys is to be verified by removing the galley equipment from its stowage

-

During the day, whenever all boxes and trolleys are sealed (including master and EPOS box) at such a destination where it is required (i.e. LTN, TLV), the same green color tone shall be used for all the boxes and trolleys. Unused seals shall de damaged and discarded, due to security reasons

Entry areas (C/A 2 and C/A 4) -

oxygen mask stowage (visual check only)

-

escape slide stowage (visual check only)

-

C/A jumpseats and compartments below the jump seats including life vest and emergency equipment

Lavatories (C/A 2 and C/A 4)

R R

-

Towel container and mirror

-

Waste container

-

Area below wash stand

-

Baby nursing table

-

Smoke detector (visual check only)

-

Toilet seat and lid

-

Ashtrays and door itself

-

Walls, ceiling and floor

-

Oxygen mask stowage (visual check only)

NOTE: Security Check of the lavatories, galleys and galley areas during the turn-around time of the aircraft (in case there is immediate Crew change) is performed by the Outbound (departing) Crew.

Reporting upon completion of security check When Security Check is completed, every Cabin Attendant must report the completion of the security check in her designated area as follows: - C/A 2 reports verbally to SCA: Security Check Completed C/A2 -

C/A 3 reports via PA to SCA: Security Check Completed C/A3 (SCA confirms reception of the report by thumb up)

-

C/A 4 reports via PA to SCA: Security Check Completed C/A4 (SCA confirms reception of the report by thumb up)

-

SCA must to report to the Commander: Security Check Completed


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1.4.2

Duties and responsibilities in case of immediate Crew change

Duties and responsibilities during turn-around in case of immediate Crew change are as follows: Main cabin area On the aircraft’s turn-around, security check of the main cabin area is performed by the Inbound (arriving) Crew. Galleys, galley areas, entry areas and lavatories On the aircraft’s turn-around, security check of the galleys, galley areas, entry areas and the lavatories is performed by the Outbound (departing) Crew.


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1.5

Cabin – Cockpit communication procedures

Coordination and communication between the flight deck and Cabin Crew is normally between the Commander and SCA. However, in the interests of good CRM, it is important that all Crew Members feel able to communicate freely when necessary. It is particularly important that those Cabin Crew Members working at the rear of the aircraft call the flight deck directly using the interphone system when necessary. However, Cabin Crew must be aware that the flight deck Crew are not linked to the cabin interphone permanently and can take a few seconds to answer a call. When Cabin Crew Member had any communication with the cockpit, she should report to the SCA about the content of the exchanged information.

1.5.1

General communication rules between cabin and cockpit

In normal operations, from the time the first engine is started until both engines have been shut down: -

The Flight Feck door is to be closed and locked

-

Number of entries to the cockpit should be reduced as much as possible as it might be both disturbing for the Flight Crew and a negative factor for security;

-

When seat belts sign is switched ON, except the on ground duties, routine communication between Cockpit and Cabin Crew Members should be done via interphone

-

Regular checks of well being of cockpit Crew by SCA during cruise should be done by interphone, as visits to the cockpit at regular intervals are a security hazard;

-

If the SCA deems it necessary, she should not hesitate to request, using the keypad, an access to the cockpit

-

Crew Members on observer flights or positioning Crew Members may travel in the cockpit at commander’s discretion. In such case, they are to remain in the cockpit during the entire flight except for physiological or safety reasons as deemed necessary by the commander

When any Cabin Crew Member visits the cockpit:

1.5.2

-

Body cover procedure by Cabin Crew and video camera identification by Cockpit Crew are to be applied before opening the cockpit door

-

Once in the cockpit the Cabin Crew Member has to remain silent until one of the Pilots addresses her

Body cover procedure

While a Crew Member is entering the Flight-deck, another Crew Member must stand behind her, facing to the cabin, blocking the way of any unauthorized person willing to enter the Flight-deck. The Crew Member must obtain cockpit access by a request via the keypad. When dialling the access code, the keypad must be covered by one hand, in order to avoid passengers seating in the 1st cabin row having an overview on the keypad. No other person than a Crew Member is entitled to be in the FWD galley/entry area while there is a request to access the cockpit. Before leaving the cockpit the Cabin Crew Member is to dentify that no unauthorized person is present in the FWD galley and FWD entry area.


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NOTE: Cabin Crew, in normal operation, is not allowed to touch any button/switch in the cockpit, except on the special request from the Commander.

1.5.3

Sterile cockpit concept

The aim of the sterile cockpit is to enable the Flight Crew focus on their duties without being distracted by non-flight related matters. During the critical phases of the flight, the sterile cockpit policy is applied. Therefore, calls from the Cabin Crew or entry into the cockpit are restricted to safety and security related matters.

N O T E: Critical phases of flight are defined as all ground operations involving taxi, takeoff, and landing and all flight operations when the aircraft is below FL100. NOTE: In normal operations the SCA communicates with the Flight Crew on behalf of the Cabin Crew. In case of an abnormal or emergency situation being discovered the first cabin crew to discover a safety related situation must report it directly to the Flight Crew and inform the SCA afterwards only.

1.6

Boarding procedures

The boarding for the first departure of the day must commence 45 minutes prior to the schedule time of departure (STD). Cabin Crew is to be ready to accept passengers 6 minutes after the last passengers have disembarked the aircraft. Therefore boarding to buses must start when the last passenger has disembarked the aircraft in order not to waste time. The bus driver must, however wait for the confirmation from the Dispatcher or SCA before passengers are allowed to disembark the bus. Cabin Crew will advise the Commander and the Dispatcher if, due to exceptional circumstances, they are unable to accept passengers at the above times. For admission of auditors or other authority personnel to Wizz A/C refer to CAM Section 1.2.1

1.6.1

General

During boarding all C/As must carefully observe passengers boarding with respect to the items described in the following sections. Before starting boarding procedure SCA must ensure that all cabin and entry area lights are set to BRIGHT position. This light setting must be kept until the cabin preparation before take-off is fully accomplished. The Cabin Crew Members should observe the following safety related issues: -

monitor the amount of baggage and ensure correct stowage (overhead compartments, under the seats)

-

check that exits and escape paths are clear of obstructions

-

distribute baby seatbelts, if necessary

-

manage the passenger flow

-

ensure that passengers comply with “ No smoking “ regulations

-

ensure that passengers seating complies with seating regulations

-

check that ABPs are seated at the designated seats

-

check boarding cards of each embarking passenger

The boarding cards of all embarking passengers must be checked by the C/As standing at the FWD/AFT entry area, this procedure is also applying to the special attention passengers (e.g. PRM, DEPA, DEPU etc.), to verify that it is for the correct flight, destination and date.


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In case a passenger cannot present boarding card, the passenger must not be admitted to the cabin. A positive verification of the passenger by the Handling must be performed and declared. In addition, Commander’s acceptance for the admission of the passenger without boarding card must be obtained. Boarding position of Cabin Crew is as follows: -

SCA has to stand in the FWD entry area facing the 1L door, blocking the way towards the cockpit

-

C/A 2 has to stand in the first passenger row/FWD entry area

-

C/A 3 has to stand in the emergency exit row on the right sid

-

C/A 4 has to stand in the AFT entry area facing the 4L door

During embarkation Cabin Crew should not hesitate to stop the boarding process if any concern regarding correct stairs status/positioning might arise and a request for stairs readjustment must be made (refer to CAM 1.1.2.3. stairs positioning). R R R R R R R R

Cabin Crew has to board passengers either by using 2 sets of stairs or using a jetbridge or 1 set of sairs, which must be positioned to the front door of the AC (1L) It is prohibited to perform the boarding process through the AFT door (4L) only, as aircraft balance could not be controlled properly this way. -

During boarding SCA must make, at least twice, the boarding announcement. If refuelling is taking place the relevant announcement must be made as well. If boarding is only done via forward door, C/A4 may make the Boarding Announcement from the AFT galley respectively

-

If SCA is not a native speaker all On-Board Announcements have to be made by the C/A 2. During time of the announcement the responsibility of checking the boarding cards is delegated to the other Cabin Crew Member present in the FWD entry area

-

In order to avoid congestion on the stairs and in the aisle, passengers should be encouraged to proceed inside the cabin

-

It is essential to perform active boarding observing the passengers’ behaviour and their health conditions. Every passenger who is considered to be ill, sick or undergone any medical treatment shortly before the flight needs to be recognised and interviewed during boarding. The final decision to accept or deny this passenger must be made by the Commander

-

Lavatories shall be closed on departure, from the beginning of embarkation until the Fasten Seatbelt Sign has been switched OFF, after take-off

-

On arrival, from the Fasten Seat belt Sign has been switched ON until the Fasten Seatbelt Sign has been switched OFF, after landing

-

C/A 3 (standing by the overwing exit rows) should monitor passengers, and decide whether passengers are corresponding to the over-wing exit seating restrictions (refer to CAM section 1.6.10.2)

-

Passengers occupying the seats adjacent to the emergency exits, in row 12 and 13 A/F, must receive a short briefing as soon as they are seated; the briefing must not be interrupted, so that the passenger clearly understands what her responsibilities are: o

Do you speak English?

o

You are sitting at the emergency exit, are you able and willing to help the Crew in case of need?

o

If any of the answers is NO: reseat the passenger

o

If both answers are YES:


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-

o

The door should be operated ONLY in case of EMERGENCY”

o

Please study these 5 pictures showing the operation of the exit, but DO NOT touch the door.

o

Do you understand? Do you have any questions?

o

Thank you

The fact that the door must be touched ONLY in case of emergency must be emphasized

NOTE: In case a passenger tries to remove the overwing exit handle cover (intentionally, without being required), the respective passenger must be removed from the ABP seat, reseated and informed that she has been instructed not to touch the cover. (Removing the Over-Wing Exit Handle Cover during pre-flight check or when briefing Able Bodied Passengers during normal or emergency operation is strictly forbidden). R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

NOTE: For take-off and landing the selected and briefed ABPs must occupy the seats next to the emergency exits. During cabin preparation Cabin Crew has to make sure that appropriate ABPs have taken their ABPs seats. In case a previously briefed ABP is not longer responsible for ABP task (becomes drunk, sick or unruly or would like to take any other seat than her assignes ABP seat), another ABP must be selected and briefed. NOTE: For take-off and landing, all passengers sitting in the overwing exit rows must put ON their shoes

Active boarding – CBAD Applying the CBAD guideline shall help Cabin Crew Members to determine how to filter a possibly intoxicated or unruly passenger during boarding. The aim of the guideline is to help in decision making whether to accept this passenger for the flight or not. C – Communication B – Behaviour A – Actions D – double check For the procedures for the refusal of embarkation refer to CAM 1.6.1.2.

Refusal of embarkation The Commander has the statutory authority to refuse entry to his airplane of anyone whose presence in flight could represent a hazard to the safety of the airplane or its passengers. Such persons could include those suspected of being under the influence of alcohol or drugs to the extent that the safety of the airplane or its occupants is likely to be endangered, or of suffering from any form of mental or physical illness which could put the remaining passengers at risk. In case of known or declared illness, arrangements may be made for such sufferers to be carried if prior medical approval has been given and qualified nursing personnel accompany the patient. Passengers showing visible signs of disease or illness likely to cause distress or inconvenience to other passengers cannot be accepted for travel. Discretion must be exercised whenever personnel becomes aware, at the time of check-in or boarding, of a passenger in a condition which could be adversely affected by air travel. If any concerns would rise on a passenger being fit to fly, the following short interview can support the decision making process: -

S=signs and symptoms of the passenger


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-

A=allergies to drugs/medication

-

M=medication used in that moment (if any)

-

P=previous medical history

-

L=last meal

-

E=events (maybe things which happened in that person’s life last few days prior to travelling lead to the medical condition)

In order to assist the Commander to exercise this authority, all personnel engaged in passenger handling and loading, including other Crew Members, handling agents and check-in personnel, should alert the Commander if at any time they consider that the condition of particular passengers could jeopardize the safety of a flight. If difficulty is encountered in dealing with such passengers, particularly those who may require physical restraint, the assistance of the aerodrome or local police should be requested. The Commander has the right to refuse the carriage or further carriage of a passenger and/or her baggage, provided that: -

The Commander reasonably believes that the refusal of the carriage is necessary for security reasons (i.e. passenger is intoxicated)

-

The Commander reasonably believes that the carriage may endanger the life, health, physical integrity and comfort of the passenger and of those on board

-

The Commander reasonably believes that passenger’s age, mental or physical state may endanger the passenger and those on board or the valuables thereof

-

The passenger, passenger’s behaviour or clothes frighten, disgust or scandalize those on board

-

The passenger does not hold valid travel documents (including the destruction of such documents in the course of carriage)

-

The passenger refuses to hand over travel documents to the Crew or to the Authorities when demanded

-

The passenger cannot prove that she is the person named in the reservation

-

The passenger failed to inform Wizz Air about her special needs or about her intention to carry a special baggage or items of conditional carriage

-

The passenger needs such special support as we are unable to provide or would incur disproportionately high expenditure

“The Commander reasonably believes” can be interpreted as “The Commander received sensible information from SCA/CA and/or ground staff”. NOTE: Any time the passenger is denied boarding, the relevant document must be filled up by the SCA (FDIR, Injury/Illness report) and sent according to the internal company policy.

1.6.2

Smoking on board

All Wizz Air flights are non-smoking flights. It is strictly forbidden to smoke on board. According to the internal company policy passengers and Crew Members are not allowed to smoke the electronic cigarettes. R R R R R R R R

In case a passenger is found smoking on board the aircraft: -

perform inside lavatory check

-

inform the passenger about Wizzair policy execution and consequences

-

inform the Commander

-

SCA shall fill out the Final Warning and FDIR if needed. In all cases, CRF shall be submitted using Safety, Security and also Technical buttons (refer to CAM 11.4 and CAM 11.5)


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1.6.3 R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

PEDs (Portable Electronic Devices)

Many portable electronic devices are known to emit radio frequency signals in excess of allowable limits. This could cause electromagnet interference with aeroplane navigation, control and communication systems. Therefore, their use on aeroplane is restricted. Non-intentional transmitter - small PEDs Passengers are permitted to use devices such as computing equipment, cameras, radio receivers, audio/video reproducers, electronic games, toys and transmitting at any phase of the flight and transmitting PED as long as they are in (non-transmitting) FLIGHT MODE at all time while on board the aircraft. During taxi-out for departure, passengers are required to remove their headphones and mute their PED to avoid distraction from passenger safety briefing. Non-intentional transmitter – large PEDs (i.e. laptop or similar size devices) Passengers are permitted to use these devices except the critical phases of the flight, when these devices must be securely stowed in accordance with CAM 1.3.6. Stowage of Cabin luggage Transmitting PEDs’ – phones, tablets Passengers are not allowed to use these devices at any phase of the flight unless they are switched to FLIGHT MODE. NOTE: When in doubt of one’s device capability of flight mode, the device is to be treated as transmitting PED and must be switched off completely. There is no requirement for passengers to remove their headphones at any time when onboard the aircraft, except:

1.6.4

-

During the time of safety demonstration

-

For passengers seated in the 1st, 12th and 13th row for the time of safety semonstration and during take-off and landing whenever LVO is in force

Allowable cabin luggage

Cabin baggage will normally be restricted to handbags, briefcases, cameras, coats and other items that can be reasonably stowed in approved stowage, unless the carriage in the cabin of other items has been cleared with Wizz Air at the time of booking. Wizz Air offers two cabin baggage options, but has a strict “one cabin baggage per passenger” policy: small cabin bag (42x32x25 cms or smaller) that can be taken on board for free of charge, and large cabin bag (larger than the small cabin bag but not exceeding the dimensions of 56x45x25 cms), for which passengers must pay a fee. Each seat-occupying passenger may carry on board one piece of hand luggage. All baggage which does not fit into the acceptable dimensions will be tagged at the gate and a letter “B” will be indicated on the boarding card of the passenger. At the same time passenger will be advised to leave the tagged luggage at the bottom of the A/C stairs. In addition, passenger may carry a reasonable amount of the following personal belongings: -

a coat or a blanket

-

a cellular phone

-

a reasonable amount of reading material


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-

For children under the age of two: food and beverages for consumption during the flight (except alcoholic beverages), small crib

-

Infant's carrying basket/car seat in case the additional ticket is purchased; car seat must be equipped with the inside seat belt, and has to have a latch which enables it to be securely fasten with the passenger seat belt fit; baby car seat has to be placed at the window seat and face AFT

-

Crutches, if the passenger is dependent on them

-

A small camera and/or a pair of binoculars

-

An umbrella or walking stick

NOTE: Wheelchairs and rollators are not allowed to be carried on board NOTE: A laptop bag is considered as one piece of baggage All cabin luggage not meeting these requirements must be taken, latest at boarding, and stored in the forward cargo hold (with an appropriate luggage tag: EU/non-EU countries). Luggage tag can be found in the Master Box, refer to CAM Appendix 16 Luggage Tags. The data field of these bag tags are to be filled at all times when used. The corresponding part is to be handed over to the passenger, the other part is to be attached to the bag. Any Cabin Crew Member is allowed to fill the tag irrelevant of her duty position. SCA (and Commander by SCA) must be advised about such luggage and Ground Staff should store it in the forward cargo hold. Furthermore, special attention must be given to the prevention of carriage of dangerous goods in cabin luggage.

NOTE: Passengers carrying backpacks have to be advised to hold them in their hands to avoid hurting others passengers when moving through the aisle. For Crew Baggage allowance refer to CAM section 1.1.2.6.

1.6.5

Stowage of cabin luggage

Cabin luggage must be stowed adequately and securely in the cabin in such a way that the aisle, cabin doors and emergency exits are not blocked. First row must be completely clear of baggage. Stowage of cabin baggage shall be as described below: R R R R

-

Each luggage carried in the cabin must be stowed and restrained in an approved stowage (i.e. in the overhead compartments or underneath the seat in front of the passenger)

-

Mass limitation attached on or adjacent to a stowage must not be exceeded

-

Under-seat stowage must not be used unless the seat is equipped with a restrain bar and the baggage is of such size that it may adequately be restrained by this equipment and not obstruct egress from the seat row

-

Items must not be stowed in toilets or against bulkheads that are incapable of restraining articles against movement forwards, sideways or upwards and unless the bulkheads carry a placard specifying the greatest mass may be placed there

-

Passenger luggage must not be stowed behind the last passenger row

-

Luggage may be stored restrained securely on an empty window seat (except rows of emergency exits and the first row, and only if an extra ticket has been purchased)

-

Baggage placed in lockers must not be of such a size that they prevent latched doors from being closed securely

-

Baggage must not be placed where it can impede access to emergency equipment

-

Checks must be made before take-off, before landing, and whenever the Commander orders so to ensure that baggage is stowed where it can not


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impede evacuation from the airplane or cause injury by falling (or other movement) as may be appropriate to the phase of flight. During boarding of passenger’s frequent announcements on how to stow hand luggage must be made (refer to During Embarkation Announcement). CAUTION: Attention must be paid to avoid Crew or passenger injury while opening overhead compartments for placement or removal of any items. Extra seat Whenever Extra seat has been purchased, due to items which are over the carry-on luggage limitations (i.e.: Contrabass) the two adjacent seats (including window seat) must be reserved at the last row(s) of the cabin. In this case, passenger is entitled to the baggage allowance for both seats.

1.6.6

Unruly/offensive passenger

Boarding Boarding passengers who are under the influence of alcohol or drugs and/or display aggressive behaviour are a possible safety hazard and may therefore be denied boarding. For details refer to CAM 1.6.1.1. To prevent boarding of potentially unruly passengers is in the duty of: ground handling staff, Crew Members (if the passenger has been brought on board). SCA should advise the Commander about such a passenger. The final decision to accept or deny this passenger must be made by the Commander. In case the situation requires the local security forces (airport security, police, boarding guards etc.) shall provide with help to withdraw the passenger from the aircraft. The Commander has the right to refuse the carriage or further carriage of a passenger and/or his/her baggage (CAM 1.6.1.2) Once the decision is made that the passenger is to be offloaded from the aircraft, Cabin Crew must make sure that all cabin luggage and any other items belonging to the offloaded passenger are removed from the aircraft, unless the passenger has been stopped by the aircraft door, by performing the baggage check inside the aircraft (refer to CAM 1.6.13). The SCA is to fill the relevant documents (refer to CAM Appendix 4 and Appendix 5). Disruptive behaviour during flight Disruptive behaviour on board might take place: -

During pre-flight phase: preparing for take –off

-

During take-off

-

In-flight

-

Preparing for landing

-

Landing

-

Taxing

Those behaviours might involve: disturbance, threat, improper attitude towards Crew, smoking, arguing, sexual harassment of other passengers or Crew Members, other behaviour causing the inconvenience to other passengers or disturbing the work of the cabin crew etc. Dangerous behaviours: not responding to the orders of the crew, attempt to rush into the cockpit, attempt to open the doors or emergency exits, smoking in the lavatory, destroying the aircraft equipment, usage of the forbidden electronic devices, fight (or attempt to do it) with other passengers or Crew Members, intoxication etc., uncontrolled alcohol drinking. The possible examples of symptoms of intoxication are: talking loudly, quickly or with slurred speech, sweating, sleepy, being red on the face, vomiting, being uncoordinated, argumentative.


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Rights of the Commander The Commander may, when he has reasonable grounds to believe that a person has committed, or is about to commit, on board the aircraft, an offence against penal law or acts which, whether or not they are offences, may or do jeopardize the safety of the aircraft or of persons or property therein or which jeopardize good order and discipline on board, impose upon such person reasonable measures including restraint which are necessary: -

To protect the safety of the aircraft, or of persons or property therein; or

-

To maintain good order and discipline on board; or

-

To enable him to deliver such person to competent authorities or to disembark him.

The Commander may require or authorize the assistance of other Crew Members and may request or authorize, but not require, the assistance of passengers to restrain any person whom he is entitled to restrain. Rights of personnel and passengers -

Make any arrangements without authorization of the Commander if they reasonable believe that the protection or flight safety requires prompt action.

The crew may use “verbal warning” as a first level of handling the unruly passenger, informing passenger about possible consequences. Second level is written warning. This form is called Flight Disturbance Incident Report (FDIR) and Final Warning (FW). The person filling in the form (SCA) must mark if passenger obeyed the crew’s requests/commands/instructions. It is crucial to find witness whenever possible.

NOTE: Filling of FDIR and FW forms does not necessarily implicate that the police must be called at all times. When dealing with unruly passenger -

Do not directly accuse the person of being drunk

-

Show your authority but be polite to her

-

Do not be afraid of the unruly passenger

-

Never loose your temper and control

-

Cooperate with other Crew Member, ask for help to ensure that safety and order are preserved

-

Notify the Cockpit Crew

-

Minimize the implications of the unruly behaviour

-

Inform the passenger that the Commander will be noted about the situation

-

Inform the passenger about the possibility of authority involvement e.g. police, airport force (and possible diversion)

All above quoted means of handling unruly passenger having informative character and should be treated as guidance.

