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FARM & RANCH AGRIBUSINESS

is the world’s oldest, largest, and most important industry.

A supplemental section to the

Oakdale Leader, Escalon Times, Riverbank News, Manteca Bulletin and the Ripon Bulletin. March 21, 2018


2 — Farm & Ranch • Wednesday, March 21, 2018

MJC Sweeps Collegiate Ag Leaders Speaking Competition

The Modesto Junior College Agricultural Department swept the student competition at the spring Collegiate Ag Leaders (CAL) contest on Friday, March 2. MJC came home with over 20 awards won by 16 students. MJC freshman Elizabeth Enke placed first in Prepared Public Speaking. Chris Galhano claimed third for Individual Sales. Andrew Skidmore won Discussion Meet, with fellow MJC student Adriana Toste placing second. Skidmore also captured first in Extemporaneous Public Speaking. The Portfolio contest was dominated by MJC, as Kaela Cooper won first, Lauryn Cabral brought home second, and Jonathan Moules took fourth. The Marketing Team, comprised of Adriana Langarcia and Rolando Tejeda, captured first. In the Job Interview competition, Rolando Tejeda won first for Ag Technician, with Jared Murdaugh placing second. Kaela Cooper took second place for Ag Production, Kalli Waid took second place in Ag Education, and Lauryn Cabral claimed second for Horticulture, with Elena Montejo-Salinas coming in fourth. The Collegiate Ag Leaders is a statewide organization that promotes agricultural and career opportunities. The MJC Agriculture and Environmental Sciences division is home to over 2,000 MJC students, served by a dozen full time staff. Learn more at www.mjc.edu/ag.

MJC Collegiate Ag Leaders competition participants included, back row from left, Adriana Toste, Elizabeth Enke, Kalli Waid, Jared Murdaugh, Keith Nunes, Chris Galhano, Renee Zelaya, Andrew Skidmore, Patrice Parks. Front row from left, Rolando Tejeda, Jonathan Moules, Kaela Cooper, Daryl Dias, Adriana Langarcia, Elena Montejo-Salinas. PHOTO CONTRIBUTED


Farm & Ranch • Wednesday, March 21, 2018 — 3

Farm Credit Helps Californians Learn More About Careers In Agriculture Adults and high school students interested in careers in agriculture will have help reaching their goals thanks to a recent $15,000 donation by Farm Credit to the Center for Land-Based Learning, a nonprofit that inspires, educates and cultivates future generations of California farmers and agricultural leaders. Farm Credit donated $10,000 to LandBased Learning’s California Farm Academy program which offers a seven-month training program for adults interested in becoming farmers, and another $5,000 to the Farming, Agriculture, and Resource Management for Sustainability Leadership Program (FARMS), which introduces high school students to college and career opportunities in agriculture, especially in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering and math. The involved Farm Credit organizations – American AgCredit, CoBank, Farm Credit West, Fresno-Madera Farm Credit and Golden State Farm Credit – are customerowned associations supporting rural communities and agriculture with reliable, consistent credit and financial services.

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Leili Ghazi, president of CoBank’s Western Region Agribusiness Banking Group, said the contributions are part of Farm Credit’s ongoing efforts to enhance agriculture in California and the West. “Farm Credit has been helping support the Center for Land-Based Learning for many years and over that time has contributed nearly $67,000 to help their programs grow,” Ghazi said. “For farming to remain viable, we need a constant influx of new farmers and people working in ag-related occupations, and helping the Center is an important part of our commitment to farming.” Christine McMorrow, the Winters-based Center’s director of development and communications, said the ongoing Farm Credit contributions have helped enable the Center to grow and expand. “Support from Farm Credit and other sponsors and supporters have made a big difference for our programs,” McMorrow said. “It’s allowed us to really establish our programs and to look at what needs we’re not fulfilling and given us the opportunity to offer more where needed.”

