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AMS/TU Delft Summer School 2018 Integrated Mobility Challenges in Future Metropolitan Areas

21–28 August 2018 TU Delft, Faculty of Architecture AMS Institute Amsterdam

Program


This summer school is a cooperation between Delft University of Technology Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions (AMS), the Delft Deltas, Infrastructures & Mobility Initiative (DIMI), University of Paris-Est and ARENA Architectural Research Network. Thanks to the City of Amsterdam for its contributions to this summer school.


AMS/TU Delft Summer School 2018 Integrated Mobility Challenges in Future Metropolitan Areas

21–28 August 2018 TU Delft, Faculty of Architecture AMS Institute Amsterdam

Program


Colophon Organizing Committee dr.ir. Manuela Triggianese dr.ir. Roberto Cavallo ir. Joran Kuijper prof.dr. Nacima Baron dr.ir. Maurice Harteveld drs.ing. Hans de Boer

Scientific Committee dr.ir. Manuela Triggianese (TU Delft, AMS) prof.dr. Nacima Baron (University of Paris-Est) dr.ir. Roberto Cavallo (TU Delft, ARENA) dr.ir. Maurice Harteveld (TU Delft, AMS) prof.ir. Kees Kaan (TU Delft, AMS) prof.dr.ir. Marcel Hertogh (TU Delft, DIMI) prof.dr. Urs Hirschberg (TU Graz, ARENA) prof.dr. Bernard Kormoss (ULiège, ARENA) prof.dr.ir. Arjan van Timmeren (TU Delft, AMS)

Project Leader

Authors Manuela Triggianese, Roberto Cavallo, Maurice Harteveld, Joran Kuijper, Project Stations of the Future/Gares du Futur, Summer School 2017 Making the Metropolis, PLAN Amsterdam, City of Amsterdam, Future of Mobility White Paper; Haven-Stad. Editors Manuela Triggianese Joran Kuijper Sponsors

In collaboration with

Manuela Triggianese

Coordination Joran Kuijper

Assistance Salma Ibrahim Judith Blommaart-Tigchelaar thanks to

Leadership and coordination


General Information AMS/TU Delft Summer School 2018: ‘Integrated Mobility Challenges in Future Metropolitan Areas’ The Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions (AMS), the Delft Deltas, Infrastructures & Mobility Initiative (DIMI), the University of Paris-Est, École d’urbanisme and ARENA Architectural Research Network join Delft University of Technology in the organization of the interdisciplinary 2018 Summer School: Integrated Mobility Challenges in Future Metropolitan Areas. This is a follow up of Making the Metropolis edition held in Amsterdam in August 2017 and the Stations of the Future event held in Paris in March 2018.

Theme The Connected, Vital and Circular City in Amsterdam Sloterdijk Station area.

When 21–28 August 2018.

Where Delft University of Technology (NL), AMS Institute Amsterdam (NL) and fieldwork in Amsterdam Sloterdijk Station area.

Group of participants Researchers and young professionals and master students in Architecture, Urban Design and Planning, Environmental Design and Sciences, Landscape Architecture, Transport, Infrastructure and Logistics, and related disciplines.

Website www.ams-institute.org/events/event/ summer-school-2018-integrated-mobilitychallenges-in-future-metropolitan-areas/

More information Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions (AMS): www.ams-institute.org Delft Deltas, Infrastructures & Mobility Initiative (DIMI) www.infrastructures.tudelft.nl ARENA Architectural Research Network http://www.arena-architecture.eu Delft University of Technology Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment www.bk.tudelft.nl/en/about-faculty/thebuilding Université Paris-Est: http://www.univ-paris-est.fr/en March 2018 Stations of the Future event www.ams-institute.org/news/stations-ofthe-future-march-15-16/


Supervisors

Wouter Oostendorp

Valentina Ciccotosto

Fabrizia Berlingieri

Tom Kuipers

Hans de Boer

Maurice Harteveld

Roberto Cavallo

Nacima Baron

Manuela Triggianese

Joran Kuijper


Guest lecturers Bachar Kabalan Movement Strategies, London Nils Le Bot LISST Cieu Lab — AREP DM&I University Toulouse Jean-Jaurès University of Potsdam Albane Grandazzi Researcher in Management Sciences at Paris-Dauphine University and SNCF Voyages Maarten Van Acker Professor, University of Antwerp Nacima Baron Professor, Université Paris-Est Membre du Laboratoire LVMT ENPC Luca Bertolini Professor, University of Amsterdam Jurgen Krabbenborg Senior Urban Planner, City of Amsterdam Oscar Vos Designer, krft studio for archicture and designer Stad van de Toekomst-project Debbie Dekkers Project Lead Mobility, MaaS residents, CTO Smart Mobility, City of Amsterdam

Critics Willem van Heijningen Transport & Public Space, City of Amsterdam Charlotte Rietdijk Project manager Sloterdijk center, City of Amsterdam Jim Nijo Associate professor, Paris La Villette

