Page 1

selected works

08-13

PORTFOLIO Marcela Gracia


contents

c.v. i

education, skills, experience awards, references, other academic projects_selected

ii

Casa Indiges_Senior Thesis

_conceptual

iii

MOCA Tucson Modular Porosity_ceramics factory

_conceptual

vii

_conceptual

xi

Birdwatching tower

_conceptual

xiii

Resting pavilion

_conceptual

xxi

Metabolic City

_conceptual

xix

College of Medicine intervention I

_conceptual

xxv

freedom by design

_built

xxix

College of Medicine intervention II

_built

xxxiii

professional work_selected Smart Lofts

xliii

Ft. Huachuca

xlv

xlvii

xliii

nature drawings other drawings

xlv

Raffles House other_selected traveling sketches

xlvii


cv

EDUCATION Pima Community College Tucson, Arizona Liberal Arts, AGEC-A Certification, Honors 07-09 University of Arizona, College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture Tucson, Arizona Bachelor of Architecture, Cum Laude 08-13

Marcela Gracia 520_312.0159 m.gracia.acosta@gmail.com marcelag@email.arizona.edu

SKILLS

EXPERIENCE

First Language Adobe Creative Suite AutoCAD Rhinoceros Google Sketchup Hand Rendering Vray Rendering 3ds Max Rendering

Vint and Associates Architects, Inc. 312 E 6th St Tucson, AZ 85705 _July 2011-December 2011 _May 2013- now Schematic design Construction Drawings Light Office management

Spanish, native Second Language Grasshopper for Rhino Revit 3ds Max, animation Third Language Italian, 80%reading 50%spoken

AIAS Freedom by Design _Volunteer: 11-12 _Director: 12-13 Schematic design Shop drawings Team management Public relations faculty advisor Siri Trumble CAPLA lecturer t 520_626_9770 strumble@email.arizona.edu


AWARDS+ACTIVITIES+INTERESTS AIAS_American Institute of Architecture Students -Active member since 08 -AIAS Freedom by Design team member 11-12 -AIAS Freedom by Design Director 12-13 -AIAS Mentorship Program Fall 11-Spring 13 -Forum 2011, Phoenix, Az. -Grassroots 2012, Washington D.C.

R

E

F

E

R

E

N

C

E

S

Brian Andrews

Adjunct Lecturer, UA CAPLA ATELIER ANDREWS t 520_621_6751 atelierandrews@gmail.com

Robert Miller

Director, UA School of Architecture t 520_621_6752 millerr@email.arizona.edu

Ruben Caldwell Studio Tack t 518_588_2881 rubencaldwell@gmail.com [best by email

Robert Vint

Vint and Associates Architects, Inc. contact info as requested

Susannah Dickinson Assistant Professor, UA CAPLA t 520_621_6753 srd@email.arizona.edu

Honors -Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society -Golden Key International Honor Society -“Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges” 2009 Awards -Be Discovered: Fashion Design Competition_Finalist -CAPLA Design Excellence nominee 11-12 -2012 AIA Arizona Student Portfolio Competition_First Prize -SmithGroup Scholarship recipient 12-13 -CAPLA Senior Award nominee 12-13 Senior Awards -Best Capstone Award_Senior Thesis -Ronald R. Gourley Capstone Award for Design Excellence_Senior Thesis -Alpha Rho Chi Medal for leadership, service and professional merit -Faculty Commendation. 3.679 GPA Interests_Architecture Cultural relevancy+Architecture Fabrication+Materials+Construction Sustainable Architecture Conservation+Preservation Extreme environments Other Piano player_17 years Vegetable gardening Photorealistic pencil drawing + sketching High skilled sewing/crochet/embroidery


conceptual

Casa Indiges Coyoacan, Mexico City, Mexico.

