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manuel navarro portfolio


photo of seating area in main lobby

photo of main lobby and reception desk


HIGHLAND TOWER houston, tx Building 17 Story high-rise Area: 277,567 GSF 96 condominium Units ranging from 825-2,651 SF Project Team Client: Pelican Builders, INC Architect: Ziegler Cooper Architects Interior Design: Ziegler Cooper Architects General Contractor: G.T. Leach Construction, LP MEP Engineer: SEI Companies Structural Engineer: Ingenium, INC Landscape Architects: Kudela & Weinheimer

rendered lobby plan

rendered lobby elevation

rendered lobby elevation

rendered lobby elevation


photo of main lobby

photo of lobby from exterior


ISSUES AND R NO.

DATE

SHEET TITLE

SHEET NUMBER

ZCA PROJECT #

sample of detail drawings

sample of interior elevations


photo of lounge

photo of unit bathroom

photo of unit kitchen

photo of unit kitchen

rendering of unit living room


K

Balcony

Balcony

closet

Bedroom 2 13'-1" x 9'-11" Living/Dining 15'-7" x 20'-2"

closet Master Bedroom 13' x 14'-9" Bath 2

p mw

ref

bev Study 9'-11" x 8'-9"

Kitchen 10'-11" x 20'-2"

w

a/c

dw

2

M

Foyer

Powder

Closet

unit plan

Residence K u n i t : 1 , 6 4 6 s q . f t. | b a l c o n y: 1 6 2 s q . f t. tota l :

Master Bath

d

1 , 8 0 8 a/c s q . f t.

cl

K

Bath 2

closet

Bedroom 2 13' x 11'-10"

I

Foyer linen

Master Closet

comp

Powder

Master Bath

w

Kitchen 8'-8" x 16'-10"

ref

d

mw lin

Master Bedroom 13'-8" x 16'-2"

dw

Living/Dining 15'-11" x 21'-5"

bev

closet

pantry

Bedroom 3 9'-8" x 10'-5"

Balcony

unit plan

Balcony

view of exterior

R e s i d e n c e M2

Balcony

u n i t : 1 , 8 3 2 s q . f t. | b a l c o n y: 1 5 1 s q . f t. tota l :

1 , 9 8 3 s q . f t.

M2

Balcony

Bedroom 2 13’-5” x 12’-6”

Master Bedroom 16’-3” x 16’-1”

Closet

cl. w

Master Bath

dw

d

Linen Bath 2

av

p

Linen

wc

Living/Dining 19’-8” x 15’-4”

ref Kitchen 8’-10” x 15’-4”

Closet Computer Niche

a/c unit plan

cl.

Closet

Bath 3

Bedroom 3 13’-0” x 13’-1”


PLANS| SECTIONS|ELEVATIONS houston, tx

ISSUES AND REVISIONS NO.

DATE

ISSUES AND RE DESCRIPTION

NO.

DATE

SHEET TITLE

SHEET TITLE

SHEET NUMBER

SHEET NUMBER

ZCA PROJECT #

ZCA PROJECT #


rendering of pool lounge

custom unit plan

custom whole floor unit plan

THIS MARKETING PLAN IS NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION. This plan is only for illustrative purposes to assist in the sales and marketing of the units. It is the responsibility of the unit architect of record to prepare construction documents and ensure that all plans comply with Fair Housing, acoustics, and Building Code requirements. Furthermore they shall ensure that the integrity of the building systems and code requirements are not compromised, in particular, the MEP systems that are modified from the base building design.

rendering of sunset lounge

custom unit plan


2727 KIRBY houston, tx Building 30 Story high-rise Area: 418,000 GSF 93 condominium Units from 1,100-10,357 SF Client: Kirby Tower, LTD Architect/Interior Design: Ziegler Cooper Architects General Contractor: MDA Builders MEP Engineer: DBR Engineering Consultants Structural Engineer: CBM Engineers, INC Civil Engineers: R.G. Miller Engineers

photo of unit bathroom

exterior view of building

rendering of main lobby seating


photo of pool deck


photo of main lobby

photo of sunset room lounge

view of pool lounge

photo of unit kitchen

view down main corridor


finished exterior at night


THE AUSTONIAN austin, tx

Building 56 Story high-rise Area: 861,040 GSF 195 condominium Units ranging from 1,319- 9,173 SF

UNIT B UNIT F

Project Team Client: Second Congress, LTD

UNIT D

Architect: Ziegler Cooper Architects Interior Design: Gary Lee Partners General Contractor: Balfour Beatty Construction