Marcel Hertogh Scientific Director of TU Delft, DIMI Delft Initiative Mobility Infrastructure Tessa Leferink Project Engineer, Witteveen+Bos Joannette Polo Dutch Embassy, Paris Niels van Oort Assistant Professor Smart Urban Mobility Lab, TU Delft Marc Verheijen Architect, City of Rotterdam Jutta Hinterleitner Architect, BNA Onderzoek Erik van den Eijden Senior policy advisor at Ministry of Infrastructure Carien Aalbers Programmamanager Toekomstbeeld OV at Ministry of Infrastructure Stephan van Dijk Program Manager, AMS Institute Kees Kaan Principal Investigator at AMS Institute Professor at TU Delft Wouter Oostendorp Founder Studio O×L, Rotterdam Valentina Ciccotosto Freelance architect, Italy Fabrizia Berlingieri Architect & professor, Politecnico di Milano Tom Kuipers Program developer, AMS Institute Ans Bouwmeester Business Strategie Movares Paul Chorus Policy Advisor at Provincie Noord-Holland



Index ‘Integrated Mobility Challenges in Future Metropolitan Areas’ Stations of the Future/Gares du Futur Amsterdam in the World and in the Netherlands

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12

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Case study: Amsterdam Sloterdijk

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Project Data and Assignment

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Presentation Format

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Schedule

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Logistics

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ieuwe special

‘Integrated Mobility Challenges in Future Metropolitan Areas’ Exploring Sustainable Urban Integration Approaches keywords station areas, intermodality, new mobility concepts, sustainable approaches, social values

Who and what?

Sloterdijk station area within Haven-Stad; source: Concept Development Strategy 2017, City of Amsterdam

Bestaande special

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By participating to this Summer School, you will explore interdisciplinary approaches towards a sustainable integration of stations here defined as intermodal nodes. You will deal with the following themes: the role and function of the station in future metropolitan areas, growing number of users, sustainability challenges, programming of transport nodes, public and semi-public spaces (and social dynamics), exploration of alternative, marginal and emerging social uses of stations as meeting places and culture, urban integration and integration in the overall mobility system and urban fabric, accessibility to and from the stations/airport as well as between rail-metro stations and other mobility nodes (e.g. bus, bike and car sharing).

re plekken aan het IJ

Cultuurhistorische elementen

ven-Stad liggen op plekken die zich

duidelijk herkenbare cultuurhistorische elementen, maar

n door bijzondere ligging, unieke uitzicht,

ook de verschillende soorten insteekhavens, pieren en

ma dat zich onderscheid van de rest van de

kades blijven herkenbaar. In de toekomst worden niet

daarmee veel mensen aantrekt. Deze spe-

alle kades hetzelfde, er is juist onderscheid tussen kades

How? At the main point of intersection between the railway and the city, the station is the central link in the mobility chain as well as a key element in the organization of the intermodal transport. The development of a station project from both a governance and financial perspective can be used to revitalize city areas, to promote a high level of (station) architecture and public spaces, and to adopt new technologies contributing to safety while enhancing the experience of the station users. The main question will be: which approaches and scenarios can be tested and applied to these intermodal nodes, particularly when dealing with lack of space and growing number of users? You will exchange knowledge of sustainable solutions by applying different strategies on Sloterdijk station area. This test-bed and design location is considered as an urban generator for future developments in Amsterdam. Sloterdijk is part of a vast development area called ‘Haven-Stad’.

What you will learn This summer school is built upon the expertise of five different institutions. Participating in the ‘Integrated Mobility Challenges’ Summer School will advance the adaptability of your own knowledge and skills related to interdisciplinary challenges in the sustainable metropolis. Working on the Sloterdijk Station area is more than working on an infrastructural


node, it’s about developing a sustainable neighborhood with public and social values. As a neighborhood its development deals with many stakeholders. Keywords are: business-case, commercial and social value, accessibility, livability, safety, inclusiveness, mixed-use, greenery and health.

“Railway stations have become much more than just a place to get on and off trains. Instead, they are places to work, do business, meet, shop and relax. Cities began seeing them as a ‘Grand Projects’ to boost their image, to serve as a symbol and eye-catching entrance into the city. The development of a station project can be used to promote a high level of architecture and the revitalization of city areas.” 1 By understanding the fundamental challenges in the Connected, Vital and Circular City (the AMS Research Themes), you will be able to create interdisciplinary answers to these challenges.

How you will work The Summer School ‘Integrated Mobility Challenges’ is organized in a studio-setting. The studios create an interactive setting for you, facilitating disciplinary exchange. Participants are distributed over four sub groups related to major challenges in the

Connected, Vital and Circular City. Within the subgroups, you will focus on either: The Connected City (Mobility, Infrastructure and Logistics or Metropolitan Development); The Vital City (Social Interaction and Urban Spaces); The Circular City (Local and Regional Networks, Data and Knowledge Sharing, Business-cases, Resource Security and Buildings as Energy Sources). Each group aims to have twelve members and will be composed interdisciplinary and internationally. As part of one of these groups, you are supervised by at least one expert as well as one appointed professor of a participating institution. Together with the other participants, you will develop design proposals supported by fieldwork, lectures in a seminar setting together with plenary mid-term and final presentations.

