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MARCELO TINAJERO


TABLE OF CONTENTS Coffered Temple Bus Shelter

7

Museum for Southern Photography

19

Monastery In The City

31

Artist Retreat

29

Which Way Is Which Chair

41

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COFFERED TEMPLE BUS SHELTER

For a design build studio, we were tasked with creating a bus shelter for the intention but not limited to being placed somewhere on the University of Arkansas campus. Since this project was going to be built, it came with a loose budget of around $6,000. The studio worked with Alternative Designs, a steel manufacture who was to be in charge of any steel manufacturing and or assembly. The first iteration I worked along side Amy Dornberg. We wanted to keep the basic shape of the bus shelter but add a texture to it with an ease of installation. The shelter was made up of "blocks" that would stack and attach to each other providing a light and shadow play along the walls. The blocks would be folded and formed from sheet steel creating a 2' long by 6" deep unit with varying height. With the first round of iterations came the aspect of staying in a budget. All preliminary proposals were up to 3 times the budget. Alternative designs provided us with a break down of the cost of the different stages of production. This knowledge led us to provide a second proposal with the cost mainly on our minds. I proposed that instead of manufacturing all of the bus shelter out of steel, we should incorporate another material that the studio could be a part of in the manufacturing. My proposal had the basic pieces of a structure built out of steel but, transitioned to wood to form the interior space and roof. I took the basic concepts of my first iteration and implement them to the new design. The grid of light and shadow that came from the walls were transfered to the ceiling as well. I wanted to minimize the assembly time along with the amount of hardware needed. The marine grade plywood was notched in a fashion where they use each other for support and not bolts, the places where wood and steel meet (columns), bolts were needed. My proposal was chosen to be built and along side my eight other studio members we detailed shop drawings, manufactured the wood pieces, and built the shelter. I was in charge of over seeing the process and coordinating with suppliers and others.


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FIRST PROPOSAL

1/8” Scale Model


Approach

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JOIST BRACKET, WELD TO CHANNEL, ALIGN TO EDGE

COLUMN CONNECTION

7" 2 1/2" 6 1/4"

3/16" BOLTS CENTERED ON BRACKET

STEEL PLATE WELDED TO CHANNEL THEN BOLTED TO TOP PLATE

1' - 0"

2 1/2"

STEEL BOX FRAME

1/2" BOLT HOLE, ENSURE THEY MATCH HOLES IN FLITCH PLATES

4" DIAMETER STEEL COLUMN

MATCH BOLT HOLES ON CHANNEL PLATE TO COLUMN TOP PLATE

5"

BEAM SECTION 3" = 1'-0"

10' - 2 3/4"

2

JOIST BRACKET

STEEL CHANNEL

7' - 11 3/4"

7' - 11 3/4"

9' - 10 3/4"

1/2" BOLTS

STEEL TOP PLATE WELDED TO COLUMN THEN BOLTED TO PLATE

WIDTH OF BOX REFERENCE IN DXF FILE (10 1/4")

MATCH ELEV. HEIGHTS

3/16" BOLTS CENTERED ON BRACKET

2"X6" STEEL CHANNEL BEAM, 15' LONG

1' - 3"

2 1/2"

1' - 0"

11"

2 A105

3"

1 1/2"

1/2" CONDUIT, PENETRATE THROUGH CHANNEL INTO PIPE COLUMN ( X 2 ) AT ALTERNATIVE CORNERS

4" DIAMETER STEEL COLUMN

STEEL PLATE WELDED TO CHANNEL STEEL TOP PLATE WELDED TO COLUMN

8"X8" STEEL PLATE AT 1/4" THICKNESS, WELDED TO COLUMN AND BOLTED TO FOOTING

4" DIAMETER STEEL COLUMN

1/4"

14G STEEL BOX WITH 4 STEEL RIBS WELDED TO COLUMN (MATCH ELEVATION ON BOTH SIDES)

1

COLUMN ELEVATION 3/4" = 1'-0"

5 5/8"

3

Structure Axon

TOP OF COLUMN AXON

C1

Column Beam Details


Wood Interlocking Pieces

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CONSTRUCTION

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MUSEUM FOR SOUTHERN PHOTOGRAPHY The site was located at the end of Beale street in Memphis TN. To the west of the site is located Beale street landing while to the east is downtown Memphis. The project called for a 23,000 square ft. museum to house southern photography. A requirement was to clad 75% of the building with an assigned metal. I was assigned copper. This aspect led me to make the majority of the panels perforated to allow diffused light. Two big aspects of my design was to front the two streets to enforce the corner, and to promote the two great views from the site (the river, and the bridge). I placed the building on the northeast corner of the site. This promoted a stronger street frontage along both streets that run along the site. This also led to the placement of the entry being on this corner since most of the foot traffic would be coming from the east. The massing of the building took shape from this street frontage and from the idea to emphasize the views from the site. I created a series of stacked masses whose geometry would help reinforce the street frontage and the views. The upper masses were pointed out towards the Mississippi River and to the Hernando de Soto bridge. The treatment of the north and south facade changed by the fact of different amounts of sun on either. The north I chose to keep vertical since there is not a lot of direct sunlight. The south tends to have a plethora of direct sunlight. This led to the move of angling those facades to add an overhang protecting from the harsh sun.