1.6.7

Animals

Animals are not accepted for carriage on Wizz Air aircraft, except guide dogs for which the airline was notified at the time of reservation (the Crew will be notified in advance of this reservation by the Ground Operations Team). The dog is not permitted to occupy a seat and must be placed in a safe manner. (The recommended seat for the passenger accompanied by a guide dog is in the first row 1 A/F; this provides sufficient space in front of the A/F seats for the dog to be placed in a safe manner). Exception: Guide dogs are NOT accepted for travel on flights to/from the United Kingdom unless specifically agreed by Ground Operations. NOTE: Only 1 guide dog per flight can be accepted on board.


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1.6.8

Passengers with Reduced Mobility (PRMs)

Passenger with reduced mobility means any person whose mobility is reduced due to physical incapacity (sensory or locomotory), intellectual impairment, age, or any other cause of disability when using transport and whose situation needs special attention and the adaption to this person’s needs of the service made available to all passengers. We do not accept passengers with stretchers. PRM’s are: -

WCHR/WCHS/WCHC

-

Blind passenger

-

Deaf passenger

-

Mentally disabled passenger

-

Invalid passenger

WCHR: (wheelchair ramp) - Passenger needs a wheelchair from check-in to the bottom of the aircraft steps and on arrival from the bottom of the steps to the arrivals hall. The passenger can manage the aircraft steps herself. WCHS: (wheelchair stairs) - Passenger needs a wheelchair from check-in to the aircraft AND a lift (e.g. ambilift vehicle) up the steps, once in the cabin passenger can walk to the cabin seat. On arrival passenger needs a lift (ambilift vehicle) down the steps and then a wheelchair to the arrivals hall. WCHC: (wheelchair cabin) - As WCHS but, the passenger also need to be lifted to/from their cabin seat. WCMP: PAX has the own wheelchair with manually powered battery, WCBD: PAX has the own wheelchair with dry cell non-spillable battery. A maximum number of 28 PRMs, including a maximum of 10 WCHC passengers, can be carried on board the same aircraft. The number of PRMs must not exceed the number of buddy passengers on board (assisting passengers). Passengers showing visible signs of disease or illness likely to cause distress or inconvenience to other passengers cannot be accepted for travel. Discretion must be exercised whenever staff becomes aware, at the time of check-in or boarding, of a passenger in a condition which could be adversely affected by air travel.

Boarding procedure for PRMs In case the lift is available before boarding of regular passengers, PRMs (including WCH) passengers should be pre-boarded. In case the lift can only be delivered after boarding of regular passengers, the Crew Members must keep the proper number of seats reserved for PRMs and their buddies (assisting passengers). Boarding cards of PRM passengers must be checked but it can be done after they are seated. The suggested seats for PRMs are A and F in the first 7 and last 7 rows. NOTE: WCHC passengers have priority over any FRRS services sold. NOTE: priority must be given to the front rows. Deaf passengers Deaf passenger may need assistance (code MAAS) and may travel with Guide Dog. In addition to the above, a deaf person must be given an individual safety briefing (safety demonstration). The following guidelines should be taken into account when dealing with a deaf passenger: -

Stand or sit facing the deaf person, and at the same level as them

-

Face the light – do not position yourself in front of a bright window


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-

Make sure people are not moving around and behind you

-

Ensure the background noise is kept to a minimum

-

Check that the deaf person is looking at you before you start to speak

-

Do not shout as this will distort your voice and lip patterns – speak clearly, with a normal rhythm of speech

-

Remember sentences and phrases are easier to lip-read than single words

-

If the person you are speaking phrase, rephrase what you have said

-

Give the deaf person you are talking to time to absorb what you have said.

-

Keep your head still; stop talking if you turn away

-

Keep your hands and anything you are holding away from your face

-

Avoid exaggerated or misleading facial expressions

-

Use gestures where these are relevant

-

If you are talking to deaf and hearing people

-

If you change the subject, make sure the deaf person knows

-

Write things down if you need to clarify them

-

Blind passengers

-

Blind passenger may need assistance (MAAS) and may travel with Guide Dog.

-

In addition to the above, a blind person must be given an individual safety briefing (safety demonstration)

-

Below is listed a number of do’s and don’t do’s to bear in mind when meeting, helping and talking to blind or partially sighted people:

-

Ask if they need or want help, announce yourself

-

Say when you arrive and when you are leaving

-

Describe where things are (obstacles, clock face)

-

Give clear information surface when guiding

-

After guiding someone make sure before you leave that knows where they are in relation to their surroundings direction they are facing

-

Do not:

about

the

to

does

not

understand

people, do not

surroundings,

steps,

a

word

or

a

forget the deaf

changes

in

road

the person and which

o

Shout at a blind person assuming they are deaf

o

Grab hold of a blind or visually impaired person

o

Ignore or talk about someone who is visually impaired or blind, in the third person

o

Make assumptions about people whether they are sighted, visually impaired or blind

o

Move/remove things without telling the person what you have done

-

Invalid passengers

-

Can be any passenger: o

Who has undergone a recent operation

o

Who requires medical assistance during the flight

o

Who is undergoing medical treatment at the time of carriage

o

An invalid is a PRM who may need assistance to move to an exit in the event of an emergency. Whenever possible, invalids should pre-board


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Individual safety briefing In an individual safety briefing (safety demonstration). The C/A must: -

Brief the person on the routes to the appropriate exits

-

Inquire if the person needs special assistance

-

Instruct how to don the oxygen mask (use demo oxygen mask to demonstrate)

-

Instruct how to put the life vest (if applicable)

-

Instruct how to open/close seat belt etc.

-

MAAS passengers

Passenger who is blind/deaf or mentally disabled and maybe need to be met and assisted. Mentally disabled passengers If a request is made for a mentally disabled passenger to travel alone the Reservation Agent must establish the mental age of the passenger. Passengers with a mental age below 14 years cannot be accepted for travel if unaccompanied. If the mental age is above 14 years and the passenger requires assistance the ‘MAAS’ code must be used. Mentally disabled passengers not travelling alone and not requiring wheelchair assistance can have a standard booking. R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

Passengers requiring additional oxygen supply (other than medical urgencies) Wizz Air accepts passengers who need extra oxygen supply as per follows: -

Service is limited to 250 minutes of continuous supply at the flow rate of 2l/min

-

1 such passenger per flight can be accepted

-

Passenger will be announced by the Ground Handling prior to the boarding

-

Passenger must present documents in English from the doctor stating that: o

oxygen is essential for the person, and

o

passenger is fit to fly

Procedure: -

SCA informs the Commander about the presence and exact location of the passenger requiring additional oxygen

-

SCA cross checks medical documents

-

Passenger is to be treated as PRM and must be seated accordingly

-

Oxygen shall be provided as soon as the passenger requests it

-

Buddy must either accompany the person, or be appointed by the Crew as follows:

-

o

Buddy must be minimum 18 years old

o

Buddy must be instructed about the rules of the handling of the bottle, particularly: reading out the indications of the manometer

Administration conditions: o

bottle can be used until indicated pressure on the bottle(s) exceeds or equals 500 PSI

o

maximum two bottles can be used


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Note: this setup equals to guaranteed as per follows: 250 minutes of continuous supply at 2l/min flow rate. R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

-

Passenger and/or buddy are responsible to inform Cabin Crew when manometer readout is close to 500 PSI

-

Any medical urgencies must be supplied in the first sequence from the bottles already used.

-

If situation requires, bottle can be completely depleted, pressure: 0 PSI

-

Work Order entry must be recorded and CRF must be sent to Safety department at the end of duty.”

Passengers with CPAP device The carriage of CPAP devices is allowed on Wizz Air aircraft. CPAP: Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) device This is a ventilation device that blows a gentle stream of air into the nose during sleep to keep the airway open.

Pregnant passengers Pregnant women shall not travel on Wizz Air flights after the 34th week of pregnancy. Women who are over their 28th week of pregnancy can only travel on Wizz Air flights only on condition that they obtain a medical certificate approving their fitness to travel by air. Wizz Air will only be liable in accordance with these General Conditions of Carriage for any health problems to pregnant women and/or their unborn child that may occur during or as a result of carriage by.

NOTE: In case the passenger forgot or lost medical certificate a “Disclaimer Form” must be issued during check-in process by Ground Handling personnel stating that Wizz Air will not be held responsible for any subsequent health problems to the passenger or to unborn child that may occur during or as a result of carriage by air. There is no requirement for the Crew to check the stage of the pregnancy of the passenger. However, this condition does not affect the right of the Commander to refuse carriage in exceptional circumstances.

1.6.9

Inadmissible or deported passengers (INAD, DEPU, DEPA)

If Wizz Air is required to carry inadmissible or deported passengers or persons in lawful custody, special arrangements, including the provision of escorts, should be made and full details shall be included in a notification to the Commander.

Inadmissible passengers Are persons whose entry to a State is refused by the competent Authority. Such persons have normally to be transported back by the air carrier on which they arrived to their State of departure or to any other State where the persons are admissible.


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DEPORTEES Are persons previously admitted legally to a State, or who entered a State illegally, and who are formally ordered by the competent Authority to leave that State. If required to be carried by Wizz Air, the competent Authority of the State concerned is obliged to provide an escort. Wizz Air accepts a maximum of 5 such passengers without escort (DEPU) plus a maximum of 3 children under the age of 14 travelling with them. There is no limit on escorted passengers (DEPA).

PERSONS IN LAWFUL CUSTODY Are persons either under arrest or convicted by courts of law and who have to be transported to another State for legal reasons. For the transport of persons in lawful custody on Wizz Air flights an escort must be provided by the competent Authority. PROCEDURE These persons and the members of the escort (if required) should: -

Board the aircraft prior to all other passengers, in order for the Crew Members to visually acquaint themselves with those passengers and eventual escorts. If operational circumstances prevent this procedure, the boarding shall be conducted (preferably via the rear passenger door) after all other passengers have boarded the aircraft and have been seated

-

Be seated in the rear of the cabin. Occupancy of aisle seats or seats next to the emergency exits is prohibited

-

Have no access to alcohol (escort members included)

1.6.10 Seating procedures

Wizz Reserved Seat This service is providing a guaranteed seat located in the first 3 rows of the A/C and priority boarding. There can be maximum 16 Reserved Seat booked per flight. On the regular boarding card the product will be marked as ’’FRRS’’. The following procedure should be applied: R R R R R R R R R

-

In case there are less than 6 FRRS passengers shown on board, the seats must be kept free with the exception of the 3rd row that should be fully occupied with non FRRS passengers (no payment should be charged for this seats).

-

If passenger number requires it is allowed to seat passengers on all Reserved Seats without additional payment for that seats.

-

If the situation requires managing both PRM and FRRS passengers, the PRM passengers are to be given priority for seating allocation starting with the first row (PRM and one companion)

For seating restrictions in the first row refer to CAM 1.6.10.4


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XXLong passengers seating procedure XXLong passengers are passengers who purchased seats where more leg room (emergency exits) is available. XXLong passengers must fully meet with Wizz Air safety requirements and regulations regarding seating in emergency rows. According to Wizz Air.com “We reserve the right to move any passengers which are considered unsuitable for exit row seats.� The following principles applied regarding XXLong passengers handling: SCA -

The Ramp Agent has to inform SCA about the exact number of XXLong passengers. SCA informs Cabin Crew, especially C/A 3 who is standing, at over wing emergency rows, during embarkation

-

In case of unclear situation it should not impede embarkation; situation must be solved precisely when all passengers are seated

-

In case of any misunderstanding between C/A 3 and passenger, SCA must be informed and report to the Commander

-

SCA and/or C/A 2 is informing passengers entering at 1L door with XXLong code on web-check in boarding pass (or sticker on other boarding card type) where the reserved seats can be found

C/A 2 AND C/A 4 -

Extends the normal procedures during embarkation by giving guidance to passengers with XXLong code on boarding pass about where are their dedicated seats. If passengers need further help, C/A 2 (C/A 4) tells the passengers where to find C/A3 at her assigned area at row 12-13

-

Extends the normal procedures during embarkation by paying attention on passengers with XXLong code on boarding pass and keeping reserved seats in row 12 and 13 on both sides available for XXLong passenger

-

Directs and explains (if needed) to other passengers wishing to occupy XXLong seats why those seats are not to be occupied

-

C/A 3 is responsible to decide, whether XXLong passengers are meeting the relevant safety requirements

-

In case of discontent passenger, if passenger with no XXLong code had taken seat in related rows and refuses being reseated and/or in case of any difficulties SCA must be informed

-

In case of unclear situation it should not impede embarkation; situation must be solved precisely when all passengers are seated.

-

In case of any misunderstanding between C/A 3 and passenger, SCA must be informed and report to the Commander

-

NOTE: If there are no XXLong passengers, then passengers who did not purchase an XXLong service can take a seat in row 12 and 13 as we need at least 4 ABPs for the over wing exits. Anyone sitting there in these circumstances must be advised that normally those seats are reserved

-

NOTE: If the passenger load is more than 168, then it might happen that passengers, who did not purchase an XXLong, will have to seat with passengers who bought such a service. Those who have purchased XXLong will have their assigned seat, however all other seats must be occupied

C/A 3


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Emergency exits The following passengers must NOT seat in an emergency exit row: -

Children (Passenger 2-14 years inclusive)

-

PRM

-

Pregnant women

-

Infants (passenger under 2 years)

-

Passengers in need of extension/extra seatbelt

-

Elderly (passenger who is limited in moving because his/her age)

-

Passengers with age 14-17 years can sit there but not directly at the over-wing exit windows

A passenger seated next to an emergency exits must be an “Able Bodied Passenger� (ABP). Therefore the person has to fulfil all emergency exit row seating restrictions:

R R

-

be able to communicate in English language

-

be mentally and physically fit to operate the emergency exit

-

must be at the age of 18 or above and must not be intoxicated

NOTE: No baggage allowance on the seats or on the floor.

First row seating restrictions (emergency row) The following restrictions apply for passengers to sit in the first row: -

Passengers with Infants (0-2 years) and Children (2-14 years) are not allowed to sit in the 1st row.

-

No items can be stored on the floor and on the seat in the 1st passenger row.

-

PRM passengers/Pregnant women (if no PRM on board) are allowed to sit in the 1st row but only at 1A and 1F seats, however, the carry-on item restrictions must be followed.

On the seats 1C and 1D only passenger with the age 18 and above are permitted, as they are ABPs. ABPs shall meet the criteria listed in paragraph 1.6.10.3 and be able to communicate with the Crew.

Last row seating restrictions

R R

The Cabin Crew has to take into consideration that passengers seated in the last passenger row, on seats 30C and 30D are potential ABPs as well, therefore they should meet the same requirements as passengers seated on 1C and 1D. In the last passenger row, seating of families with infants/children should be avoided whenever possible.

Infants The number of passengers (infants included) in a row may not exceed the number of oxygen masks available in the PSU (refer to type instructions); Infant must be seated on the lap of an adult, with a minimum age of 16 years, strapped in a baby belt. Despite the extra seat being purchased for the car seat (car seat with own seatbelts, attached securely to a window seat) for take-off, landing, critical phases of the flight infant is to be strapped in a baby belt and seated on the adult lap.


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According to company policy we do accept 18 Infants on board; however, the number of infant belts is 18, so the maximum number of the infants and those in need of extention seatbelt must not be more than 18 heads in total. One adult can be accepted with one infant only. If an adult wishes to travel with two infants she has to arrange for a travel companion who is older than 16 year and who will be responsible for the infant while onboard. The infant has to be strapped-in whenever the "Fasten Seatbelt" sign is ON. CAUTION: Advice passengers travelling with small children of the potential risk related to the armrest movement (risk of injury to small children’s fingers when operating the movable armrest). MULTIPLE OCCUPANCY OF A SEAT It is only permitted when one occupant is an infant under 2 years old and the other is a responsible adult aged 16 years or more. A maximum of 18 infants may be carried additional to 180 passengers.

Young passengers Wizz Air does not accept unaccompanied children (UM) under the age of 14 years. Children under the age of 14 years must be accompanied on the same reservation by a passenger of 16 years of over who will take full responsibility of the child. Passengers aged 14 and 15 years old may travel unaccompanied but they cannot travel with and be responsible for a child under 14 years. Wizz Air accepts children travelling in groups provided there is one accompanying adult (aged 16 years or over) per 10 children. The accompanying adult(s) must seat together with the group he/she is responsible for. When seating groups of children together, it is recommended to have an adult occupying a seat in their immediate vicinity.

1.6.11 Distribution of passengers The SCA is responsible for ensuring that passengers are spread evenly throughout the whole aircraft cabin from the front to the back to ensure the safe balance of the aircraft. Particular attention should be paid to flights where the load factor is less than 70% (125 passengers). If there is any doubt at any time about that the SCA must request advice from the Commander. Should the situation require different passenger distribution, it is the SCA's responsibility to coordinate between Flight Crew and Ground staff. If the Commander deems it necessary, the passengers must be reseated in order to prevent balance problems. Flight and ground Crew will assume an even distribution of passengers between the sections in the cabin UNLESS they are informed otherwise by the SCA. Therefore it is the SCA's responsibility to manage this process. When the SCA asks permission for the closure of 1L door means an automatic confirmation to the Commander that the passengers are evenly distributed along the cabin as specified above. It is necessary to allocate Able Bodied Passengers adjacent to unsupervised exits. Passengers seated adjacent to unsupervised exits must be informed that they are sitting next to an emergency exit. They must be briefed that they are responsible for opening the exit in case of an emergency (refer to CAM 1.3.1.). They must study the passenger safety information card carefully. They must be asked if the information is understood and if they have any objections.


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1.6.12 Counting of passengers In normal circumstances headcount of passengers is not required. Ground handling must ensure that the correct number of passengers is checked and is on board before the stairs/gates are removed. When ground handling informs the SCA about the end of boarding the SCA has to announce: “CABIN CREW BOARDING IS COMPLETED” via the PA. On special request of the Commander or Ground Staff the headcount must be performed. -

After the announcement of the SCA “CABIN CREW, HEADCOUNT” an immediate headcount shall be performed by C/A 2 and C/A 3

-

C/A 2 starts to count from the 1st row towards row 30

-

C/A 3 starts to count from the row 30 towards 1st row

-

The result has to be reported to the SCA verbally by C/A 3 and via the interphone system by C/A 2

-

The Flight Supervisor must be notified, by the Handling Agent, if the number of checked in passengers is not conform with: o

The number of flight coupons received with boarding passengers, or

o

The number of passengers counted on board

If the number is not correct, the Commander/ Flight Supervisor will decide whether a baggage check is necessary or not. This is to avoid having unaccompanied baggage on board. Unaccompanied baggage could very well contain hazardous objects and may therefore only be accepted with the permission of the responsible Flight Supervisor/Commander. It might be decided that: -

YES: a baggage check must be performed

-

NO: according to the Flight Supervisor a baggage check is not necessary. In that case the decision regarding baggage check is with the Commander

1.6.13 Baggage check inside the aircraft Baggage check inside the aircraft is to be performed in the following circumstances: -

Transit flights

-

When a passenger, who has already entered the passenger cabin and took a seat resigned from the flight (independently from the reason)

-

When the Commander deems it necessary

-

Procedure:

-

SCA must make a relevant announcement informing passengers that a baggage check must be performed

-

All passengers must remove their personal belongings from the overhead compartments and also from underneath the seats

-

SCA must be present in the FWD entry area

-

C/A 2 starts to check the overhead compartments and the area under the seats (from the 1st row towards row 15th)

-

C/A 3 starts to check the overhead compartments and the area under the seats (from row 30th towards row 16th)

-

C/A 4 must be present in the AFT entry area

-

Any un-identified bag/personal belonging must be left before departure as it might contain a hazardous objects

-

Completion of the baggage check shall be reported to the Commander by SCA


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1.6.14 Baggage check outside the aircraft The following procedure applies: -

One stair must be positioned at the front exit and one at the rear exit, both on the same side of the aircraft (L)

-

SCA must be present in the FWD entry area, C/A 4 in the AFT entry area

-

SCA must make a relevant announcement informing passengers that a baggage check must be performed

-

A small group (a maximum of 10 passengers will be allowed outside the aircraft at the same time) must go outside and identify the baggage. Passengers will be called forward, starting from the rear of the cabin, leaving the front exit and entering the aircraft through the rear exit

-

C/A 2 and C/A 3 are to ensure the proper passenger flow inside the passenger cabin of the A/C

-

Baggage not identified must be left before departure

-

Completion of the baggage check shall be reported to the Commander by SCA

NOTE: Security of the passengers outside the aircraft is ensured by the Ground Staff.

1.6.15 Boarding With Less Than Minimum Crew For details regarding boarding with less than minimum Crew refer to CAM section 0.8.1.2.


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1.7

Before taxi

1.7.1

Cabin report to the Commander

Upon completion of boarding, a cabin report must be given by SCA to the Commander: “BOARDING IS COMPLETED” -

Giving this command to the Commander means that SCA has made sure of the followings:

-

All necessary flight documents are on board

-

Particularities – if any – are properly handled (i.e. PRMs passengers, special attention passengers, pax distribution if less than 125 passengers)

-

If headcount was required the number of passengers is to be reported to the Commander by the SCA (adults + infants separately)

1.7.2

Door closing

AFT passenger door (4L) The AFT door should be closed immediately following the “CABIN CREW, BOARDING IS COMPLETED” command, if the Seat Belt sign is on. In case there are a few late passengers to board, the AFT door should be closed to help facilitate an on-time departure. In this case, SCA will call C/A 4 via the interphone to request AFT door to be closed. R R

NOTE: Before closing door 4L, C/A4 must ensure that the door safety strap is stowed correctly Ground Staff responsible for removing stairs and other ground equipment must check with Cabin Crew verbally (e.g. by climbing to the top of the stairs) that stairs are to be removed. The stairs may only be removed when the aircraft doors have been closed.

NOTE: C/A 4 has to be present in the rear galley till the door has been closed to control the AFT entry area. C/A 4 can start the cabin preparation only if door 4L has been closed. FWD passenger door (1L) After boarding, the forward passenger door is to remain open until all customers have stowed their hand baggage and taken their seats. This also permits the last minute transfer of excess hand baggage to the hold, if necessary. Prior to closure of the forward passenger door, the SCA must confirm that: -

All hand baggage is properly stowed

-

Every passenger is seated

-

Permission is granted from the Commander

After the cabin report has been given and closure of the door permitted by the Commander, the cockpit door must be closed just before closing the main door. Junior Cabin Attendants during line-training are allowed to operate any of the main A/C door ONLY in presence and under supervision of another Cabin Crew Member (does not apply in Emergency situation). NOTE: Before closing door 1L, SCA must ensure that the door safety strap is stowed correctly

1.7.3

Slide arming

When the stairs/gates are out of the slide deployment area (approx. 3m), SCA (after visual check of the outside conditions) must give the command over the PA: "CABIN CREW, DOORS IN FLIGHT AND CROSSCHECK"


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On this command, slides must be armed. Each C/A assigned to specific door must:

-

Ensure (by checking the outside conditions via the observation hole on the main door) that stairs/gate is moved away from A/C (out of slide deployment area)

-

Ensure the door is properly closed (door locking indicator is in the locked position)

-

Arm the slide (pin, lever, pin) o

Remove the safety pin from disarmed position (pin)

o

Move the arming lever to the armed position (lever)

o

Stow the safety pin in the pin stowage (pin)

-

Have an eye contact with the other Crew Member while announcing: “DOOR IN FLIGHT”

-

Perform cross-check as follows: o o

Check that arming lever is in armed position (visual and manual check is required) Check that safety pin stowed correctly in pin stowage and the warning flag of the safety pin is not hanging onto the door support arm (manual check is required)

-

NOTE: In the Flight Deck an indication will appear when a slide is armed.