Manifistation Teleport ’86, the new train station Sloterdijk; image: Frans Brusselmans/Collectie Amsterdams Stadsblad

The railway station as a centerpiece of urban design, source: Manuela Triggianese, 9 September 2015, interview in RailTech. 1

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Stations of the Future/ Gares du Futur

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AMS Institute organized a successful workshop on Stations of the Future, together with the Embassy of the Netherlands in Paris, Atelier Néerlandais, TU Delft (DIMI) and La Fabrique de la Cité. During the event, we addressed several issues within the scope of Le Grand Paris Express. The mega-initiative « Le Grand Paris » has the ambition to create several economic centers around the metropolitan area of Paris that are connected with a 200 km long new network of public transport as well as with airports and high-speed train services. Together with the « Randstad » networks in the Netherlands, this seminar focused on a debate on several case studies in both metropolitan areas to understand the role of station hubs (intermodal nodes) in these areas. During the joint French-Dutch event on Stations of the Future, we focused on topics like « station as inter modal-node », « station as destination » and « station as data center », including a debate on: business cases of rail-metro stations, public space and architecture, densification and programming of station areas, crowd sensing, way-findings and navigation systems, pedestrian flows management and security systems (waiting zones and retail), and the integration of data.

The summer school Integrated Mobility Challenges in Future Metropolitan Area intends to extend the debate among young professionals and international students by looking at an important rail-metro node in Amsterdam, Sloterdijk Station: a crucial hub in the metropolitan area for mobility and exchange, and catalyst for urban developments.

Station as intermodal node The intermodal node does not only connect different modes of transport on several levels (local, regional, (inter)national). Finding an optimal mix of transport modes for each situation and making it as seamless as possible for the user, are the main goals to achieve. However, we need to rethink the intermodal node as an urban place and look for new design solutions. Incorporating flexibility and finding ways to deal with the often complicated governance structure around the station are the big challenges to take into account.

Station as destination Stations become much more than a just place to get on and off trains or other modes of transport. They are places to work, do business, meet, shop and relax. How do networks of transport inform our cities? Public transport becomes an urban generator, the station as connector and the station as destination. Which financial mechanisms work best for a


station as destination? How to define the station as a public space well-integrated?

Station as datacenter Data can mainly be used to understand crowds and pedestrian flows and to forecast future situations in relation to safety, but also to understand customer satisfaction and comfort, and to improve the design of stations. Challenges lie in the integration and cross-fertilization of data from different operators of the different modalities that come together in a station (an ecosystem approach would be preferable) and integrating stations in its surroundings, creating new and optimal user experience.

visuals by Louise Plantin ‣

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Amsterdam in the World and in the Netherlands (source: Making the Metropolis, Summer School 2017)

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Amsterdam is a low-rise metropolis embedded in the Dutch Delta water landscape, with its historical core, with world-famous canals and with a liberal, open and international image. It may be considered as even the center of the world in the seventeenth century, now it is a global city with irresistible attraction for many people, of different backgrounds, and of various nationalities. Schiphol Amsterdam airport, a major hub in the world, is close- by, and geographically it is located in the urbanized delta of the Low Lands, including the conurbations of the Randstad and the Flemish Triangle, all well-connected to the metropolitan areas of London, Paris and the Ruhr Area in Germany. Since 2007, more than half of the world’s population lives in cities. From Vancouver to Hong Kong, everywhere there is an urbanization process and a migration to metropolitan areas. This is seen in Amsterdam too. It showcases how the role of cities has changed drastically worldwide in the past decades. Until thirty years ago, cities were out of grace in the western world. People favor suburban areas. Now cities turned from unpopular living areas, in some

cases even no-go areas and/or business districts only, into a rediscovered place to live. While new centralities have poppedup, the heart of the city became a place where the chances would lie, and where agglomeration advantages would be high for many. It has become clear that the growing economy driven by knowledge and creativity mainly thrives in and around the city. Not in every city, of every size and at every location. But it does in Amsterdam. The city has strong assets. The Amsterdam region will continue to grow in the coming decades, while other parts of the Netherlands are already showing demographic shrinkage. People return to Amsterdam to build their lives; Looking for personal development, looking for a job, looking for a partner or just looking for peers: alone and/or together, and especially also more and more in a family context. Generations stay longer and elderly are finding their place in the city next to the younger ones. Amsterdam was and is a place with a great population dynamics, tourists, short-stayers and expats add to this. This has made Amsterdam the place it is now. The people form the life force and economic strength of Amsterdam. To keep this role, the city is tested. The population of Amsterdam will grow with 20% in 2050. One million people will live within the municipal boundaries, 2.5 to 3.0 million in its larger metropolitan area. The city should stay accessible and connected to keep


attractive, economically and socially, it should stay a place where it is attractive to live, and where the resources of the city are available and the environment is sustainable.