Farm Credit funding helps provide tuition assistance for the Farm Academy – the program costs $4,000 a year – and also helps with an intensive tractor driving and maintenance program. Earlier this year, the program expanded its offerings when it received state certification for its new Beginning Farm and Ranch Manager Apprenticeship Program, which requires 250 hours of coursework and 3,000 hours of paid on-thejob training on a farm under the mentorship of a seasoned farmer. The FARMS Leadership program was Land-Based Learning’s first program, launched in 1993. It encourages high school students in multiple California counties to get hands-on experience on farms and ranches and to consider making ag a career. Many of the students are the first generation in their families to attend college, and many in fact are the sons and daughters of farmworkers. “Their parents tell them to get out of agriculture, go to college and get a good job. We encourage them to get a good job in agriculture,” McMorrow said. American AgCredit, CoBank, Farm Credit

West, Fresno-Madera Farm Credit and Golden State Farm Credit are cooperatively owned lending institutions providing agriculture and rural America with a dependable source of credit. They specialize in financing farmers, ranchers, farmer-owned cooperatives, rural utilities and agribusinesses. Farm Credit offers a broad range of loan products and financial services, including long-term real estate loans, operating lines of credit, equipment and facility loans, cash management and appraisal and leasing services. For more information, visit www.farmcreditalliance.com The mission of the Center for Land-Based Learning is to inspire, educate and cultivate future generations of farmers, agricultural leaders, and natural resource stewards. Combining innovative hands-on experience with classroom learning, participants in Land-Based Learning programs develop leadership skills, learn how sustainable agriculture practices contribute to a healthy ecosystem, and create connections to careers in agriculture and natural resources. For more information, visit www.landbasedlearning.org.


4 — Farm & Ranch • Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Salmonella Is ‘No Yolk’ When Raising Backyard Chickens City dwellers and suburbanites have flown the coop, so to speak. A growing interest in raising chickens has enabled coops and nesting birds to spring up in neighborhoods one would not typically associate with chickens. Sometimes dubbed ‘urban homesteading’ or ‘urban farming,’ these homegrown operations enable people to enjoy fresh eggs from the comfort of home. Henhouses are just another extension of methods to reap the benefits of fresh, local and nonfactory-produced foods. Although advocates insist that raising chickens on a small scale makes the birds less likely to carry disease than factoryfarmed chickens, anyone raising chickens needs to be aware of the potential for disease – particularly salmonella. Also, it’s important to care for chickens in a manner that is humane and in line with local laws. What is salmonella? Salmonella is a common bacteria that lives in the intestinal tract of humans, other mammals and some birds, including chickens. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that approximately 1.2 million illnesses and 450 deaths are attributed to salmonella annually in the

United States. The illness causes diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps between 12 and 72 hours after infection and can last between four and seven days. Salmonella can cause death when not properly treated with antibiotics. Spreading salmonella Although humans cannot catch salmonella from chickens the way one would contract a cold, they can catch it through handling or consuming eggs of infected birds. The rural newsletter and farming resource Grit says salmonella can then be transmitted to humans who eat improperly cooked meat or eggs from infected birds or from putting their hands in their mouths after touching chickens or eggs that have come in contact with contaminated rodent or chicken feces. The elderly, people with weakened immune systems and young children are at the highest risk for salmonella infection. Children who help gather eggs and do not thoroughly wash their hands afterward can be at increased risk. Reducing risk Maintaining clean conditions and routinely inspecting chickens for good health

can help lower the risk of salmonella infection. Chicks and adult chickens that have salmonella may produce loose yellow or green droppings; have a drop in egg production, increased thirst and decreased feed consumption; and show signs of weight loss. Look for rodents in the henhouse, as infected mice or other small rodents may transmit salmonella as well. Chickens also need safe, roomy clean conditions to remain healthy and content. According to the resource MyPetChicken, a diet of whole grains and seeds also may be associated with decreased salmonella colonies. Some experts warn against washing eggs as a preventative method. According to a report written by Diane Schivera, an organic livestock specialist for the Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association, thoroughly cleaning egg shells can remove a protective ‘bloom’ that prevents bacteria from entering eggs. Eggs shouldn’t be scrubbed, but some suggest a warm water rinse that will push dirt away from the shell’s pores. Old eggs are more susceptible to bacteria penetration. Storing eggs at room temperature may cause them to degrade faster. Once eggs are gathered, individuals should

Salmonella can be prevented in backyard chicken coops. wash their hands and make sure the eggs are chilled. It’s important to note that risk of infection is very small. The American Egg Board’s Egg Safety reference says an average consumer might encounter a contaminated egg once every 84 years.

