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Getting Started

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InDEX Getting Started Intro

3

Lima

4

Core Creative’s Guide To Lima Where they live

6

Where they hang out

11

Where they go at night

12

How they get around

17

Media consumption

18

Role of social media

20

What they listen to

22

What role does creativity play in their lives

24

Where they shop

27

Retail Landscape Overview Key accounts

28

Shopping destinations

30

Converse locations

36

Outside Lima Intro

38

Cusco

40

Machu Picchu

42


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Welcome / Intro

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Welcome / Intro

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Welcome to lima: The streets of South America’s oldest city continue to learn new tricks

It’s said that with age, comes wisdom, and it’s especially true for South America’s oldest city, Lima, where it readily flows through every street. This metropolitan capital boasts centuries of history to inspire any civilization. So, it comes as no surprise that the wisdom, history, and streets of the capital are once again being used as inspiration for a growing creative culture led, this time, by the youth. This guide is a peak into the sights, smells, sounds, and sensations of an old city with an increasingly young spirit. Home to more than nine million Limeños, the streets of Lima are a crossroads joining ancient traditions and old stories with young people and new ideas. The result is something unique we invite you to experience for yourself.


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Welcome / Intro

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Welcome / Intro

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Taking inspiration from the past to mold the future Lima’s residents, or Limeños, simply adore their city. One of the oldest cities in the Americas, it draws its energies, tales, and experiences from five centuries of history. It’s easily felt in the air and on the ground, with no signs of weakening.

vibrantly colored houses that cling to the hills in its periphery. Skyscrapers designed by international developers stretch the city vertically, while new roadways lined with gigantic shopping malls, theaters, and art districts expand it horizontally.

Peru’s capital emits a creative energy stretching from the charmingly preserved colonial Centro to the

As new money pours into urban regeneration and infrastructure, an emerging Peruvian creative spirit

is re-engaging with its capital city and it really seems as if Lima’s time has returned once again. Moreover, a peculiar mood in Lima remains: its unexpected rhythms and street art, the extreme contrasts between historical exuberance and the urge of standing out all breed a truly unique identity.

There are 2.1 million Limeños aged 15-29. Even though creatives were marginalized and suffered through the terrorism and corruption times of the Shining Path Maoist group in the 1980s and ’90s, today they have confirmed their place in the consumer society. Various core creative youngsters have been taking Lima by storm while expressing their outgoing, social spirit in search of historical vindication.


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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

For obvious cultural and social reasons, young core creatives strive to live in well-connected, central locations or classic urban areas with access to many streets. As a polycentric city, these types of places are not hard to find. The most popular have to be Barranco, Miraflores, San Isidro, and Callao, but one must not disregard the numerous others that are growing in popularity. The aforementioned zones are becoming less accessible to young people as the cost of living increases. As a result, core creative Limeños are looking to restore Lima’s Historic Center to its old beauty with their take on a modern, cultural, and safe lifestyle.

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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

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Barranco

Miraflores

San Isidro

Callao

Although Barranco is one of Lima’s smallest districts, it may also be the one that best represents its cultural essence. You can feel the special creative atmosphere as every street corner breathes life into the city. Barranco shares 140 years of history, and within that time, many artists were born and raised in this peaceful, yet thriving, south Lima district.

Miraflores is a popular tourist center with shopping, restaurants and entertainment in high supply. It’s a meeting point for generations of core creative Limeños with a charming blend of historical and modern architecture where artists, musicians, and folk groups love to meet. Miraflores is a safe and clean district, as well as one of the most dynamic areas of the capital.

Simply put, San Isidro is just charming. It’s that quaint district to wander around, go shopping, savor art galleries, enjoy excellent restaurants, cafes, and bars, and relax in peaceful parks. San Isidro also prides itself of being home to many core creative artists.