-

Have an eye contact with the other Crew Member while announcing: “CROSSCHECKED”

After slides of the main cabin door 4R and 4L are being armed and the cross-check has been performed, C/A 4 must report, by interphone system, to SCA: “DOORS IN FLIGHT AND CROSS-CHECKED” (Refer to CAM 10.6.3 regarding the use of interphone system). On A/Cs equipped with the Touchscreen FAP, SCA is to visually confirm on the Door/Slide Page the closed and armed status of the doors.

1.8

Taxi-out

1.8.1

Passenger announcement, safety briefing and demonstration

SCA must make an announcement (for detailed text refer to section 8), which includes the following: -

Welcoming passengers

-

Safety demonstration

Passenger safety demonstration must include the following: -

Location of the emergency exits in the cabin

-

Location of the floor proximity lighting

-

Use of the seatbelt

-

Demonstration of the oxygen mask

-

Demonstration of the life-vest (see NOTE below)

-

Presence and location of the passenger safety information card

NOTE: Life-vest demo is only required: -

If initial climb out and/or final approach is over open water, or


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-

Whenever flying over water more than 50 NM (1 nautical mile = 1.852 km, 50 NM = 92.6 km) away from land

During General Briefing, if in doubt about the necessity of life-vest demo, SCA is to obtain the relevant information from the Commander. NOTE: Cabin Crew Members during taxing are required to be readily able to reach their stations in order to be able to carry their individual duties and in particular the need for evacuation. NOTE: When using the handset Cabin Crew Members must always make sure that the handset cable does not stretch or brake at the base where it is attached to its bracket. Cabin Crew Members must never overstretch the cable. The handset cradle can only be extended to a maximum of 2 meters. Whenever a handset is in use for a call or announcement Cabin Crew Member is required to stay as close to the bracket as possible and keep the cable loose. Cabin Crew Members should always place the handset back on the hook when it is not in use.

1.8.2

Passenger safety demonstration General

Passenger’s safety demonstration is to be carried out when all passengers are seated, and their attention can readily be gained. The safety demonstration shall be given in a calm and authoritative manner, and shall be as interesting and informative as possible. Whereas some passengers may be experienced air travellers, others may not previously have flown, or may not be accustomed to different types of aeroplanes. Individual safety demonstration must be provided to a passenger who is unable to receive the information contained in the standard safety demonstration. These passenger may be visually impaired and/or hearing impaired. -

SCA reads the announcement;

-

C/A 2 and C/A 4 do the demonstration in the cabin;

-

C/A 2 stands at the first row;

-

C/A 4 stands in the cabin at the overwing exits.

SCA has to read in a clear, understandable and calm manner, paying attention on the speed of reading to avoid being too fast for those who are doing the demonstration. The reading done by the SCA should contain the necessary pauses to allow C/A 2 and C/A 4 to prepare the safety equipment which will be presented in the incoming phrase. The demonstration and the reading should be simultaneous. C/A 2 and C/A 4 has to do wide movements not too quickly to let the passengers follow with attention. The movements of the two demonstrators should be simultaneous. As C/A 4 (standing at the overwing exits facing aft galley) does not see C/A 2, C/A 2 has to follow and to copy the movements of C/A 4. Every movement starts first to the right. The Crew Members have to stand at the demo position until the end of the reading.

In case one demo kit is missing, the demonstration and reading for two demonstrators should be done excluding the oxygen mask and life vest (if applicable) presentation. The excluded parts should be done by one demonstrator twice in both languages respectively in the first and then in the overwing exit row. CAUTION: While performing Safety Demonstration attention must be paid to avoid passenger injury such as being hit with demo equipment.


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Safety demonstration step by step Initial demo position: C/A 2 stands straight before the first row and C/A 4 stands straight between row 12 and 13. The hands are crossed in the back of the body. Exits The announcement goes on two languages, every movement has to be hold out until it is said on both English / relevant native language of the base. SCA: „The emergency exits are marked with EXIT signs” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 have to show the exits SIGNS with both hands, and closed palms. The movement has to be done from the elbow.

SCA: „On this aircraft there are a total of 8 emergency EXITS” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 have to show 8 fingers with both stretched out hands (4 fingers on each hand, thumb finger excluded).

SCA: „Two doors are in the front” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 have to show index and middle fingers with right stretched out hands, then turn her body by the right to face forward galley and extend the hands from elbow to stretched out position and direct the hands to the EXITS.

SCA: „Four emergency windows are over the wings” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 have to show fours fingers on right stretched out hand (thumb finger excluded),

-

C/A 2 extends the hands from elbow to stretch out position and directs the hands to the EXITS, than moves 1 step forward and repeat the movement of the hands.

-

C/A 4 extends the hands to the side, than moves 1 step forward and repeats the movement of the hands.

SCA: „Two doors are in the rear” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 have to show index and middle fingers with right stretched out hands,

-

C/A 2 extends the hands from elbow to stretched out position, repeats the movement while walking one step forward and then directs the hands to the EXITS.

-

C/A 4 extends the hands from elbow to stretch out position, than directs the hands to the EXITS.

Floor level lighting The announcement goes on two languages; every movement has to be repeated twice, once with English language and once with relevant native language of the base. SCA: „In the event of evacuation floor level lighting will help guide you to the emergency exits” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 have to bend forward with two balancing stretched out hands following the floor level lighting.

SCA: „Please take a moment to locate the exit nearest to you, keeping in mind that it may be behind you." -

C/A 2 turns his/her body by the right to face forward galley and extends the hands from elbow to stretched out position and directs the hands to the EXITS.

-

C/A 4 extends the hands from elbow to stretch out position, than directs the hands to the EXITS (the movements for this part are only done once for both languages).

-

Seat belts

The announcement goes on two languages; every movement has to be repeated twice, once with English language and once with relevant native language of the base. SCA: „ Now we are going to show how to use the seatbelts”


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-

C/A 2 and C/A 4 prepare the seatbelt for further demonstration.

SCA: „Please fasten your seatbelts and secure them tightly” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 show the seatbelt extended between their two stretched out hands, the buckle in the right hand.

SCA: „This is how to close” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 close the seatbelt and do the movement how to adjust the belt.

SCA: „And how to open it” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 open the seatbelt and return to initial position (seatbelt extended between their two stretched out hands, the buckle in the right hand).

-

Oxygen masks

The announcement goes on two languages; every movement has to be repeated twice, once with English language and once with relevant native language of the base. SCA: „We are now going to show you how to use the oxygen masks” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 held the oxygen mask in the right stretched out hand.

SCA: „The oxygen masks are located in the panels above your head” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 keep the oxygen mask in the right hand, extend the hands on both sides showing the oxygen masks compartments and walk one step forward.

SCA: „In case of loss of cabin pressure they are automatically released” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 hide the left hand behind the body, and, while keeping the right hand on its position under the oxygen panel, release the mask.

SCA: „When released, pull the nearest one towards you, this will activate the flow of oxygen” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 while keeping the right hand on its position under the oxygen panel with the mask released, pull the mask with the left hand parallel to the stretched right hand. SCA: „Place the mask over your nose and mouth. Secure with strap and breathe normally”

-

C/A 2 and C/A 4 place with right hand the mask over nose and mouth and put the strap over the head with left hand. When the mask and strap are on the position, turn first to the right, than to the left to show the lateral view of the adjustment of the mask.

SCA: „After putting on your own mask, please help anyone next to you who may need your assistance” Life vests The announcement goes on 2 languages; each movement has to be repeated twice, once with English language, once with relevant native language of the base. SCA: „Your life vest is located under your seat in a sealed bag” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 show the life vest extended between the two stretched out hands. Then, while keeping the life vest in the right hand, bend forward directing the hands on the sides to show the location of life vests under the seats.

SCA: „Do not remove it, unless otherwise instructed” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 show the life vest extended between the two stretched out hands.

SCA: „Remove the life vest from the pouch, and pull it over your head” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 put the life vest on.

SCA: „Attach the straps to the hooks in front and pull them tight” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 attach the strap to the hook (on the right side) and adjust the strap

SCA: „After leaving the aircraft pull firmly on the red handle and the life vest will inflate”


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-

C/A 2 and C/A 4 show and pull 2 times the handle with the right hand.

SCA: „The life vest can also be inflated by blowing through this tube” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 show with the right hand the rubber inflation tube on the side of the life vest.

SCA: „Children’s life vest should be inflated while inside the aircraft” Safety instruction card The announcement goes on two languages; every movement has to be repeated twice, once with English language and once with relevant native language of the base. SCA: „For further information you will find a safety instruction card” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 held the safety instruction card in the right stretched out hand.

SCA: „in the seat pocket in front of you” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 keep the safety instruction card in the right hand, show the seat pocket on the right side, raise the hand above the head, and show the seat pocket on the left side.

SCA: „which contains the important safety features of this aircraft” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 held the safety instruction card in the two stretched out hands showing both sides of the card.

SCA: „Ladies and Gentlemen, your safety and comfort is our priority, if you have any question, please ask a member of our Cabin Crew. Thank you for attention and thank you cabin Crew” -

C/A 2 and C/A 4 stay in the initial demo position.

NOTE: Demo life-vest should be kept on until the cabin preparation is completed.

1.8.3

Cabin preparation

Directly after the safety demonstration, C/A 2 and C/A 4 must perform a cabin preparation in their assigned area (C/A 2 row 1-15, C/A 4 row 16-30) and SCA and C/A 3 must perform a galley and entry area preparation in their respective areas (SCA in FWD galley and FWD entry area and C/A3 in AFT galley and AFT entry area). Note: Lavatory door locking during normal cabin preparation is in the responsibility of C/A 2 (lavatory A) and C/A 4 (lavatory D and E) Cabin luggage Overhead compartment

R R R R R

All passengers Seatbacks Armrests All infants Tray tables Cup holders Electronic devices Window blinds Curtain(s)

Properly stowed Closed and Latched; Stowage of passenger and crew baggage complies with size and weight limitations of compartments, Correctly seated with their seat belts properly fasten Upright position (if applicable) Horizontal position Strapped in baby belt Closed and Latched Closed (if applicable) large PEDs safely secured for take-off and landing; small PEDs in flight mode or completely off (if flight mode feature is not available or whenever LVO in progress) Open Secured open


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Exit areas Lavatories Galleys

Free of obstacles Vacant and locked Clear of loose articles; Galley doors/boxes and trolleys closed, latched and secured; Water boilers power is off.

- Smaller personal items (such as light jacket, sweater, book, neck pillow, small PED etc.) are not required to be stowed in the overhead compartment unless they would obstruct the access to the aisle

R R R R R R R R R

- Luggage (rucksack, laptop bag, suitcase, large PED etc) must be stored in the overhead compartments or under passenger seat. Whenever stored under a passenger seat, luggage must completely fit the area - Emergency exit rows, 1st row are to remain clear from any items/personal belongings When final cabin preparation is completed: -

C/A 2 verbally confirms to SCA: “CABIN SECURED” (referring to cabin section A) C/A 3 verbally confirms to C/A 4 that the galley and AFT entry area is prepared for take-off

-

C/A 4 then shows to SCA one thumb up that the cabin section B, galley and AFT entry area is prepared for take-off (thumb up of CA/4 is given while maintaining eye-contact with the SCA)

NOTE: Section A is from row 1 to row 15 included; section B is from row 16 to row 30. CAUTION: Do not overload stowage compartments. Overload may cause a failure of the locking mechanism (danger of uncontrolled door opening) or damage to the stowage compartment attachment. To avoid passenger injuries, distribute some items to other stowage compartments.

1.8.4

Cabin Attendant seating

When the aircraft starts to taxi, all C/As, unless they have to perform safety duties, should be seated near their assigned door. It means that no door should be left unattended during taxi. During take-off, landing and whenever the Commander deems it necessary, each Crew Member must be properly secured using the safety belts and the harnesses provided. The feet must be placed firmly on the floor and hands under thighs with palms up.

1.8.5

Cabin ready procedure before take-off

After the cabin preparation has been completed, and the confirmation from all Cabin Attendants has been received, SCA should select cabin and entry lights to “DIM2” (10%) position and window lights to “OFF” position. This allows a better perception of emergency exits and signs in case of emergency evacuations. As soon as tasks related to cabin/galley preparation are completed and the confirmation to SCA is granted, Cabin Attendants should sit and secure themselves on their jumpseats. After all confirmation has been received and lights properly set the SCA will sit and secure herself on the jumpseat. Once the SCA is secured on the jumpseat, but not before the aircraft starts moving under its own power, the SCA is to call the cockpit by interphone. As soon as the workload in the cockpit permits, the flight deck Crew will answer the call: -

SCA to announce “CABIN SECURED”,


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-

1.8.6

Flight deck Crew responds “CABIN SECURED, TAKE-OFF IN xxx MINUTES”.

Silent review / 30 seconds review

The use of the Silent Review is an excellent tool to prepare for the unexpected. The constant use of the Silent Review is a key element in identifying emergency duties and responsibilities, and increases awareness during take-off and landing phases of flights. It enables cabin crew to respond, adapt and react quickly in the event of an emergency. The cabin crew should be alert to any indication that a possible emergency situation exists, when preparing for take-off and landing. The Silent Review must be performed by each Cabin Crew Member during take-off and landing phases of the flight. Possible example of the “Silent Review”: OLD ABC -

Operation of exits

-

Location of emergency equipment

-

Drills

-

Able-bodied passengers and PRMs

-

Brace position

-

Commands

1.9

Take-off

1.9.1

During take-off

Except those duties required for the safe operation of the aircraft, no Crew Member should perform any activity during take-off, initial climb, final approach and landing, except the situation when Commander deems it necessary. If needed, during this time the communication between cabin and cockpit is established via interphone system.

1.9.2

After take-off Catering announcement

Catering announcement is to be made after take-off once exit signs are off.

No smoking sign The "No Smoking" sign remains illuminated throughout the flight.

Seat belt sign procedure after take-off After take-off C/As must remain seated until the “Fasten Seatbelt” sign has been cycled or switched off. If the “Fasten Seatbelt” sign has been cycled only: -

It is the information that the C/As can stand up, but the “Fasten Seatbelt” sign remains on as passengers have to remain seated


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R R R R

-

SCA shall make an announcement to passengers advising them to remain seated with their seatbelts fastened (passengers must remain seated until the “Fasten Seatbelt” sign has been switched off).

-

Cabin lights shall be kept in DIM2 and window lights OFF

When the “Fasten Seatbelt” is switched off:

R R R R R R R

-

Flight Deck might be contacted by the interphone system (give the Pilots a couple of seconds to establish communication)

-

SCA has to select cabin illumination to BRIGHT (unless circumstances require differently)

-

Window lights might be kept OFF until the start of the onboard catering service

-

NOTE: On longer flights, after finishing the onboard sales activities (Wizz Café and Boutique service(s), SCA is to set cabin illuminating properly, taking into consideration the time of day, outside light conditions, time at departure airport and at destination, circadian cycle of passengers.

-

SCA makes an announcement, advising passengers of the following: o

Keep the seatbelt fastened during flight, when seated

o

Prohibition of smoking and possible consequences of smoking on board

NOTE: Whenever the FAP is not in use the Wizz Logo screen sever should be engaged (refer to type instruction).

1.9.3

First call of SCA to the cockpit after take-off

Unless safety concern, SCA is to call the cockpit only when the first of the following event occurs: -

C/As are ready to start the service

-

15 minutes after take-off

During this first call to the cockpit: -

The Commander should inform the SCA about the expected descent time and landing time, expected flight conditions (turbulence) and any special/requests from cockpit Crew Members (including Crew-meal concerns)

-

The SCA should inform the Commander about the expected start time of the catering service, special procedures to be requested by radio to ground-handling (e.g. wheelchairs etc.) and any special in the cabin

1.10

During flight

For safety reasons, the following checks have to be done during the flight: -

-

Check of lavatories (minimum every 15 minutes): o

Check that the smoke detection system has not been disabled or tampered with

o

no cigarettes were disposed in the waste bin or towel container

Check of the passenger cabin (minimum every 10 minutes) o

Ensure passenger compliance with all lightened signs, placards, Crew Members instructions

o

Ensure that passengers are using only permitted electronic devices

-

Check of the cockpit crew well being every 30 minutes via interphone system.

-

Portable electronic devices

-

For details refer to CAM section 1.6.3


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1.10.1 Admittance to the cockpit Passengers No person, other than a Flight Crew Member assigned to a flight, is admitted to, or carried on the flight deck unless that person is: -

An operating Crew Member

-

A representative of the Authority responsible for certification, licensing or inspection if this is required for the performance of his official duties

-

An employee of other national aviation Authorities or Wizz Air or of its maintenance contractor, if this is required for the performance of his official duties

-

An employee of foreign aviation Authorities/organizations performing specific duties and/or on a familiarization flight, as approved by Wizz Air’s Head of Flight Operations

-

An employee of Wizz Air

NOTE: Any person (other than operating crew) admitted to the flight deck by the commander is required to remain in the flight deck throughout the entire duration of the flight. Entry or exit of the flightdeck during flight is not permitted except for physiological or duty reasons Exceptionally, carriage of person not in the categories above may be authorized by Head of Flight Operations if this is in the interest of the airline or in the interest of aviation safety. The Commander shall ensure that: -

In the interests of safety, admission to the flight deck does not cause distraction and/or interfere with the flight’s operation; and

-

All persons carried on the flight deck are made familiar with the relevant safety and operating procedures.

-

The final decision regarding admission to the flight deck of the persons above rests with the Commander, who shall request credentials or identification of such persons before granting permission. The Commander shall only deny access of persons duly authorized by the Authority - entitled to enter and remain on the flight deck – when interest of safety requires.

ACCESS TO THE COCKPIT DURING FLIGHT OF PERSONS NOT INCLUDED IN THE ABOVE LIST The commander may grant access to persons not included in the above list only if this would raise the level of safety of the flight. In any such case the commander will submit a written report to the Head of Flight Operations within 24 hours after the event.

Cabin Crew Members Since the cockpit door is locked from engines start until after landing when engines are shut off, the Cabin Crew must obtain cockpit access by a request via the keypad. When requesting the access via the keypad, the keypad must be covered by one hand, in order that passengers seating in the 1st cabin row will not have an overview on the keypad. A normal entry request via the keypad causes a doorbell to sound in the cockpit and is regarded as safe. The Flight Crew will select the flight deck door switch to the unlocked position. The cockpit door can be pushed open when on the keypad the green LED light illuminates. While any of the Crew Members is entering the Flight Deck, another Crew Member must stand behind the entering person, in front of the cockpit door (Body cover procedure). This Crew Member has to face the passenger cabin blocking the way of any unauthorized person willing


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to go to the Flight Deck. No other person than a Crew Members is entitled to be in the FWD galley/entry area while there is a request to access the cockpit. Should the second Crew Member not apply the above mentioned procedure, flight deck Crew must refuse the permission of cockpit entry, considering a possible hijacking attempt.

NOTE: C/A can enter the cockpit if called by the flight deck Crew only after being permitted by the SCA, unless emergency situation makes the request for permission impossible. NOTE: During standard operation it is not allowed for the Cabin Crew to occupy neither CPT nor FO seat.

1.10.2 Serving the Flight Crew The SCA should pay special attention to the well-being of the Flight Crew during flight duty. Regular contacts must be established (every 30 minutes), by interphone, to ensure Pilots have no health irregularity. Serving liquid in the cockpit should be done in a careful manner, because spilling liquid over the pedestal may result in a malfunction of the equipments. The following rules must be observed: -

Every item must be served from the window side.

-

Cans or any other pressurized beverages should be opened before entering the cockpit.

-

No bottle must be disposed on the cockpit floor at any time, neither by Cabin Crew nor Pilots.

-

Bottles brought to the cockpit must be given in hand to the Pilots or placed in the lateral stowage compartments,

-

Rubbish bag should be provided behind the crew seating for flight crew use.

In case serving hot beverages for the flight crew the following precautions must be observed: -

Before handling out the cup, it must be assured that the cup lid is properly positioned/closed

-

Before servicing, the crew must be advised that the content of the cup is hot

-

There should be at least 60 minutes between serving the same meals to the Commander and the First Officer

-

Whenever a hot meal is served at least 120 minutes must be ensured

-

However, light snacks, coffees or other non-alcoholic drinks can be taken at the same time at the Commander's discretion. Meals must be served to the Commander and the Co-Pilot during the flight duty. High-risk food (e.g. shellfish) must not be consumed while on flight duty

-

Serving any alcoholic beverage is strictly forbidden

1.10.3 In-flight Sales and Catering procedures R R

Catering procedures, standards and requirements are elaborated in detail in the Cabin Attendant Service Manual.


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General Catering procedures No late departure should be accepted due to missing catering on board. The Captain - after coordination with the SCA – is to advise OCC as soon as possible of any missing catering in order to receive the loading/replacement at the first opportunity (basically on the flight back to the base or even at outstations) -

It is obligatory to provide all customers with a receipt

-

Product prices in different currencies are provided by the EPOS device

-

It is forbidden to sell any alcoholic beverages to a customer under the age of 18, or customer already under influence of alcohol

-

Distributing articles from the catering trolley for other than sales purposes is not allowed (exception: missing Crew meal and refund due to unsatisfied customer)

-

Attention must be paid while preparing beverages and serving passengers to avoid Crew or passenger injury (like being hit by catering trolley or injury caused by hot beverages)

-

C/A2 and C/A4 must pour hot water in cups preferably using the cart’s tray

-

No other beverages than hot beverages can be opened and prepared for serving

-

Before handling out the cup, it must be assured that the cup lid is properly positioned and the passenger must be advised that the content of the cup is hot and needs to be handled carefully

-

Trolleys must be braked every time when not moved and must not be left unattended

-

When not in use, trolleys must be restored safely and must be stored, locked and latched during taxi, take-off, turbulences and landing

CAUTION: Operate the trolley brake carefully to minimize the risk of any injury to feet

Catering service on ground In case (after embarkation of passengers and closure of the main doors) due to unforeseen circumstances longer waiting with passengers on board is required (more than 30 min.) it is allowed to provide catering service on demand, however the following rules must be strictly applied: -

Permission from the Commander is received

-

C/A2 and C/A3 are the Cabin Crew Members to serve the passengers (SCA and C/A4 are allowed to assist in the galley only, due to supervision of the main doors)

-

SCA and C/A4 are to stay in the respective entry area/galley

-

No alcoholic beverages to be served

-

No hot beverages to be served

-

Passengers must be provided with the receipt (if not possible, service is strictly forbidden)

-

No Wizz Boutique items to be sold

Missing Crew Meal procedure Each Crew Member is entitled to take a sandwich and water still or sparkling of 1.5l per person from the catering trolley without paying. Should there be no sandwich or water available, and only then, Crew Members are to choose any other combination of food and non alcoholic soft drinks, however, the combined value per Crew member cannot exceed the value of the sandwich and 1.5l water combination.


