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EXPO: JOHANNESBURG, PRETORIA(RSA) & STOCKHOLM(SE): THREE AMAZING CITIES FOR BETTER LIVING

MONOCLE A BRIEFING ON GLOBAL AFFAIRS, BUSINESS, CULTURE & DESIGN

issue 56 . volume 06 SEPTEMBER 2012

A AFFAIRS Good governance: 10 inspiring urban leaders

B BUSINESS Ground cover: the

go_faster couriers and caterers

C CULTURE Good governance:

The vintage movement: where to find one-of-a-kind treasures Our ANNUAL RANKING of the best cities to base yourself in − who’s new, who’s up, who’s down, who’s out and who needs to up their game

D E

+

10 inspiring urban leaders DESIGN Good governance: 10 inspiring urban leaders EDITS Good governance: 10 inspiring urban leaders HOT CENTREFOLD! Meet you on Monoclestrasse, our ideal street

PRETORIA Our global list of cities that do better with design, infrastructure, opening

STOCKHOLM The rush to suburbia is over; people want to live in the hearts of their cities

56 9 771753 243006

UK £6 USA $12 EUR 12(GER) EUR 13(ITA) DKK 122

SEK 95 JPY ¥2,310 AUD $13.00 SGD $19.90(W/GST) CDN $12.00

JOHANNESBURG A picture is something to be instantly shared, forwarded.We explore photo’s


CONTENTS

— September 2012 022................ Editors note The writers and photographers who made this issue. 025-030......... Shopping MERCHANDISE: The full range of MONOCLE products which you must have. 034-056..........Today’s city dwellers want no hassle REPORT: Today’s city dwellers want no hassle.

A 063.................Irene country village REPORT: Irene country village market, find out where to escape from the city in the city. 069.................Bryanston REPORT: Bryanston organic market and what it has to offer for the everyday city dweller. 076-078..........Restaurants are no place for restraint GLOBAL: Restaurants are no place for restraint. 0079...............Silver orange bistro LOCAL HEROES: The Silver Orange Bistro is a quaint restaurant just outside the city. 080-081..........Design should speak for itself GLOBAL: Sophisticated branding is of course brilliant. 087.................Decorex REPORT: Designing a chair is only half the story objects can be found everyday 090.................Markets that matter GLOBAL: We visit markets were interesting objects can be found everyday 093.................Design should speak for itself GLOBAL: Sophisticated branding is of course brilliant. 095-096..........Design should speak for itself GLOBAL: Sophisticated branding is of course brilliant. 099.................Irene country village REPORT: Irene country village market, find out where to escape from the city in the city.

B PHOTOGRAPHERS:

Marcelle van der Walt − MODELS: From left to right Jose Molenaar Amy Dickonson Frank Bound

01 — ISSUE 56

119-122..........Bryanston REPORT: Bryanston organic market and what it has to offer for the everyday city dweller. 129-130..........Bryanston REPORT: Bryanston organic market and what it has to offer for the everyday city dweller. 134-135..........Restaurants are no place for restraint GLOBAL: Restaurants are no place for restraint.


EDITORS NOTE — Marcelle van der Walt

I find it hard to leave my phone in my pocket when I’m at lunch. I recently left my phone in a hotel room when I went to dinner and I felt uncomfortable; something was wrong. I switch it on as soon as my plane has landed – none of this waiting to arrive at the gate nonsense.Sherry Turkle, a psychologist and professor at MIT, has written a book, Alone Together, that looks at how. Technology is changing the ways we relate to each other and create our inner lives. Much of the book investigates the impact on children but she also details how adults use their phones and technology to create false closeness and by default, an aching distance. In a recent piece in the New York Times, Turkle explained how technology allowed us to disengage at will, helped us to avoid conversation when things got too uncomfortable or

Her piece ended, “I spend the summers at a cottage on Cape Cod, and for decades I walked the same dunes that Thoreau once walked. Not too long ago, people walked with their heads up, looking at the water, the sky, the sand and at one another, talking. Now they often walk with their heads down, typing. Even when they are with friends, partners, children, everyone is on their own devices.” It’s a vision we have all been part of, unfortunately. I’d like to change; well, I think I would. A couple of people close to me have tried interventions but I have beaten off their sect-crushing ways. Yet I watch people on trains unable to look up and see the passing mountains, or the friends at dinner who are there it seems to keep sending messages to Facebook acquaintances, or the lovers who miss the flicker in their partner’s eyes.