Senior Thesis_DesignStudio8 Professor Brian Andrews

TRAFFIC/

In order for Architecture to be meaningful and significant, it should be based on the careful analysis of the cultural geography of place, and the layering of time. In the understanding that in order for the Modern to exist, the non-Modern must to. The site is located in one of sixteen boroughs, called Coyoacan, being the geographical, and consider the cultural center of the city. The program responds to the economic, ritualistic and cultural needs of place, while attending to the climatic and environmental characteristics of the region through architectural typologies. It is comprised of an orphanage, a housing complex and a market. It also takes into consideration the absolute need for orphan children to grow up in a place that showcases the realities of everyday life while conveying the culture around it.

EXISTING

INTERNAL ZONING

hyper-public

semi-private

hyper-private

ORGANIZATION

Ronald R. Gourley Award for Design Excellence Best Capstone Award

LOCATION


MASS

VOID

USES BREAKDOWN

T

KE

R

A

M

HO

USI

OR

PHA

NG

NA GE


FIRST FLOOR PLAN

SECOND/THIRD FLOOR PLAN


EAST ELEVATION

The local cultural practice of blanding public and private uses is explored in the shared courtyard between the housing complex and the market. The angular perspectives achieved by the positioning of volumes is counteracted by the introduction of catalonian arches. A semiotic element that pertains to the immediate identification of uses, i.e. public domain.

MARKET COURTYARD


ORPHANAGE COURTYARD

GALLERY

MARKET


LONGITUDINAL SECTION

DORMITORIES

NORTH COLONNADE

HOUSING COURTYARDS

NORTH ELEVATION


conceptual

MOCA Tucson 6 W. Congress St. Tucson, AZ

ARC401_DesignStudio5 Professor Wilson Peterson The development of downtown Tucson, and any other downtown, has to have an incremental, block-to-block, site-by-site nature to succeed. The unique settings in which the city developed and continues to grow, must not be ignored, but consciously acknowledged. This proposal aims to reconciliate the urban fabric of Downtown Tucson with the natural setting in which it exists, understanding that a building does not stand alone in the city. Two main volumes create a focal point that brings awareness to the most prominent natural features of the Sonoran Desert: the sky and th erth. The massing building welcomes pedestrian activity into the museum, while keeping a more conservative interior to avoid a strong clash with the art inside.

AIA Design Excellence nominee


4’

3’3

FLOOR STRUCTURE_TRIANGULAR SLAB


7 6 5

4

3

1 a2.0

35’ 5” 2’ 10”

6’

3’ 1”

6’

2’ 4”

a

6’ 8”

2’6”

6’

1

5’

2 b 4’

253’ 10”

6’

189’ 7”

25’

5’ 6”

5R

8’ 3”

1’

do wn 1

28’ 10” 8’ 9”

5’

2’9

5’

5’ 6”

@

6”

11’

3’

5’

3

c

4’6

6’

2 ’

5’9”

’ 11

2

4

5’6 ”

b

8”

66’

28

7’ 6”

a

b

19

5’6

74’ 6”

24’11”

3 h 47

’4”

49’ 6”

’3”

31

26

13’ 9”

2’ 6”

5’

3

4’

3’

11

4”

13

44’

i

2 a2.0

c d

6’

5’

a

19’ 01”

18

6’

1

14’ 4”

earth-sky b north-south street

18’

75’ 3”

31’11”

90

5’

’5”

54’5”

14’ 7”

14’ 2”

2 54’5”

123’5”

18

6’

3’

6’

3’

15’6”

14’8”

7’

11’3” 22’1”

21’ 3’

3’3”

1

8’

28’4

1’6”

12’7

up

1’6”

8’

0”

3’3”

22’ 21’2”

6”

@

7R

9’

13’9

c ” 10’8 ” 10’8 14’1

46’5”

g

e

4’

27’

f 111’

2’

1

37’

height correlation to adjacent buildings.

c d

’2”

4’

1 a2.0

d

10

e

1

d

” 17’8

13’8

2 a2.0

28’ 9”

” 16’2

7

3’6” 4’

1’6”

CDS_FIRST FLOOR

8’9” 4’

e

6

9’