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NOTE: Alcoholic beverages and boutique products may not be included in any combination. After the last duty sector, the SCA has to send Crew Report Form with the following details: -

Flight Data: Flight number, Date, A/C registration, Set number, Crew Members

-

Items removed: specification to what kind of sandwiches (cheese/ham) and water (still/sparkling)

Serving Alcohol Alcoholic beverages which were not bought on board the A/C cannot be consumed by passengers. It is not allowed to serve alcoholic beverages to a passenger who appears to be under the influence of alcohol, and to a passenger below 18 years old. Intoxicated passengers are a possible safety hazard. It is not allowed to serve any alcoholic beverages to passengers before take-off and/or after landing.

1.10.4 Cockpit-cabin communication during the cruise The SCA is to communicate with the cockpit once again after the service. In addition, during long flights, the SCA should check the well-being of the Flight-Crew every 30 minutes, by interphone. In case SCA deems it necessary, due to safety operation of the flight, she should not hesitate to request an access to the cockpit. If there is any change in the data’s already shared during the previous contacts with the cockpit, the Commander and the SCA should update each other’s (holding, push-back on arrival…) and SCA should update Cabin Crew Members respectively. When deemed necessary the Commander may call SCA using FWD/AFT Call buttons. As first priority SCA shall answer the call without any substantial delay by interphone. Should the SCA be not available, any other C/A is to answer the call.

1.10.5 Flight Crew controlled rest During long flights, pilots may apply Controlled Rest (CR) is intended as a last resort to relieve unexpected, excessive tiredness in flight. It does not absolve the flight crew member of their responsibility to be sufficiently rested before a flight. CR should be used in conjunction with other on board fatigue management countermeasures such as physical exercise, bright cockpit illumination at appropriate times, balanced eating and drinking, and intellectual activity. It may be used on flights where experience has shown or where it is expected that crew alertness may be improved, especially for the final part of the flight. Cockpit Crew actions: - SCA must be informed about the CR, to avoid interruption during the pilot nonflying‘s rest time. If it is known that CR will be utilised prior to the flight, the SCA should be advised to allow for planning of the On Board Service. Otherwise the Captain must inform the SCA just prior to the start of CR. - The pilot flying (PF) must call the cabin every 20 minutes to advise they are still awake. If they fail to do so, the SCA will call the flight deck - CR may be used during single or augmented crew operation - Only one Flight Crew Member at a time shall make use of CR


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-

During this time all Flight Crew Members have to stay at their stations, including the resting Flight Crew Membe CR should only be used during the cruise phase and should terminate at least 30 minutes prior to top of descent A period of at least 15 minutes should be planned as a ―post–rest period to let the effects of sleep inertia‘ wear off before the crew member resumes their duties The maximum time for an individual rest period shall not exceed 40 minutes. This time limitation serves the purpose of avoiding deep sleep, with resulting increased sleep inertia

Cabin Crew actions: When CR is applied, SCA shall: - Seek information on the planned start and end of the CR - Inform Cabin Crew Members about the planned time and duration of the flight deck CR - Take into consideration the CR when planning service activities - Ensure that Flight Crew is not interrupted – contact and communication is limited to issues in relation to flight safety - Regularly monitor time while CR is applied to ensure that contact with flight deck is maintained in every 20 minutes intervals

1.10.6 Turbulence management Turbulence is air movement that normally cannot be seen and often occurs unexpectedly. It can be created by many different conditions, including atmospheric pressure, jet streams, air around mountains, cold or warm weather fronts or thunderstorms. Turbulence can even occur when the sky appears to be clear. Turbulence is the leading cause of injury to passengers and Cabin Crew in non-fatal accidents. If the weather conditions, cloud structure and route forecast indicate that turbulence is likely to be encounter, the cabin crew should be pre-warned by the flight crew, and the passengers advised to return to, and/or remain in their seats, and to ensure that their seat belts are securely fastened. Catering and other loose equipment shall be stowed and secured until it is evident that the risk of further turbulence has passed. Turbulences are sometimes felt differently in the cabin than in the cockpit. SCA should establish contact with the Commander via interphone in case she/he thinks the level of turbulence might be a safety factor. The final decision of switching ON the seatbelt signs remains with the Commander. CAUTION: Cabin Crew moving through the cabin is required to ensure the personal safety by all means at all times. Seat headrests or overhead compartment handrails are to be held while moving through the passenger cabin. The levels of turbulence are defined and described as follows: Light turbulence Light turbulence momentary causes slight, erratic changes in the aircraft altitude or attitude, and only likely to affect passengers’ safety and comfort: -

Passengers may feel a slight strain against seat belts

-

Liquids are shaking but are not splashing out of cups

-

Trolleys can be manoeuvred with little difficulty

In case of light turbulence the service does not have to be suspended. However the safety of the passengers must be assured:


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-

Visually check that all passengers are seated with their seat belts fastened and hand baggage is stowed

-

Infants must be secured with an infant seat belt on the guardians lap

-

The “Fasten Seatbelt” sign will be switched on by the Cockpit Crew

-

The passengers must avoid using lavatories

-

The relevant announcement has to be made by the SCA

-

The hot water pot from the service drawer from the top of the catering trolley has to be replaced to the lowest drawer of the respective trolley, with the opening directed to the inside drawer

NOTE: During light turbulence serving of hot beverages must be suspended. Should this result discrepancies in sales, the Crew Report Form must be sent, after the end of the flight duty. Moderate turbulence Moderate turbulence causes rapid bumps or jolts, likely to affect safety of cabin Crew members: -

Passengers feel definite strain against seat belts

-

Liquids are splashing out of cups

-

Trolleys are difficult to manoeuvre

-

It is difficult to walk or stand in the cabin

-

In case of moderate turbulence, the Commander informs the Cabin Crew via the PA to take their seats (‘CABIN CREW TAKE YOUR SEATS’).

-

The relevant announcement has to be made by the SCA.

-

The SCA has to inform the passengers about the fact that the service is suspended until the aircraft is out of the turbulent zone and the circumstances are back to normal

-

The “Fasten Seatbelt” sign will be switched ON by the cockpit Crew

-

At this time the Crew has to replace the trolleys (in closed, latched and secured position) and the EPOS in the galley as soon as possible.

-

While returning to their jumpseats, C/As must check that all passengers are seated and securely fastened and hand baggage is stowed.

-

After making the galley safe, the Cabin Crew must seat on their jumpseats and fastened seatbelts until the aircraft is out of the turbulent zone.

-

When all C/As are secured, the SCA calls the cockpit using the interphone to confirm all C/As are secured.

-

SCA has to advise C/As when the service can be continued.

-

Severe/extreme turbulence

Severe turbulence causes large abrupt changes in the aircraft altitude and attitude, likely to affect safety of Cabin Crew Members: -

Passengers are forced violently against their seat belts

-

Items fall or lift off the floor

-

Loose items are tossed about the cabin

-

It is impossible to walk

-

In case of severe or extreme turbulence, the Commander should inform the Cabin Crew via the PA to take their seats (‘CABIN CREW TAKE YOUR SEATS’).

When the flight is experiencing severe/extreme turbulences and whatever is the cockpit reaction: -

The Cabin Crew must not attempt to visually check passenger compliance


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-

If trolleys are in the cabin, set the brakes on all trolleys that are in use in the current location. Place jugs/pots of hot beverages on the floor

-

The Cabin Crew must immediately sit down. Take the nearest seat (including passenger seat) and fasten seatbelt/harness

-

The “Fasten Seatbelt” sign will be switched ON by the cockpit Crew

-

The relevant announcement has to be made by the SCA at the first opportunity (when the moving in the cabin is considered to be safe)

-

The SCA calls the cockpit using the interphone to confirm all Cabin Crew Members are secured

-

After severe/extreme turbulence, the Cabin Crew must check the cabin for any potential damage and possible passenger’s injury. The cabin crew should provide first aid treatment to injured passengers and Crew Members, and calm passengers if necessary.

NOTE: When the flight is out of a given level of turbulence, the Commander is to decide whether He should switch off the seatbelt signs or liaise with SCA to release the Cabin Crew only (the seatbelt sign can be cycled OFF/ON to advice the crew that it is safe to resume service). SCA should not hesitate to liaise with the Commander in case the flight is smooth for a reasonable time and there is no reaction from the cockpit.

LEVEL OF TURBULENCE

SIGNS

SERVICE

LAVATORIES LOCKED

CABIN CREW

PA TO CABIN CREW

LIGHT

ON

YES

YES

STANDING

NO

MODERATE

ON

NO

YES

SEATED

YES

SEVERE

ON

NO

YES

SEATED

YES*

*if possible During the flight, the aircraft may encounter areas of turbulence that were not forecast. For example, Clear Air Turbulence (CAT), which usually occurs at high altitudes, during cruise. Clear Air Turbulence can be forecast but cannot be detected by the aircraft radar, so there is often no warning. When the aircraft encounters, or is about to encounter moderate or severe turbulence there may be little or no time for preparation. Cabin Crew should not risk injury by continuing cabin service during moderate or severe turbulence. Complements for cabin management It is possible that loose objects, such as passenger baggage, or service equipment, such as trays, trolleys, etc. become projectiles, and cause injury to cabin Crew members and passengers during turbulence. Consequently the Cabin Crew during flight must ensure that: -

trolleys not remain unattended in front of exits, outside the galleys, or in the aisle during cabin service,

-

cabin is kept tidy, in order to limit the amount of loose objects

-

passenger baggage is not left in the aisles

-

all overhead stowage compartments are closed

-

Complements for galley management

After each service, the Cabin Crew has to:


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-

stow trolleys in their correct stowage

-

close and lock the doors of trolleys and stowage compartments immediately after each use

-

stow service equipment that is not in use

Securing the galley after each service and restraining all equipment after each service means that less time is needed to secure the galley in the event of turbulence. CAUTION: Cabin Crew should never use the galley standard units as a seat or a ladder. The galley standard units should be in their correct location, closed and latched when not in use. Complements for passenger management The most effective way to prevent passenger and cabin crew injuries during turbulence is to be seated and fastened. When the Fasten Seat Belt sign comes on during the flight due to turbulence, the cabin crew must: -

Make an announcement to advice passengers to return to their seats and fasten their seat belts

-

Walk through the cabin and check that all passengers are seated with their seat belts fastened

-

Make periodic announcements when the fasten seat belt sign is on for a long time, or when passengers do not comply with the fasten seat belt sign

1.11

Descent – cabin preparation

Cabin Secured procedure on arrival When starting descend (end of cruise) the Commander informs the Cabin Crew Members by: -

Cycling the seatbelt signs and

-

Announcing via PA: “CABIN CREW, START OF DESCENT”

With the announcement “CABIN CREW, START OF DESCENT” from the Flight Deck, waste collection must be completed and waste disposed into the waste trolley. SCA should increase the intensity of light setting by one level higher, and make an announcement to the passengers containing the following:

-

End of on board service

-

Request towards passengers to start re-stowing personal belongings under the seat or in the overhead compartment

Collection of unwanted items

When passing FL150 (latest 10 minutes before landing): -

The seatbelt signs will be set ON or cycled if already ON due to turbulence, and

-

Announcement via PA “CABIN CREW, PREPARE FOR LANDING” will be made by the Flight Deck Crew

The cabin preparation for landing should be started:

-

When the Seat Belt sign is switched ON by the Flight Deck Crew together with the command “CABIN CREW, PREPARE FOR LANDING” or

-

If Seat Belt sign is ALREADY ON due to turbulence, when the Seat Belt sign is being recycled by the Flight Crew (slow sequence OFF/ON to generate a clear signal), together with the command “CABIN CREW, PREPARE FOR LANDING”


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When the “Fasten Seatbelt” sign is switched ON before landing and the command “CABIN CREW, PREPARE FOR LANDING” is given by the Flight Crew, SCA must select the ‘BRIGHT’ setting of cabin lights and make an announcement to passengers, containing the following:

R R R R R

-

Return to seat / stow all luggage

-

Fasten seatbelts

-

Position seatbacks upright (if applicable)

-

Stow tray tables

-

Close cup holders (if applicable)

-

All electronic equipment must remain switched offline, or must be switched off, in case of Low Visibility Operation. In this situation, all PED equipment must be switched OFF during the approach and landing phase.

-

Flight Crew will inform the SCA of the flight via the interphone not later than “CABIN CREW, START OF DESCENT” when LVO is in force. Passenger announcement is to be made accordingly.

Cabin Crew safety related duties:

R R R R R R R R R R

-

passengers are seated with their seat belts fastened

-

infants strapped in the baby belts on adult laps

-

stowage of passenger and crew baggage complies with regulations

-

overhead compartments are closed and latched

-

all catering items are correctly stowed and galleys are secured and

-

exits and escape paths are clear of obstructions

-

curtain(s) are secured

-

armrests are in horizontal position

-

window blinds are open

-

tray tables are in upright and latched position and cup holders are closed (if applicable)

-

seat backs are in the upright position (if applicable)

-

passengers comply with Portable Electronic Devices (PED) restrictions

C/A 2 and C/A 4 must perform a cabin preparation in their assigned area (C/A 2 row 1-15 and lock lavatory A, C/A 4 row 16-30 and lock lavatory D and E) and SCA and C/A 3 must perform a galley and entry area preparation in their respective areas (SCA in FWD galley and FWD entry area and C/A3 in AFT galley and AFT entry area). C/A3 before preparation for landing has to make sure that appropriate ABPs has taken their ABPs seats. In case previously briefed ABP is not longer responsible for ABP task (becomes drunk, sick or unruly or would like to take any other seat than her assignes ABP seat), another ABP must be selected and briefed before landing. CAUTION: Due to possible injuries caused by opening doors or/and falling items, make sure that the doors of all stowage compartments are closed and correctly latched during taxi, takeoff, turbulence and landing. Cabin luggage Overhead compartment All passengers Seatbacks Armrests All infants

Properly stowed Closed and Latched; Stowage of passenger and crew baggage complies with size and weight limitations of compartments, Correctly seated with their seat belts properly fasten Upright position (if applicable) Horizontal position Strapped in baby belt


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Tray tables Cup holders R R R R

Electronic devices Window blinds Curtain(s) Exit areas Lavatories Galleys

R R R R R R R R R

Closed and Latched Closed (if applicable) large PEDs safely secured for take-off and landing small PEDs – in flight mode or completely off (if flight mode feature is not available or whenever LVO in progress) Open Secured Free of obstacles Vacant and locked Clear of loose articles; Galley doors/boxes and trolleys closed, latched and secured; Water boilers power is off.

-

Smaller personal items (such as light jacket, sweater, book, neck pillow, small PED etc.) are not required to be stowed in the overhead compartment unless they would obstruct the access to the aisle

-

Luggage (rucksack, laptop bags, suitcases, large PEDs etc) must be stored in the overhead compartments or under passenger seat. Whenever stored under a passenger seat, luggage must completely fit the area

-

Emergency exit rows and the 1st row are to remain clear from any items/personal belongings

When final cabin preparation is completed: -

C/A 2 verbally confirms verbally to SCA: ‘CABIN SECURED’ (referring to cabin section A)

-

C/A 3 verbally confirms to C/A 4 that the galley and AFT entry area is prepared for landing

-

C/A 4 than shows to SCA with one thumb up that the cabin section B is prepared for landing

After the confirmation from all C/As has been received, SCA selects cabin and entry lights to “DIM2” (10%) position and window lights to “OFF” position. Once cabin is secured, all Cabin Crew Members have to seat and secure on the jumpseats and SCA has to call the cockpit by interphone. As soon as the workload in the cockpit permits, the Flight Deck Crew will answer the call: -

SCA announces “CABIN SECURED”

-

The Flight Crew Member responds “CABIN SECURED, LANDING IN xxx MINUTES”

Except for essential operational aspects and/or safety matters, the Flight Crew is no longer to be disturbed until the aircraft will land and come to a complete stop and the engines will be shut down.

1.11.1 Go around R R R R R

Go around procedure can be performed at different heights above the ground whenever an approach is not fully stabilized. They are associated to high and sustained engine power (from 5 seconds to several tenths of seconds), rapid nose up change and a sensation of acceleration. In most cases, the landing gear is retracted, which is an ultimate clue that the landing procedure is being interrupted. A go-around is mandatory in the following circumstances:


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-

If it is obvious that any component of the stabilization criteria will not/has not been achieved by the required point If the approach becomes unstable below the required point If an approach is not fully stabilized At any time it is suggested by the pilot non-flying

Cabin Crew actions: - All Cabin Crew Members must stay seated, observing outside and inside conditions -

Right after the GA, SCA is making a PA announcement to passengers:

“Ladies and Gentlemen, We would like to inform you that we have just perfomed a go around. This is a standard and normal procedure when airport/weather conditions are not suitable for landing. Thank you for your attention and patience.” Following a go-around, subject to flight deck workload, a PA should be made from the flight deck before commencing another approach.

1.12

After landing

1.12.1 Taxi-in All passengers (and C/As, unless performing safety duties) must remain seated until the aircraft has come to a complete stop and the “Fasten Seatbelt” sign has been switched off. After the aircraft has vacated the runway, the SCA must make a Goodbye Announcement including the following: -

Passengers must remain seated with the seatbelt fastened until the A/C has come to complete stop in its final parking position and the Fasten Seatbelt sign is switched off

-

Mobile phones must be kept offline until the aircraft door is opened

-

Smoking is not allowed until the designated smoking area

-

Passengers must carefully open the overhead compartments as the items might fall out

1.12.2 At the parking position – Disarming slides/opening doors

Disarming the slides When the aircraft has come to a complete stop at the gate/parking stand and the “Fasten Seatbelt” sign has been switched off, SCA must select the cabin lights as required (all cabin and entry area lights in bright position-BRT) and give the command over the PA: “CABIN CREW, DOORS IN PARK AND CROSS-CHECK” -

Each C/A assigned to a specific door must disarm the slides (pin, lever, pin) o

Remove the safety pin from the pin stowage (pin)

o

Move the arming lever to the disarmed position (lever)

o

Stow the safety pin in the disarmed position (pin)


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-

Having an eye contact with the other crew member announce “DOOR IN PARK”

-

Perform cross-check as follows: o

o -

Each CA checks if arming lever in disarmed position (manual check is required by touching the yellow arming/disarming lever to crosscheck that it is blocked in the disarmed position) Check that safety pin stowed correctly in disarmed position (manual check is required by pulling on the end of the safety pin)

Each CA, having an eye contact with the other crew member, verbally confirms to her colleague " CROSS-CHECKED”

After slides of the main cabin door 4R and 4L are being disarmed and the cross-check has been performed, C/A 4 must inform the SCA over the interphone: "DOORS IN PARK AND CROSS-CHECKED” (Refer to CAM 10.6.3. regarding use of interphone system) CAUTION: Every Crew Member needs to be absolutely concentrated on her actions whenever arming or disarming the doors. Any conversations with other Crew Members or passengers during performing the procedure can lead to an error and therefore it is not allowed unless safety is concerned.

Opening of the doors Upon arrival, doors (passengers, galley, cargo etc) shall not be opened until all engines have stopped and the parking brake has been set (or chocks are in). Procedure: After confirmation of C/A 4 of the AFT doors disarmed status, SCA has to check the door disarmed status on the Door/Slide Page of the Touchscreen FAP (if applicable - refer to CAM 10.3.2.2.). -

SCA has to enter the cockpit to obtain permission for opening of doors

-

After completion of “Parking Checklist” the Captain will open the cockpit door for the SCA to enter

-

If visual sign or interphone confirmation for “chocks in place” (the stopping bars used to stabilize the Aircraft wheels) was received from the Ground Crew, the Captain will show the door page on ECAM, check that slides are disarmed and announce: “SLIDES DISARMED, YOU MAY OPEN THE DOORS AND DISEMBARK PASSENGERS”


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-

If “chocks in place” was not received from the Ground Crew, the Captain will show the door page on ECAM, check that slides are disarmed and announce: “SLIDES DISARMED, YOU MAY OPEN THE DOORS, DO NOT DISEMBARK PASSENGERS’’

R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

-

After receiving confirmation from Ground Crew that chocks are in place, the Commander will authorize disembarkation. The Commander should also inform the SCA in case the doors have to be opened before the stairs are positioned at the aircraft.

-

SCA - after receiving confirmation from the CPT that the doors are disarmed and may be opened, before calling CA4 to pass on the information, she will crosscheck the Touch screen FAP for the second time and will check the disarmed mechanical indicator on the door

-

SCA must liaise with C/A 4 via interphone, with clear instructions, and give permission to open the rear door by the standard phraseology, including as applicable: “YOU MAY OPEN THE DOOR”

-

CA4 - after receiving SCA’s confirmation that the doors may be opened will check the disarmed mechanical indicator on the door

After receiving the knock from the outside standing GHA at 4L -

CA4 will confirm with CA3 that the door is in park

-

CA3 will visually crosscheck that the door is in park, by standing next to the door and respond: “DOOR DISARMED, YOU MAY OPEN THE DOOR”

- The orange handle may now be lifted for door opening. After receiving the knock from the outside standing GHA at 1L: - SCA will confirm with CA2 that the door is in park - CA2 will visually crosscheck that the door is in park, by standing next to the door and respond: “DOOR DISARMED, YOU MAY OPEN THE DOOR” - The orange handle may now be lifted for door opening NOTE: This procedure applies for all main door opening (including 1R, 4R). 1R is to be opened by C/A2 after the confirmation of SCA; 4R is to be opened by CA3 after the confirmation of C/A4 -

Disembarkation via 4L shall be commenced by CA4 only after passengers have started to disembark at the front via 1L (unless otherwise instructed by the SCA, after SCA’s consultation with the Commander and the Ground Staff).

In general, doors may only be opened when stairs and / or gate are securely positioned and Ground Staffs have knocked to the door, but procedure may vary due to airports specification.

Note: In exceptional cases, when one engine needs to be running, doors are allowed to be opened only on the side opposite to the running engine. Procedures for proper positioning of the stairs are given in CAM 1.2.3

NOTE: When doors need to be open in order to position the stairs, the use of door safety straps is mandatory. (Refer to CAM 1.2.4. for the usage of door safety straps).


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1.12.3 Disembarkation / embarkation of passengers Passenger disembarkation can only be started when a responsible agent is presented, to guide the passengers to the terminal (ramp safety). When two sets of stairs are used passengers must disembark from the front and back passenger doors to avoid aircraft movement. When passengers are disembarking / embarking via stairs:

R R R R

-

Assigned C/As make sure lights are on

-

Passengers are not permitted to wander about the apron and in the proximity of the engines at any time

-

Passengers are not permitted to smoke until in the designated areas

-

In case of jet bridge being in use for disembarkation OR whenever AFT stairs are positioned with delay (i.e. disembarkation starts through door 1L only), a significant A/C nose movement may take place. Therefore, a special attention to active disembarkation must be maintained by Cabin Crew. For details refer to CAM section 1.2.3

-

Should any lost property be found after passenger disembarkation, a Lost Property Form has to be filled in. Re-entering of the A/C for passengers is not allowed.