Yet I watch people on trains unable to look up and see the passing mountains, or the friends at dinner who are there it seems to keep sending messages to Facebook acquaintances, or the lovers who miss the flicker in their partner’s eyes. I’d like to change; well, I think I would. A couple of people close to me have tried interventions but I have beaten off their sect-crushing ways. Yet I watch people on trains unable to look up and see the passing mountains, or the friends at dinner who are there it seems to keep sending messages to Facebook acquaintances, or the lovers who miss the flicker in their partner’s eyes and I see a bit of me. It’s not very pretty. However, if you have managed to stay focused for the past 500 words, congratulations, you are a rare and special person. Indeed one of a dying breed. —MW

Technology is changing the ways we relate to each other and create our inner lives. Much of the book investigates the impact on children but she also details how adults use their phones and create−

ISSUE 56 — 02


2

1 4

5

The market is the place to shop 3

We find the best markets and see what they’ve got 01) Leopard print scarf, edgars.co.za 02) Striped suit jacket, foschini.co.za 03) Old school glas milk jug, bigblue.co.za 04) Silver alarm clock, bigblue.co.za 05) Yuhon film camera, goldenoldies.co.za 06) String of pearls necklace, missgaven.co.za 07) Lamp stand, boardmans.co.za

03 — ISSUE 56

6


Today’s city dwellers want no hassle

01

Preface Images are power, especially when they’re tied to our social experiences. My parents have an entire wall of their house dedicated to photo albums

PHOTOGRAPHER : MARCELLE VAN DER WALT

Irene market Pretoria First there’s the urban shift. The rush to suburbia is over; people want to live in the hearts of their cities – and not just during their student years. They will sacrifice space for location and so the ultimate city luxury becomes not owning a car but being able to walk to work. It is not an embarrassment but a boast to say that you have no car. Plus, where would you park it? Next there’s that new old bogey: social media. Photographs on a camera serve no purpose to most people under 30. A picture is something to be instantly shared, forwarded. I have just bought a baby Leica that I nurse in my coat pocket but if I am on the road with any colleague who is under 30 they will be camera-free and content with the odd BlackBerry shot. Then there’s the flight from quality. People used to say that the demise of Concorde was one of the only examples of technoog going backwards but

WRITER

Andrew Tuck show on a laptop – unless they happened to be staying with their grandparents (or round my house). And then there’s the nagging feeling that there’s an expanding group of people who are, or have been forced to be, less materialistic. Pushed out of the housing market, more likely to move cities for work, getting hitched later and later – all these things have combined to make an anti-consumer time-bomb. It’s created.

If you don’t want to reveal your age in our office I suggest that you steer clear of any conversation involving cars, televisions, home phones or cameras. Anyone under 30 will probably have none of the above and, what’s more important, not lust after any of them either. We are of course talking about a particular demographic here – lots of team Monocle have come to London from other cities so they try to stay centrally if possible to make the most of the experience (so bike wins over car), they have often lived in numerous apartments (who’d want a landline?), and they are young (why stay at home and watch TV?). But the Monocle mindset is being replicated all over the western world, especially the urban one. Last week the Federal Highway Administration in the US reported that the number of 14 to 34 year olds without a driver’s licence rose to 26 per cent from 21 per cent a decade earlier. Meanwhile the use of cycling, public transport and two feet among 16 to 34 year olds rose. Sure, some of this may be down to blunt economics: if you think the chances. Then there’s the flight from quality.—AT ISSUE 56 — 04


A REPORT

Logistics

02

PHOTOGRAPHER : MARCELLE VAN DER WALT ILLUSTRATOR : MARCELLE VAN DER WALT

05 — ISSUE 56

pta

london

nyc

jhb

First there’s the urban shift. The rush to suburbia is over; people want to live in the hearts of their cities – and not just during their student years. They will sacrifice space for location and so the ultimate city luxury becomes not owning a car but being able to walk to work. It is not an embarrassment but a boast to say that you have no car. Plus, where would you park it? Next there’s that new old bogey: social media. Photographs on a camera serve no purpose to most people under 30. A picture is something to be instantly shared, forwarded. I have just bought a baby Leica that I nurse in my coat pocket but if I am on the road with any colleague who is under 30 they will be camera-free and content with the odd BlackBerry shot. Then there’s the flight from quality. People used to say that the demise of Concorde was one of the only examples of technology going backwards but today this is the norm. Sure a few (ie old) people want hi-def giant TVs but anyone under 30 in my office will only have watched their favourite show on a laptop – unless they happened to be staying with

sydney

Organic market Bryanston


RESTAURANTS ARE NO PLACE FOR RESTRAINTS — Global Preface In every issue of Monocle we ask personalities to tell us how they would spend their final repast. Although the interviews can choose—