6’8”

91’10” 85’2”

2

1

1 a2.0

5

4

3

7’

1’

10’10”

1’

22’6”

3’

4’

7’

1’3”

2’

8’3”

4’

4’2”

6’8”

3’

6’

b

14’6

25’

130’6”

1’

3’6”

1’

26’3” 3’8”

4’

1’11”

7’

9’8”

c

27’6

h 5’9”

11 ’

19

indentation in focal point

1’

24’11”

5’6

’2”

1

94’8

2 5’6 ”

b

4

32’3”

74’6”

46’4

f 21 26

98

’11

3’

40

11

a

49’6”

’6”

’2”

1’7

18

1

’10

7’4 ”

49’10”

59

11’

123’5”

2 a2.0 3’

i

12’

10’4”

10’7”

17’8”

a

’10

3’

3’

3’

1

2 3’

3’

3’ 23’

” 49’2

1’

8’

1

1’ 1’ 3’8”

4’8

8’4”

14’

98’6”

13’8

10’4

c

” 16’6

d

25’2” 8’4”

4’4”

2 a2.0

10’3”

3’

10’10”

7’

4’

1’4”

4’

8’3”

2’

4’2”

6’

2’10”

22’6”

131’6”

i 0” 10’1

1 a2.0

2’

3’

10’8

8’

3’

12’6

17’1

g

recessed courtyard and pedestrian ramp

2’

20’

110’

e

11’8

1

j ”

13’4

15’2 3’8”

1’6” 8’9”

4’ 9’3”

4’

0”

25’1

39’2

CDS_SECOND FLOOR PLAN xv


SYSTEMS supply

return

triangular slab allows forsupply longer spans and space for electrical and lighting purposes.

return

underground mechanical rooms feed two vertical shafts the consequently provide the mechanical needs for Each floor; building component activation and mechanical ventilation.

thick insulated concrete walls work together with two solar chimneys to create desirable conditions. the solar chimneys create a vacuum effect, sucking the cooled air from the underground courtyard and shaded slanted walls into each floor.

ENTRANCE RAMP


1500 S. Cherrybell St. Tucson, AZ

ARC302_DesignStudio4 Professor Steven Ehlbeck The objective of the project was to achieve an understanding of material properties and development of material craftsmanship applied to design, while conveying human experience. With the notion of tectonic connections, paired with a nontraditional approach with the use of heavy concrete elements, the building creates a sense of both lightness and sturdiness for the purposes of human habitation and industrial activities.

structural equilibrium_modularity

CERAMICS FACTORY

conceptual configuration_2d abstraction

Modular Porosity

microscale+porosity ceramics_digital manipulation

conceptual

The concept of porosity taken from the ceramic’s properties is applied to construction to create permeability at a bigger scale; modular elements, program, public-private relatioships, and the blending of inside and outside.

1500 S Cherrybell


4” precast panel

double pane glass

precast ‘x’

4” precast panel

LOADING DOCK_NORTH ELEVATION


2 3

1

4

13

10

5 6 11 9

7

8

12

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

INTERIOR VIEW

SITE PLAN

The interior open plan and the light quality created by the porous construction, create ideal conditions for the team-work based culture of factories, and provides a healthy physical, and emotional environment.


conceptual

Birdwatching tower

team: Marco Juliani, Rene Corella, Alez Zee

ARC322_Structures2 Professor Christopher Trumble The wetlands in Southern Arizona created by reclaimed water create an opportunity for nature lovers to interact with the attracted fauna. The project presented a structural and functional problem resolved by the careful consideration for steel elements and cantilevered projections. Members in tension and compression acheieve the required structural equilibrium in the vertical and horizontal forces. The interplay of stairs, landings and roof, create a dynamic combination of shade and shadow to activate different zones at different times.