UNIT E

UNIT C UNIT A

MEP Engineer: CHPA Consulting Engineers Structural Engineer: CBM Engineers, INC Landscape Architects: TBG Partners

unit plans levels 11-24

Civil Engineers: Axiom Engineers, INC Construction Fall 2007- Spring 2010

UNIT K

unit plans levels 25-40

UNIT MAS


rendering of unit living and dining room

sales center model bathroom

unit kitchen


kitchen elevation

kitchen elevation

kitchen elevation

bathroom elevation

bathroom elevation

sketches of various unit plans


level 55 sky lounge

level 10 media room

main elevator lobby

level 56 sky fitness

level 55 sky lounge


main lobby and waiting area

main lobby and reception desk


manuel navarro graduate work


rendering looking north down main corridor

rendering inside of judd gallery


theDOCKS graduate work

GOAL: Introduce and design a new museum to the Elston Corridor of Chicago utilizing and exploring varied daylighting methods to passively illuminate a museum environment. The site is located along the river and has easy access to highway 90/94. The site is also located in between the prominent neighborhoods of Lincoln Park and Bucktown/Wicker Park. The building will consist of multiple daylit galleries, storage areas, reception, educational rooms, conservation rooms, and back of house offices. The main entry freeform roof is a powerful statement that binds the site together. The mullions add texture, scale and movement to the image and the space. The main hovering roof is designed to capture the most amount of indirect northern light for illuminating the galleries. The concrete and stone building is made up of different planes and volumes intersecting each other at various intervals which create a rhythm on the site.

elevation

elevation

building section


rendering down main corridor

rendering inside gallery facing main corridor

rendering looking south on main corridor


rendering behind reception desk looking towards exterior


rendering down main corridor

rendering in dan flavin sculpture gallery

rendering in main gallery


roof detail

view from southern entrance


Hotel15

graduate work

Privacy is essentially a modern invention. Towns used to be too small to have any secrets. In return for loss of privacy you get connection and community. Concept: HOTEL15 provides a place where people can live out their fantasies of becoming fragments of popular culture while embedding themselves into a greater community network of like minded individuals. The rooms and public spaces of the hotel become the stage for patrons. Participants have the option of activating a live video stream of themselves to be placed on a hotel website. Online participants can view the activity of the hotel online and interact through video chat with hotel patrons. The hotel and website create on-line databases that keep record of friends, interests, occupations, room preferences, and food/drink preferences in effort to create exceptional customer service programs. Hardware: The hotel rooms and public areas are equipped with cameras that start filming when they sense activity. The cameras in the private rooms have the option of being turned on and off by the hotel guests. When the camera turns on, the footage is streamed live to the HOTEL15 website and is accessible to millions worldwide. Only members of HOTEL15 can view the footage. Only people that are over 18 years old and have access to a webcam can participate in the HOTEL15 viewing experience. As each viewer tunes in, their web image gets live-streamed onto an LCD screen in the room they are viewing. The viewers can communicate and be viewed by the room occupants. The footage viewed by the most people gets projected on a large outdoor LCD screen that is visible to the public, serving as a notifier of what is going on inside at that very moment. Each area of the hotel also displays screens that show live footage other public areas in the hotel. No matter where you are, you are always connected to the other participants/guests. Software: All live footage is monitored by the HOTEL15 IT staff and placed into different categories on the website. The IT staff is also accompanied by strict security staff that is ready to protect the hotel patrons at any time. The website is used as a database for everyone that participates in it. Any member of HOTEL15 can view the footage. In order to interact and participate in the HOTEL15 experience one must create a profile. The profile allows you to chat with occupants you are watching. It also allows you a chance to request a room at HOTEL15 Application: When an online HOTEL15 participant decides that they want to stop living behind the scenes, they can take a stab at becoming the focal point of this media interaction. In order to do so, they must apply for a room through their online HOTEL15 account. Upon room arrival, guests will then have freedom to express themselves over live broadcast. Their live feed will be monitored by the HOTEL15 IT department and fit into the appropriate channels based on the changing content for easier filtering and viewing. BAR15: Every patron that enters the bar has their ID scanned. The scanner automatically creates an online profile that is linked up with the general hotel network. The patron has the option of editing their profile and linking it with other social networking sites (i.e.: Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Blogger, etc.) The profile information keeps track of the patron’s orders, interests and company. When someone creates a profile, they can access it from the hotel website or from an application on their iPhone and see who is at the bar. People can browse bar patrons based on age, gender, interests, mutual friends, careers, etc. This database and application allows patrons to monitor and intercept the exact bar experience that they are looking for.