The dish Wishfull thinking

WRITER

Andrew Tuck Drinks at a smart hotel after work. Two glasses of something chilled. And two bowls: one piled high with fat green olives, the other teeming with something roasted and nutty. After a few sips I want both and go in for the olives. My guest, a chic woman with less fat on her body than a gazelle, touches neither. Not wanting to look greedy, I leave them alone too. After 30 minutes an aproned waiter switches the bowls for fresh ones – despite them only being one olive down on their original haul. Breakfast at one of those London restaurants where trade is brisk even at 8am. This time I have been invited along to talk about a new publishing venture. I order – eggs, scrambled, and, yes, toast, please too. And coffee? Of course.

(serves 1)

baked ciabata bread roll rocket and mixed greens rosa tomatoes danish feta cheese basil pesto

The method 01 Toast the ciabata roll in a hot oven. 02 Roast the tomatoes with the cheese. 03 Put the rest of the topping on the roll and enjoy.

01 Isabellas Centurion, Pretoria For foodies around the world the idea of having a last meal is harrowing. It’s an existentialist conundrum that is enough to drive gourmands mad, a certainty that can’t be evaded, a halt to pleasure and taste. In every issue of Monocle we ask personalities to tell us how they would spend their final repast. Although the interviewees can choose their own restaurant and could easily spend a fortune on a feast, most of them end up opting for a small, cosy gathering of family and friends,

After reading many of these interviews I decided to taste our own medicine and asked myself what my last meal would be. It’s not an easy question. Besides selecting who to invite (family and friends, of course), it’s a puzzle that left me with the imbarazzo della scelta – the awkwardness of choosing. Would I start with a delicate white truffle risotto? Or a mountain of deep-fried plantains and empanadas smothered with guacamole instead? Would my grandmother’s rabbit stew make the perfect main course or should I get her to make the brigadeiros for dessert? Would I be allowed to have more than one main course? I pondered this for days but was still unable to find an answer. The barbecue ribs at Shorty’s in Miami. ISSUE 56 — 06


C REPORT

Local heroes

02 Silver Orange Bistro Hartbeespoort North West

PHOTOGRAPHER : MARCELLE VAN DER WALT ILLUSTRATOR : MARCELLE VAN DER WALT

Preface Sophisticated branding is of course brilliant. But I’m a little worried it’s getting out of control as far as young— Drinks at a smart hotel after work. Two glasses of something chilled. And two bowls: one piled high with fat green olives, the other teeming with something roasted and nutty. After a few sips I want both and go in for the olives. My guest, a chic woman with less fat on her body than a gazelle, touches neither. Not wanting to look greedy, I leave them alone too. After 30 minutes an aproned waiter switches the bowls for fresh ones – despite them only being one olive down on their original haul. Breakfast at one of those London restaurants where trade is brisk even at 8am. This time I have been invited along to talk about a new publishing venture. I order – eggs, scrambled, and, yes, toast, please too. And coffee? Of course. My host slides the menu to one side and says, “just an orange juice for me”. Dinner with friends. It’s pudding time. The first person demures, “I’d better not”. And then it’s a cascading dominoes effect as person after person says, “no thanks”. Do I want to be the only person insisting

07 — ISSUE 56

No wonder some – serious – business books suggest that you eat before you go to a key lunch so that you don’t look greedy and certainly never risk getting spinach tooth.
Alcohol is particularly tricky. When your lunchtime date asks if you’d like a glass you have to be cautious it’s not a trick question. You say, yes, and they reveal a long history of alcoholism (it’s happened to me more than once). I tend to press on but the message is clear – you have a job where you don’t have to be as sharp as your dining companion – or is that “opponent”? Even the bread basket promises both tasty temptations and carbohydrate remorse. I recently tore off a piece of something perfectly plump and just out of an oven and one of the people at my table gasped. And a real gasp. “Do you eat bread?” he wondered. Then half-joking: “obviously no beach holiday for you then.” Not all the people I know are lean and mean. There’s something delicious about going to dinner with someone who likes food and wants to try everything. This restaurant restraint would never know are lean and mean. — MW