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Farm & Ranch • Wednesday, March 21, 2018 — 5

USDA Announces American Egg Board Appointments U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue this month announced the appointment of 11 members and 10 alternates to serve on the American Egg Board. Nine member appointees and nine alternates will serve two-year terms. Three appointees – two members and one alternate – will serve the remaining one-year portion of vacant positions. The appointed members and alternates are: North Atlantic States •Karyn Kreher, Clarence Center, N.Y., member •Paul Sauder, Hershey, Pa., alternate member •Christopher Pierce, Annville, Pa., member (1-year term) South Atlantic States •Charles J. Hardin, Jackson, Miss., member •Tim E. Floyd, Hartwell, Ga., alternate member

•Alex Richard Simpson, Monroe, N.C., member •John C. Watson III, Raleigh, N.C., alternate member East North Central States •Thomas Stoller, Ohio City, Ohio, member •Tim Vande Bunte, Holland, Mich., alternate member •Robert Gornichec, Centerburg, Ohio, alternate member (1-year term) West North Central States •Amos Baer, Lake Park, Minn., member •Andrew Seger, Jasper, Ind., alternate member South Central States •Steven L. George, Grinnell, Iowa, member •Blair Van Zetten, Oskaloosa, Iowa, alternate member •Brent G. Nelson, Manhattan, Kan., member

•Brian Joyer, Litchfield, Minn. (Iowa Farms), alternate member Western States •Michael I. Sencer, Glendora, Calif., member •Clint Hickman, Goodyear, Ariz., alternate member •Mark Oldenkamp, Canby, Ore., member •Roger Deffner, Mill Creek, Wash., alternate member •Anthony Demler, Ramona, Calif., member (1-year term) “From hard boiled to over-easy, the demand for eggs continues to grow. More Americans are looking to include eggs as part of their nutritious breakfast and egg producers across the country are helping consumers add more protein to their morning,” said Perdue. “I know that these appointees, with their wide range of experience, will help meet the needs of the egg industry so it can continue bringing eggs to the

American table.” The American Egg Board is composed of 18 members and 18 alternates representing six areas. The board is authorized by the Egg Research and Consumer Information Act of 1974. Since 1966, Congress has authorized the establishment of 22 industry-funded research and promotion boards. They employ farmers and ranchers to leverage their own resources to develop new markets, strengthen existing markets, and conduct important research and promotion activities. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) provides oversight, paid for by industry assessments, which ensures fiscal accountability and program integrity for participating stakeholders. More information about the board is available on the American Egg Board page on the AMS website and on the American Egg Board website.

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6 — Farm & Ranch • Wednesday, March 21, 2018

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Many people may be familiar with the term ‘sustainable energy,’ but not everyone may be aware of what that term implies. According to Energy Alabama, sustainable energy is energy that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Inexhaustible, sustainable energy sources cannot be used up or depleted. Widely known sources of sustainable energy include solar, wind and water, but there are other sources as well. Bioenergy, the process of creating energy from biological masses such as manure and other agricultural byproducts, is one such sustainable energy source. Geothermal energy is another sustainable energy

source, and that refers to energy gained from the planet’s internal energy sources. An increased focus on sustainable energy sources is a byproduct of warnings from environmentalists and researchers alike that suggest traditional sources of energy, including coal and natural gas, will not be available to future generations. By finding and supporting sustainable solutions now, scientists and consumers can protect and provide for future generations. Energy Alabama notes that another advantage to sustainable energy sources is they do not produce greenhouse gases or pollutants, further protecting the planet and ensuring future generations will have a healthy planet to call home.