Hotel15

graduate work

rendering of bar15

hotel section

rendering of bar15

site location Location:

The site is situated at the six corners in the bucktown/wicker park neighborhood in Chicago. The site was chosen because of density and demographics. The demographic make-up of these two neighborhoods are a good mix of artists, young professionals, bohemians, and hipsters. The six corners is the most prominent intersection in the neighborhood and is where the blue line train intersects the neighborhood.


rendering of hotel suite

rendering of hotel suite

rendering of hotel suite


rendering of exterior curtain wall system with embedded LEDs to display hotel patrons

rendering looking through exterior curtain wall system into hotel suite


rendering of hotel lobby

rendering of hotel lobby


rendering of hotel lobby


collapsible, adaptable, portable, expandable

renderings showing csquared art gallery on site


[c]squared

tempoary outdoor gallery Austin celebrates life, art and nature, which is evident in the many attractions the city has to offer. Two of these attractions are the SXSW festival and the Congress Avenue Bats. Both bring participants and spectators from around the world to partake in progressive creative alliance and to witness a natural phenomenon. Communication, human and natural, is vital for these events to occur, and because it takes place between many players it is referred to as collective communication. The [c] squared pavilion captures this element of communication to represent this celebration.

dallas

austin houston san antonio

site plans of austin, bat flight migrations, and sxsw arts festival locations

interior rendering of csquared gallery empty


density, speed, light graduate work

My personal infrastructure is built around transportation and overlays of the city that create a complex visual field. I encounter thousands of images everyday that tell stories of the city I’ve seen, imagined, dreamt, and remembered. The result of this is a juxtaposed fantasy of imagery alternating between mirage and memory. The speeds of which I travel and the intensity of images I focus on leave the remaining city to fly by and recede into the distance. My perception of the city is constantly altered depending on the speed at which I travel and the scale of buildings I pass. All of these images tangled and woven together form my infrastructure of Chicago. This complex visual field allows me to experience images, objects, and architecture in various assemblages that compose together fragmented city experiences and perceptions. A series of frames were chosen from my commute based on various levels of perception characterized by speed, light, and density to explore form generationation through fields. A diagram was created connecting my destinations on a map of Chicago, and then applied to the form that was generated through the field explorations. The overlay on the form created nodes of densities and speed, which reflects my experience of traveling by bike in Chicago.


generating form through fields


DINING BY DESIGN diffa

concept: connections team: manuel navarro troy atwood erin costello tim naus danielle vevea


interior rendering showing seamless transition of bench to counter

interior rendering

detail rendering of integrated ipad shelf


iRENT

graduate work The re-incarnation of the magazine/bookstand using iPad’s as rentals. Provide city dwellers with a small urban reading room where you can rent ipads by the hour with your credit card. The use of the ipad enables users access to any of their favorite publication, book, or website. These will be scattered throughout the city in high-traffic areas most likely near bus stops or even placed in train stations. The “iRent” gives visitors a much needed refuge in an urban environment and will have integrated seating areas within the space. Design inspiration came from the ipad itself. With an aluminum unibody exterior and a high-gloss seamless solid surface interior it provides a modern touch to the city infrastructure. Design also departed from “bigness and the problem with large”. Why should we have big box bookstores everywhere throughout the city when we can have small scattered sites that have ipad rentals allowing users access to millions of books at the click of a button. No need for large floor plates when you can just download the latest book in seconds.

section

interior rendering


W OO D Y O U B E MY NEIGHBOR? The structure was designed to be built almost entirely from wooden shipping pallets using the 40”x40” & 48”x40” platforms. Materials donated from various grocery stores would make this structure highly inexpensive. A hammer, nails, saws, and some helping hands is all it takes to build the structure. The structure should be left unpainted for ease of recycling. At the end of it’s life-cycle it can be disassembled to re-create shipping pallets or the wood may be recycled into other goods.

exterior renderings of structure


e


W OO D Y O U B E MY NEIGHBOR? Are you tired of looking at empty lots in your neighborhood that are waiting to be developed or wondering who your future neighbors will be? Empty lots litter the urban fabric of Chicago much like wood pallets do often found behind grocery stores. Why not combine the two and utilize the space and material to create a respite for the neighborhood in the summer while fostering a sense of community. The goal of this structure to was create a versatile temporary space that includes a bicycle rack, covered seating area, and a community herb garden to help spark a sense of involvement. It also provides plenty of space for conversation, reading, and relaxing.