People-centred The municipality emphases in their Structure Vision 2040 that the city of the future is a city of humanity, a human city. The City bodies provide the housing needs, maintain the economic dynamics and keep the surrounding country green, and because the space in the city is scarce, they opt for compact or dense urban development. But, as they say, deification is not a goal in itself, it should not be at the expense of the quality of living and the living environment. The urbanization calls for extra investment in public sphere: Investing in public transport, means in its fineness and capacity, and changing the modal split. Investing in the public space means, improving the quality of life in the city, largely determined by the quality of the living environment and by green, water and all its urban spaces. For this reason, the city streets and squares are given special attention and are called ‘metropolitan areas’, with the user- friendliness of public space as an important task. Children and families are cherished in new plans for the city by creating more relaxed living environments, introducing the public space child-friendly and by tak-

ing into account the need for neighborhood facilities, such as schools, sports facilities and childcare. These must be realized at the same time as housing. Within the highway or motorway ring, nowadays the city is very popular as urban residential area and as a place for work, trade, business, and all kinds of economic activity. The urban and architectural qualities of the city center and nineteenth-century belt and the so-called belt ’20–’40 are generally much appreciated and protected. Parts outside the ring remain behind and less financially capable people and functions within the ring are displaced partially. Governmental bodies Amsterdam are actively pursuing the socioeconomic differences (avoiding division). With that, the realization that our environment, our environment is vulnerable and needs continued care is strongly present. People not only want to live in one healthy, beautiful and pleasant city, they also want to leave these pleasures in a good way to our children and grandchildren. Therefore, the City aims to make the living environment as sustainable as possible. Together with the National Government, they develop and innovate legislation and regulations in such a way that the spatial assignment can be realized without affecting the quality of life but even improving it. Sustainability and innovation go together and are prominent (see the governmental memorandum “Structuurvisie Amsterdam 2040 – Economisch Sterk en Duurzaam”, pdf online available in Dutch only)

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Amsterdam Haven-Stad

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Within the city of Amsterdam, there is a great need for new living and working space, especially within the Ring A10. You will challenge an area which is dubbed “Haven-Stad” or Port City. Here, twelve locations, west and northwest of the city center, are designated to create these new living environments. These areas include some of the old port areas, given the name. In terms of location and size the Haven-Stad area is seen as the most logical places where the need for new living and working space can be met. Therefore, the City of Amsterdam schedules to add 40,000 to 70,000 homes here and 45,000 to 58,000 jobs. The ambition is to develop a residential area that is (i) dense but vital, (ii) well accessible by public transport and bicycle hence well connected, and (iii) environmental sustainable opting for a more circular city too. The board of Mayor and Municipal Executive accepted the concept for the development of Port City most recently on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 (see the governmental memorandum “Haven-Stad, Concept-Ontwikkelstrategie”, pdf online available in Dutch only). The transformation from port to residential area will be the next step in the development of the city and of great value for the larger metropolitan region of Amsterdam (AMR). The transformation takes place in phases, and as such program will be distributed over several sub-lo-

cations, neighborhoods called Sloterdijk and Groot Westerpark, (abandoned) harbor areas like Coen- en Vlothaven, and part of the Northern IJ-river front. Within Sloterdijk transformation has begun, particularly within its center and what is called Sloterdijk I. This will be our prime reference area. Here your innovative interdisciplinary ideas could relate to the first phases in the process. Yet by matter of course, this transformation needs context, both towards the water fronts and future development areas, as well as the existing urban areas. Haven-Stad will be an attractive living and business area, primary due to its location and presence of certain people. It is located near the center, the harbor area, Schiphol Amsterdam Airport and in the region directly connected with the northern urban agglomeration of Zaanstad and along the North Sea Channel. About 40,000 extra jobs are expected to be created in the Haven-Stad area. The municipality is ambitious. Mobility, livability and sustainability are important foci in the vision of the City.