Callao is Peru’s biggest port. Located adjacent to the capital, it is part of the Lima Metropolitan Area. As one of the country’s biggest industrial areas, this city has been rebuilt several times as earthquakes and tsunamis have taken their toll. Little by little, groups of street-wise core creatives lured by their common love for the arts and their desire to enrich the city with an empowering music scene and amazing graffiti walls have put their artistic stamp on the beautifying and rebuilding processes.


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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

If you’re a young, core creative Limeño, then it’s unlikely you’ve never been to an art exhibition at CPUCP (Cultural Center of the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru) or indie music shows and outdoor movies at MAC (Museum of Contemporary Art of Lima). An insatiable appetite for culture and authentic expression has led young people to re-embrace “Chicha.” This psychedelic version of Cumbia — the Afro-Latino dance music — was once shunned by the mainstream, but now calls Barranco’s musical circles home. For music lovers, there’s the Elefante Blanco Music Store selling all kinds of instruments, second-hand parts and records from underground bands.

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At the heart of the Jesús María District (north of Miraflores) you will find the Brasil galleries home of bootlegged music and accessories for all of Lima’s “urban tribes.” To get a taste of Limeño punk, go to Jirón Quilca street where contemporary folk art mixes with eroded colonial architecture covered in urban graffiti. Be sure to check out iconic Bar Averno, one of the most important cultural centers of Lima that refuses to disappear. Goths, punks, metal-heads and emos have colonized various areas of the city like Parque Washington in Santa Beatriz (Centro Histórico) or Arenales Mall in Lince District. Eccentric or not, they are the new inhabitants of postmodern Lima, going to discos in Larcomar in Miraflores.


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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

Chances are high that on any given day one would find young core creatives sipping local microbrews – usually De Tomás or Barbarian - from plastic cups with a statue of the Virgin Mary staring down in the background. They also can often be seen catching a breeze at rooftop concert venues in Lima’s Magdalena district. Local folk bands are always on tap as listeners take in songs about the lead singers’ abuelas and they enjoy the refreshing Costa Verde winds. Limeños love the city’s laid-back vibe, where it’s just as common to mix it up with friends or take a solo stroll. But like

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any capital city, Lima residents live for the drama and excitement of the noisy nightlife found in Barranco. Even with its Bohemian feel, it is the place to find live local music and DJs. It seems that each day the number of new nightlife spots grows in Lima. Bizarro, El Dragon, Aura, and La Noche de Barranco, offer variety and options of musical styles to suit anyone’s interests or tastes. That being said, a Lima night always starts off with “Previos,”—a few drinks to get the night going—usually at someone’s home or at a local bar. This is where places like La Emolienteria in Miraflores or Ayahuasca in Barranco come in.

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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

La Emolienteria

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Located a block from El Parque Kennedy in the heart of Miraflores, La Emolienteria is a favorite amongst local hipsters. What makes it stand out from the rest is its exquisite variety of infused drinks made from jungle and Andean herbs and liquors. These treats are best served with delicious dishes of native Peruvian origin. Its modern-pop, Peruvian decor also allows a space for local independent artists to exhibit their work. All this has made La Emolienteria the main watering hole for locals to drop by for their can’t-do-without “previos” drinks on weekends or just to hang out during the week.

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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

El Dragon

El Dragon in Barranco is a classic spot that constantly reinvents itself and continues growing and remaining relevant, presenting a variety of musical performances and genres on a daily basis. It has a dance floor and a lounge style environment that is welcoming to anyone and everyone.

El Sargento Pimienta

A traditional venue located in Barranco hosts mostly 1970’s-, 80’s-, and 90’s-themed Rock concerts on a large stage setting. It’s a very attractive option for rock lovers to dance, sing, and have fun late into the night.

Bizarro

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Back in Miraflores, you can find Bizarro, a discotheque-style lounge bar hosting the best local and international Electronic performers. It’s a great spot for those who wish to dance to house, drum & bass, and other electronic sounds without having to wait for a rave to come to town.


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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

“Chaotic” is the best way to describe the traffic Lima experiences nowadays. This is mainly due to a poor public transportation system that is pushing people towards more resourceful modes of transport. “Micros” or “combis,” and taxis and moto-taxis are the preferred ways to zip people from A to B.