seating area for 6 people

12'-0"

a

8'-0"

wood deck made from wood pallets

b

c

6'-8" floor plan

12'-0"

community herb garden

bicycle rack


1'-6"

3'-4" 2'-6"

a

b 4'-0"

4'-0"

5"

1'-6"

10'-0"

12'-0"

elevation

elevation

b

c elevation


top view rendering

sectional rendering

rendering of exterior shell

site plan

rendering of crypt wall

crypt section

top view rendering


chicago crypt graduate work

This project proposes utilizing the scar left by the Chicago Spire and converting into an urban crypt for Chicago. The spire’s foundation hole has fallen to disuse and has become a constant reminder of failures in the financial markets since the recession. The project proposes 650 burial areas, two funeral chapels, administrative areas, prep areas, meeting space, and planning services. Two remembrance chapels line two sides of the ground floor. The chapels are bounded by monumental stairs which lead visitors throughout the space. Four elevators transport visitors down to the five crypt levels below. The dead are entombed into the monolithic concrete crypts that surround the perimeter of the building. The space contains a series of tall concrete columns that are placed radially throughout. At the top of these columns there is a circular light shaft that suggests an extension from earth to the heavens. The concept for this crypt is to celebrate life by creating a serene and quiet atmosphere utilizing monolithic materials such as concrete for their enduring qualities and monochromatic finish. The proportions are kept large on the ground floor and add a more spiritual and sacred experience. The exterior shell alludes to a skeletal shape which shows complexity in connections not only in the material but throughout life. A vertical twisting shaft slices through the building and terminates at a still reflection pool on level E. Ground level gardens provide places for family and friends to reminisce on memories of loved ones.

levels a-e

ground floor

level f


interior rendering of crypt

interior rendering of crypt


interior rendering of crypt

interior rendering of crypt


manuel navarro undergraduate work


HAND SKETCHES and rendering


manuel navarro photography


PHOTOGRAPHY

still life|engagement|style


manuel navarro vibe sheets


manuel navarro publications


austonian condo project on cover

images from presentation at pecha kucha vol. 14

diffa dining by design shown inside

flyer for pecha kucha vol. 14


cottage featured on apartmenttherapy.com

Hospitality Design Magazine > More From The Magazine > Radical Innovation in Hospitality Award Student Winner

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Radical Innovation in Hospitality Award Student Winner A group from Harrington College of Design in Chicago has concepted Hotel15, where social networking comes to life. By Stacy Shoemaker Rauen Each year, the judges of the John Hardy Group- and Hospitality Design magazine-sponsored Radical Innovation in Hospitality Award competition pick a student winner. This year's was a group from Harrington College of Design in Chicago, and their entry was Hotel15. "Hotel15 provides a place where people can live out their fantasies of becoming fragments of popular culture while embedding themselves into a greater community network of like-minded individuals," the entry states. Think of Facebook in reality. The rooms and public spaces of the hotel become the stage for guests and members. They have the option of activating a live video stream of themselves to be placed on the hotel website. Online participants can view the activity of the hotel and interact through video chat. The live streaming videos are distorted and projected on LCD screens that are incorporated into the curtain walls. Each area of the hotel also displays screens that show live footage of other public areas. And the hotel and website create online databases that keep record of friends, interests, occupations, and preferences (food and drink, room) in an effort to up the ante on customer service.

blog post from www.manuelnavarrodesign.blogspot.com

article on first place prize inside hospitality and design Magazine


manuel navarro lifestyle zine


MS make |space

hOme


MS make |space

make|space magazine documents the shelters, cities, and food of culture shapers, movers, and makers in a realistic way. We adapt and

make|space our own with an interesting mixture of stratgeic and eventful decisions that in the end make|space. Let’s celebrate the untidiness of life.


all content and photography by:

manuel navarro


ontent


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8 manuel navarro interior designer 18 donald judd sculptor | designer | critic 28 sabreen basith designer 36 aleksandra furman designer 42 lauren roberts | dane hughley interior designer | developer 56 ace hotel- new york hotel 62 angela brasington sylist 72 ryan ross designer | deejay | engineer 84 david hamilton graphic designer