(.5”) Thick Steel Weld Plate Bolted

(.5”) Thick Steel Weld Plate Bolted

(8”x8”) Steel Tube Section (1”) Thick

Platform Cable Harness Weld Joint

Welded Plate (2”) Thick Steel Seat for Platform 1” Bolts

(8”x8”) Steel Tube Section (1”) Thick

(8”x8”) Steel Tube Section (1”) Thick

Platform Welded Plate (2”) Thick Steel Seat for Platform

Cable Harness Weld Joint

perforated metal panels (1/2”)

steel boot

6”

fastners

tube steel beams (1/2”)

1” Bolts

2” welded plates (8”x8”) Steel Tube Section (1”) Thick

steel cable (1”)


conceptual A B

Resting Pavilion

5’

9’ ” 1/4 4’

team: Marco Juliani, Rene Corella, Alex Zee 6” 6’

20’

5’

13’ 10’

8’

1 8’

2

4”

1/

8’

3

2’

6’

16

F

4”

1/

6’

2’

4’ 3/8”

13 ’

21’

10’

6

’6

9’

2”

8’

11’

11’ 11 /16”

3’

1/

All connection , and structural elements are specific to the internal and external forces applied to the structure, avoiding extra material and labor in the construction of it.

E

D

10’

A light frame pavilion with inhabitable spaces, defined by a structural assambladge in the form of a tripod column+cantilevered roof system. The composition derives introverted and extroverted areas where social gathering, landscape, structure, and water management features are fully integrated.

C

9’ 1/2”

Professor Christopher Trumble

10’

ARC322_Structures2

10’

11’

6’

5’

5’ 2’

4”

3/

5’

9’

1’

6’

1’

4’6”

11’

8’

6 2’

3’

5’

8’

17’

8’ 22’


modular nodes that alternate in slope and orientation to direct water.

CONNECTION DETAILS shift modules in response to sun path

orient nodes according to vistas, vegetation and water direction; create introverted/extroverted spaces according to wind flow and ‘enclosed’ zones.

angled perception and entrance creates the dynamism within the procession, where the spatial configuration is ordered by the structural hierarchy of the


conceptual

Metabolic City

Downtown, Tucson, AZ

ARC402_DesignStudio6 Professor Susannah Dickinson A CITY IS AN ORGANISM Just as vessels in a vascular network distribute energy and materials to c ells in an organism, road networks, paths, open space, distribute energy, materials and social relationships in an urban area. The notion that life-support functions provided by a network of natural ecosystems, with an emphasis on inter-conenctivity, can be applied to both the human body, and the planning of cities. The similarities in processes and energy exchanges, can lead to models for sustainability. The intrinsic efficiency of the human body is an ideal model for a city that strives for natural processes in order to create and develop an eco-living. The actual model for most of the things in Architecture, is a linear, inert model, with a linear and equally inert transfer of energy from the unsustainable built environment, to the natural world. To create truly sustainable cities, they have to be, conceptually and programmatically, connected to the natural processes, not isolated from them. The difference is that cities do not act in the same way that most organisms, due to the fact that the collective behavior of masses and the individuals, must be taken in to consideration in the making of rich environments. The notion of a metabolic system is then applied to the regulatory processes of living, while at the same time, allowing for community-driven living and an all-inclusive society.

Arizona Challenge 2.0 Competition

SITE PLAN The site selected takes into consideration the desirable aspects for remediation: exploited urban core, vacant lots, closeness to the freeway. These factors contributed to the site being in downtown tucson, victim of an unsuccessful urban renewal project in the 60’s, that distressed the historical neighborhoods in the area. The project aims to reconciliate both sides of the freeway, create sustainable ways of living, respecting the historicity of the site, and creating new ways of habitation and relationship to urban environments.

SITE SELECTION


EXISTING_skin incorporation of existing neighborhoods to create cultural cohesiveness. historic neighborhoods are embeded in the site.

NEW_muscular variety of program and construction forms. design allows for infill development and future vertical and horizontal expansions.

GREEN_respiratory restoration of native wildlife by connecting to the natural corridors. the green intervention reconnects both sides of the freeway.