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The increasing number of people and vehicles, coupled with the lack of wide roads and intersections, forces young people to be more creative in how they navigate the city, making skateboards and bicycles attractive alternatives to wormhole through Lima’s narrow streets.


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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

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Core creative Limeños went digital long ago. And, like most youngsters around the world, they’re using newer media platforms as sources of news and entertainment due to the fact a hefty portion of internet access takes place through public access points.

and some noteworthy processes are taking place, like the blogs created by young core creative Limeños that are becoming an independent alternative reference for content. In strictly quantitative terms, their impact is growing.

They’ve grown weary of mainstream media conglomerates and their abilities to shape agendas via broadcast and print outlets.

Dedo Medio With its unique blend of irreverence, sardonic humor, investigative journalism, and check-this-out photography, Dedo Medio flips the bird at traditional print publication. The magazine, which means “middle finger” in English, started out as a reaction

Online communication has begun to modify the general trends of traditional media production and consumption,

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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

against the dull, self-righteous posers of the establishment in Lima and has successfully slashed its own niche in the cultural landscape showing how easy it is to be in love with imprudence. DedoMedio.com Oveja Negra Oveja Negra (Black Sheep) has no problem straying from the herd as it’s regarded as an ideal alternative to what’s trending in Lima. The magazine delivers fresh insight into the worlds of music, dance, sports, film, art, and dining, helping the young Limeños stay ahead of the curve. OvejaNegra.com.pe Etiqueta Negra Covering anything from stories about swingers, suicide, and soccer stars

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to conspiracy theories and Peruvian politics, Etiqueta Negra (Black Label) offers readers entertainment from unlikely sources with wide perspectives and varying methods. As the self-proclaimed magazine of the ADD, Etiqueta Negra started creating a quick buzz across the literary circles and hasn’t taken its foot off the gas yet. EtiquetaNegra.com.pe Asia Sur Asia Sur is a magazine devoted to Peruvian social life, extremely visual, and with extensive photo dossiers and videos of the latest music scene, sports, and the low down of Lima nightlife. AsiaSur.com


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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

Social media has revolutionized millennial minds in Peru, allowing them to share their interests like never before. They rarely walk around without their smartphones in hand, always connected to the world.

• 35% of the Peruvians, or 10

million+, are on Facebook: 22% higher than the worldwide average.

• More Peruvian men are using social media than women, an opposite trend compared to the rest of the world: 675,000 men are on Twitter, while only 540,000 are women.

As a result, Luis Carlos Burneo, aka Henry Spencer, emerged. (www.lahabitaciondehenryspencer.com) Henry took advantage of the social media explosion with videos about what was

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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

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hip in Lima. His prose tells stories of those just starting out and making it in all levels of cultural society. This has given a voice to the arts and a venue for young people to have fun and, particularly, the fulfilling liberty to speak openly. Spencer said his interviews were freeform “conversations” without any rules. With this came criticism from journalists and established media networks who have had to accept that a new kind of journalism was being inserted into Peru’s capital. At the same time, Adri Vainilla emerged as a no-holds-barred, electro-pop-punk diva. As Adriana Cebrián’s alter-ego, she has grown out of her need to expose Peruvian

problems like chauvinism, homophobia, women’s rights, and social repression. In 2007, she started the electro-stupid band Pestaña, known for uncommon performances and irreverence. Vainilla charms Peru’s social media community with her suggestive dialogue and erotic photographs. It’s a calling for women’s sexual liberation that has garnered her a loyal fan base and the title “queen of the social media.”

After the unexpected death of Leonardo Bacteria, Vainilla left Pestaña and released her first EP, “Stereosexual.” She is currently completing her first studio album, while performing live shows in Lima and NYC and breaking ground with her blog www.censurame.com.