HOME [hohm] –noun

1. a house, apartment, or other shelter that is the usual residence of a person, family, or household. 2. the place in which one’s domestic affections are centered. 3. an institution for the homeless, sick, etc.: a nursing home. 4. the dwelling place or retreat of an animal. 5. the place or region where something is native or most common. 6. any place of residence or refuge: a heavenly home. 7. a person’s native place or own country. 8. (in games) the destination or goal. 9. a principal base of operations or activities: The new stadium will be the home of the local football team. 10. Baseball . home plate. 11. Lacrosse . one of three attack positions nearest the opposing goal. –adjective 12. of, pertaining to, or connected with one’s home or country; domestic: home products. 13. principal or main: the corporation’s home office. 14. reaching the mark aimed at: a home thrust. 15. Sports . played in a ball park, arena, or the like, that is or is assumed to be the center of operations of a team: The pitcher didn’t lose a single home game all season. Compare away ( def. 11 ) .

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make |space with manuel navarro chicago

Not too categorically cashmere sweater and not too flannel shirt either is how Manuel Navarro describes himself and his style. He like to mix things that are high and low and classic and contemporary. He has no qualms combining different elements to create a sense of surprise. He enjoys entertaining and making people feel welcome when they arrive into his home. Texas>Colorado>Texas>Illinois has been his migratory path in life thus far. There is no doubt that one can sense a bit of a southwest vibe in his home with a plethora of cowhides and cacti. On his last move from Houston to Chicago he pretty much purged everything he owned and started fresh with his partner Colt in a 450 square foot Gold Coast apartment. The pieces they own are a mixture of craigslist and antique store finds, a few hand-me-downs, custom pieces, and some key splurge items. The main focal point in the living room is a glicee print by street artist Matthew Rodriguez. He believes that you can never go wrong with a good scent (candles), fresh flowers, and a nice bottle of wine. Here is a glimpse of how Manuel makes|space.

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“But I think you have to - whatever the environment looks like, it does enter into people’s art work one way or another; it’s very remote or it isn’t. It’s remote in my work but it has to have a certain degree of ordinariness.“

-Donald Judd


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make |space with donald judd marfa & new york city

Donald Judd moved to Marfa in the early 1970’s as he grew tired with the NYC art scene. He established what would become the Judd and Chinati foundation which house his permanent collections along with several other artists. In 1979 Judd acquired decommissioned Fort D.A. Russell, and began transforming the fort’s buildings into art spaces and into his permanent home. Judd’s vision was to house large collections of individual artists’ work on permanent display, as a sort of anti-museum. Every year artists, collectors, and enthusiasts come from around the world to visit Judd’s 101 Spring Street home in NYC and his home in Marfa. Typical to Judd was that the size and scale of the buildings determined the nature of certain installations. His spaces were typically defined by polished concrete floors, exposed concrete ceiling, and huge floor to ceiling windows that were usually open onto the landscape beyond. Judd was fascinated by daylight and how objects interacted with light admitted by windows. The objects tend to hover, reflect, disappear, and then come back into view as you circle them when there is daylight within a space. This is how Judd lived.

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make |space with sabreen basith chicago

Sabreen wants to create spaces that draw upon the evocative moods, textures, and meaningful objects. Objects that linger somewhere between past and present. She is inspired by Mo Willems’ idea that everyone should draw and have an interactive space to create art. That is why she recently renovated her condo to include a giant chalkboard wall so that her guests can become immersed into her space. The chalkboard wall was also an adaptation from the film 500 Days of Summer which paired it with a neutral color palette of grays, browns, and whites. She hopes to use this palette in the future as her stains/finishes of wood and furniture selections. Sabreen’s design decisions are guided by simplicity and clean lines. Understated building structure, elegant components with layers of decorative furniture, artwork, and dramatic walls are the perfect ingredients for design. She doesn’t quite have a favorite must-have piece of furniture but she does look up to New York based designers Roman & Williams. She describes good taste as quality, functionality, and beauty in materials...you just know it when you see it.

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“I believe in doing the thing you feel is right.If it looks right,it is right� -Dorothy Draper


peculiar vitrine

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make |space with aleksandra furman chiago

On a typical day one can find Interior Designer Aleksandra Furman thrifting usually in her home neighborhood of Pilsen to find her next object of desire. In a conversation I recently had with Aleks, she had the following to about design: What are your inspirations? My inspirations are everything around me. Music, art, movies, food, textures, colors, and most importantly people. What guides your design decisions? The project and the end use are what guide my design decisions. I believe that no matter how beautiful the design, it is unsuccessful if it doesn’t improve the general experience of its environment. What is your favorite piece of furniture? I think that furniture needs and environment al needs are necessary to measure success in a piece of furniture. I personally am drawn to mid-century modern pieces for their elegance and simplicity. How would you describe good taste? Good taste is simplicity, individuality and honesty.