Before start of boarding the stairs must be positioned according to the CAM 1.2.3 Stairs positioning; repositioning of the stairs after disembarkation of all passengers might be required to achieve the expected stairs positioning level.

1.13

Turn-around procedures

1.13.1 General NOTE: For Admission of Auditors and other Authority personnel to WIZZ A/C refer to CAM section 1.2.1. As long as there are passengers on board the aircraft the minimum number of Cabin Crew must be present. During the turn around time (25-30 minutes depending on destination airport), the passenger cabin must be prepared for the next sector. For this reason the cabin is divided into four sectors: -

SCA is responsible for seats ABC in row 1-15

-

C/A 2 is responsible seats DEF in row 1-15

-

C/A 3 is responsible for seats DEF in row 16-30

-

C/A 4 is responsible for seats ABC in row 16-30

During turn around SCA shall decide whether water uplift is necessary or not. Following guidelines are to be taken into consideration: - Uplift of water should be done only in cases when level of water reaches 25% or goes below that limit - Uplifts of water (emptying waste) should be done in home bases only - Whenever SCA reasonably believes that the amount of water in the tank may not be sufficient for the entire duration of the flight, she is authorized to order additional water supply.


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1.13.2 Closure of 4L door during turn-around The closure of 4L door after passenger disembarkation is forbidden, until boarding is completed, due to the following reasons: -

The procedure of the security check is defined in a way that the Cabin Crew is checking the cabin from the middle of the A/C direction the main doors. In case any item would be placed on board the A/C, with proper execution of the security check the item must be found

-

The ground staff is authorized to remove the stairs from the A/C whenever the door is closed

-

The closure of the 4L door requires the operation of the handrail of the stairs in several cases, which might lead to the damage of the door (only ground staff is authorized to operate the handrails)

1.13.3 Cabin cleaning During cabin cleaning all C/As are responsible in their above mentioned areas for: -

Collecting all rubbish

-

Crossing all seatbelts

-

Placing all seatbacks, tray tables, and cup holders (if applicable) in the upright position

-

Placing all the armrests in horizontal position

-

Taking out all unwanted items from all seat pockets

-

Checking and additionally refilling all seat pockets (Safety cards placed in all seat pocket in front of the magazine with WIZZ logo facing the passengers, On-board magazine placed in all seat pockets, Air Sickness Bags placed in all seat-pockets)

-

Refilling all lavatory accessories

-

Waste should be collected into plastic bags that are either:

-

Disposed, together with the bag from waste trolley, in home base airports or airports where waste collection is included into the handling fee (bag(s) must be tightly closed),or

-

Disposed into the waste trolley in all other cases

NOTE: Change of plastic bags of the waste trolley should be done by SCA When cabin preparation is finished, all C/As have: -

To report to the SCA that they are ready for boarding

-

To take their assigned position for boarding passengers

In order to minimize the duration of turn around time it is very important that the SCA reports to the Ground Handling staff the required time for cabin cleaning (max 6 minutes). It means that the first outbound passenger will arrive on board when the requested time is over. NOTE: For aircraft security check procedure during turn-around time, refer to CAM 1.4

1.13.4 Aircraft change procedures For operational reasons, an aircraft change might be required during the turn-around time. The aircraft change procedure is as follows: -

1st aircraft (the one which landed the first):


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-

the Crew is to prepare the aircraft for next Crew and destination; Cabin Crew prepares the cabin (performs cleaning and security check in the main cabin area)

-

Passengers will board as soon as cabin is ready

-

SCA will make an announcement to the passengers regarding the Crew change

-

If the outbound passengers are already boarded by the Crew other than the outbound crew, the pre-flight check and the security check is not required to be performed by the outbound crew (as it was already completed by the inbound crew), SCA is to verbally report to the SCA of outbound crew the cabin status and the completion of the security check.

-

2nd aircraft

-

As soon as possible after the passengers left the aircraft, all Crew Members except one Pilot will proceed to the first aircraft. The second Pilot will leave the aircraft only when at least one Pilot from the first aircraft or one Pilot positioning is on board and has taken responsibility over the aircraft

-

The Crew from the first aircraft will proceed to the second aircraft and prepare it for its next destination (prepare the cabin - cleaning and security check to be performed– the cabin, refuel and board the passengers, even if they are not in the aircraft they will fly)

-

3rd aircraft

-

As soon as possible after the passengers left the aircraft, all Crew Members except one Pilot will proceed to second aircraft. The second Pilot will leave the aircraft only when at least one Pilot from the second aircraft or one Pilot positioning is on board and has taken responsibility over the aircraft

-

The Crew from the first aircraft will proceed to the third aircraft and prepare it for its next destination (prepare cabin - cleaning and security check to be performed–, refuel and board the passengers, even if they are not in the aircraft they will fly)

Aircrafts are to be at all time under the supervision of one Cockpit Crew Member or mechanic. Proceeding from one aircraft to another to be coordinated with flight dispatcher, either on foot according to prescribed routing and wearing high-visibility jacket, or by car/bus if not possible on foot. Positioning Crew is not allowed to carry out any duties of the active Crew. CAUTION: On specific airports Cabin Crew should follow the defined security procedure when conducting the ramp transfers. CAUTION: During the aircraft change, whenever passengers are in the cabin, minimum cabin crew number must be present in the cabin.

1.13.5 Aircraft security check during transit flights/diversion due to unforeseen circumstances Passengers are not permitted to disembark at intermediate stations for which they are not ticketed, except in exceptional circumstances. If the disembarkation is permitted for any reason, all hold and hand baggage associated with that passenger is to be off-loaded. -

Each time when passenger(s) leave the aircraft a cabin security check must be performed.

-

All passengers must be weaken up.

-

Besides the normal cabin security check a carry-on item security check (i.e. baggage check inside cabin) must be performed as well (for details refer to CAM 1.6.13.).


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-

When the first group of passenger will disembark the headcount must be performed (for details refer to CAM Section 1.6.12.).

-

When the new group of passengers will embark the A/C the second headcount must be performed-applicable only on transit flights.

1.13.6 Cabin cleaning with passengers on board On transit flights the full cleaning of the aircraft with PAX on board is not possible: -

Only big trash must be picked up

-

Seatbelts hanging out in aisle seats must be tidied for a nicer appearance of the cabin

1.13.7 Refuelling with passengers on board Refuelling/de-fuelling (hereafter written only as refuelling, but referring to both procedures) may be undertaken with passengers on board, boarding or disembarking, subject to local airport or authority restrictions. The Commander is responsible for the precautionary actions taken on board. Ramp agent/dispatcher is responsible for actions to be taken on the ground. GENERAL RULE Out of the 3 following procedures: -

Refuelling

-

Boarding or disembarkation of passengers

-

Boarding or disembarkation of PRMs via door 1R and 4R

Only 2 can be conducted simultaneously. Refuelling during embarkation As soon as refuelling is about to be started, Flight Crew will inform SCA about starting of the refuelling. SCA must set Emergency Lights ON by EMER pushbutton switch from the FAP panel (refer to CAM 10.4.2. Emergency lights) and make the announcement to the passengers, informing about the following: -

Fuelling is taking place

-

The seat belts must be OPEN and passengers must be seated

-

The use of mobile phones is forbidden

-

Smoking is strictly forbidden

The following precautions must be strictly observed: -

“Fasten Seat Belt” sign must be off, “No Smoking” sign on

-

The ground below main door and emergency exit slide deployment areas must be clear, except at doors with stairs/jetway in position

-

Unnecessary electrical switching should be avoided on the aircraft and no personal electrical items are to be used or switched on

-

One pilot must be on the flight deck during the refulling

-

A direct interphone communication is established between ground personnel supervising the refulling and the cockpit crew

-

Any irregularities must immediately be reported to the Commander


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Procedure

R R R R R

-

During refuelling (fasten seatbelt sign OFF), both 1L and 4L doors must remain open whenever stairs are positioned

-

Whenever jetbridge is provided, stairs does not need to be present at 4L for the purpose of refuelling. In this case, 4L door shall remain in PARK position. If an emergency situation arises, C/A 4 must arm the slides on 4L door before opening it for evacuation. For details refer to CAM 4.5.

-

Cabin Crew assigned positions during refuelling with PAX on board: o o

o

o

SCA: FWD entry area, close to door 1L C/A 2: stands in the first row/fwd galley during boarding. After boarding of the last passenger, C/A 2 should proceed to the emergency exit rows. On the way she should check if the passengers are keeping the seatbelts open and no personal electronic devices are used or switched on. At the overwing exits she should stand on the left side, facing the right side of the A/C and looking via the emergency exit window on the right side outside the A/C where refuelling is taking place C/A 3: when C/A 2 arrives to the emergency exit rows, C/A 3 should check, in the remaining part of the cabin, if the passengers are keeping the seatbelts open and no personal electronic devices are used or switched on. After performing this check, she should come back to the emergency exit rows stand on the left side, facing the right side of the A/C and looking via the emergency exit window on the right side outside the A/C where refuelling is taking place. No communication between C/A 2 and C/A 3 is allowed while on the refuelling positions except safety related issues C/A 4: AFT entry area, close to door 4L (in case of jetway or only one step at 1L, 4L does not need to be armed)

-

During refuelling with passengers on board all lavatories should be locked

-

As soon as refuelling is completed, Flight Crew must inform SCA about the completion of refuelling and SCA is to switch OFF the Emergency Lights

NOTE: Cabin Crew is required to check the illumination of the Exit Signs. When the system is switched ON for the fuelling time and a discrepancy visible to the Crew in system operation, it must be reported to the Commander after refuelling being completed. Refuelling during disembarkation

When refuelling and disembarkation are taking place simultaneously, Cabin Crew actions are as follows: -

SCA and Commander are to liaise on the commencement of the refuelling and the door opening

-

SCA is to advise the Cabin Crew of the refuelling start-up

-

SCA must set Emergency Lights ON and make the relevant announcement

As quick disembarkation or evacuation might be initiated, refuelling is to be started only after at least one of the main doors 1L, or 4L has been opened.


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1.14

Post-flight duties

1.14.1 After the last duty sector of the operating Crew After the last duty sector of the operating crew, when the A/C is not taken over by the next operating crew, the complete security check must be performed by all Cabin Crew Members and completion is to be reported to the Commander. At the same time 4L door is to be closed but only with the assistance of ground staff due to need of operation of the handrails of stairs. For the procedure of sealing catering trolley/boxes refer to Cabin Attendant Service Manual

1.14.2 After the last commercial flight of the A/C After last commercial flight of the A /C, the complete security check must be performed by all Cabin Crew Members and completion is to be reported to the Commander. R R R R R R

C/A4 is to count the spare emergency equipment and pay extra attention to the quantity, condition and functionality of the equipment (infant seat belts, infant life vests and adult life vests) and any discrepancy discovered must be reported to the SCA, who will report to the Commander. At the same time 4L door is to be closed but only with the permission of the Commander and the assistance of ground staff due to need of operation of the handrails of stairs. For the procedure of sealing catering trolley/boxes refer to Cabin Attendant Service Manual.

1.14.3 Debriefing After a flight or a series of flight, a Crew debriefing should be held whenever the Commander or any other Crew Member think it is requested. It is the responsibility of the Commander to propose a debriefing or a post flight discussion. When decided, the debriefing should be done immediately after the flight or the rotation in a trustful and positive environment. In case of safety related questions, problems and suggestions, the responsible person of Flight Operation Department can always be contacted via e-mail.

NOTE: If the Commander or the SCA requires a debriefing the participation of the Cabin Crew is mandatory. Exception is the debriefing after a training flight/check flight when the Instructor/Line Trainer may decide whether the participation of all Cabin Crew Members is necessary.


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2 SAFETY EQUIPMENT 2.1

Safety equipment – General

Each aircraft is equipped with fixed and loose/portable safety equipment. The Law requires safety equipment to be on board. Occasions arise when certain items of installed airplane equipment may be unserviceable without adversely affecting the airplane’s fitness for a particular flight, or the required level of safety. Wizz Air holds permission from the Authority that allows its airplane to operate with such items unserviceable, subject to the requirements of its Minimum Equipment List (MEL). The MEL is based on, but may not be less restrictive than the Master MEL that has been produced for the type by the airplane manufacturer and its approved by the Authority. The MEL lists all the equipment, systems and installations that must be serviceable before a particular flight is undertaken. Items that may be unserviceable are indicated, together with any additional limitations that may apply to flights with such items inoperative.

NOTE: In case any of the emergency/safety equipment was used, the discrepancies comparing to the pre-flight check status have to be reported to the Commander.

2.2

Safety equipment – Fixed equipment

The fixed emergency equipment consists of the following items: -

Fixed oxygen system in Flight Deck

-

Fixed oxygen system in the cabin

-

Emergency lighting

-

Evacuation visual sign and aural signal system

-

Escape slide / floating device

-

Smoke detection system in lavatories

-

Automatic fire extinguisher system in lavatories

-

Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT)

2.2.1

Fixed oxygen system in the Flight Deck

The Flight Deck Crew oxygen system is a separate oxygen system supplied from a single cylinder. The Quick Donning full face masks are located in a stowage box on both side consoles of the cockpit. Three or four masks are provided, depending if the A/C is equipped with one or two observer seats. The visor of the mask can have a protective shield to protect the shield against scratches. The protective shield can be removed if necessary, for example when frost is forming after decompression. The Quick Donning full face mask is equipped with several regulators and indicators: -

The red grips or release levers, when squeezed, enable the Flight Crew to retrieve the mask from the container

-

The blinker flow meter (flow indicator) shows a yellow cross when the oxygen is flowing


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-

The NORMAL/100% (N/100%SEL) supply selector enables the Pilot to select either pure oxygen or a mixture of cabin air and oxygen; pushing up the button from underneath releases it, and it pops up to the N (normal) position. Pressing it again returns it to 100%

-

The TEST/RESET control slide, the Crew Member presses the slide and pushes it in the direction of the arrow to test: the operation of the blinker, the regulator supply, system sealing downstream of the valve and the regulator sealing and system operation. Pressing the RESET control slide, after the oxygen mask has been used, cuts off the oxygen, and mask microphone

-

An EMERGENCY pressure selector: use of this selector creates an overpressure, which eliminates condensation and prevents smoke, smell or ashes from entering the mask. Pressing this knob generates an overpressure for a few seconds, turning the knob, in the direction of the arrow, generates a permanent overpressure.

-

OXY ON flag: as soon as the left flap door opens, the mask is supplied with oxygen and, once it closes (mask still supplied with oxygen), the OXY ON flag appears.

-

The mask-mounted regulator supplies a mixture of air and oxygen, or pure oxygen, and performs emergency pressure control. With the regulator set to NORMAL, the user breathes a mixture of cabin air and oxygen up to the cabin altitude at which point the regulator supplies 100% oxygen. With the regulator set to 100%, the regulator supplies pure oxygen at all cabin altitudes.

NOTE: The overpressure supply automatically is started, when the cabin attitude exceeds 30 000 ft To don the oxygen mask: -

Remove the mask from stowage by squeezing the red release levers inwards (this will start an oxygen flow that inflates the head-harness)

-

Continue to squeeze the red grips, as this causes the oxygen flow to inflate the head harness

-

Place the mask over nose and mouth

-

Release the red levers, the harness will deflate and fit over head

-

Oxygen is now available at 100% on demand


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EXAMPLE OF THE QUICK DONNING MASK

2.2.2

Fixed oxygen system in the cabin

The fixed oxygen system in the cabin consists of chemical generators which produce the oxygen. Each generator feeds a group of 2, 3 or 4 mask. Generators and masks are in containers above the passengers seats (3 in the even rows / 4 in the odd rows - refer to type instruction), in the lavatories, in each galley and in each Cabin Crew station. A door stop is used for the oxygen test procedure and prevents the masks from dropping. The number of masks contained in the unit is indicated on it.


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The system can be activated: -

Automatically when the cabin pressure decreases to a pressure equivalent to 14.000 feet or

-

Manually by the Cockpit Crew action (MASK MAN ON)

When the system is activated, the oxygen masks will drop from the stowage compartment. Pulling one of the masks will activate the oxygen generator and oxygen will flow through all the masks connected to the same generator (each group of masks has a release pin that is connected to a lanyard). The mask receives pure oxygen under positive pressure. Operation: -

Oxygen mask fall and hang on the lanyards

-

User pulls one mask to their face (the lanyard pulls the release pin from the striker assembly of the generator)

-

The striker hits the percussion cap, and the oxygen supply is generated

-

Oxygen flows through the flexible supply hoses into the reservoir bag

-

The flow indicator indicates oxygen flow as follows: in case oxygen is flowing>0.5 l/min in the housing of the flow indicator, a green tube is visible. If there is no oxygen flowing or <0.5 l/min, there is nothing visible inside the clear flow indicator housing.

-

Oxygen mask

-

The mask assembly consists of a reservoir bag and a face mask. The mask is fitted with three valves: the reservoir and exhaust valves, plus a supplementary inhalation

-

The chemical generator creates heat and becomes hot. Oxygen flows for approximately 15 minutes and cannot be switched off

NOTE: There is no apparent inflation of the mask reservoir bag at lower altitudes between approximately 10 000 and 19 000ft. NOTE: After an emergency mask deployment, it is possible to smell of burning, smoke, and of cabin temperature increase associated with the normal operation of the oxygen generator system.


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OXYGEN UNITS LOCATION EXAMPLE

OXYGEN MASK (EXAMPLE)


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Lavatory oxygen mask stowage compartment

A two oxygen mask unit is installed in each lavatory.

Cabin Crew station oxygen mask compartment example

Manual opeing of oxygen compartment If a unit door does not open automatically, it can be opened manually by using the manual release tool (insert the pin-end of the tool into the hole of the unit door to release the door latch).


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CAUTION: Do not restore an oxygen mask, if the oxygen generator is started in order to prevent the smell of burning or fumes. Aircrafts with registration from HA-LWR are equipped with a different type of oxygen containers than described above. The only difference is the test button instead of lever and the operation of it. The button has to be pulled out and turned sideways by 90 degrees to TEST position in order to check the amount of masks attached to the generator. To ensure operation in case of decompression, the test button must be restored at all times

Pre-flight check of the manual release tool -

Quantity is correct

-

Manual Release Tool is not damaged

-

Inadvertent oxygen mask deployment

Recommendations: -

If the generator is started, the door must be left open. To minimize inconvenience to the passengers, and avoid having the deployed masks in their way, they should be relocated, if possible. This will also ensure they are seated in a location in which a generator has not been used, in case a decompression occurs later in flight (if no alternate seats are available, the crew should be prepared to assist these passengers in reaching spare masks, in event of decompression)

-

If the unit has not started, then passenger relocation is not necessary

2.2.3

Emergency lighting

The cabin emergency lighting system consists of the followings: 1. Exit signs / Exit markers: exit signs are located throughout the cabin to indicate the location of an exit. The system provides low level illumination of the escape routes in case the emergency lights are obscured by smoke 2. The floor proximity escape path marking system: two stripes are running through the cabin on the floor to show the escape route 3. Cabin minimum lights: are distributed along the cabin ceiling to ensure continuous illumination of the aisle 4. Lavatory auxiliary lights: mounted in the lavatories, are always on 5. Over-wing escape route lighting: housed in the fuselage underneath the overwing exit, starts to operate after slide deployment to illuminate the escape route leading to the overwing escape slide 6. Escape slide lighting: starts to operate after slide deployment


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If the standard aircraft power supply is not available, the emergency lighting system is able to operate independently from the aircraft systems for 12 min. The Emergency Light pushbutton on the FAP enables the emergency lights to be switched on and this under any conditions.

The emergency lighting system has different functions. In standard operation: -

To show the way to the exits, to leave the aircraft

In an emergency: -

To illuminate the cabin, if the normal lighting does not operate

-

To show the way to the exits, to leave the aircraft, e.g. if the cabin is full of smoke

-

To illuminate the escape paths on the wings

-

To illuminate the escape slides


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R R R R

NOTE: During the first flight pre-flight check, Cabin Crew is required to check the illumination of the Exit Signs. When the system is switched ON for the fuelling time and any discrepancy visible to the Crew in system operation, must be reported to the Commander after refuelling being completed.

2.2.4

Evacuation visual sign and aural signals

An emergency evacuation signalling system (integrated in the CIDS) is installed. It provides visual and aural alert in the event of impending evacuation of the aircraft. Panels provided with control and warning lights: R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

Cockpit (On the overhead panel) -

COMMAND PUSHBUTTON

When pressed, it activates the EVAC flashlights in the cockpit and cabin, as well as the horns in the cabin and in the cockpit -

HORN SHUT OFF PUSHBUTTON When pressed, the cockpit horn is stopped

-

CAPT/CAPT&PURS Two selector switch position, which enables the evac to be commanded from the cockpit only, or from the cockpit and cabin (Wizz Air policy is to keep the switch always in CAPT position)

Cabin - touchscreen FAP panel -

EVAC CMD Evacuation command pushbutton illuminates green when the evacuation system activated by Cabin Crew

is


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-

EVAC/RESET Flashing red. When pressed, all visual and audio warnings are stopped in the FWD cabin section (except for EVAC CMD pushbutton warning on the FAP hard key subpanel)

Cabin - classic FAP panel (HA-LPD, LPE, LPF) -

EVAC CMD pushbutton illuminates green when it is pressed

-

RESET When pressed, all visual and audio warnings are stopped in the FWD cabin section (except for EVAC CMD pushbutton warning on the FAP

-

EVAC indicator o

light indicator, flashes red when the EVAC system is activated

Cabin - AAP -

EVAC CMD pushbutton illuminates green when pressed

-

EVAC Indicator flashes red when the EVAC system is activated

-

EVAC/RESET When pressed, all visual and audio warnings are stopped in the FWD cabin section

The evacuation alert system can be activated at any time from the cockpit manually by pressing the command pushbutton on the EVAC panel. In this case, in the cabin, the followings will happen: -

CLASSIC FAP: the EVAC indicator flashes in red

-

TOUCHSCREEN FAP: EVAC CMD illuminates green and EVAC reset flashes red

-

Evacuation indicators flash in red on all AAP

-

SPECIFIC HORN sounds (horn can be shut off in the dedicated areas by pressing the RESET pushbutton on FAP/AAP)

-

the EVACUATION ALERT message is displayed on all AIPs with the red flashing indicator light


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When the evacuation command pushbutton is selected on the FAP (and the cockpit selector switch is in CAPT position [Wizz Air policy]), the evacuation alert system is only activated in the cockpit: -

The EVAC horn sounds for 3 seconds

-

The EVAC indicator flashes

2.2.5

Escape slide / floating device

Slide pressure gauge

Compressed gas from the slide bottle initiates the slide inflation. -

Pre-flight check of the escape slides

-

Pressure indicator must be in green band range, the gauge is visible through a small plastic, transparent, cover on the slide container

-

Slide is disarmed

Inflation and operation on land

-

During emergency door opening, the slide pack is released from the door but is still attached to the aircraft floor brackets by a girt bar

-

As the slide falls approximately 1 meter, the slide bottle is activated and the slide inflates within 3-4 seconds

-

In case of emergency the manual inflation handle, on the right hand side of the girt bar, must always be pulled

-

The slide can still be used if either the upper or lower chamber of the slide is not inflated and / or in case of collapsing of one or more gears

-

The red handles on the lower part of the escape device, allow the slide to be used as a hand held escape chute (refer to CAM 10.2.2.5)

Inflation and operation on water

-

In case of ditching the manual inflation handle must be used to inflate the slide, as the slide drop is insufficient to trigger the automatic system

-

Before beginning an evacuation on water, first determine the water level outside the airplane. The water level must be below the doorsill height

-

Do not open the door(s) if the water level is above doorsill height


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-

Grasp lines are fitted around the outside of the buoyancy tubes to facilitate the use of the slides as a flotation device in case of ditching


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Manual inflation

In case of emergency the manual inflation handle must always be used: -

Pull the manual inflation handle (red handle, located on the right hand side of the girt bar)

Slide lights

Each slide contains battery-powered lights, which automatically illuminate the area at the bottom of the slide when the slide is inflated. The lights have the same power supply as the cabin emergency lights.

