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Robert Gonzales Process Book


ood50x70 /// 20

PROJECT THAT HELPS SOCIAL COM

L FOR ENTRIES DITIONS AND RULES

INDEX 1.

BRIEFS

2.

ELIGIBILITY

3.

JURY 3.a Members 3.b Independen


blishing an effective campaign to support their causes

4. DATE AN

PROJECT 1 HOMELESS POSTER for. There are also many issues that are not represented by an accredited charity or a non-governmental organization. We believe that a poster is the appropriate medium for giving a visual for a cause, a key concept for starting a campaign and for reducing the distance between creativity and charities.

In order to raise awareness about as many different social issues as possible and to offer every charity a potential poster for a campaign or an event, free of charge, Good50x70 is reaching out to everyone. Designers, art directors, illustrators, students, professionals or any interested individual, are invited to create a 50x70 poster (or more than one).

What we ask is: engaging visuals and a message as simple and clear as possible and for the widest target. The competition provides the participants with the chance of sharing their interest about social issues that

4.A CONTEST DA 5. ANONYMITY

The contest is op can be uploaded M o 5.A COPYRIGHTED 2011. Thean contes By submitting entry (CETtotim pantmidnight will be asked s published prior to the c SPEC her/ 4.B theirENTRY personal wor Every work presen 5.B ANONYMOUS EN 1. A poster address No poster submitted 150D bear(2953x4134 any other disting previously and and address of the un pa matically in the contes 2. Aentry black and whit Poster and perso JPG and 300DPI reunitedRGB only after

6.

3. A brief explana or a short essay in RESTRICTIO view about social


Wordlist


Research http://thejustlife.org/home/2010/12/26/homelessness-facts/ THE FACTS WORLDWIDE Over one billion people on the planet lack adequate housing, while around 100 million have no housing whatsoever. – www.ipsnews.net It is estimated that the number of homeless people in the world’s urban centers is between 20 and 40 million. At the same time, U.N. statistics indicate that in the least developed countries (LDCs), 78% of the population lives in slums. – www.ipsnews.net The number of homeless people in Western Europe is at its highest level in 50 years, with numbers not seen since the end of World War II. An estimated 3 million Western Europeans were believed to be homeless during the winter of 2003. – www.youthxchange.net The real numbers of homeless people are much higher than official statistics suggest; in Britain, for example, approximately two million people are ‘unofficially’ homeless or ‘hidden,’ sleeping on friends’ floors or in overcrowded conditions. – www.youthxchange.net IN AMERICA About 3.5 million people are homeless, including 0.9 to 1.4 million children. – www.youthxchange.net Of the children and youth identified as homeless by the Department of Education in 2000, only 35% lived in shelters; 34% lived doubled-up with family or friends, and 23% lived in motels and other locations. – www.urbanministry.org An average of 22% of homeless single people are considered mentally ill, while 8% of homeless individuals in a household with children were found to have mental illnesses. – www.youthxchange.net Over a five-year period, about 2–3 percent of the U.S. population (5–8 million people) will experience at least one night of homelessness (“Homelessness Statistics and Data”, Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration). A study done by the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty which states that approximately 3.5 million people, 1.35 million of them children, are likely to experience homelessness in a given year (“How Many People Experience Homelessness?”, National Coalition for the Homeless). On any given day, at least 800,000 people are homeless in the U.S., including about 200,000 children in homeless families (“What Will It Take to End Homelessness?”, the Urban Institute). As much as 10 percent of the poor people in the country may be homeless each year (ibid.). In a survey of 21 cities, it was found that 23 percent of the homeless are members of households with children, 23 percent are individuals, while one percent is made up of unaccompanied youth (“How Many People Experience Homelessness?”). One to three percent of the cities’ total population used a shelter or transitional housing in 2007 (ibid.). Singles and unaccompanied children remain homeless an average of 4.7 months while 5.7 months is the average for families with children in the 23 survey cities (ibid.). The homeless population is estimated to be 42 percent African-American, 39 percent white, 13 percent Hispanic, 4 percent Native American and 2 percent Asian (ibid.). In 2003, children under the age of 18 accounted for 39% of the homeless population; 42% of these children were under the age of five (“Who Is Homeless?”, National Coalition for the Homeless). In 2007, a survey by the U.S. Conference of Mayors found that of the population surveyed 35% of the homeless people who are members of households with children are male while 65% of these people are females. However, 67.5% of the single homeless population are males, and it is this single population that makes up 76% of the homeless populations surveyed (ibid.). A 2003 survey of 100 homeless mothers in 10 locations around the country found that 25% of the women had been physically abused in the last year (ibid.). Many homeless men are veterans: 40% have served in the armed forces, as compared to 34% of the general adult male population (ibid.) An average of 22 percent of homeless single people is considered mentally ill while 8 percent of homeless individuals in a household with children were found to have mental illnesses (“How Many People Experience Homelessness?”). The Council for Affordable and Rural Housing estimates that about nine percent of the nation’s homeless are in rural areas (ibid.). Of the children and youth identified as homeless by the Department of Education in FY2000, only 35% lived in shelters; 34% lived doubled-up with family or friends, and 23% lived in motels and other locations (ibid.). IN CHICAGO A study led by the Chicago Coalition for the Homeless (CCH) showed that 73,656 men, women, youths,and children were homeless in Chicago during fiscal year 2006. – www. chicagohomeless.org Chicago ranks fifth in the nation for segregation of poor families. – www. chicagohomeless.org The majority of new jobs through 2012 are projected to pay far below the current state median household income of $48,008. – www.chicagohomeless.org