Chef profile Neil Nel After 18 months at Prueleith culinary school, He has spent the past year practicing his culinary skills at the Silver Orange. Recommended duck and fig samoosas Founded: Leon Nel Owner Since: 2003 Staff: 6 waiters and 6 chefs Tipe of dishes: Everything is prepared fresh using local and organic produce. Each dish is unique in flavour and as it is a Bistro they serve a la carte. Favourites: There is definitely no doubt that you would have to return to try the other dishes, but the menu does change every fouth night, so new dishes can be introduced to delight the taste buds


D REPORT

Global

DESIGN SHOULD SPEAK FOR ITSELF — Global

01 Decorex Gallaghar convention centre, Midrand Sophisticated branding is of course brilliant. But I’m a little worried it’s getting out of control as far as young designers are concerned. Does a table really need a book and a short film to be explain why it’s good design? The notion of good design is that it should speak for itself. It’s not just that there’s a lot of material to wade through that’s the problem, it’s that young designers feel it’s necessary – and enough – to sell their design. After watching a mildly amusing animation about some dancing cutlery I asked one young graduate why his cutlery was an improvement on what exists already? That might sound harsh but he couldn’t answer. And if he on earth would he persuade.

Preface Sophisticated branding is of course brilliant. But I’m a little worried it’s getting out of control as far as young—

WRITER

Hugo Macdonald

What on earth is the point of the animation and printed matter, the logo, the packaging, if the designer himself can’t speak simply about why his design is valid? Clever, creative branding

should be supporting material, not a substitute for human communication, not something for designers to hide behind. I mentioned this to a friend of mine somewhat

Today’s young designers are impressively versed in the art of branding across many different forms of media. Whilst in Milan recent for the annual Salone Internazion del Mobile furniture fair, the stands dedicated to graduates and students were populated as much by new products as they were by videos, animations, cartoons, illustrations, graphics and sophisticated branding to promote them. Designing a chair is only half the story for a student these days – designing the mess and story that comes with it is seem as important a part of the process. I’ve returned with a small forest of printed material, a library of CDs and USB sticks. And going through it in an attempt to file it all I’m struck by how obscuring it is of the designs it’s all intended to promote. I have a 32-page manga comic devised around single. — HM ISSUE 56 — 08


Sophisticated branding is of course brilliant. But I’m a little worried it’s getting out of control as far as young designers are concerned. Does a table really need a book and a short film to explain why it’s good design? The notion of good design is that it should speak for itself. It’s not just that there’s a lot of material to wade through that’s the problem, it’s that young designers feel it’s necessary – and enough – to sell their design. After watching a mildly amusing animation about some dancing cutlery I asked one young graduate why his cutlery was an improvement on what exists already? That might sound harsh but he couldn’t answer. And if he couldn’t answer to me, how on earth would he persuade a flatware manufacturer to invest its precious budget in putting his cutlery prototype into production. What on earth is the point of the animation and printed matter, the logo, the packaging, if

09 — ISSUE 56

“Where’s your animation and coffee table book which explains the idea behind what you do?” I asked. He agreed collateral material and branding has got out of control. Instead he credits his time spent at the San Francisco Academy of Art University where instead of learning graphic design they were given acting and performance classes. At the time he said he hated it and thought it was a complete waste of time. It’s taken 20 years for him to understand what a blessing it was – granting him the gift of the gab – the power of the pitch. What he might be lacking in the finer nuances of Apple Final Cut Pro, he makes up for in being able to talk straight about what he’s creating and why it’s important. And that translates to success. Young designers take note – if your chair doesn’t speak for itself and if you It’s not just that there’s a lot of material to wade through that’s the problem, it’s that young designers feel it’s necessary – and enough – to sell their design. After watching a mildly amusing animation about some dancing cutlery I asked one young graduate why his cutlery was an improvement on what exists already? That might sound harsh.— MW


Tide of progress Johannesburg

It’s not just that there’s a lot of material to wade through that’s the problem, it’s that young designers feel it’s necessary –

Fine Design

Amsterdam [ORGANIC FABRIC] Preface Sophisticated branding is of course brilliant. But I’m a little worried it’s getting out of control as far as young. It’s not just that there’s a lot of material to wade through that’s the problem, it’s that young course brilliant. But I’m a little designers feel it’s necessary — “Where’s your animation and coffee table book which explains the idea behind what you do?” I asked. He agreed collateral material and branding has got out of control. Instead he credits his time spent at the San Francisco Academy of Art University where instead of learning graphic design they were given acting and performance classes. At the time he said he hated it and thought it was a complete waste of time. It’s taken 20 years for him to understand what a blessing it was – granting him the gift of the gab – the power of the pitch. What he might be lacking in the finer nuances of Apple Final Cut Pro, he makes