BIOFUEL_immune algae producing wall flanks the freeway, generating biofuel and distribution locally, and regionally. the wall also extends over the freeway to mitigate noise and pollution

I-10VEINS_skeletal structural veins house residential, commercial and learning facilities connecting both sides of the freeway

AGRICUL_digestive local farming in designated zones, and urban farming located in the ‘veins’ provide for the new neighborhood, and allows for resale value.

wetlands

waste water treatment plant

SITE SIZE: 49.25 acre POPULATION existing: 300 new: 3000 JOBS: 500-2000 new jobs HOUSING TYPES studios 300 sqft: 110 units courtyard apts. 600-800 sq ft: 60 units apts./condos 1200 sqft: 860 unitS cluster housing 950-1500 sqft: 60 units

EDUCATION existing: 41,800 sqft new: 55,450 sqft daycare, adul education, gallery, musem, comm. center COMMERCIAL 1st floor comm.: 50,550 sqft independent shops: 7200 sqft farmer’s market, bike shop, comm. center. BIOFUEL ALGAE WALL: 33,000 sqft produces: 35,000 g/year FARMING vertical: 57,600 sqft ground: 125,000 sqft

EXISTING green open space 15% paved 39% built 46% PROPOSED green open space 51% paved 20% built 29%

STATISTICS


VEINS_concept Self-sufficient structures span west-east to reconciliate both sides of the freeway. The lightweight structural composition, allows for additive and modular components. the romboid openings are cladded with either opaque, translucent or photovoltaic panels, depending on the user’s needs. Their linear strategy provides an outlet for pedestrians and cyclist to walk along them, while at the same time getting shade on the north side. Their open plan allows the user to create their ideal living situation while being in touch with the rest of the community and in sink with the natural processes.

VEINS_food The south side of the veins is equipped with rotating panels for vertical farming. they allow the user to harvest them from the inside of their unit and resale them on the local shops at the end of the veins. Their rotational capacity allows for interior, exterior, sun, or shade gardening. The soil walls act as insulation during the extreme temperatures in the summer.


CLUSTER HOUSING

SINGLE FAMILY_new+old Houses along the existing historical neighborhoods take their planning and aesthetic principles from the sonoran row-houses. They provide a transitional typology into the other types of housing, such as the ‘veins’.

WASH VIEW+VEINS xxiv


conceptual

CoM Intervention I SHADING STRUCTURE

UofA College of Medicine

ARC451_DesignStudio7 Professor Ruben Caldwell SIMPLE COMPLEXITY The project presented an opportunity for a collaboration between the College of Medicine, and the School of Architecture at the University of Arizona. The CoM was looking for a new face to their building, while at the same time, reconfiguring their plaza to give it more prominence. The work presented here is part of the initial stages, where individually done proposal The isolation of the plaza turns were presented to the CoM for selection. the entrance of the CoM into the Simple Complexity became a finalist. necessary focal point, emphasizGATHERING CAPACITY

The problem was approached from the view of rapid fabrication and digital derivation to accelerate the process in order to comply with time requirements.

FINAL AERIAL VIEW SEATING LOCATION

ing the importance of threshold. Based on previous surveys, the most important qualities looked for in the future intervention were: shade and sitting.

60

30

60

20

30

30 people 30

20

EXISTING CONDITIONS 1 person

30

xxv


DIGITAL SCAFFOLDING A digital model was created based on connection, shading and rotational studies, where a logical sequence was followed to create a ‘complex’ result that satisfies the habitable requirements of shade, sitting and social interaction. The resultant linear model, resulted in the interpretation of lines constructing planes, creating the volumetric quality of the structure.

plan_digital+physical

PHYSICAL+DIGITAL_form

xxvi


built

Freedom by Design South Tucson+Marana, AZ

UofA AIAS Chapter To unsure that AIAS chapters flourish locally, national offers a community service program called Freedom by Design, which utilizes the skills of architecture students ti impact the lives of people in their community through modest, universal design solutions. In Arizona, we have completed one project, and the other it’s on its way.