study: Amsterdam ngesCase Sloterdijk

sive measures are required to maintain accessibility and liveability in the city; the challenge is substantial and urgent. If residents, visitors and businesses continue to travel as they do today, all forms of Mobility Challenges in Amster- transport combined will grow by between dam 20% and 40%, and traffic will grind to a halt. (source: City of Amsterdam, Future of Mobility Good accessibility – with smart conIf no action is taken, the quality of life will decrease, White Paper) nections within the city and with the rest primarily due to the increasing competition of forthe space. In and world – makes an country the Amsterdam Mobility Survey, Amsterdam examined is prospering, the cityCity is Council important contribution to Amsterdam’s the growing, potentialnew challenges and solutions for maintaining the homes are being built, attractiveness for residents, visitors and new companies and talent to city businesses. accessibility and liveability of continue this growing in detail. TheAnd in the city, we value sorelocate here, and the city is becoming cial diversity transition to a sustainable and more adaptable city with aand inclusivity, which means increasingly popular with tourists. The providing everyone with equal access to cleaner economy is already underway. Innovation provides Mobility Survey (Mobiliteitsverkenning, good liveability and transport. opportunities for entrepreneurial activity, an improved published by the City of Amsterdam on The city’s growth is set to continue. The living climate and equal access to mobility services. 31 October 2017) concluded that extenincreasing crowds put accessibility, road safety, liveability (includPollution ing air quality) and social Particulates cohesion under growing CO2 pressure. If no action is taken, this will have repercussions on the quality of life and Amsterdam’s economic strength, primarily due to the increasing competition for space. By 2030 the number of trips made daily will Speed of technological change Competition for space increase significantly (by Bike sharing Pressure on parking 20–40% compared with Uber Traffic 2015). What does this mean for Sloterdijk Station Challenges for the growth of mobility and its district?

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Working and living in the Sloterdijk Area (source: Plan Amsterdam 01—2015)

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pdf files available online

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For many years the Sloterdijk industrial zone in the Westpoort precinct to the west of Amsterdam was relatively unknown and unloved among the Dutch capital’s inhabitants. The crisis also meant that the area faced contrary winds, resulting in a period of high rates of vacancy, particularly in the large office premises around Sloterdijk’s multimodal station. That tide has now turned. A key reason for this is that for the first time in 30 years people are now allowed to live in Sloterdijk Centre. And by no means does this imply living a life devoid of greenery, as De Bretten nature zone is within a stone’s throw. The Sloterdijk district – comprised of subsectors I, II, III, IV and Sloterdijk Centre – includes the ‘dry’ section of Westpoort, while the ‘wet’ part adjoins the harbour basin itself. The area is not just an industrial location; it is also home to major media companies such as the publisher Elsevier and telecoms provider KPN, as well as to enterprises one might not expect, such as the largest warehouse for recycled goods in the Netherlands. The area is very favourably situated in relation to recreational areas like the Westerpark and De Bretten nature reserve. It also

boasts excellent accessibility by road, rail and water, as well as via Schiphol Airport. After years of relative stagnation with a considerable lack of occupancy in office buildings, Sloterdijk Centre is now being transformed from a monotone office area into a varied urban area, which generates renewed dynamism.

Sloterdijk multi layered/ barriers (source: Sloterdijk area Research by the TU Delft Graduation Studio AMS Mid-City, Chair of Complex Projects) Area Sloterdijk has by nature a multifaced character. At the centre of this contradicting site lays the Sloterdijk station. The station is one of the important nodes of the Amsterdam public transport network. It functions as a big transfer hub and as a gateway to the inner city. There are three main documents that describe future plans and visions from the government that are relevant for the Sloterdijk Area in Amsterdam. These three are: ‘Koers 2025’ (Direction 2025), ‘Havenstad’ (Harbour-city), ‘Structuurvisie 2040’ (Structure Vision 2040).2 Overal key aspects of envisioned change for the sloterdijk area are: Transformation of Office to Work-Live area, Urban Renewal in the AUP housing, improved Public Transport terminal & Densification.


Sloterdijk Station area, photo by courtesy of the City of Amsterdam

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6 km 4

2.

Data* Sloterdijk Station

km 0

80 m

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Project Data

Data Sloterdijk Station

Area Amsterdam Sloterdijk Station area Size ± 2.85 km2 Team ± 10 students per group Title Integrated Mobility Challenges in Future Metropolitan Areas Theme Resilient Infrastructure (Social Inclusive and Sustainable Neighborhoods) Sub-Themes of Mobility research topics (choice of the group)

(by the courtesy of Paul Chorus, Provincie Noord-Holland)

1. Vital City Public Space & Social Values Human interactions Safety & Health Travel behavior & Urban spaces

2. Connected City Inter-modality & New mobilities Mobility as a Service Commuting & Sharing Mobility & Tourism

3. Circular City Buildings as Energy sources Reduce-Reuse-Recycle Clean technologies (such as electric and zero emission vehicles) Business Cases

Highlights: in 2017 Amsterdam Sloterdijk Station had 54,330 passengers per day (getting on and off the train). In 2016 the total number passengers was 50,612 – a growth of 7%. Bicycle facilities There is quite a shortage. Current usage is: 112% Parking Current usage is 90% (when the level is higher than 80%, there is need for expansion).