Thumbnails


Thumbnails


Roughs


Roughs


Roughs


Roughs


Roughs


House of Cards Option Rough and Final


Fishbowl Option Rough and Final


PROJECT 2 SUSTAINABLE DESIGN


Consumption Log

TUESDAY / DAY 1 2 Q tips. 1 Coffee Filter. Coffee from plastic (?) bag. Kashi granola bar wrapper. 2 cans of sparkling water. Bill Miller half chicken delight: Clear plastic salad container. Plastic cup and lid for salad dressing. Styrofoam plate for chicken. Foil wrapper for chicken plate. Styrofoam cup and plastic lid for BBQ

Plastic straw sauce. Plastic knife Paper bag and fork in a 1 paper napplastic bag. kin 2 paper tow2 cans of spar- els at bathroom kling water W E D N E S - 1 paper popDAY / DAY 2 corn bag 1 glass beer bottle 2 Q tips. 1 Coffee Fil- 1 plastic water bottle ter. Coffee from plastic (?) THURSDAY / DAY 3 bag. Kashi granola bar wrap- 2 Q tips. 1 Coffee Filper. ter. 3 cans of spar- Coffee from (?) kling water. plastic bag. 1 large piece Whataburger of foil to wrap a two tacos. lunch: Orange paper h a m b u r g e r 3 cans of sparkling water. wrapper Cardboard fry box Large soda Large plastic water bottle. cup

Plastic bag of trail mix. Paper sandwich wrapper. Plastic chip bag. Plastic bag for sandwich and chips. Paper towel. FRIDAY / DAY 4 2 Q tips. 1 Coffee Filter. Coffee from plastic (?) bag. Kashi granola bar wrapper. 3 cans of sparkling water. Paper towels


Earbuds: Original Packaging

The challange was to make the packaging of earbuds more sustainable.


Earbuds: Prototyping and Thumbnails

I not only wanted to reduce the packaging for this product, I wanted to give the packaging a second life by allowing the consume


er to use the main piece to wrap the earbuds when not in use.


Earbuds: Design Development

B U D W R A P W R A P

ear EAR buds BUDS

e a r b u d s

e a r b u d s

wraparound

Color-matching for iPod Nano Ergo-Fit Design for Ultimate Comfort and Fit 3 Pairs of Soft Earpads Included 1 Year Limited Warranty, Parts and Labor Drive Unit (diam.in mm) Diameter 9mm Impedance (ohm/1kHz) - 16 Ergo-Fit Design for Ultimate Comfort and Fit, 3.5 mm plug

EAR BUDS Color-matching for iPod Nano Ergo-Fit Design for Ultimate Comfort and Fit 3 Pairs of Soft Earpads Included 1 Year Limited Warranty, Parts and Labor Drive Unit (diam.in mm) Diameter 9mm Impedance (ohm/1kHz) - 16 Ergo-Fit Design for Ultimate Comfort and Fit, 3.5 mm plug

I always envisioned the piece to fit in someone’s pocket, but when I realized that this should be the same size as a credit card th


Earbuds: Prototyping of Final Design

hat I knew I found the right dimensions. The silicone band would hold the earbuds for the retailer and, later, the consumer.


Earbuds: Design Development

reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix

Ecologically minded economically priced technologically advanced

earbuds WRAPAROUND earbuds WRAPAROUND earbuds reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduceremix reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse

reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix

Ecologically minded economically priced technologically advanced

earbuds WRAPAROUND earbuds WRAPAROUND earbuds reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduceremix reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse remix reduce reuse

Thick aluminum would give the piece the necessary rigidity as well as a highly recyclable material when the life of the product w


Earbuds: Final Design

was over. The silicone band is for the optimal use of this piece as earbud storage, but not necessary.


Water Container: Thumbnails

Since the size of a gallon jug is something that cannot be reduced, the challenge of this piece was to create as many uses for th


his after its life as a water container. I wanted this to provide as many opportunities for invention and re-use.


Water Container: Design

With scored lines for cutting, the container would suggest more uses of this product.


Water Container: Use as Planter


Water Container: Design

There is no “correct� usage of this piece. The consumer becomes a creative participant in its reinvention.


Water Container: Use as Household Bucket and Organizer


Water Container: Use as Carrier


Water Container: Use as Building Material

Design Process Book Semester Two  
Design Process Book Semester Two  

Done to document my work for a design class at Texas State University.

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