Involvement: 2011-2012: Design+construction volunteer 2012-2013: FBD Director


client] Michael Williams a] 802 w. calle de casa lindas involvement] design+construction volunteer.

2011-2012_SOUTH TUCSON

A2

Michael was in a wheelchair, and the difference in floor elevations made it hard for him and his wife to go out to their backyard.

12”

12”

steel grate handrail post: 1-1/2” x 1-1/2” sq. stock handrail pipe

steel frame: 1-1/2” x 1-1/2” sq. stock steel frame: 1” x 1” sq. stock

A3

steel frame: 1” x 1” sq. stock

A2 concrete footing 13’-10-1/2” 11-1/4” O.C.

1’ - 3-1/4”

12’-10” steel frame: 1-1/2” x 1-1/2” sq. stock

1’ - 5-11/16”

SITE SURVEYING

1’ - 5-11/16”

1’ - 5-11/16”

24” O.C.

composite decking 1”

6’ - 5-1/4”

24” O.C.

1’ - 11”

1”

16-1/2” O.C.

10”

existing wood post

existing wood deck

structural plan welded connection

overall plan

composite decking

steel grate steel plate welded connection

steel frame: 1-1/2” x 1-1/2” sq. stock 2-1/2”

FINAL PRODUCT

1-1/2” x 1-1/2” sq. stock

detail : end condition

11 - 3/16” O.C.

16 - 3/4” O.C.

16 - 3/4” O.C.

11 - 3/16” O.C.

steel grate

welded connection steel plate

handrail post: 1-1/2” x 1-1/2” sq. stock welded connection angle iron

2 - 1/4” 2 - 1/2”

composite decking

3 - 1/8”

steel frame: 1-1/2” x 1-1/2” sq. stock

2 - 1/2”

1-1/2”

5 - 1/2”

2 - 1/2” 11/16”

1 - 3/16” 1”

steel frame: 1” x 1” sq. stock

3-1/2” 1”

enlarged plan : end condition

handrail: 1-3/4” pipe welded connection

welded connection

handrail post: 1-1/2” x 1-1/2” sq. stock

steel frame: 1-1/2” x 1-1/2” sq. stock

angle iron

welded connection

1/4” x 3” bolt steel frame: 1” x 1” sq. stock

composite decking

post: 1-1/2” x 1-1/2” sq. stock

steel plate

concrete footing

4’ - 5”

4’ - 8”

cross section

SHOP DRAWINGS


client] Robert Cartwright, 33 y.o. a] 18391 w avra valley road involvement] FBD director Our client suffered a stroke recently and requires both a walker and a wheelchair to move around his house and to his car. The stroke left him partially paralyzed, and this is were we come in. The house is elevated 3’ above the ground, which presents a problem for the dimensions of the ramp. His love for gardening introduces the opportunity to implement a small space for gardening in the design.

DESIGN CHARRETTE As part of our on-going community involvement, we hosted a design charrette for people in the school to help in the design solution. Five teams of 4 developed different ideas, and at the end we condensated them into one design, taking the negatives and positives from all of them. After our firsts material donations, the design adapted to those constraints and changed accordingly.

2012-2013_MARANA


B2

C2

B2 16’ 7”

bench

landing

vegetable planters

B3

5”

steel frame: 2” x 1” tube stock

ramp module 2 see sheet C1

ramp module 1 see sheet B1

concrete footing

composite decking 3’-8”

handrail pipe

B2

enlarged plan: module 1

16’ 7”

4’ 2-3/4” o.c.

4’ 0-1/4” o.c.

4’ 0-1/4” o.c.

4’ 2-3/4” o.c.