Assignment Objective In this summer school we discuss and explore the relations between the station of Sloterdijk (as infrastructural node) and the urban dynamics in its surroundings, towards the organization of a resilient (social inclusive, sustainable) neighborhood. What urban contexts, design principles and guidelines, governance models of station areas could contribute to more resilient neighborhoods? Who are the future users of this hub? What will be the role of Sloterdijk in the Haven-Stad vision of the City of Amsterdam? Which approaches and scenarios can be tested and applied to intermodal nodes, particularly when dealing with lack of space and growing number of users? Output urban scenario and design guidelines Method Analysis, Development of Positions, Propositions and Scenarios Design products Graphs, Schemes, Sketches, Diagrams, Street Profiles, Masterplan, Collages.

map by Manuela Triggianese and Joran Kuijper

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Presentation Format First working session on the 21st Students use this opportunity to introduce themselves both in personal and professional way to other members of the group. Each student explains his motivation for the Summer School, fascinations and expectations. —Groups/tutors define the theme they would like to work on. —Groups/tutors prepare the excursion to Amsterdam by theme Visiting critics: Université Paris-Est, University of Toulouse, University of Antwerp, DIMI, AMS Institute

Presentation on the 24th Short presentation through which students reflect on the current state of their research, positions and propositions. Students use this opportunity to reflect and critically examine their work in the first days. Each student presents several ideas for the further development of their projects. —Pin-up presentations of the Analyses, Positions and Propositions; —4 groups presenting in 10 min. each + 10 min. Q&A ; —Format: 6 digital slides in total; —Slides are Saved in pdf, A3 landscape (because of post production), bring printed/ sketces on tracing paper and maquettes. map by Maurits van Ardenne, edited by Joran Kuijper

slide 01 location strengths slide 02 location weaknesses slide 03 drivers for the strategy slide 04 themes/topic(s) to be investigated throughout the project slide 05/slide 06 concept ideas (with references/precedents) Visiting critics: City of Amsterdam, DIMI

Presentation on the 28th —Analyses, Positions, Propositions, Projects; —4 groups presenting in 20 min. each + 10 min. Q&A ; —Format 12 digital slides in total, same format as the pin-up presentation, but more elaboration on the project part and concept ideas; —Slides are saved in pdf, A3 landscape (because of post production); —A1 (color) poster per group, printing deadline: 27th of August before 22.00h + bring printed to AMS/ Visiting critics: among others City of Amsterdam, DIMI, Université Paris-Est, Movares, Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure

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AMS/TU Delft Summer School 2018 Program

Schedule

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Tuesday

kick-off day

TU Delft, BK City, Bot. Garden

registration 08:30 ORANGE HALL welcome & introduction 09.00 Roberto Cavallo (DIMI/TU Delft) & Manuela Triggianese (AMS Institute/TU Delft) ORANGE HALL morning lectures 09.15 Roberto Cavallo Nacima Baron (Université Paris-Est) coffee break Bachar Kabalan (Movements Strategies) Albane Grandazzi (ParisDauphine University, SNCF) Nils Le Bot (AREP DM&I)

22

Wednesday

24

Excursion AMS Institute/Sloterdijk, TL

working sessions BK City, Teaching Lab

Friday

bus trip 08:30 BK City ‣ AMS Institute

ROOMS BG.East.410;430;450 working session 08.30

ROOMS BG.East.410;430;450 working session 08.30

—location analysis —theme analysis (focusing on location premises)

—compiling Analyses towards Propositions —determining Propositions

LECTURE ZAAL welcome & introduction 10.00

Maurice Harteveld (AMS Institute/TU Delft) & Manuela Triggianese (AMS/TU Delft)

working sessions BK City, Teaching Lab

ORANGE HALL afternoon lectures 14.00

AMSTERDAM SLOTERDIJK STATION AREA excursion 14.00

ROOMS BG.East.410;430;450 working session 13.30

ROOMS BG.East.410;430;450 presenting session 13.30

—fine-tuning Analyses at the overlap of disciplines —reviewing Analyses and defining Positions

—Setup of the presentations —Introduction —Pin-up Presentations of the Analyses, Positions and Propositions Visiting critics on Smart Mobility, Traffic and Public Space

—defining and dividing themes —motivations and critical reflections —preparing field trip —questions and remarks TU DELFT BOTANICAL GARDEN drinks and dinner 18.00 end of dinner 20.30

Guided tour hosted by the City of Amsterdam (± 1,5h): Onno van het Groenewoud, Jurgen Krabbenborg, Charlotte Rietdijk, Saskia van Eijk

bus trip 17.00 Sloterdijk Station area ‣ BK City 18.00 break (on own occasion) TEACHING LAB working session 19.30 —compiling observations Teaching Lab closes 22.00

sponsors

—self-study an sketching defin Projects/Desig

coffee break

12.30 break (on own occasion)

ROOMS BG.East.410;430;450 working session 15.30

BLUE and ORA working ses

Jurgen Krabbenborg (City of Amsterdam) Debbie Dekkers (City of Amsterdam) 12.30 break (on own occasion)

coffee break

working se TU Libra

Luca Bertolini (UvA) Oscar Vos (designer at krft)

lunch and bus transit 12.30 AMS Institute ‣ Sloterdijk Station area

Maarten van Acker (University of Antwerp) Manuela Triggianese (AMS Institute/TU Delft)