Grasp lines

Grasp lines are fitted around the outside of the buoyancy tubes to facilitate the use of the slides as a flotation device in case of ditching.

2.2.6

Smoke detection system in lavatories

The lavatory smoke detection system is installed to alert the Crew Members that smoke is present in the lavatories. In case the smoke detector system has been activated, the status must be reported to the Flight Crew. In order to reduce the number of false smoke alerts the usage of hair sprays/deodorant sprays/air fresheners sprays (except odour neutralizer - Odorgone) in lavatories is forbidden during flight. The only exception when such devices can be used in lavatories is on ground when both engines are shut down. When smoke enters into the measuring chamber of the detector, a warning signal is transmitted to the CIDS-SDF (CIDS Smoke Detection Function) of the CIDS (Cabin Intercommunication Data System) and to the FWC (Flight Warning Computer) in the cockpit.


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Lavatory smoke detector location

If smoke is detected the system gives a visual and aural warning in the cockpit and in the cabin. Cockpit warnings: -

A repetitive chime

-

A red master warning light

-

A smoke warning indication on the ECAM upper display unit

Cabin warnings: -

The cabin loudspeakers give a triple chime, repeated every 30 seconds

-

A red flashing indicator light and a steady text (SMOKE LAV X) on all Attendant Indication Panels

-

An amber segment flashing on the related Area Call Panel (ACP)

-

An amber flashing call light on the related lavatory wall

-

A red indication SMOKE LAV on the FAP (CLASSIC FAP installed on HALPD/LPE/LPF)

-

A red indication SMOKE DETECTED on the FAP together with location information of the smoke alarm (Touchscreen FAP)


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-

A red indication SMOKE RESET on the hard key sub panel on Touchscreen FAP

The LAV SMOKE/RESET push-button on the FAP (Classic FAP installed on the following aircrafts: HA-LPD/LPE/LPF) or the related AAP stops the aural and visual warnings in the cabin. The indication on the FAP disappears, as soon as the density of smoke drops below the accepted level.


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The aural and visual warning reset switch on the FAP stops the warning indications on the ACP and AIP. The indications lights of: the FAP hardkey “Smoke Reset”, the FAP symbol “Smoke Detected” on the SMOKE DETECTION page and the AAP pushbutton “Smoke Reset” go off, when the density of smoke drops below the accepted.

2.2.7

Automatic fire extinguisher in lavatories

An automatic fire extinguisher system is located beneath the sink area in each lavatory. Each fire extinguisher has these main components: -

A spherical container mounting bracket

with

a

-

A discharge tube with a fusible plug

-

A pressure gauge extinguisher condition

-

An identification label

indicating

When the temperature in the waste bin area is approximately 174.2°F/79°C, the fusible material in the tip of the discharge tube melts. The lavatory fire extinguisher then discharges completely within 3 to 15 seconds into the lavatory waste bin. In case the lavatory extinguisher has discharged, the lavatory must be locked and checked for the remainder of the flight since


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the lavatory fire extinguisher must be replaced/refilled. Pre-flight check -

2.2.8 R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

The indicator on the gauge must show into the green area to ensure full operation in case of a fire

ELT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Emergency Locator Transmitter

On all aircrafts (except for HA-LPD, LPE and LPF), ELT system is permanently fixed to the aircraft (Honeywell RESCU 406AFN) and has the following characteristics: -

The device is located in the AFT galley area and installed above the ceiling panel between the two AFT toilets

-

The beacon remains attached to the aircraft after impact

-

The transmitter unit status may be partially monitored and controlled (activated) from the cockpit

-

Switch positions on the fixed ELT device are: o

ARM (selected mode)

o

OFF

o

XT

-

Once activated, the beacon transmits emergency location signals: bursts of digitally encoded 406 MHz signals received by the COSPAS-SARSAT satellite network for alerting Search and Rescue (SAR) teams, and continuous 121.5/243 MHz signals for closer proximity directional tracking

-

The system is set to ARM mode at all times (with the exception of maintenance checks) and switches to XT mode when activated by G-force

-

Ways of activating the ELT: o

G-force

o

Manually from the cockpit

o

XT (transmit) switch on the unit itself


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ELT installed on HA-LPD, LPE and LPF

-


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-

The device is located in the AFT galley area and installed above the ceiling panel between the two AFT toilets

-

It is normally in an AUTO position; G-force should automatically activate it in the event of a crash. If not, it can be activated by using the ON switch located on the ELT or the ARMED/ON switch located in the cockpit

-

The ELT operates between -20 and +50 Celsius, transmits on 3 frequencies: 121.5 MHz (Civil) and 243 MHz (Military) homing-signals and 406 MHz to the COSPASSARSAT satellite system

-

The pre-flight check of the ELT is maintenance responsibility

2.3

Emergency equipment â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Loose equipment

This chapter contains full description and details of the use and operation of each item of following emergency equipment: 1. BCF portable fire extinguisher 2. Crash axe 3. Protective gloves 4. Smoke hoods 5. Flashlight 6. Portable oxygen bottles 7. Megaphone 8. Life-vests 9. Seat seatbelts (passenger, INF, extension, spare seat belts) 10. Demonstration kit 11. First Aid Kit 12. Life-lines 13. Portable ELT

2.3.1

BCF Fire extinguisher

The extinguisher is composed of three major components: -

container

-

Valve

-

agent

BCF (also called Halon) is a liquefied gas that extinguishes fires by chemically interrupting a fireâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s combustion chain, as opposed to physically smothering the fire. Halon accomplishes molecules.

flame

retardation

by

enclosing

oxygen

This is one of the main reasons why halon is effective when the exact source of the fire cannot be positively determined. A small concentration of halon in the air as a vapour will prevent fire from continuing to burn. Halon is a toxic acid gas and has a rapid knock down effect on fire. When discharged from the extinguisher nozzle, it rapidly expands and forms an effective extinguishing cloud. Effective is


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only a fully developed extinguishing cloud but not the bundled stream at the nozzle. Therefore, is there no cloud at the fire front, step back to increase the distance to the fire. This gas can irritate the eyes, nose and throat. The discharge stream of the extinguisher has a range of 2.5 - 4 meters and the discharge time is at least 7 to 10 seconds. -

Safeguard: protects the triggering lever from being accidently operated

-

Carrying handle: for holding and carrying the unit while extinguishing

-

Operation of BCF extinguisher:

-

Unlock brackets and take the BCF out of the stowage

-

Remove the seal

-

Hold the BCF upright, turn down the black lock, grasp the handle and lever (red and white)

-

Do not direct the initial extinguishing agent discharge at close range onto burning material. A distance of 1,5m to 2,5m should be respected, because the high speed of the stream of extinguishing agent may cause the extinguishing agent to splash and/or scatter burning material

-

Press the lever downwards

-

Hold the lever while spraying the contents of the BCF first at the base of the fire at the near edge, progressively working to the back of the fire, by moving the fire extinguisher nozzle in a sweeping motion from side-to-side; always direct the nozzle at the base of the fire

-

When the BCF contacts the fire, the fire will appear to grow larger. This is a normal, temporary reaction before the BCF puts out the fire. However, move back if discharge stream scatters fire

-

Continue until the fire is extinguished

NOTE: When discharging the extinguisher on to burning liquid, never point the stream directly in to the liquid. An extinguishing action must always start at the front of the flame. Then follow the flames with the extinguishing cloud.


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Pre-flight check of BCF fire extinguisher -

Properly stowed and latched

-

Seal not damaged

-

The indicator on the gauge must show into the green area to ensure full operation in case of a fire

NOTE: Never expose the fire extinguisher to direct sun radiation or excessive heat

2.3.2

Crash-axe/Fire-axe

The crash axe is used to break in/out during an emergency (e.g. fire behind panels). The crash axe may be used as a lever to lift a panel, or to dig an incision in the panel large enough to place the nozzle of the extinguisher, in order to discharge the agent into the affected area. Crew Members must count on their own determination and use all the resources available to fight the fire, the crash axe should be considered as the last tool to gain access. The handle of the crash axe is insulated against electrical shock.

2.3.3

Protective gloves

The protective gloves shall be used for personal protection during abnormal/emergency situations [e.g. during fire fighting or while handling Dangerous Goods (gloves should be covered by polyethylene bags for DG handling)]. Pre-flight check of protective gloves -

properly stowed

-

not damaged

2.3.4

Smoke hood

The PBE/Smoke Hood protects the user's eyes and respiratory system against heat, smoke, and/or toxic gases. It ensures that a minimum of 15 minutes oxygen supply. The PBE is readily available to Cabin Attendants. The primary purpose of the PBE is to supply oxygen to cabin attendants, in the event of a fire, smoke and/or toxic gases.

Scott/Avox smoke hood The Scott/Avox Smoke Hood (Protective Breathing Equipment PBE) can provide oxygen for 15 minutes and must be used in case of smoke / toxic fumes filled environment (e.g. during fire fighting).


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Operation of the smoke hood -

To remove the unit from the green case, lift the single latch, labelled “LIFT”, located at the top edge of the case. The hood is in the vacuum bag

-

To remove the hood from the vacuum bag, hold the unit firmly against waist with one hand and grip the edge of vacuum bag at the notch. Grasp the red tear strip side of notch with other hand. Pull the red tear strip side of the notch to tear the vacuum bag at notch and rip open

-

To actuate the hood, pull the ring marked “PULL TO ACTUATE” parallel with the housing surface. Actuation is effective when the ring and attached pin is completely removed. The pin cannot be re-inserted

-

NOTE: the actuation ring will stay in hand when it is pulled

-

To don the hood, bend forward from the waist and grasp the smoke hood opened with thumbs and forefingers, insert chin into the hole and pull the smoke hood across face and over head, so that the head is within the hood and the neck seal is around the neck. Remove all hair and clothing between the neck and the seal, and make sure the seal makes a firm contact around the neck. When standing upright, grasp the hood and pull it down until headband firmly engages the head


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-

It is normal to hear the sound of a gas flow in the hood; it indicates that the oxygen is delivered to the smoke hood. When the noise stops, it means that the oxygen generator has stopped working

-

To remove the smoke hood, grasp the back upper edge of the hood and pull up over the head. Due to possible oxygen saturation of the hair, do not enter area exposed to the fire or open flame. As long as the generator produces the oxygen, smoke hood should be kept away from the combustible materials or fire. If the smoke hood is still working after removing it, allow the generator to completely expend, and then allow the hood to cool before storing it. Place it in a dry, fire protected place and away from any source of heat, sunlight or corrosive fluid

NOTE: Normal operation causes heat on some parts of the generator CAUTION: Remove the PBE and discard it immediately if the sound of the oxygen flow canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be heard Due to the oxygen saturation of the hair, do not smoke or become exposed to fire or flame immediately after removing. NOTE: The smoke hood is ready for use if the smoke hood container indicator shows blue. If the colour is changed to pink the PBE must be replaced Pre-flight check of smoke hood -

Properly stowed and secured

-

Box not damaged

-

The indication window shows in blue

Drager smoke hood The Drager Smoke Hood (Protective Breathing Equipment PBE) can provide oxygen for 15 minutes and must be used in case of smoke / toxic fumes filled environment (e.g. during fire fighting).


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OPERATION OF THE SMOKE HOOD -

Open the box and tear off the opening device of the vacuum foil,

-

Take the hood out of the foil,

-

Start the quickstarter by pulling the lanyard of the quickstarter â&#x20AC;&#x201C;this is the start of breathing protection. Following commencement of respiration, the amount of oxygen produced and carbon dioxide bound is sufficient to enable the full protective effect of the smoke hood to come into action within a short period of time, 2-3 breathes are sufficient to initiate the reaction. For safety reasons a starter cartridge is installed, which supplies oxygen immediately and independently from respiration when the PBE is activated.

-

Adjust the strap around the waist; during the utilization it is possible to communicate with an unprotected person, by a speech transmitter which is fitted to the mask; the smoke hood ventilation provides a small overpressure in the hood to avoid smoke entering the hood. This protects the eyes of the user from the environmental smoke.

-

To remove the Smoke Hood, take the hood at the top of the visor and pull the hood to the front, away from the head. The use of the smoke hood can be terminated any time within duration time by removing the smoke hood.

-

After removal the generation of oxygen will slow down rapidly. The end of duration is recognizable by an increased breathing resistance which leads to inhalation through the anti-suffocation valve. This end of duration signal cannot be switched off or be ignored by the user. Inhalation through the anti-suffocation valve has a significantly higher breathing resistance.

PRE-FLIGHT CHECK OF THE SMOKE HOOD -

Properly stowed and secured

-

Box not damaged

-

Serviceability indicator seen through the inspection screen is not broken or not visible


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2.3.5

Flashlight

Cabin flashlight A portable flashlight is stowed at each C/A seat and is to be used for emergency situation only. The flashlight is ON automatically, when removed from its stowage. The flashlight is OFF automatically, when put into its stowage, however, the stowage brackets do not have a recharging function. The flashlight is water resistant and has a cord for attachment to the wrist coiled in the bottom of the holder. On the front of each flashlight is a red Light Emitting Diode (LED). The LED flashes every 5-10 seconds as long as the battery has adequate power. This is also intended as an aid to find the flashlight in the dark. If the flashlight is accidentally removed from the brackets, the seal needs to be replaced. Replacing of the seal on the flashlight is done by the technical staff. It is not possible to be done by Cabin Crew.

Operational removal of the flashlight -

Pull away plastic safety strap

-

Pull the flashlight out of holder, it illuminates automatically for at least 4 hours

Pre-flight check of the flashlight -

Properly stowed

-

The LED flashes every 5-10 seconds

-

Plastic safety strap is engage around the flashlight


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Cockpit flashlight

2.3.6

Portable oxygen bottle

A number of portable oxygen bottles are installed in the cabin. There are two different types of oxygen bottles available on board the aircrafts. They can be used for first aid purposes and as supplemental oxygen after decompression. The portable oxygen bottle is able to supply oxygen at a flow rate 2 Liters per Minute or 4 Liters per Minute.


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NOTE: Prevent pressurized oxygen from coming in contact with oil, grease, flammable solvents, contaminated tools, or other combustible material, because this may cause a fire or explosion.

-

Oxygen bottle showed on picture “A”

-

A pressure gauge, indicating the amount of oxygen in the bottle. When FULL, it must read approximately 1800 PSI

-

An ON / OFF valve

-

A high flow outlet marked HI and a low flow outlet marked LO. The high outlet, if not marked, is always on the "FULL" side of the pressure gauge

-

Two separate plastic masks, both with a long plastic tube, that can be fitted to the HI / LO outlet with a bayonet type fitting. The mask fits directly over the nose and mouth

-

A shoulder strap is attached to the bottle

-

Pre-fllight check of the portable oxygen bottle

-

Portable Oxygen Unit is considered serviceable (Minimum Equipment List) with a pressure equal or higher than those are indicated below: Portable Oxygen Unit Temperature (°C) Pressure (PSI)

- 10 1250

-

Two oxygen masks are per bottle

-

Oxygen bottle is properly stowed and secured

0 1350

10 1450

20 1550

30 1650

40 1750

NOTE: If the pressure in the bottle is reduced to below 500 PSI, the bottle cannot be refilled anymore NOTE: If the oxygen cylinder pressure is below the minimum required (as per above table), it should be reported to the Commander Calculation of oxygen bottle temperature -

Before start of cabin heating: OAT (outside air temperature)=oxygen bottle temperature,

-

After start of cabin heating up to 2 hours: OAT temperature+cabin temperature divided by 2= oxygen bottle temperature,

-

2 hours or more after start of cabin heating: cabin temperature= oxygen bottle temperature.


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OPERATION OF THE PORTABLE SHOWED ON PICTURE “A”

OXYGEN

BOTTLE

-

Connect mask to the respective constant flow outlet

-

Open ON/OFF knob

-

Secure bottle and check flow indication” at the mask bag)

-

Remove make-up/ clean the face in case of sweating and put the mask on

-

Time check by assisting person

-

Inform the Commander of the use of oxygen

(green

“flow

WHEN OXYGEN IS NO LONGER REQUIRED -

Take mask off

-

Close ON/OFF knob

-

Disconnect the mask

-

Store oxygen bottle in its stowage

-

Inform the Commander about number of bottles used

-

The respective entry should be done in the Work Order Book by the Commander

-

Oxygen bottle showed on picture “B”

-

Each Portable Oxygen Bottle consists of a cylinder on which a manually operated regulator is installed.

-

The regulator has a flow switching device that allows the user to manually control the oxygen flow to passenger mask.


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-

The ON/OFF valve enables the user to open the oxygen valve and select the desired flow rate.

OPERATION OF THE PORTABLE OXYGEN BOTTLE SHOWED ON PICTURE “B” -

Remove the portable oxygen bottle from its location

-

Remove the mask from the stowage bag, ensure that the mask is attached to the oxygen outlet. Remove make-up/clean the face in case of sweating and put the mask on the user’s face, covering the user’s nose and mouth

-

Turn the ON/OFF valve to the 2 liters per minute or 4 liters per minute position to start the flow of oxygen. Ensure that the number is centered in the window above


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the gauge for oxygen to flow correctly. Check the flow indicator of the mask to ensure that the oxygen is flowing NOTE: Cabin Crew must monitor the gauge when the oxygen is in use. -

When using the portable oxygen unit, oxygen does not flow until “2” is centered in the window and the ON/OFF valve is in the 2 Liters per Minute detent position. When adjusting oxygen flow from 2 Liters per Minute to 4 Liters per Minute the oxygen does not flow until the “4” is centered in the window above the gauge and the ON/OFF valve is in the 4 Liters Per Minute detent position.

-

While the portable oxygen bottle unit is in use, periodically check the visual flow indicator on the mask to ensure that there is oxygen flowing to the mask.

-

Forcing the ON/OFF valve past the "4" position damages the portable oxygen unit.

-

Time check by assisting person.

-

Inform the Commander of use of oxygen.

WHEN OXYGEN IS NO LONGER REQUIRED -

Take mask off

-

Turn the ON/OFF valve until a red band appears in the window. The flow of oxygen stops

-

Stow oxygen bottle in its stowage

-

Inform the Commander about number of bottles used

-

The respective entry should be done in the Work Order Book by the Commander

NOTE: When moving or transporting the portable oxygen bottle, be sure to keep a firm grasp on the portable oxygen bottle and do not allow it to drop

2.3.7

Megaphone

PURPOSE OF THE MEGAPHONE -

To replace an inoperative PA System


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-

To instruct the passengers outside the aircraft after evacuation

NOTE: When the megaphone gets wet, it will fail to operate CONSISTS OF -

Loudspeaker

-

Push to talk button

-

Microphone

-

Wrist loop

OPERATION OF THE MEGAPHONE -

Take the megaphone from the stowage

-

Hold the megaphone in one hand

-

Enclose microphone with index finger and thumb for protection

-

Place mouth almost in contact with the microphone

-

Press the push to talk button; speak slowly and clearly

-

When not in use, carry the megaphone by the wrist loop

PRE-FLIGHT CHECK OF THE MEGAPHONE -

Properly stowed and latched

-

When the push to talk button is engaged the click is audible

NOTE: Do not operate the megaphone near personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ears. Amplified sound or howling can cause damage to the inner ear.

2.3.8

Life-vest

REGULATION For every person on board (including infants) a life-vest must be carried: -

When the initial climb out and /or final approach of the aircraft is over water

-

When flying over water more than 50 NM (app.100 km) away from land

LIFE-VEST CARRIED ON BOARD -

For each Crew Member an orange-red colour life-vest is available

-

For each passenger a yellow colour life-vest is available

-

Each aircraft is equipped with a bag, which contains spare life-vests

-

Each aircraft is equipped with a bag, which contains infant life-vests (For exact contents of bags refer to Emergency Equipment Location Map)

PRE-FLIGHT CHECK OF THE PASSENGER LIFE VESTS -

Under each passenger seat one life vest is present in the life vest stowage


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PRE-FLIGHT CHECK OF THE CREW LIFE VESTS -

Correct quantity

-

Life vest bags closed and sealed

PRE-FLIGHT CHECK OF THE SPARE ADULT LIFE VESTS -

Correct quantity

-

Life vest bags closed sealed

PRE-FLIGHT CHECK OF THE INFANT LIFE VESTS -

Correct quantity

-

Life vest bags closed and sealed

Passenger / Crew life-vest The life-vest has one inflatable chamber providing enough buoyancy to keep a heavy person afloat. The chamber can be inflated by firmly pulling the red tag. The life-vest can be deflated and re-inflated by means of the rubber tube. -

To deflate: Press the valve in top of deflation tube and allow excess air to escape

-

To inflate: Blow into red rubber tube

The life-vest is equipped with a light to assist location of survivors in darkness. The light is located on the shoulder, which will illuminate when the battery is in contact with water.


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OPERATION OF THE ADULT / CREW LIFE-VEST -

Remove the life-vest from under the passenger seat/Crew seat, unpack the life-vest and hold the life-vest in front of you;

-

Put the life-vest over your head

-

Wrap the strap around your waist and close the clip in the front. Pull the strap tight around your waist

-

Pull the red tag standing in the door opening or outside on the wing to inflate the life-vest

NOTE: Operating instructions are provided in easy-to-understand pictorial steps on the front of the vest and are readable before and after donning.

USE OF PASSENGER LIFE-VEST ON SMALL CHILDREN: -

Put -the life-vest over the child's head

-

Wrap the strap around the child's waist and close the clip in the front

-

Pull the strap tight around the waist

-

Pull the strap between the child's legs and tie it with a knot on the back

-

Before evacuating the aircraft, but after it has come to a complete stop, inflate the chamber of the life-vest by pulling the red tag


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Infant life-vest The infant life-vest should only be handed out during ditching preparations MAIN FEATURES: -

Oral tube with unidirectional flow control

-

An inflator with a pull tab connected to CO2 cylinder

-

Rescue light system consisting of lamp powered by a sea-water activated battery

-

Mooring strap to connect the infant to an adult

EXAMPLE OF INFANT LIFE VEST -


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OPERATION OF INFANT LIFE-VEST -

Remove the life-vest from the sealed bag by pulling the label

-

Hold life vest in front of the infant

-

Put infant's arms through the openings

-

Tighten the straps at the back so the life-vest has a secure fit

-

Pull the strap between the child's legs and adjusted

THE FOLLOWING INSTRUCTIONS MUST BE GIVEN TO THE ADULT TRAVELLING WITH INFANT -

Infant life-vest must be inflated while inside the aircraft after the A/C has come to a complete stop

-

The adult must carry the infant while evacuating the aircraft

-

The adult has to attach the infant life-vest rope (lanyard) to her/his own life-vest before leaving the aircraft

2.3.9

Seat belts Passenger seat belts

Every passenger seat must be equipped with a seatbelt attached to the seat. The seatbelt is a part of the seat. In case a seatbelt is unserviceable or is missing, it must be reported to the SCA of the flight and afterwards to the Commander, who is to do the respective entry in the Work Order Book. The seat is considered as inoperative.