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PLAN

PLAN DEFFUSED NORTH LIGHT PV PANELS

HIGH SOLAR RADIATION

PLAN

PLAN FORM + SOLAR 1

OPAQUE MATERIAL TO DIFFUSE WESTERN SUN

PLAN

FORM + SOLAR 2

FORM + SOLAR 3

FORM +SOLAR 4 LOW SOLAR RADIATION

GLASS

PLAN FORM + DAYLIGHT 1

FORM + DAYLIGHT 2

FORM + DAYLIGHT 3

FORM + DAYLIGHT 4

Initial Form Studies


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RIV

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A BE

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T EE

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DIN

LAN

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IV

SI

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V RI

DE

DR

BEA

LE S TRE

ET

1

2

3

4

WA GN

ER

PL

SITE

Form + Site

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EVENT SPACE GALLERY LOBBY/RECEPTION CAFE/SHOP ADMIN LOADING MECHANICAL/STORAGE

Views

Street Frontage

Program

Structure


East-West Section

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Lobby

Multi-use Space


Enclosure/Facade Model

Gallery Hallway

19


Trail Perspective


Beale Street Facade

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MONASTERY IN THE CITY Located on Christopher St. near Washington Square Park in New York City, we were tasked with designing a Monastery for New Monasticism. The site was an infill with streets in front and back. My proposal involved having the monk cells on the front with views to the busier street, Christopher. The larger spaces (library, refectory, and chapel) were placed towards the back for less noise. The circulation space is in-between the monks cells and larger spaces. Cutting through the middle in the circulation space, there is a light well that is also an illuminating wall. On one side of this light well there is a balcony to provide a place to be in the illuminated space.


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Interior Illuminating wall.

Section Perspective

Preliminary Section Perspective


Perforated Wall

Chapel Wall-Ceiling

Model

25


Chapel Space Lighting Iteration

Front Facade Model

Chapel Space Lighting Iteration

Chapel Space Lighting Iteration


n

Final Chapel

Section Model

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ARTIST RETREAT The Artists Retreat was located on the corner of Dickson St. and Block St. in Fayetteville AR. Inspired by Rafael Moneo, I wanted to have a heavy mass based building but, at the same time, wanted to express the beauty of glued laminated wood. To take from Moneo, I constructed to masses that were separated by circulation space. These two masses where then raised and cantilevered on large glulam beams. The more public spaces (gift shop and cafe) were placed on the ground floor. The private residences are placed on the second and third floor. At the top of the building are located the galleries in order to provide them with overhead diffused light.


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Section Perspective


ST CHARLES

DICKSON ST

STUDIO

STUDIO

STUDIO

STUDIO

GALLERY GIFT SHOP

GALLERY

COFFEE SHOP

STUDIO

STUDIO

OFFICE

BLOCK ST

STORAGE

OFFICE

GALLERY

STUDIO

Residents Floor Plan

STUDIO

STUDIO

STUDIO

Gallery Floor Plan

Ground Floor Plan 8

9 6

7

5

4

10

3 2

Detail Wall Section 1. Concrete Slab on Grade 2. Cladding nailing strips 3. Waterproof membrane 4. Riged insulation 5. Glue-Lam Floor slabs 6. CLT Wall panels 7. Raised Floor system 8. Wood window frame 9. Vertical Wood Cladding 10. Glue-Lam Column

Public Semi-Private Private 1

Private Public Diagram

WALL SECTION ISOMETRIC

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Roof Terrace

Lobby


Dickson st Night Render

Gallery

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WHICH WAY IS WHICH CHAIR The design is for a chair that could be used in a variety of positions, not having a main intended position. I approached this by joining different seating position profiles together and adjusting and tweaking them to make them work with one another. I made small models and a full mock up to adjust the seating angles and heights.


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First Iteration

Seating Positions

1:1 Scale Mock Up

Sit

Relax


Finished Model

Lounge

Standing Desk

Two Seater

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