4’ 1-3/4”

3’ 11-1/4”

3’ 11-1/4”

4’ 1-3/4”

steel frame: 2” x 1” tube stock

1’ 8-1/2” steel frame: 2” x 1” tube stock

1’ 8-1/2”

steel frame: 2” x 1” tube stock steel frame: 2” x 1” tube stock

enlarged structural plan: module 1

existing stair

existing deck

framing plan

3’-8”

handrail: 1-1/4” pipe welded connection existing house

handrail post: 2” x 1” tube stock

1/4” x 3” countersunk bolt steel frame: 2” x 1” tube stock welded connection

composite decking welded connection

post: 2” x 2” sq. stock steel plate

steel plate

welded connection

concrete footing

3’ 5”

3’ 9”

cross section

SHOP DRAWINGS


FINAL PRODUCT


built

CoM Intervention II DONOR WALL

UofA College of Medicine

ARC451_DesignStudio7 Professor Ruben Caldwell As part of a collaboration between the College of Medicine and the School of Architecture at the University of Arizona, a design for a donor wall as a tribute to new and old donors was conceived. Most of the deisgn and build work was done during Fall 2012, and details were finilized on Spring 2013. The fabrication process was all done by our studio, where we all had a hand on every step of the process, while at the same time, having an emphasis on certain aspects. I was in charge of the acrylic panels where the plaques are going to eventually be placed. The wood paneling took about a total of 2 months from design, to fabrication to installation. The project has a very big scope that allowed us to be involved in many aspects of the design-build process. Everything was made at the school’s material fabrication shop and then transported back to the lobby at the College of Medicine. Involvement: Design development, acryclic design+fabrication, wood panel fabrication, construction drawings with Melanie George, and post-occupancy evaluation/pictures.

SITE/WALL CONDITIONS

CoM library

plaza

UMC office

CIRCULATION PATTERN


POPLAR STRIPS

9'-4" 9'-0 1/4"

65" TOUCHSCREEN TV

ALUMINUM TIMELINE

20'-3 1/2" C L

5'-0 1/2"

5'-1 1/4"

32'-0 7/8"

C L

7'-11" 8'-0 1/2"

C L

1 1/2"

EAST WALL

CONSTRUCTION TIMELINE

POPLAR CAP POPLAR STRIPS 1/4" ACRYLC DIFFUSER 1/2" CLEAR ACRYLIC 1/8" ALUMINUM MOUNTING BRACKETS

6'-10 1/8"

5'-0 1/2" C L

9' 4" 9'-0 1/4"

5'-1 1/4" C L

10"

3'-7 3/8" 3'-8 7/8"

1'-4"

1 1/2"

3 3/4" 3 3/4"

3 3/4"

BASEBOARD

NORTH WALL 1 1/2"

4'-4 1/2" 4'-8 1/4"

2 1/4" 13'-0 7/8"

6'-7 1/4" 6'-7 1/4"

2 3/8" 1'-5 1/2" 1 1/2" 1'-9 3/8"


Merlin K. DuVal, M.D. Founding Dean 1964-1971 Acting Dean 1973-1974

Neal A. Vanselow, M.D. Dean 1974-1977

Vincent A. Fulginiti, M.D. Acting Dean 1988

Raymond L. Woosley, M.D., Ph. D. Dean 2001

Kenneth J. Ryan, M.D. Interim Dean 2002-2004

Steve Goldschmid, M.D. Dean 2008-Present

Jack M. Layton, M.D. Acting Dean 1971-1973

Louis J. Kettel, M.D. Acting Dean 1977 Dean 1977-1987

In 1963, after more than two decades of debate about the location of Arizona's medical school, the Arizona Legislature passed a bill by just two votes to appropriate funds to hire a dean and begin planning the College at the University of Arizona in Tucson. Construction of the College of Medicine began in 1966 and completed in 1967, and was designed by Tucson architect, Bernard Friedman.

The following year, Merlin K. DuVal, MD, arrived at the UA as founding dean of the College of Medicine and set out to build a medical school from the ground up. With tireless enthusiasm, determination and steadfast community support, Dr. DuVal laid the foundation for what would emerge as one of the top medical schools in the West.