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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

Lima’s musical landscape ranges from electronic to acoustic, to pop, and even to punk. Recently however, as with most aspects of Peruvian culture, music has looked inward and embraced its native sounds finding inspiration all over Peru. Enter electronic Dengue Dengue Dengue and DJ Shushupe, or the rock infused, neo-Andean La Sarita. Dengue Dengue Dengue, one of the pioneers of “Cumbia Digital,” and aiming to re-vindicate Peru’s primal culture in a modern context, has taken over the capital. They combine audiovisuals,

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tribal-style masks, and a talent for mixing dubstep, drum & bass, techno, and dancehall with psychedelic Peruvian cumbia. The influence of Indie and Folk music are also slowly creeping into Peru’s mainstream. Heading this movement are Kanaku & El Tigre. Marked by a unique style and sound, they have received a warm welcome to Lima’s musical scene. Their enigmatic sound, on par with Wilco or I am Kloot, is proof that folk music can be just as interesting in Spanish as it is in English.

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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

It’s a lost cause to clearly and completely define a Limeño core creative, but there are some common qualities that bond them together: curiosity, perseverance, nonconformity, and observation. They feed on all the sights, smells, and sensations that Lima offers and they turn this input into inspiration and experience. Core creatives are truly unconventional, seeking to be challenged every day. They also tend to work late hours with demanding schedules, but many have learned to find balance between work and play and can manage their time to enjoy their well-deserved nights out. They’ve realized that there is always

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time to do what they want; it’s simply a matter of desire and seeing it done. And let the record show: Limeños are great doers. Limeños are a group of self-taught individuals that have no concerns for master’s degrees or specialized studies. For them, street experience is the best teacher and knowledge is best discovered in the conversations and life situations among friends and acquaintances. In observing their surroundings – especially Lima street – they acquire greater empathy with their reality, get in tune with the world, and use these emotions to generate creative ideas.


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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

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Core Creative’s Guide To Lima

While wandering around Miraflores and Barranco, core creative Limeños keep their ears to the street when it comes to finding deals, unique shops, beautiful crafts, and stylish clothing from young designers and entrepreneurs.

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Fledging artists, micro-boutique vendors, and stylists all converge in the residential area of Miraflores, a word-of-mouth and social-media driven shopping haven that welcomes creative upstarts as well as seasoned hagglers. The scene is something akin to a popup store gone tropical, set in your aunt’s empty basement or a flash sale, heavily discounting accessories that occupy abandoned office building corners. Even with all these options, the core creative class still indulges in sinful visits to the new generations of megamalls that are, not so quietly, conquering their city. Today’s shopping centers in Lima are edging out the main squares as preferred meeting places that offer almost endless shopping opportunities, entertainment, fairs, and exhibitions. Love them or loathe them, they are a real part of today’s culture.


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Retail Landscape Overview

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best

Fashion Sport

Sport Style

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Better

Retail Landscape Overview

Good

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Retail Landscape Overview

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Retail Landscape Overview

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ta

o

Los Olivos

Na ra n j

12

al

Nestor G am

re

Av

2

3

Pueblo Libre

13

Av en id a

Cir c

e

14 La Uni ver Av s

6

do Este J a viet Pra

San Isidro District

Miraflores District

San Borja

7 ericana Su r

ya s

5

4

11

l tra

Panam

u it od

San Luis

Surquillo

8 14. Car. Carretera Panamericana Sur Cañete Mala, Lima, Peru 15. Av. Avenida javier prado este #4200 Santiago de Surco, Lima, Peru

Santiago de Surco

San Juan de Miraflores

9

10

n

d ida

Jesus Maria

San Miguel District

ll o s Ay ola Nic

n ío

13. Av. Avenida Del Castillo #301 Ate, Lima, Peru

en C a r r e te r a C

lac va un rc

Ma rin a

Breña

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Santa Anita

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La Perla

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12. Av. Avenida Autop.cto Grandre-Flores Sn San Juan de Lurigancho, Lima, Peru