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“it makes me feel guilty that anybody should have such a goodtime doing what they are supposed to do� -Charles Eames


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make |space with lauren & dane denver

Lovers and taste-makers these two Coloradoans are a power couple with impeccable taste. Lauren an Interior Designer and Dane a developer have developed a keen eye for a diamond in the rough. They are inspired by their peers talents, art, modern architecture, and design blogs. Sometimes all it takes is a bold/unique piece of fabric, antique furniture, or strolling through a vintage boutique shop to find their inspiration. They like mixing old and new to create something wonderful. They both strive for balance and variety with their design decisions. They believe that a space should compliment a persons personal lifestyle: fashion, art, travel, books, etc. The space should tell a story. Their favorite piece of furniture that they currently own is the Eames white molded plastic RAR rocker. It is a timeless piece of design that can be integrated into traditional and contemporary settings. It is perfectly simple with a modern statement. Lauren and Dane describe Having the ability to blend classic pieces with unique and modern statement pieces is what describes good taste to them. Adding a little bit of inquiry and wit to their interiors adds interest and tells a good story and tie everything together and make it work. Good taste requires a good eye, a little bit of history, personal influence, a splash of bold, confidence, and the ability to take a risk.

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“design is thinking made visual� -Saul Bass


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make |space with ace hotel new york

Upon walking into the Ace Hotel in NYC your are greeted by the most friendly and attentive staff. The hotel recently opened and was designed by Stephen Alesch and Robin Standefer of the firm Roman & Williams. They try and connect several different references to create new visual memories. Rendering all of their presentations by hand the spaces they create evoke a strong sense of craft and arrtisanship. Having worked on 211 Elizabeth and The Standard Hotel the environment of The Ace hotel is a balance of new spaces and sense of memory infused in it. The branding of the hotel is executed carefully and is carried rthourghout the space flawlessly. They want people to have dreamlike moments in their spaces.

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ACE

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make |space with

angela brasington & penny chicago Where do the glitteratti of Chicago go to get done up before being in public or in front of a camera? Angela Brasington of course. This spunky and talented stylist migrated from hot and humid Florida to a more friendly midwest locale. She has been the go-to stylist in Chicago for over twenty years! As an avid musuem goer and art addict there is no suprise that she has a whimsical collection of “stuff� in her home. She shares her home with her best friend Penny, a well-loved Jack Russell Terrier. Who could blame them for loving the Chicago summers most! Angela lives pretty simply and surrounds herself with memories and experiences that are meaningful. She is constantly inspired by her artist friends that never seize to come up with fresh ideas. This is how she lives at home.

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make |space with ryan ross chicago

Dj by night designer by day. This is how Ryan Ross rolls. Previously an engineer for 10 years and a music aficionado since birth Ryan likes to keep people motivated. He finds inspirations in his past and hopefully his future. He strives to create design and music remixes that will stand the test of time. There is nothing more that he enjoys than relaxing in his bed after a long night of djing. Ryan goes by RAS or Raw Authentic Style as his musical identity/ brand. This raw and authentic style is integrated and implemented through the interiors he creates. His description of good taste is “classic yet innovative�. He communicates his environments with objects and is constantly in a dialogue with his spaces like the music he mixes. Always trying to find the perfect balance and remix of materials, form, connections, and transitions. Heavily influenced by hip-hop culture and fashion, Ryan brings a fresh and influential aesthtic that is never stale or boring.

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“Design is a learning experience. So my agenda is to figure out what I want to learn next� -Ayse Birsell


make |space with david hamilton chicago

Orginially from Wisconsin, David migrated south to Chicago over 5 years ago and hasn’t looked back! He is an extremely talented graphic designer and lover of all things Celine Dion! As an avid music afficionado he attends multiple concerrts and visits music club Berlin on a weekly basis. He purchases anything pink, sparklely, and covered in gems just like his idol Iowa based rapper Leslie Hall. He has an eclectic aesthetic that runs from vintage finds to Gucci snow boots. He is the most reliable person I have met when it comes to what is happening in the city of Chicago. This is how Dave makes|space.

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grace

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keeper of thy gems 95


THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU 96


THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU HAVE A NICE DAY

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hOme

manuel navarro | portfolio  

interior design portfolio -professional -graduate -undergraduate -photography -vibe sheets -zine -publications

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