James E. Dalen, M.D., M.P.H. Dean, College of Medicine 1988-2001

Among his first efforts were designing and choosing a site for the original facility and raising the funds to build it. In what Dr. DuVal called "a people's campaign," a citizens' group known as Founders for Arizona Medical Education (FAME) raised nearly $3 million to build the Basic Sciences Building, where the first classes would be taught.In summer 1965, a federal matching grant of $4.3 million was awarded, and construction soon was under way on the grounds of a one-time polo field.

William S. Dalton, M.D., Ph.D. Dean, College of Medicine 2002

Just two months after the first UA College of Medicine class graduated in 1971, University Hospital (now University Medical Center), the primary teaching hospital for the College, was completed, and the College of Medicine was about to become a cornerstone of the thriving Arizona Health Sciences Center on the UA campus.

Keith A. Joiner, M.D., M.P.H. Vice Provost for Medical Affairs Dean 2004-2008

Louis J. Kettel, MD, served as dean of the College of Medicine from 1977-1987, succeeding Dr. DuVal (founding dean 1964-1971; acting dean 1973-1974), Jack M. Layton, MD (acting dean 1971-1973) and Neal A. Vanselow, MD (1974-1977). In his 1979 historical perspective on early planning for the College, Dr. Kettel wrote, "Moving rapidly the concept evolved of a health sciences institution which could always react to and move with a changing society in its health care and scientific needs."

The College's commitment to diagnosis, treatment and research into causes of respiratory illness led to the establishment of the Arizona Respiratory Sciences Center (now the Arizona Respiratory Center), designated the first Center of Excellence at the UA College of Medicine in 1971. Recognition of the great need for cancer research in the state spurred the renowned cancer program at the College and plans for the first major building expansion, the freestanding Arizona Cancer Center, which was dedicated in 1986.

The two sides of the wall have the same configuration, but respond differently with the organization of the plaques. The larger, east wall is dedicated to the donors, and the acrylic elements allow for many panel sizes to be put in. The north wall is dedicated to the history of the college and onformation for current and past deans of the College.

ORGANIZATION

steel reflector

The wood panel configuration is based on the service and maintenance needs of the future. Three panels that cover the electrical circuits can be easily removed by sliding them up.

PANEL CONFIGURATION

1/4� white diffuser

1� clear acrylic plexiglass name plate


FINISHED PROJECT finished March 2013


professional

Smart Lofts

Tucson, AZ - 2013 We were approached by two developer clients in the Tucson area, to create a schematic design for their next project. Involvement: -Schematic Design (choosen design) -Presentation boards

3 buildings 2 units per building


professional

Ft. Huachuca

Ft. Huachuca, AZ - 2013 Included in the National Register of Historic Places, Ft. Huachuca is a late 19th Century military base. Vint and Associates is contracted as a consultant for historic renovations. Involvement: -Assesment of historic buildings -Measurement and drawing reconstruction of historic buildings.


professional

Raffles house

Douglas, AZ - 2011 A ranch house in eastern Arizona, where the client was the contractor as a one-man effort. He build the structure by himself and needed of the documentation required to do so. Involvement: -Schematic Design + 3d representation -Construction Drawings


drawings_travel sketches

Mexico City’s Cathedral. Pulpit. Mexico City, Mexico. Summer 2011.


Courtyard, Casa Azul. Frida Kahlo’s house. Coyoacan, Mexico City. Summer 2012


draw-

Nature Series Pencil. 2012


Nature Series Ink and pencil, 2010


drawings

Puebla Cathedral. Puebla City, Mexico. 3d reconstruction from 2d drawings Pencil, 2009, ARC232 History2


Dress design proposal Be Discovered: Fashion Design Competition. Finalist. Ink, pencil and color pencil, 2008.


PORTFOLIO Marcela Gracia

selected works

08-13

Portfolio_Selected Works 08-13  

Sample works from my Undergraduate education and professional experience.

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