Lima

Rep

7. Av. Avenida javier prado este #4200 Santiago de Surco, Lima, Peru

11. Cal. Calle Las Begonias #489 San Isidro, Lima, Peru

ra

d eo e la

6. Av. Avenida Universitaria S/N San Miguel, Lima, Peru

El Agustino te

r asca Hu

a Pl

5. Av. Avenida guardia peruana #1033 Chorrillos, Lima, Peru

San Juan de Lurigancho

Callao

Pas

4. Cal. Calle Las Begonias #577 San Isidro, Lima, Peru

10. Cal. Calle Shell #202 Miraflores, Lima, Peru

Ramiro Prialé

Ca r

3. Av. Avenida Aviacion y Angamos Este Sn San Borja, Lima, Peru

9. Av. Avenida El Sol #2241 Villa el Salvador, Lima, Peru

ort e ric ana N

2. Av. Avenida Javier Prado Este #576 San Isidro, Lima, Peru

8. Av. Avenida la marina #2040 San Miguel, Lima, Peru

El

Independencia

P aname

1. Av. Avenida Aalfredo Mendiola #3698 Independencia, Lima, Peru

1

San Martin de Porres

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Ca

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Tupac

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La Molina District


Retail Landscape Overview

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Retail Landscape Overview

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ta

o

Los Olivos

Na ra n j

al

Nestor G am

4. Saga Falabella San Isidro Av. Paseo de la República #3220 San Isidro, Lima, Peru Hours: 11:00 - 21:30 hrs. Callao Phone: 215-1030 Customer Service: 512-3333 r asca

El Agustino re

te

La Perla

Av

e C a r r e te r a C

Pueblo Libre

Miraflores District

San Borja

Surquillo

5

Santiago de Surco

San Juan de Miraflores

La Uni ver Av s

d ida

San Isidro District

ericana Su r

ya s

6

Panam

e

ú p l i ca

u it od

do Este J a viet Pra

Rep

Cir c

4 d eo e la

Av en id a

San Luis

n ío

Jesus Maria

San Miguel District

n

ral nt

lac va un rc

Ma rin a

Breña

ll o s Ay ola Nic

Ci

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3

Santa Anita

Na c

1N 00 al ion

Lima

ra

Pas

6. Saga Falabella Jockey Plaza Av. Javier Prado Este #4200 Jockey Plaza, Lima, Peru Hours : 11:00 - 21:30 hrs. Phone: 313-4040 Customer Service: 512-3333

San Juan de Lurigancho

Ca r

2

Hu

5. Saga Falabella Miraflores Av. Arequipa #5280 Miraflores, Lima Peru Hours: 11:00 - 21:30 hrs. Phone: 213-6330 Customer Service: 512-3333

Ramiro Prialé

a Pl

3. Saga Falabella San Miguel Av. La Marina #2100 - Urb. Pando San Miguel, Lima, Peru Hours: 11:00 - 21:30 hrs. Phone: 411-2800 Customer Service: 512-3333

El

ort e ric ana N

2. Saga Falabella Centro Histórico Jiron de La Unión #517 Centro Historico, Lima, Peru Hours:11:00 - 21:30 hrs. Customer Service: 311-7070

Independencia

P aname

1. Saga Falabella Mega Plaza Av. Industrial 3515 / 3517 Independencia, Lima, Peru Hours: 11:00 - 21:30 hrs. Customer Service: 511-2300

1 San Martin de Porres

ce t t Fau er m

b e tt a

n

Ca

lla Ca

Tupac

Am a

ru

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La Molina District


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Retail Landscape Overview

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Retail Landscape Overview

OPEN PLAZA:

REAL PLAZA:

1. Angamos Av. Angamos #1803 y/o Av. Tomas Marsano #961 Surquillo, Lima, Peru

1. Centro Civico Av. Garcilaso de la Vega #1337 Lima, Peru

1. C.C. Real Plaza Av. Paseo de la República #144 Centro Cívico, Lima, Peru

2. Guardia Civil Av. Guardia Civil con La Campiña #1035 Chorrillos, Lima, Peru

2. C.C Rambla Calle Carpaccio con Calle Ucelo San Borja, Lima, Peru

2. Atocongo Av. Circunvalación con Atocongo. San Juan de Miraflores, Lima, Peru 3.C. C. La Marina Open Plaza Av. La Marina #2355 La Marina, Lima, Peru 4. Canta Callao Av. Alejandro Bertello con Av. Canta Callao Canta Callao, Lima, Peru

3. Primavera Av. Aviación #3620 San Borja, Lima, Peru 4. Real Plaza Pro Av. Alfredo Mendiola con Urb. Santa Luzmila #7042. San Martín de Porres, Lima, Peru 5. Real Plaza Santa Clara Av. Nicolas Ayllon con carretera Central KM. 10.5 #8694. Intersección Av. Estrella Santa Clara, Lima, Peru

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Retail Landscape Overview

converse monobrands 1. Larcomar Block 6 of Malec贸n de la Reserva Miraflores, Lima, Peru 2. Jockey Plaza Avenida Javier Prado Este #4200 Lima, Peru

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Retail Landscape Overview

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Outside Lima

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With all there is to do and see in Lima, it can be easy to overlook some of the country’s other many treasures. And even though some may think that they pale in comparison to the magnitude of the capital, places like Cusco and Machu Picchu have not failed to offer their own creative spin on Peruvian culture. The former capital and greatest icon of the Incan Empire, respectively, Cusco and Machu Picchu still exert that creative energy that saw them flourish in times past. And what’s more, it’s still inspiring the core creatives of the present.

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LIMA

Outside Lima

MACHU PICCHU

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CUSCO


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Outside Lima

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Outside Lima

Incan village, countercultural hot spot, and a glamorous cultural destination: young core creatives find an intoxicating mix of arts, nightlife, and great lounging in Cusco. This tiny town nestled in a highland valley is the treasure of the Cusqueños, and was built out of local stone that has been well preserved allowing its residents to continue enjoying it after so many centuries. One minute you’re walking down a shadowy, stonewalled alley, the next, you burst onto the colonial Plaza de Armas. This square is full of tourists from all over the planet and artists from Lima, joining in what seems like an endless lounge-y life.

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Cusqueños love sipping coffee on the terrace of the Maytaq and watching the world pass behind the Cathedral of Santo Domingo. But they are not very frivolous: core creative entrepreneurs have a deep respect for the rural, pre-Columbian way of life and they boost the local food movement to bring prosperity to Cusco. Sites like the Mutu bar offer organic coffee and a Peruvian variety of staple herbal infusions, made with the freshest local produce. In Cusco there is a sense of syncretism that comes naturally. Point in case: Puna Shop Gallery, dedicated to promoting contemporary art and design, blending the modern with the traditional, designing prints and serigraphs, and publishing books and music that you won’t find elsewhere.


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Outside Lima

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Outside Lima

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The construction of Machu Picchu was ordered by the Incan emperor, Pachacuti, sometime in the mid-15th century. The legendary Incan desired Machu Picchu be built to celebrate the defeat of powerful rivals Chancas. If you wish to walk to the ruins, the Inca Trail is 27 to 35 miles long passing through high-mountain desert, cloud forest and mountain passes at heights of nearly 14,000 feet. Then, you must navigate the orchid-rich jungle before arriving at the legendary Lost City of the Incas. Lasting evidence show how creative the Incas really were: the stones of the most beautiful buildings of used no mortar. These stones were cut with precision and wedged so closely together that a credit card can’t be inserted between them. In addition to the aesthetics of this design, there are technical advantages. Peru is a country seismically unstable. Both Lima and Cusco were destroyed by earthquakes, and Machu Picchu itself was built atop two previous disasters. When an earthquake hits, Incan stones “dance” by bouncing around during the earthquake, and then fall back into place. Without this design, many of the most famous buildings of Machu Picchu would have collapsed long ago.


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Callejeando Perú  

Converse guide to Lima and Cusco.

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