Farm & Ranch • Wednesday, March 21, 2018 — 7

Pros And Cons To Keeping Pigs As Pets People are drawn to pets for various reasons. Self-sufficient cats entice those who prefer independent pets that do not take up much space. Dog lovers might enjoy the companionship and boisterous personalities of tailwagging pooches. Exotic pet owners appreciate the uniqueness of their reptiles and amphibians and how they may serve as a conversation starters. Pot-bellied pigs also can make for interesting pets that can make for beloved additions to households. Curious, trainable and very intelligent, pigs offer more as pets than many people may realize. Many people mistakenly perceive pigs as dirty, smelly, sweaty messes. Such misconceptions may make people wary of adopting pet pigs. While not ideal for everyone, pot-bellied pigs can make wonderful pets. The Pig Placement Network, a service that facilitates pot-bellied pig adoptions and placement, says that while pigs are highly trainable

and can learn at a faster rate than dogs, the behavior of pigs is quite different from canines. Prospective pig owners must learn the intricacies of pigs before considering taking one in as a pet. Pigs are regarded as prey and therefore have developed a suspicious nature. It can take time to earn a pig’s trust. Furthermore, pigs can become stubborn, depressed and easily bored if not given adequate attention. This may lead to destructive or aggressive behavior. Mini Pig Info, another pet pig resource, says pigs will constantly test limits. They quickly can learn that squealing will get them attention. Unlike other pets, pigs’ emotions closely mirror those of humans. Pot-bellied pigs, which originated in Vietnam, are one of the smallest breeds of pigs as compared to what one would find on a farm. Piglets may start out small and cute, but even a smaller potbellied pig can reach 100 to 170 pounds in adulthood. Those who

don’t understand this ahead of time contribute to the growing number of pet pigs surrendered to shelters. Other factors that can influence if a pig is the right pet for a person: Pot-bellied pigs can live an average of 12 to 15 years with proper care. Communities have their own specific rules regarding pet pigs. Check if pigs are legal before adopting one. Pigs are not apartment dwellers. They will need exercise and access to a yard that allows for rooting and exploration. Pigs have a pronounced sense of smell and will immediately know when someone is eating or opening food. Finding a veterinarian who is familiar with pot-bellied pigs is key to maintaining the animal’s health and longevity. Pot-bellied pigs can be a welcome addition to a home. With education, training and patience, pigs can make great pets.

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8 — Farm & Ranch • Wednesday, March 21, 2018

USDA Withdraws Some New Poultry, Livestock Rules The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) earlier this month announced the decision to withdraw the Organic Livestock and Poultry Practices (OLPP) final rule published on Jan. 19, 2017. The rule would have increased federal regulation of livestock and poultry for certified organic producers and handlers. The withdrawal becomes effective May 13, 2018. Significant policy and legal issues were identified after the rule published in January 2017. After careful review and two rounds of public comment, USDA has determined that the rule exceeds the Department’s statutory authority, and that the changes to the existing organic regulations could have a negative effect on voluntary participation in the National Organic Program, including real costs for producers and consumers. “The existing robust organic livestock and poultry regulations are effective,” said USDA Marketing and

Regulatory Program Undersecretary Greg Ibach. “The organic industry’s continued growth domestically and globally shows that consumers trust the current approach that balances consumer expectations and the needs of organic producers and handlers.” According to USDA reports for 2017, the number of certified organic operations increased domestically by seven percent and globally by 11 percent. Industry estimates show that organic sales in the United States reached almost $47 billion in 2016, reflecting an increase of almost $3.7 billion since 2015. The Department carefully considered public comments and the relative costs and benefits for both producers and consumers of imposing the proposed additional regulations. More information on the OLPP final rule is available in the March 12, 2018, Federal Register, and on the USDA National Organic Program web page.

Cattle-Drive Image Earns Photo Contest Top Prize Ar t i cl e P r o v i d e d C o u r tes y C a l i f o r n i a F a r m B u r e a u F e d er at io n

Capturing the drama of an earlymorning cattle roundup near Yosemite, an amateur photographer from San Joaquin County took home the top prize in the 36th annual California Farm Bureau Federation Photo Contest. Emela Brown McLaren of Manteca earned the $1,000 Grand Prize, and said it’s “a real honor” to live in proximity to so many farms and ranches. The CFBF Photo Contest attracted hundreds of images from amateur photographers who are members of county Farm Bureaus or supporters of the California Bountiful Foundation. Andrew Lincoln of Napa garnered First Place and $500 for his photo of employees at a hillside vineyard, while Second Place and $250 went to Solvang resident Henry Schulte, who submitted a photo of a Madera County barn painted with the American flag.