HOW TO FASTEN THE SEAT BELT -

Take the belt fastener (connector) in one hand and the buckle of the opposite belt in the other hand,

-

Move the buckle into the belt fastener until it snaps into place,

-

Pull the free strap end until the seat belt is tightened,

-

Check whether the seat belt is correctly locked and tightened.

HOW TO OPEN THE SEAT BELT -

Lift the cap of the buckle at the rear end. The buckle opens

-

Take the buckle in one hand and the connector in the other hand

-

Lay the seat belt on the seat avoid seat belt hanging on the aisle (danger of tripping)


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CAUTION: Ensure that the seat belt is not twisted before or during the fasten procedure, otherwise it does not protect from injury. CAUTION: Ensure that the seat belt is correctly locked and tightened, otherwise it does not protect from injury.

Baby belts (infant belts) Baby belts must be used at all times when the "Fasten seatbelt" sign is illuminating. Cabin Crew must hand out the baby belt before taxiing and give the following instructions on its use: -

Seat the infant on the adult's lap, preferably facing forward

-

Slide the end of the adult seatbelt with no buckle through the loop of the infant's seatbelt

-

Close the adult's seat belt and adjust

-

Close the baby belt and adjust

-

In case of evacuation, only unfasten the adult seatbelt; the baby belt can remain secured on the infant

-

Study the "brace position" on the passenger safety information card

NOTE: The baby belts must be collected after passengersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; disembarkation. CAUTION: Advise the passenger travelling with small children about the possibility of harm when the child is operating the seatbelt buckle.

Extension belts Extension belts must be used if the regular seatbelt is too short for oversized passengers.

NOTE: In case only baby belts are available on board, they can be use as an extension belt (they are called extension belt with the loop) but not vice versa. PRE-FLIGHT CHECK OF BABY BELTS/EXTENSION BELTS -

Quantity is correct

-

Belts are not damaged/incomplete

-

Placed in the assigned location


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Spare passenger seat belt Spare passenger seat belts are located in the cabin on particular aircrafts (refer to the aircraft definition). In case of replacement of the seat belt, the relevant WO must be entered, as it requires a maintenance action.

2.3.10 Demonstration kit CONSISTS OF -

Demonstration life-vest

-

Demonstration seatbelt

-

Demonstration oxygen mask

-

Demonstration safety card

NOTE: The contents of the demonstration kit are for demonstration purposes only and not for the actual use.

PRE-FLIGHT CHECK OF THE DEMONSTRATION KIT -

Presented

-

Content is not damaged or missing

-

Placed in the assigned location

2.3.11 First Aid Kit For the contents of the First Aid Kit refer to CAM section 9.24. FAK sealing procedure -

When the box is complete the green seal is applied

-

Once the kit has been opened, affix a red seal to the outside of the box

-

Any opening of the First Aid Kit must be reported to the Commander, in order to have the WO initiated

NOTE: “Red seal” indicates that FAK was used, security checked, closed and re-secured”. Only one of the required FAK can be incomplete (red seal applied) for a maximum of 2 calendar days.


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EXAMPLES OF FIRST AID KITS

PRE-FLIGHT check of the first aid kit: -

Box is properly stowed and not damaged

-

Appropriate seal is presented

-

Stowed in the designated location

NOTE: One seal applied per FAK is sufficient to indicate its status either complete (green seal applied) or opened/incomplete (red seal applied).


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2.3.12 Life lines Life lines should mainly be used during ditching evacuation procedures (if time permits). They are stowed in the small overhead compartments over the rows 12 and 13 on the right and left side of the A/C. On each side, 2 life lines are located in sealed bags. To use it, attach one life line snaphook to the door-stop fitting on the upper outer corner of the overwing exit. Second life line snaphook should be attached to the yellow wing hook (the hook is on the center of the wing surface). PRE-FLIGHT CHECK OF THE LIFE LINES -

Quantity is correct

-

Life lines are sealed closed in the proper bag

-

Stowed in the designated location

2.3.13 Portable ELT -

The ELT is a triple frequency emergency transmitter able to send the emergency signal during at least 24 hours. It is located in stowage behind C/A 4 jumpseat. It can be removed from its mounting bracket

-

Portable ELT is NOT installed on the following A/Cs belonging to the WAH fleet: from HA-LPD up to HA-LPR (included)

PRINCIPLE -

Activation is automatic by immersion of the ELT in water provided that the ELT four-position switch is set to the ARM position (the presence of water is detected by a sensor that, in turn, activates the ELT)

-

Activation is manual on land where the four-position switch on the bottom of the ELT must be set to XMT mode

-

The antenna automatically erects upon immersion in water, and is manually deployed by unhooking the antenna from the antenna retainer clip


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MANUAL DEPLOYMENT IN WATER -

Open quick release latches of stowage bracket and remove the ELT

-

Break tape holding cord wound on lanyard and pull the ELT

-

Tie cord securely to the floating device or yourself

-

Make sure the 4 position switch is in ARM position

-

Place the ELT inside the water

-

After 10 seconds, the flashing LED light will be visible, after 5 minutes, the antenna will deploy

MANUAL DEPLOYMENT ON LAND -

Open quick release latches of stowage bracket and remove the ELT

-

Move the ELT to an area clear of obstruction (highest point)

-

Manually set the 4 position switch to “XMT”

-

With hand over antenna, break the tape holding the antenna

-

Stand clear of antenna for best transmission

mode

PRE-FLIGHT CHECK OF THE PORTABLE ELT -

Stowed in the designated location (for the location refer to the Emergency Equipment Location Map)

-

During daily operation to fulfil the pre-flight check requirements the portable ELT must not be removed from its dedicated stowage compartment.


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INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK


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3 SAFETY PROCEDURES 3.1

Fire

3.1.1

Fire - general

A fire is made up by the following elements: -

Inflammable material

-

Oxygen

-

Relevant ignition temperature

Removing one of these three elements will extinguish the fire!

Class

3.1.2

Type of fire

Burning material

Extinguished by

A

Combustible material

Fabric, wood, paper rubbish, etc.

Non-flammable liquid

B

Burning liquids and gases

Gasoline, oil, tar, paint alcohol, etc.

BCF

C

Electrical fire

Operating electrical equipment

BCF

Fire prevention

It must be realized that fire on board an aircraft is an extreme hazard, therefore: PREVENTION IS BETTER THAN CURE! -

Lavatories must be checked every 15 minutes, to ensure that no burning stubs have been placed in the disposal containers and the smoke detectors are not tempered with e.g. tissues

-

In galleys Cabin Crew should ensure that no flammable materials, such as paper napkins, towels are left near the heated galley equipment (hot plate of the beverage system). The Cabin Crew must monitor the galley electrical panels for fault indications and tripped circuit breakers (refer to Circuit Breaker Procedure).

-

Passengers must be observed if they do not act carelessly.

Sometimes a fire may not always be obvious and smoke and flames may not always be visible, but there may be other indications that a potential fire is in progress. Signs to be aware of include: -

Fumes or unusual odours

-

Electrical malfunctions, for example circuit breakers tripping

-

Hot spots on sidewalls, floors, and panels


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-

Noises, such as popping, snapping or crackling, which may indicate electrical arcing

If passengers or Crew Members suddenly develop eye irritation, sore throats, and/or headaches, it may indicate that gas fumes are present, but may have not reached a level when it is visible.

3.1.3

Circuit breaker procedure

Circuit breakers perform a dual function in an aircraft electrical system: -

To provide protection from overheating, due to an abnormal electrical load on a piece of equipment, which may result in the total or partial deactivation of the electrical installation (short circuit)

-

To facilitate the isolation of a specific circuit that does not have any other switching mechanism

If the circuit breaker will trip automatically, do not re-engage it, inform the Commander immediately. Re-engaging a tripped circuit breaker may aggravate any electrical damage, and risks affecting other equipment. This may result in a temperature increase, and smoke emissions in the area concerned.

3.1.4

Fire fighting procedures General - Fire fighting team

Due to the nature of the fire, and it’s devastating effects on an aircraft, particularly within a confined space, it is important to know what steps should be taken to prevent the fire and to stop it from spreading. Therefore, at the first sign of any fire, the first priority will always be to put it out. The fire fighting procedure requires a team of 4 Cabin Crew Members. A team effort is the most effective way to fight onboard fire. Tasks are performed simultaneously, in order to optimize the fire fighting effort. The roles are: FIRE-FIGHTER (CABIN CREW MEMBER WHO LOCATES THE FIRE) -

Alerts other Crew Members by shouting “BCF”, “BCF”

-

Gets the nearest BCF (consider the use of PBE)

-

Locates the source of fire

-

Fights the fire

ASSISTANT (THIS CABIN CREW MEMBER WHO STAYS WITH THE FIREFIGHTER) -

Supplies extra fire fighting equipment

-

Supports the fire fighting effort

-

Replaces Fire-fighter and change roles with Fire-fighter, if required

COMMUNICATOR -

Informs the Flight Crew about the fire’s:

-

Location

-

Source

-

Severity/density

-

Action/fire fighting progress status

-

Number of BCF used

-

Time of fire fighting action started


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The Communicator maintains the communication link between the cabin and the Flight Crew, via an interphone that is near the fire fighting scene. Provides the Flight Crew with an accurate description of the fire fighting effort, and of the situation in the cabin. The information that the Flight Crew receives from the Cabin Crew determinates the course of action that the Flight Crew will take. Therefore, it is vitally important that the Flight Crew receives a realistic account of the events in the cabin, as they occur. SUPPORTER: This Crew Member is not directly involved in the fire fighting effort, but will be required to provide assistance and therefore shall: -

Relocate passengers

-

Provide first-aid

-

Calm and reassure passengers

-

Removes flammable material from the area (e.g. oxygen bottles)

NOTE: After any fire or smoke one Crew Member shall be responsible for monitoring the affected area for the remainder of the flight. NOTE: The Fire-fighter, the Communicator and the Assistant Fire-fighter perform their roles and actions simultaneously. In case the flight is operated with reduced number of Cabin Crew, due to incapacitation, role of the Communicator and Supporter will be combined. GENERAL FIRE FIGHTING PROCEDURE -

Locate and attack fire immediately

-

Always fight fire aggressively

-

Every small fire on board is an extreme hazard that is why must be treated as a big one

-

Call other Cabin Attendant for assistance and to bring protective and additional equipment (e.g. BCF, protective gloves, Smoke Hood, water)

-

Never leave the burning object

-

Keep the aisle free of obstacles

-

Make sure that the Commander is informed ASAP and kept clearly advised of the situation in the cabin

-

Use additional equipment (if situation requires)

-

Always check for re-ignition after extinguishing the fire with 2nd BCF as a standby

-

To prevent re-ignition and to cool fire area, only in case of class A fire, use nonflammable liquids

-

Move oxygen bottles away from the fire area

-

Remove passengers from fire area and distribute protective materials (wet tissues, cloths etc. to prevent from smoke inhalation)

-

Give full report to the Flight Crew

-

Close cold air outlets in fire area

-

Monitor fire area/material for the remaining of the flight

Fire fighting – Class “A” fire SEATS OR OTHER FABRICS -

Use curtain to smother the flames, douse with water or other non-flammable liquid


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-

If not effective use BCF, then soak with water

PAPER OR RUBBISH -

Use water or other non-flammable liquid

-

If not effective use BCF, then soak with water

NOTE: When a halon extinguisher is used on a class A fire, the affected area must be dampened with water afterwards to prevent the fire re-ignitation.

Fire fighting – Class “B” fire FLAMMABLE LIQUIDES -

Use blanket or coat smother the flames

-

For cooling douse with water or other non-flammable liquid

-

If not effective use BCF, then soak with water

DANGEROUS GOODS -

Use BCF

NOTE: On fires of flammable solids gently discharged the extinguishing agent in spurts.

Fire fighting – Class “C” fire ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT -

Pull circuit breakers and switch off equipment

-

Use BCF if required

-

Never use water or other liquids

Lithium Battery fires

R R R R R R

R R R R R R

The two types of batteries commonly used to power consumer PEDs are lithium batteries (disposable) and lithium-ion batteries (rechargeable). Both types are capable of ignition and subsequent explosion due to overheating. The resulting fire can flare repeatedly as each cell ruptures and releases its contents. Based on testing by the Fire Safety Branch of the FAA, the following procedures are recommended for fighting a fire of a lithium type batterypowered PED regardless if the battery is disposable or rechargeable: -

Use BCF to estinguish the fire o

usage of BCF shall prevent the spread of the fire to adjacent battery cells and materials

-

If it is safe to approach the device, it must be cooled down with water or other non-alcoholic liquid, from any available source over the cells immediately after extinguishing the fire

-

While cooling the battery, use protective gloves and PBE, as a precaution measure

-

Relocate passengers away from the device

-

When the device is considered to be cool enough to be moved and stored for landing, move it into one of the AFT lavatory waste bins, filled with non-alcoholic fluid and store it there for the rest of the flight

-

Monitor regularly

-

Lavatory shall be locked for the rest of the flight

NOTE: Only water or other non-alcoholic liquid can provide sufficient cooling to prevent re-ignition and/or spreading of the fire to adjacent batteries. Significant cooling is needed to prevent the spread of fire to additional cells in a battery pack.


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CAUTION : -

Do not attempt to pick up and move a smoking or burning device

-

Do not cover the device or use ice to cool down the device. Ice or other materials insulate the device increasing the likelihood that additional battery cells will ignite

Lavatory fire GENERAL Lavatory smoke/fire can be caused by electrical system malfunction for example, the water heater, toilet vacuum, or may be caused by burning materials usually caused by a carelessly discarded cigarette in the lavatory waste bin. -

Check if there is nobody in the lavatory

-

Using the back of the hand, feel the panel of the lavatory door, to determine temperature and presence of fire

NOTE: When a fire occurs in an enclosed area such as lavatory, overhead compartment, before opening the door, always check the door panel for a heat (with the back of the hand). IF THE DOOR IS HOT -

Take the nearest fire extinguisher from its mounting and test it before using

-

Open the lavatory door carefully just enough to pass the nozzle of the fire extinguisher inside (keep body as low as possible because the flames will exit at the upper part, and block the door, but only with your foot not with the whole body)

-

Keep standing behind the lavatory door while fighting the fire (use the door panel as protection against smoke and heat)

-

Empty the BCF completely (7-10 seconds)

-

Close the lavatory door

-

Wait approx. 1,5 min

-

Prepare PBE : check the door if they are hot, proceed as above otherwise enter the affected lavatory

-

Use additional equipment if necessary

-

Check if the fire is completely extinguished with 2nd BCF stand-by, beware of reignition

-

To prevent re-ignition use water to cool the fire area if electrics are not involved

-

Check fire area frequently for the remainder of the flight (min.every 15 min)

IF THE DOOR IS NOT HOT -

Open the door carefully, go into the LAV wearing PBE

-

Locate the source of smoke/fire area with BCF stand by

-

If applicable extinguish the fire immediately

-

To prevent re-ignition use water to cool the fire area if electrics are not involved

-

Check fire area frequently for the remainder of the flight (minimum every 15 minutes)


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Overhead compartment fire Smoke/Fire in overhead compartment may be caused by the contents of the compartment or possible electrical malfunction in the Passenger Service Unit (PSU). If smoke is visibly emitting from an overhead compartment, basic fire fighting - procedure should be applied: -

Check for heat. Using the back of the hand, feel the overhead compartment to determine the temperature and presence of fire

-

Open the overhead compartment slightly from the side, enough to pass the nozzle of fire extinguisher

NOTE: Opening the overhead compartment more than is necessary risks contaminating the cabin with smoke, puts occupants at risk of smoke inhalation and allows the fire (if any) to be fed with oxygen. NOTE: The fire extinguisher must be discharged into the overhead compartment, away from the seat, to prevent debris from contaminating the cabin. -

Discharge the fire extinguisher

-

Close the overhead compartment

-

Repeat fire fighting procedure, if necessary

Open fire in the cabin Halon is the liquefied gas that extinguishes fires by chemically interrupting a fireâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s combustion chain (retracting the oxygen). This is one of the main reasons why Halon is effective when the exact source of the fire cannot be positively determined, and therefore is effective in close area. In case of open fire in the cabin: -

Use curtain to smother the flames, douse with water or other non-flammable liquid

PERSON -

Wrap the person in (non synthetic) material (e.g. curtain or coat) from the head/neck down

-

Lay person on the floor

-

When the fire is extinguished, cool the skin with water for at least 15 minutes;

-

Do not remove clothing

-

Give first aid

Galley electrical equipment fire The source of smoke/fire in the galley areas is usually due to the malfunction of electrical equipment, such as beverage makers/water boilers etc. When the source of the smoke/fire has been identified as coming from a piece of electrical equipment, the cabin crew should: -

Switch off power

-

Pull the associated circuit breaker that is located on the galley electrical panel (above the beverage makers/water boilers)

-

Inform the Flight Crew immediately

-

Closely monitor the situation

-

Prepare a fire extinguisher, PBE, and fire gloves (if applicable) in case the situation deteriorates


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Fire re-ignition Never assume that a fire has been totally extinguished. It may not have visible flames but it may still be smoldering and may re-ignite and develop into a larger, uncontrollable fire in a short space of time. Following any fire-fighting action, cabin crew must prevent any possibility of re-ignition. On all non-electrical fire debris the use of non-alcoholic beverages should be used to soak the area, and suffocate the potential of re-ignition. However, liquids should not be used on electrical items or wiring.

3.2

Smoke

3.2.1

General

Smoke occurrences in the cabin usually involve equipment that is easily accessible to Cabin Crew. Smoke and hot gases will rise vertically until they strike a roof or ceiling then they will spread sideways. This is called mushrooming. Due to limited height within an aircraft fuselage this effect takes place quickly. Smoke can travel big distances from the base of fire, this is due to air circulation. The volume of smoke is not an indication of the size of the fire. Small fires can produce smoke for long periods in an aircraft and can completely feel the structure with smoke, making fire fighting operations very difficult. The type and colour of smoke can sometimes give an indication as to the material involved in the fire, e.g. robber and plastic give off a large volume of thick, black smoke. Smoke can impair judgment and affect performance. When inhaled even in small quantities, it can be fatal depending on an individual’s level of tolerance. Breathing through wet towels will effectively reduce the ingestion of toxic gases. EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION IN CASE OF SMOKE: -

Reduces confusion

-

Increases confidence in decision making

-

Improves the chances of successful outcome

-

One Crew Member should act as a liaison between the cabin and the Flight Crew, via the interphone; this is to avoid conflicting information

-

Information shall be clear and concise, and reflect the conditions in the cabin

NOTE: Do never say you have a fire if you don’t see the flames, report only smoke occurrence in that case.

3.2.2

Procedure in a smoke field area

In the event of smoke in the cabin, the following actions should be taken by the cabin Crew Member who noticed the smoke: -

Inform the other Crew Members by shouting “BCF”,”BCF”

-

Obtain the nearest fire fighting equipment in the cabin

-

Locate the source of smoke (touching surrounding area with the back of your hand)

-

Closely monitor the situation

The other Crew Members must also be ready to perform their assigned duties if the smoke develops into a fire. It is important to remember that a smoke occurrence can be a potential fire that, if left undetected, can deteriorate within a short space of time.


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The Cabin Crew Members must take the following actions, in order to protect everyone on board, from the negative effects and consequences of smoke inhalation: -

Do not open the cockpit door, unless it is necessary. Take necessary action to prevent smoke and fumes from contaminating the cockpit

-

Move passengers away from the smoke source area. If this is not possible, encourage the passengers to remain at low level where the air is clearer

-

Use wet towels or wet cloth to reduce some of the effects of smoke inhalation. Instruct passengers to hold the wet towel/cloth over their noses and mouth and breathe through it

-

Close cold air outlets in smoke area

-

In addition, the Cabin Crew Members should use PBEs (Protective Breathing Equipment) to protect themselves (for use of PBE refer to CAM 2.3.4).

NOTE: If a passenger needs to be treated for smoke inhalation, and requires oxygen, the passenger must be moved away from the affected area, before administering the oxygen.

3.2.3

Awareness of smoke/fire in a hidden area

Hidden areas are defined as “any area inside the pressure shell, which is not readily accessible to the crew, other than a dedicated cargo area.” It is important for Cabin Crew to be aware of the potential sources of smoke onboard the aircraft and to take immediate action. -

The area above the ceiling panels; this overhead area includes wiring bundles, control surface cables, passenger emergency oxygen system, parts of the air conditioning system

-

The vents that are at the foot of the sidewall panels, on each side of the passenger cabin; most aircraft air conditioning system supply conditioned air from the cabin ceiling. This conditioned air then flows from the top of the cabin to the bottom, exits via the return grills, and finally leaves the aircraft via the outflow valves.

-

The area below the floor outboard of the cargo area; this area hosts hydraulic lines, electrical components and wiring bundles.

-

Smoke emission from sidewall panels and ceiling may indicate a hidden fire.

Many of these “hidden areas” involve wiring, air conditioning, and insulation, and may, in fact, hide a potential fire within the aircraft. Smoke emitting from the seams of a wall panel may possibly indicate electrical arcing that has ignited another piece of material. Smoke and fumes, due to contamination of the cabin air supply, may also infiltrate the cabin. Immediate investigation of odors, fumes, unusual noises, and passenger observations that relate to a smoke occurrence, may save valuable time. In some cases, smoke may appear some distance from the source. When the Cabin Crew suspects a fire in a hidden area, for example behind a panel, she should try to locate “hot spot”. A “hot spot” is an abnormally warm area. A “hot spot” is usually a good indicator as to where the source of the fire is. Indications of a fire in a hidden area may be: -

An unusually hot surface

-

Smoke emitted from ceiling or wall panels

-

Fumes and unusual odours

-

Snapping, or popping noises, may indicate electrical short circuit/fire


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NOTE: To find the “hot spot”, the Cabin Crew should move the back of their hand along the panel to find the hottest area.