2

Saturday

—finalizing Pin-up Presentations

LECTURE ZAAL lectures 10.15

12.30

lunch break

24

23

Thursday

break (on own occ

BLUE and ORA working se

—self-study an sketching defin Projects/Desig

closing session 15.30 drinks 16.00 18.00 break (on own occasion)

18.00 break (on own occasion)

TEACHING LAB working session 19.30

TEACHING LAB working session 19.30

—start preparing Pin-up Presentations Teaching Lab closes 22.00

—towards Projects Teaching Lab closes 22.00

break (on own occ

TU LIBRARY working se

—towards Elab

TU Library c

in collaboration with

Summer School 2018—21st–28th August This summer school is a cooperation between Delft University of Technology, Amsterdam Institut


24

g sessions aching Lab

ast.410;430;450 session 08.30

Analyses positions g

‘Integrated Mobility Challenges in Future Metropolitan Areas’ Exploring Sustainable Urban Integration Approaches

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26

Saturday

27

Sunday

working sessions TU Library

break or self-studying TU Library

TU LIBRARY BLUE and ORANGE ROOM working session 08.30 —self-study and sketching defining Projects/Designing

—self-studying —self-guided tours to The Hague, Rotterdam, Amsterdam —biking around town and hinterlands

Monday

working sessions BK City, TU Library ROOMS BG.East.410;430 ORANGE HALL working session 08.30

28

Tuesday

20180814

final presentations, prep. at BK City, presenting at AMS ROOMS BG.East.410;430 ORANGE HALL working session 08.30

—defining Project in larger area —designing

—preparing Final Presentations at TU Delft

in-up s

12.30 occasion)

12.30 break (on own occasion)

12.30 break (on own occasion)

lunch and bus trip 12.30 BK City ‣ AMS Institute

ast.410;430;450 session 13.30

TU LIBRARY BLUE and ORANGE ROOM working session 13.30

ROOMS BG.East.410;430 ORANGE HALL working session 13.30

LECTURE ZAAL presentations 13.30

he s n sentations of , Positions ions on Smart c and Public

—self-study and sketching defining Projects/Designing

—fine-tuning Designs at the overlap of disciplines —reflection related to formulated Positions —start preparing Final Presentations

session 15.30 drinks 16.00

end and walk to the restaurant 17.30

18.00 occasion)

18.00 break (on own occasion)

18.00 break (on own occasion)

TEACHING LAB session 19.30

TU LIBRARY FLEX SPACE working session 19.30

ROOMS BG.East.410;430 ORANGE HALL working session 19.30 —preparing Final Presentations BK City closes 22.00 TU Library closes 00.00

rojects

b closes 22.00

—Final Presentations With guests of the City of Amsterdam, designers and external critics —Closing session By Organizing Committee —‘Netwerkborrel’

—towards Elaboration TU Library closes 00.00

TU Library opens 08.00 TU Library closes 00.00

leadership and coordination

thanks to

Department of Architecture Chair of Complex Projects

y of Technology, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions (AMS),

Closing dinner 18.00 Restaurant ‘Pompstation’v

bus trip 22.30 Restaurant Pompstation ‣ BK City back in Delft ± 23.30

Delft Amsterdam

25


an Julia

nala

NS Station Delft 221

TU Delft Campus Map Campus Map

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laa

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lia

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8

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221 tso

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Van der Burghweg 26b

34b

38

45

Van den Broekweg

Sports

35

22

18

60

184

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N470

186

A13

199

Watermanweg

Anthony Fokkerweg

66 61

152

60

Molengraaffsingel 161

Mekelweg

Kluyverweg

50

Huism

See page 2 for building list and addresses

Kruithuisweg

63 62

Heertjeslaan

Heertjeslaan

Sports

affsinge

L&R

Van den Broekweg

Molengra

A4

Huismansingel

Information Desk TU Delft Tel: +31 (0)15 27 88022

NS 193Station Delft Zuid

38

25

Thijsseweg

26

196 Boussinesqweg

3 min Water

Rotterdamseweg

Park / sport field / grass surface Park / sportveld / gras

37

Van der Maasweg

197

26b

153 TNW

181

Van der Burghweg

58

Bus stop Februari 2018 Bushalte Parking Parkeerplaats

161

50

64

26

Molengraaffsingel

66Balthasar van der Polweg

Schoemakerstraat

Kluyverweg

Pedestrian area See page 2 for building list and addresses Voetgangersgebied Zie pagina 2 voor gebouwenlijst en adressen