Let them sit down

PHOTOGRAPHER : MARCELLE VAN DER WALT ILLUSTRATOR : MARCELLE VAN DER WALT

Madrid [COLOURFUL]

It’s not just that there’s a lot of material to wade through that’s the problem, it’s that young designers feel it’s necessary – and enough – to sell their design. After watching a mildly amusing animation about some dancing cutlery I asked one young graduate why his cutlery was an improvement on what exists already? That might sound harsh but he couldn’t answer. And if he couldn’t answer to me, how on earth would he persuade a flatware manufacturer to invest its precious budget in putting his cutlery prototype into production. What on earth is the point of the animation and printed matter, the logo, the packaging, if. At the time he said he hated it and thought it was a complete waste of time. It’s taken 20 years for him to understand what a blessing it

Young designers take note – if your chair doesn’t speak for itself and if you University where instead of learning graphic design they were given acting and performance classes. At the time he said he hated it and thought it was a complete waste of time. It’s not just that there’s a lot of material to wade through that’s the problem, it’s that young designers feel it’s necessary – and enough – to sell their design. After watching a mildly amusing animation about some dancing cutlery I asked one young graduate why his cutlery was an improvement on what exists already? That might sound harsh.— MW

Q & A Marcelle vd Walt Designer, Artist, Photographer New York

How often don you go to the market? I take a turn to the City Mission in Sundbyberg once a week, always find fun things and it’s very friendly staff in the shop. Do you enjoy it? City Mission is without a doubt my favorite cafe in Sundbyberg! What would you recomend? The staff is absolutely phenomenal, friendly and accommodating - and fun! Plus they have an eye on everything in its range. Do you enjoy it? City Mission is without a doubt my favorite cafe in Sundbyberg!

ISSUE 56 — 10


MARKETS THAT MATTER — Global 01 Antiques fair Pretoria Preface Sophisticated branding is of course brilliant. But I’m a little worried it’s getting out — I was born in the 1960s. My dad was 50. So the London he told me about living in as a young man may seem dusty and distant to you. In his twenties, for example, he commuted to work in London’s Holborn by train and tram; the latter a type of transport – like my dad – long since vanished from London’s streets. Today by some nice coincidence I live in Holborn, an area of the city that sits between the busy shoppacked neighbourhood of Covent Garden and the Inns of Court, home for centuries to the country’s leading legal folk. One of the odder landmarks in Holborn is the cobblestoned exit from a subterrane

11 — ISSUE 56


02 Arts on Main Johannesburg Preface Sophisticated branding is of course brilliant. But I’m a little worried it’s getting out of control as far as young— Children can’t concentrate these days. Children? It’s the adults who are the problem. If someone sits and listens to you tell a story for more than 10 minutes without checking the email on their BlackBerry or quickly replying to that text from Aunt Maud on their iPhone, it can only mean one thing – they were recently robbed of their telephonic hardware. You could be detailing the most revealing or tragic story or even be telling your best friend that you’ve got a cancerous lump and the best you can hope for is a “Sorry, I missed that, you say you have a bad

I find it hard to leave my phone in my pocket when I’m at lunch. I recently left my phone in a hotel room when I went to dinner and I felt uncomfortable; something was wrong. I switch it on as soon as my plane has landed – none of this waiting to arrive at the gate nonsense. Sherry Turkle, a psychologist and professor at MIT, has written a book, Alone Together, that looks at how technology is changing the ways we relate to each other and create our inner lives. Much of the book investigates the impact on children but she also details how

In a recent piece in the New York Times, Turkle explained how technology allowed us to disengage at will, helped us to avoid conversation when things got too uncomfortable or just dull. Her piece ended, “I spend the summers at a cottage on Cape Cod, and for decades I walked the same dunes that Thoreau once walked. Not too long ago, people walked with their heads up, looking at the water, the sky, the sand and at one another, talking. Now they often walk with their heads down, typing. Even when they are with friends, partners. — MW