3.2.4

Lavatory smoke detector

In case smoke is detected in one of the lavatories the smoke detector generates: AURAL WARNING -

Smoke detector alarm gives a triple warning sound (low chime), with a repetitive time of 30 seconds, broadcasted via all passenger and Attendant station loudspeakers

VISUAL WARNINGS: -

Red lavatory smoke indicator on the FAP panel comes on (refer to the type instruction)

-

An amber light flashes on the related Area Call Panel (ACP)

-

An amber light flashes on the related lavatory wall

-

A red flashing indicator light and a steady text (SMOKE LAV XX) on all Attendant Indication Panels (AIP)

-

The affected lavatory is graphically shown on FAP SMOKE DETECTION page (Touchscreen FAP only)

RESET SEQUENCE TOUCHSCREEN FAP (INSTALLED ON ALL AIRCRAFTS OF THE FLEET EXCEPT HALPD/LPE/LPF) Depending on the aircraft definition (Touchscreen FAP) the aural and visual warning reset switch on the FAP stops the warning indications on the ACP and AIPs. The indications lights of: FAP hardkey Smoke Reset, FAP symbol Smoke Detected on the SMOKE DETECTION page and the AAP pushbutton Smoke Reset goes off only when the density of the smoke drops below the accepted level.


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FAP CLASSIC (INSTALLED ON THE AIRCRAFTS: HA- LPD/LPE/LPF) The LAV SMOKE/RESET push-button on the FAP or the related AAP stops the aural and visual warnings in the cabin. The indication on the FAP disappears, as soon as the density of smoke drops below the accepted level.

3.3

Decompression

3.3.1

General

Modern aircraft flies at altitudes at which there is insufficient air for breathing. Therefore they are equipped with a pressurization system. The pressurization system is using a series of valves to control the flow of air into, and out of the cabin. A pressurized cabin is basically a container into which compressed air is pumped continuously. Outside air is compressed by the engines, cooled and humidified by the air conditioning unit and directed to the cabin. The used air is vented outside through the outflow valves. Under normal circumstances the cabin pressurization system will keep the cabin pressure between 6.000 and 8.000 feet. The external altitude may be 40 000 feet, therefore the difference between the cabin altitude and the external altitude creates a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;pressure differentialâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. During decompression, the cabin pressure decreases, and the cabin altitude increases to equalize with the flight altitude.

3.3.2

Types of decompression

Loss of cabin pressure results in decompression. At a different altitude than what human being is able to tolerate this means insufficient oxygen in the air and a decreased pressure level; with such conditions it is not possible to sustain life, therefore, altitude change must be performed. If depressurization occurs during climb, pilots will consider reducing speed (possible return) and/or stopping the climb during the trouble shooting process. During cruise, they will consider descending to a lower altitude. If partial failure cannot be resolved, pilots will continue the decent to FL100/10,000 feet. A loss of pressurization can be slow - in case of small air leak - while a rapid or explosive depressurization occurs suddenly within a few seconds. If decompression occurs, an automatic system will provide supplementary oxygen through masks in the cabin, toilets and galleys to passengers and Cabin Crew. The cockpit is equipped with a separate oxygen system for the Flight Crew. The cabin indications specified


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below are signs of loss of cabin pressure. However, the built-in oxygen masks will automatically be presented only when the cabin altitude reaches 14000 feet. In case of any type of decompression, Flight Crew will make an emergency descent to reach a safe altitude. If, however, the aircraft continues to climb, Cabin Crew Member nearest to the cockpit should notify Flight Crew and confirm that they donned their oxygen masks. CABIN INDICATIONS: When the cabin altitude reaches > 11 300 ft the following will happen: -

The cabin lightening comes on 100%

-

The EXIT signs will come on

-

The FASTEN SEAT BELT sign come on

NOTE: In case of depressurization, the lavatory RETURN TO SEAT sign do not come on. When the cabin altitude reaches > 14 000 ft the following will happen: -

The oxygen masks will drop

-

The PA volume increases

-

The emergency depressurization message will be broadcast (if, installed)

SLOW DECOMPRESSION: Slow decompression can be caused by a pressurization system failure or by structural damage (small hole), a faulty door or a damaged window seal. In that case passengers that are seated in the area should be moved and reseated if possible. Slow decompression may not always be obvious. Therefore, Cabin Crew must be aware of signs that could indicate a slow decompression. In some cases an unusual noise, such a whistling or hissing sound around the door areas, may be an indication of a slow decompression. One of the first physiological indications of a slow decompression may be ear discomfort, joint pain, stomach pain due to gas expansion. As a precautionary measure all seat belts should be fastened, and equipment stowed and secured, as the situation can develop to a rapid decompression. RAPID DECOMPRESSION: Rapid decompression may be caused by a structural damage to the aircraft. A rapid or explosive decompression may be accompanied by: -

A loud bang or clap that is the result of the sudden contact between the internal and external masses of air

-

A very strong rush of air, as the air exits the cabin

-

A sudden drop of temperature, as the cabin temperature equalizes with the outside air temperature

-

The release of the cabin oxygen masks, when the cabin altitude reaches 14.000 feet

-

Fog or mist in the cabin due to the temperature drop and change of humidity

-

Unsecured items might be ejected from the A/C

-

Loose items may become projectiles

-

Automatic illumination of the cabin lights to BRIGHT position

-

The “Fasten Seatbelt” signs, which comes on automatically

-

PA is automatically adjusted to the maximum value

-

Signs of hypoxia amongst passengers and Crew if they do not receive supplementary oxygen, hypothermia, gas expansion.

NOTE: In case of decompression, the lavatory “return to seat” signs do not come on. For passengers located in the lavatories, 2 masks will immediately drop down from the lavatory ceiling. Passengers should apply the mask over their nose and mouth.


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PHYSIOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF HYPOXIA During decompression the Cabin Crew Members must be aware of the symptoms of hypoxia. It is important for cabin crew to realize that even mild hypoxia, though not fatal, can have fatal results. This is because hypoxia can significantly reduce the performance of the cabin crew and consequently lead to errors that may be fatal. As the insidious nature of hypoxia can cause a gradual decrease in individual performance, followed by incapacitation, the symptoms may not be identified until it is too late. It is important to remember that each person reacts differently depending on the individual physical condition. Hypoxia can cause a false sense of well being. It is possible for a person to be hypoxic and not be aware of their condition. Therefore, it is vital that the cabin crew recognizes the signs of hypoxia, and provides oxygen as soon as possible, in order to prevent loss of consciousness. The affected passenger or Crew Member usually recovers a few minutes after receiving oxygen. However, they may not be aware of having lost consciousness. Initial signs of hypoxia include: -

Tingling sensation in the hands and feet

-

Blue discoloration of the lips and fingernails

-

Increased rate of breathing

-

Headache, nausea, light-headedness, dizziness, sweating, irritability, euphoria, ear discomfort

These symptoms become more pronounced with the lack of oxygen: -

Impaired vision

-

Impaired judgment

-

Not able to coordinate body movements

-

Drowsiness

-

Slurred speech

-

Memory loss

-

Difficulty to concentrate

TIME OF USEFUL CONSCIOUSNESS The time of useful consciousness refers to the time available to individuals to perform their tasks, after they have been deprived of oxygen, but are still aware of their environment and capable of controlling their actions. It is important to remember that, the time of useful consciousness is different for each individual, and depends on: -

Altitude

-

Individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s state of health

-

Amount of activity

In case of continued physical activity, the time of useful consciousness is significantly reduced.


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The following factors can contribute to reducing the time of useful consciousness: -

Fatigue: a person, who is physically or mentally fatigued will have an increased risk of hypoxia

-

Physical effort: during the physical activity, there is an increased need for oxygen, and increased risk of hypoxia and as a result, a decrease in the amount of useful consciousness time

-

Alcohol: can increase the risk of hypoxia

3.3.3

Decompression procedures

In case of decompression an emergency descent will be initiated. The Commander announces via PA to other Crew Members:

“CABIN CREW, EMERGENCY DESCENT, CABIN CREW, EMERGENCY DESCENT”

After this announcement (or in case of rapid decompression experienced in the cabin) the cabin crew must: -

Don, immediately the nearest oxygen mask

-

Sit down and strap in, or grasp the nearest fixed object to avoid being ejected from the A/C

-

Evaluate the situation and act accordingly e.g. instruct the passenger to done the oxygen mask, from your location, speak through your mask, or use gestures to demonstrate the donning of masks

-

Establish communication with the flight crew, as soon as practicable, to confirm that pilots donned their Quick Donning Masks

If Cabin Crew Members are not able to sit down or grasp a fixed object, they should move between passengers and hold on to them. In case of rapid/explosive decompression, the level of noise will be very high. Therefore, this makes communication difficult between the flight crew and the cabin crew, and equally between the cabin crew and the passengers. Due to the fact that effective communication is vital during any emergency, the cabin crew should use any available form of communication. Communication is a lifeline during any emergency. The information that cabin crew can give passengers will save lives. The sharing of information is vital during any emergency, whether it is between cabin crew or passengers. Aircraft safety and survival is a team effort. Advise passengers that although the bag from the oxygen mask does not inflate oxygen is flowing to the mask.

3.3.4

Post-decompression procedures

When the emergency descent has been completed and a safe altitude has been reached, the Flight Crew will notify the Cabin Crew Members that it is safe to remove the oxygen masks by the announcement "CABIN CREW TO THE COCKPIT". All Cabin Crew Members can remove their oxygen masks, check the other Cabin Crew Members and resume procedure after emergency call in flight (e.g.: stowage of service trolleys – refer to CAM 4.1.2.1). The SCA, if not incapacitated, has to proceed to the cockpit, check the Flight Crew and be prepared to assist in case of pilot incapacitation. NOTE: In case the SCA is incapacitated, the cabin crew nearest to the flight deck must proceed to the cockpit. The Commander is to give a NITS briefing to the SCA.


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In the meantime C/As should:

R R R R R R R R R

-

Check other C/As, use portable/fixed oxygen/manual release tool

-

Check passengers in the cabin and in the lavatories

-

Give oxygen and first aid to passengers if needed

-

Check galley, secure items

-

If necessary reseat passengers from damaged area

-

Check the cabin for any damage

-

Report the cabin status to the SCA/flight crew

-

Prepare for emergency/normal landing according to the NITS briefing

-

NOTE: To prevent Crew incapacitation due to hypoxia, the Cabin Crew must transfer to portable oxygen, and consider their post decompression oxygen needs. The first source of oxygen provided to passengers shall be from the drop off masks.

3.4

Communication between cabin and entry areas

In situations when a Cabin Crew Member â&#x20AC;&#x201C; being in the cabin area â&#x20AC;&#x201C; must quickly alert the rest of the Crew (i.e: medical emergency or any other safety related situation when assistance of other Crew Members is necessary without delay), Crew Member in the cabin shall act as follows: -

Press the CA call button 3 times to alert the rest of the Crew

-

Start to handle the given situation until support arrives


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4 EMERGENCY PROCEDURES 4.1

Emergency â&#x20AC;&#x201C; General

4.1.1

Prepared and unprepared emergency

History shows that most accidents occurred during take-off, initial climb, approach and landing, leaving very little or no time for preparation. If an emergency arises during other phases of the flight there is normally sufficient time to fully prepare the passengers and the Crew. Recognized methods of preparation can and must be used to give passengers and Crew members the best chance of survival. Emergency procedures can be divided in two groups: -

PREPARED, when there is TIME to prepare passengers, cabin and Crew

-

UNPREPARED, when there is NO TIME to prepare passengers, cabin and Crew (e.g. sudden accident during take-off or landing)

4.1.2

General knowledge

Whether an emergency on board an aircraft is handled successfully, will depend upon the C/As comprehensive knowledge of what to do and how to handle passengers. The need for calm, capable leadership is critical in preventing panic amongst passengers. The proper preparations and control of a full complement of passengers can only be accomplished by coordinated Crew efforts. A complete knowledge of the emergency procedures, the location and use of equipment provided for such purposes is the first step towards handling an emergency successfully.

Emergency calls and following actions Cancelling an emergency call In case the emergency call is pressed unintentionally use the following command by interphone and/or PA: "CANCEL ALERT, CANCEL ALERT!â&#x20AC;? Emergency call on ground (during taxiing) An Emergency Call on ground (during taxiing) can be used by any of the C/As to get the immediate attention of the Flight Crew in case of serious situation, which requires action (e.g.: fire/smoke, heart attack of passenger, offensive passenger etc..). Crew actions The Flight Crew will immediately stop the aircraft and answer the call, unless the take-off run has been started. When communication with the Flight Crew is established, the C/A initiating the emergency call will report her crew station and the situation. The Flight Crew will give a command over the PA if the Commander deems it necessary. On the command all C/As will take the necessary action. NOTE: During the most critical phases of the flight the oral signal (buzzer) of the Emergency Call is inhibited in the cockpit.


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Emergency call in flight Whenever possible, to avoid alarming passengers unnecessarily, the SCA should be called to the flight deck using the normal crew call functions. However, if an urgent need to brief the SCA arises, the Commander should make the PA announcement "CABIN CREW TO THE COCKPIT" or use the EMER CALL button. Crew actions SCA must immediately proceed to the cockpit, C/As should start preparation of the galleys expecting an emergency landing (stowing trolleys, drawers etc.). The emergency call in flight may also be initiated by C/As.

4.2

Prepared emergency

Prepared emergency landing can be defined as an emergency that enables the Cabin Crew to review procedures, and to inform and prepare passengers for an emergency landing. The time available to prepare the cabin will determine extend and method of the preparation. Time permitting, a full passenger briefing may be possible, however, a certain amount of time should be allocated to each task. The steps of the cabin preparation should be completed in the order of their importance (Refer to Cabin Emergency Checklist located under each C/A jumpseat). Therefore, TIME is the most important factor to consider! Effective communication between Crew Members and passengers is crucial for a timely, effective, and orderly response.

4.2.1

After the emergency call in flight

After an emergency call SCA must report to the cockpit immediately All other C/As must stow trolleys, drawers, clear galleys from any unwanted items and expect briefing from SCA R R R

Flight Crew shall always start the communication with the SCA as follows:" THIS IS A NITS BRIEFING". Flight Crew must brief SCA using the NITS briefing: -

Nature of the emergency

-

Intentions (crash landing, ditching, diversion, continue etc)

-

Time remaining before landing

-

Special instructions

The NITS briefing is giving an answer to the WHAT, WHEN, WHERE questions. In the part “Special instructions” of the NITS briefing, the Commander has to clearly instruct the SCA whether to prepare the cabin for normal or emergency landing. A NITS briefing has always to be repeated by the SCA (to make sure there is no misunderstanding). After the NITS briefing SCA must gather all other C/As to the FWD galley and personally inform, preferably before the Commander’s announcement to the passengers, about the information received from the Flight Crew during the NITS briefing and the priorities of preparations. SCA must check time and has to ensure the same time setting of the watches of all Cabin Crew Members. SCA must request reconfirmation of the received information from other C/A (to make sure there is no misunderstanding). NOTE: The Commander should not normally specify the direction of evacuation, but should allow the Cabin Crew to assess the usability of their designated exits.


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4.2.2

Senior Cabin Attendant briefing to Cabin Attendants

-

The SCA must gather the Cabin Attendants to the FWD galley, the SCA provides the Cabin Attendants with the information received from Pilots.

-

The Senior Cabin Attendant instructs Cabin Attendants to prepare for the Cabin Crew actions relevant to Passenger Briefing Announcement.

4.2.3

General Announcement

The Commander will make an announcement to passengers giving them general information or he may delegate this to the SCA. The General Announcement includes as following: -

The nature of the emergency

-

Necessity to prepare the cabin

-

Time available

-

Request to follow the instructions of the Crew

The actual announcements (General and Passenger Briefing) are included in the Cabin Emergency Checklist (C.E.C. located under each C/A jumpseat).

4.2.4

Passenger Briefing Announcement

Before the Passenger Briefing Announcement begins it must be ensured that: -

The cabin lighting is set to 100% BRT lighting

-

The Cabin Crew is ready to start the demonstration in their assigned areas

During the Passenger Briefing Announcement, Crew members should: -

Not talk during announcement

-

Coordinate the demonstration with the announcement

-

Give thumb up to SCA after every accomplished task

When reading the announcement, the SCA shall: -

Speak slowly and distinctly,

-

Pause at key points, this will enable Cabin Crew Members to perform the demonstration, and verify passenger compliance,

-

Check the time, to make sure that the time available will be sufficient to complete task,

-

Receive the thumb up confirmation from every Crew Member after every accomplished task.

NOTE: If possible reseat passengers into aisle seats, after the consultation with the Commander.

The following table gives an explanation of the passenger preparation procedure: 1. Life-vest (in case of ditching) 2. Location of exits 3. Floor level lights 4. Brace Position


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5. Seat backs and tray tables 6. High-heeled shoes, sharp objects 7. Loose items and carry-on items 8. Seat belts 9. ABP briefing (for details refer to CAM 4.3.7)


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PASSENGER PREPARATION FOR EMERGENCY LANDING General Announcement (see C.E.C.) PAX Briefing Announcement (See C.E.C.)

C/A Action C/As on demo position with Crew life vests in case of ditching. Demo positions: C/A 2 : row 1 C/A 4 : row 10 C/A 3 : row 20 -

Life-vest (ditching only) Passengers have to put on their life-vest without inflating them.

Pointing out exits and the floor lever lighting

-

C/As have to put on Crew life-vest without inflating them, Distribute the infants’ life-vest, inform the adults responsible for infants about exact procedure with inflating infant life vest inside the aircraft, Assist parents with life-vest for infants and small children, Check passengers compliance, Report to SCA (thumb up)

-

Demonstrate

-

Demonstrate brace position relevant for majority of passengers presented on board and instruct the minority on differences; check if all passengers (including adults with infants) follow the instructions correctly, Inform when to assume Brace Position Report to SCA (thumb up)

-

-

Explanation of brace position When the command “brace position” is given by the C/As this means everybody has to adopt brace position -

Pass all service items

To be picked-up by the C/As to clear the cabin and exits of all loose articles which could delay the evacuation

Check exits and evacuation path, Report to SCA (thumb up).

Seat back and tables If a seatback is not in the upright position this limits the space for the person sitting behind. If the table is not in the upright, locked position this limits the space for the person seating in front of the table.

Check upright position, Report to SCA (thumb up)

Remove high heeled shoes To prevent damage to the slides and will enable the passenger to move faster

Remove ties and sharp objects

-

Check shoes/ties/sharp objects, Report to SCA (thumb up)

-

Check exits and evacuation path, Report to SCA (thumb up)

-

Demonstrate, Ensure that adults with infants know the correct procedure, Check all belts (also empty seats) are fastened very tight, Report to SCA (thumb up)

High heeled shoes/ties/sharp objects must be stowed safely e.g. in the overhead compartment

Place all luggage under the seat in front or in an overhead compartment To clear the cabin and exits of all loose articles which could delay the evacuation

Fasten seatbelts To ensure that all passengers know how to open their seatbelts passengers will be instructed to fasten the seatbelts of empty seats

ABP passenger Briefing

-

Passengers seated next to emergency exits should be chosen as Able Bodied Passengers

C/A must select and brief ABPs for their assigned door, Report to SCA (thumb up)


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Securing loose items Passengers should remove and stow all loose and sharp items, and secure them in the overhead compartments or under a seat. These objects include: -

Carry on baggage

-

High heeled shoes

-

Handbags

-

Laptops

-

Briefcases, etc.

High heeled shoes and sharp objects must also be removed, because these objects can cause damage to the slide during an evacuation. In addition, these objects must not be stowed in seat pockets, since they may injury passengers when they take the brace position. Seat pockets should only be used to stow small objects, such as pens and eyeglasses.

4.2.5

Cabin safety check

C/As in assigned areas (refer to type instructions): -

Exits and escape paths are clear of obstructions (hand luggage etc.)

-

Aisles clear of all loose articles (newspapers, luggage etc.)

-

Overhead compartments closed and latched

-

Passengers are seated with their seat belts fastened

-

Infants strapped in the baby belts on adult laps

-

Seat backs are in the upright position (if applicable)

-

Tray tables are in upright and latched position and cup holders are closed (if applicable)

-

Armrests down

-

Window blinds are open

-

Carry-on baggage stowed and secured

-

Service items are cleared

-

Passengers comply with Portable Electronic Devices (PED) restrictions

4.2.6

Galley preparation and safety check

The galley preparation is SCA and C/A 3 responsibility. It includes: -

Loose objects removed and stowed

-

Curtain removed

-

Lavatories vacated and locked

-

Coffee pot and coffee bag holder removed and stowed (when applicable)

-

Galley compartments, containers, boxes and trolleys secured

-

All electrical devices in the galley switched off (e.g. water heater)

-

Circuit Breakers which are accessible to Cabin Crew pull out

-

All doors are ARMED checked by SCA in FWD entry area and C/A3 in AFT entry area

NOTE: during preparation for emergency landing, lavatory door locking is the responsibility of SCA/CA3. In normal operation, lavatory door locking is the responsibility of CA2/CA4.


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4.2.7

Able Bodied Passenger (ABP)

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) defines able-bodied passengers as â&#x20AC;&#x153;passengers selected by Crew Members to assist in managing emergency situations if and as requiredâ&#x20AC;?. In case of a prepared emergency situation passengers seated next to the emergency exits should preferably be chosen as Able Bodied Passengers (ABP's). The selection of the ABPs may be based on their ability to understand instruction, their physical ability, and their ability to stay calm. Examples of potential ABPs: -

Deadheading Crew Member

-

Military personnel

-

Police personnel

-

Fire personnel

-

People who are able to respond to instructions

C/As must select one ABP for each of their assigned doors, which means all together 8 ABPs. The selection shall be made based on mental capabilities rather than on physical capabilities. During preparation to an emergency landing, C/As must brief ABPs for their assigned doors preferably after the passenger's preparation (SCA's decision). Crew Members should avoid selecting family members travelling together (especially with infants/children) to be ABPs, because they will naturally prefer to assist their family members before the other passengers. Instead, Crew Members should select passengers who are travelling alone to be ABPs.

ABP briefing to the main cabin doors Briefing of an ABP to the main cabin doors must include the following cases: CABIN CREW IS OK ABPs should be briefed on the followings: -

How to hold passengers back during door opening and slide inflation


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R R R

-

How to act after sliding down on the slide (to remain at the bottom of the slide during the evacuation and to make sure passengers leave the slide quickly to avoid injuries)

-

How to assist other passengers if necessary

CABIN CREW IS NOT OK (incapacitated) ABPs should be briefed on the followings: -

How to replace the Cabin Crew Members in case they become incapacitated. However, the Cabin Crew must emphasize that ABPs will replace her only if she is not able perform her function due to incapacitation

-

How to assess conditions outside the aircraft (i.e how to identify that the exit is usable/no longer usable)

-

When to open the exit

-

How to open the exit

-

How to locate and use the manual inflation handle

-

How to redirect passengers if an exit is blocked

-

How to protect oneself from going overboard, to remain in the assist space and to hold on to the frame assist handle

-

The commands to be used during evacuation i.e “Jump and slide”

-

How to open the Crew Member’s seat belt: the Crew harness buckle is different from passengers’ seat buckles, and a Cabin Crew Member who is incapacitated in a Crew seat may block a usable exit

EXAMPLE ON HOW TO INSTRUCT AN ABP TO THE MAIN DOORS -

‘Are you willing to help us in this emergency situation’? If ‘NO’, reseat passenger and choose another If ‘YES’, check language spoken and start briefing:

-

‘There may be two situations’:

Instruct in case CA is OK