Watermanweg

Anthony Fokkerweg

61

28

Pieter Calandweg

Mekelweg

63 62

Rotterdamseweg

L&R

Gebied in ontwikkeling

Cycle path Information Desk TU Delft Fietspad Tel: +31 (0)15 27 88022

Stevinweg

A13

Feldmannweg

Water

Keverling Buismanweg Van Mourik Broekmanweg

N470 49

Kruithuisweg

A4

Bus track Busbaan Area under construction

23

N.C. Kistweg

NS Station Delft Zuid

18a

116

36

EWI

Leeghwaterstraat

Park / sport field / grass surface Road Park / sportveld / gras Autoweg

46

Aula

Stieltjesweg

Cornelis Drebbelweg

TUParking roundway TUParkeerplaats ring

TU Delft Library Building 21

21

Van der Waalsweg

34

Christiaan Huygensweg

20 Van der Waalsweg

Bushalte

aat

28

34a

3mE

rstr

32a

Pieter Calandweg

Lorentzweg

37

ake

33b

32

Schoemakerstraat

Stevinweg

Mekelweg

Voetgangersgebied

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30a

30b

25

Delivery entrance Bus stop Goedereningang

tso

30 Buismanweg Keverling

31 23

Landbergstraat

34

43

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116

32

42

18a

Van Mourik Broekmanweg

Balthasar van der Polweg

Aula

N.C. Kistweg

Feldmannweg

Cycle path

Fietspad (Main) entrance building (Hoofd)ingang gebouw Pedestrian area

Leeghwaterstraat

Rotterdamseweg

Gebouwnummer

8

Stieltjesweg

Jaffalaan

36

40

49

Bus track Building number Busbaan

22

Prins Bernhardlaan

EWI

Teaching Lab Building 32a

na

Faculty of Architecture/ BK City Building 8

n

Sch

34a 34b

Leeghwaterstraat

Other Roadbuildings Overige gebouwen Autoweg

lia

n laa

Van der Waalsweg

46

Ju

laa

21 Van der Waalsweg

34

Cornelis Drebbelweg

TU ring

na

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Z

35

45

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Christiaan Huygensweg

20

O

Lorentzweg

3mE

Ju

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W32a

Mekelweg

Legend / Legenda

TU buildings roundway TUTU gebouwen

N

32

34

43

Delivery entrance Goedereningang

33b

32

42

(Main) entrance building (Hoofd)ingang gebouw

30b

Landbergstraat

Mijnbouwstraat

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Building number Gebouwnummer

31

30a

ld

Leeghwaterstraat

40

30

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Other buildings Overige gebouwen

Area under construction Gebied in ontwikkeling

Botanical Garden Building 6

aat

15

Prins Bernhardlaan

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Campus Map Campusplattegrond TU buildings TU gebouwen

20

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Legend / Legenda

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Juli

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NS Station N Delft W

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Campusplattegrond

Mijnbouwstraat

Mic

2

5

6

3

181


Faculty of Architecture/ BK City Building 8 21st of August: all day 23th until 18.00h 24th until 18.00h 27th until 22.00h 28th until 12.30h Bus Stop parking lot

Eas

t

En tr

anc e

Sou

th

En tra nc e

En tr anc e BK E xp o

410

ORAN

GE HA LL

430

K

450

WORK ING ROOM SESSION S

Ma in

C en

En tr anc e

te r

E ntr

anc

e

Teaching Lab Building 32a 22nd of August: from 19.30 until 22.00h 23th from 19.30 until 22.00h 24th from 19.30 until 22.00h

27


TU Delft Library Building 8 25th of August: 8.30–18.00h: Blue and Orange Rooms 18.00–0.00h: Flex spaces 26th of August: 8.30–18.00h: Blue and Orange Rooms 18.00–0.00h: Flex spaces

28


AMS Institute Amsterdam 22nd of August: arrival by bus at 9.30h from BK City* 28th arrival by bus at 13.30h from BK City**

*meeting time for departure from BK City parking lot at 8.20h **meeting time for departure from BK City parking lot at 12.20h

29


Notes

30



Information Venues

Phone numbers

Delft University of Technology Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment/BK City Building 8 Julianalaan 134 2628 BL Delft +31 15 278 30 97

Salma Ibrahim +31 15 278 39 77 or +31 6 17 41 61 37

AMS Institute Amsterdam Mauritskade 62 1092 AD Amsterdam +31 20 665 13 50 TU Delft Library Building 21 Prometheusplein 1 2628 ZC Delft +31 15 278 56 78 TU Delft Teaching Lab Building 32a Landbergstraat 15 2628 CE Delft TU Delft Botanical Garden Building 6 Poortlandplein 6 2628 BM Delft Restaurant Pompstation Zeeburgerdijk 52 1094 AE Amsterdam +31 20 692 28 88

Judith Blommaart-Tigchelaar +31 15 278 30 97 Joran Kuijper +31 6 16 36 54 08 Manuela Triggianese +31 6 18 18 93 02

Wi-Fi Wi-Fi is available at the following venues: BK City, TU Delft Teaching Lab and TU Delft Library Network name Summerschool-AR-2018 Password tudelftams


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