ISSUE 56 — 12


03 Street and Art Market: Yesterdays Stockholm Sweden Street & Art Market, with creative exhibitor at Fridhemsgatan. Exhibitors are jewelry designers, artists, clothing brands, vintage stores, vinyl music ect .. Among other things, the Petite France to sell bread, Young Arts Art show, Stuck Tattoo have a place with tattoos. Kings’Island consists of Grandpa, Awesome Rags, Yesterdays, My Shop, Pom Pom Parlour, Temp, Scan Cafe, Press Stop, Nooka, Hangers & Le Shop, all we will be exhibiting. The Aristocrats will be playing live music. Some DJ’s will play in some stores. The market is on the street from Fleming Street to Industrial Way early. Street & Art Market, with creative exhibitor at Fridhemsgatan. Exhibitors are jewelry designers, artists, clothing Industrial 13 — ISSUE 56

Street & Art Market, with creative exhibitor at Fridhemsgatan. Exhibitors are jewelry designers, artists, clothing brands, vintage stores, vinyl music ect .. Among other things, the Petite France to sell bread, Young Arts Art show, Stuck Tattoo have a place with tattoos. Kings’Island consists of Grandpa, Awesome Rags, Yesterdays, My Shop, Pom Pom Parlour, Temp, Scan Cafe, Press Stop, Nooka, Hangers & Le Shop, all we will be exhibiting. The Aristocrats will be playing live music. Some DJ’s will play in some stores. The market is on the street from Fleming Street to Industrial Way early. Street & Art Market, with creative exhibitor at Fridhemsgatan. Exhibitors are jewelry designers, artists, clothing brands, vintage stores, vinyl music ect Among other things, the Petite France to sell bread, Young Arts Art show, Stuck Tattoo have a place with tattoos. Kings’Island consists of Grandpa, Awesome Rags.— MW

Q & A Linda Olsson Student, Traveler, Aupair Norrköping, Sweden

How often do you go to the market? I take a turn to the City Mission in Sundbyberg once a week, always find fun things and it’s very friendly staff in the shop. Do you enjoy it? City Mission is without a doubt my favorite cafe in Sundbyberg! What would you recomend? The staff is absolutely phenomenal, friendly and accommodating - and fun! Plus they have an eye on everything in its range.


Musical genius Stockholm

You could be detailing the most revealing or tragic story or even be telling your best friend that you’ve got a cancerous lump and the best you can hope−

04

PHOTOGRAPHER : MARCELLE VAN DER WALT ILLUSTRATOR : MARCELLE VAN DER WALT

Stortorget, Stockholms Stadsmission Stockholm Sweden The stores sell everything from vintage clothing and retro furniture to simple drinking glass and paperbacks. The stores all have different approaches, such as Hantverkargatan - brand range, Hagagatan - Remake and record shop, Skånegatan - trend, Old Town - art and antiques and Hornsgatan and Liljeholmstorget - wide range of gadgets, clothes and furniture. Info Shop in Culture sells remake- products and other products that contribute to a sustainable society. You can also get information about Stockholm City. The shops on Hagagatan in Sundbyberg and Väsby has a cozy kafédel the store. We recycle seven tonnes of goods a week.Through second-hand stores, we are contributing to a sustainable society where things are reused and utilized while creating opportunities for people to grow through job training, internships and job opportunities for students in the social activities and pupils in the Stockholm City Mission School . Profits from sales go to Stockholm City Mission’s social work. Thus transformed things to cash used for increased efforts to our students and

Main square - old town Second hand shop in the Old Town neighborhood near Main Square, the nearest metro station Old Town. The shop offers a wide range of older and finer quality furniture, china and curios. The shop also sells some branded accessories such as bags, scarves and sunglasses. It also has a unique selection of clothing, accessories, pillows, soft furnishings and furniture brand remake - Stockholm City

Sturegatan - Sundbyberg The store is welcoming with nice light and high ceilings. The entire upper floor consists of clothes, shoes and handbags for women, men. Here you will also find books, ranging from children’s books to exciting detective story. On the ground floor you will find a large area with crockery, gadgets and children’s clothing. For our stroller customers we have arranged a stroller parking to facilitate shopping. The range is in fact both kids clothes, games, toys and children’s books. Find it here.

Our café offers a lunch menu, salads, sandwiches, pies and cakes. All pastries and sandwiches from Stockholm City Mission’s popular cafe and bakery in Grillska house in Old Town. Our café has 30 seats and a small outdoor seating during the summer. Sturegatan - Sundbyberg The store is welcoming with nice light and high ceilings. The entire upper floor consists of clothes, shoes and handbags for women, men. Here you will also find books, ranging from children’s books to exciting detective story. On the ground floor you will find a large area with crockery, gadgets and children’s clothing. The supply of second-hand shop follows the season and the store is filled regularly with new products.— MW

ISSUE 56 — 14


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