Kellie Neufeld of Exeter won Third Place and $100 for capturing a humorous moment between her 9-year-old son and his muddy 4-H hog. Six photos earned Honorable Mentions and $50 each, submitted by Amy Blagg of Lodi, Holly Schaad of Dunnigan, Andrea Traphagan of Ravendale and Thomas Gannon of Atwater, plus an additional image each from Lincoln and Neufeld. In the Budding Artists category for photographers aged 13 and younger, Nathan Blagg of Lodi, the 8-year-old son of Honorable Mention winner Amy Blagg, claimed First Place and $250 for his portrait of a pig peeking over a fence. A view of a calf peering from underneath its mother earned the Second Place prize of $100 for 11-year-old Holyn Sylvester of San Luis Obispo. Both prizes were presented by the California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom.

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Farm & Ranch • Wednesday, March 21, 2018 — 9

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10 — Farm & Ranch • Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Protect Natural Bee Habitats Honeybees are humble insects that benefit the environment in various ways. Unfortunately, many people lump bees in with wasps and other seemingly ‘harmful’ insects and do whatever is necessary to remove them from their properties. But it’s important to be mindful of the beneficial roles bees play and to take steps to maintain healthy habitats so they can thrive. Bees are one of the most important pollinators of flowers, crops and fruit trees. These small insects can make or break entire food supplies. They also pollinate clover and alfalfa that provide feed for cattle. Some experts place the economic value of bees at roughly $15 billion per year. A consortium of universities and research laboratories that reported to The White House in 2015 found that beekeepers lost 42.1 percent of their colonies between 2014 and 2015. Bee populations continue to decline. According to the conservation organization Save the Bees, recent surveys suggest close to a 99 percent loss in bees over the last 150 years, primarily due to increasing agricultural intensification. To combat this sharp decline in bee populations, people from all walks of life can do their part to help bees thrive once again. And by helping bees, individuals also may indirectly help other beneficial pollinating insects, such as butterflies.

visible even for bees that do build them. Wood-nesting bees can nest in twigs or dead trees. Bees may nest underground or use the burrows abandoned by small rodents. Before excavating or disturbing more remote areas of the yard, check to see if it is a habitat for bees. Leave some natural areas of the landscape untouched and do not remove twigs, mounds of dirt and native flowers to attract more bees. Plant native flowers and flowering trees Offer bees plenty of flowering choices so they’ll be happy to come investigate. Native flowers are best because they will be most familiar. Try to plant an array that will flower at different times of the year. Simple flowers will offer more readily available access to pollen than hybrid or exotic varieties bred to produce mounding petals.

Bees can be quite beneficial to have around, and it can be an enjoyable venture to customize landscapes to support the propagation of wild bees.

Support local beekeepers If you find a honey bee swarm on your property, contact a local beekeeper who may be able to safely collect and relocate that swarm so it will produce honey and provide the additional benefits associated with healthy bees. People can also support beekeepers’ work by purchasing local honey. Not only does it keep jobs in the area, but some

research also suggests that consuming local honey can help reduce seasonal allergies. WebMD says the practice is based on immunotherapy. Local honey contains traces of local pollen that may be responsible for seasonal allergies. Repeated exposure to small doses of this pollen might help bodies develop natural immunities.

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2009FORD FORD ESCAPE LIMITED 4X4 2007LEXUS LEXUSRX350 RX350AWD AWD RED,2009 ALLOYS, 6 CYL, RED, TOW ALLOYS, PKG 6 CYL,LIMITED TOW PKG 4X4 ESCAPE 2007 79,314 MILES, STK#15T0341A VIN#A18155 LEATHER, ALLOYS, MOONROOF MILES, *PERFECT79,314 FOR THE *PERFECT FOR THE SKIVIN#A18155 SKISTK#15T0341A TRIPS TRIPS LEATHER, ALLOYS, MOONROOF 116,470 MILES, STK#T1709P VIN#014568 *PERFECT FORMILES, SKI*PERFECT SEASON FOR SKI VIN#014568 SEASON *GREAT VALUE *GREAT VALUE 116,470 STK#T1709P *ALL THE PREMIUM *ALL OPTIONS THE PREMIUM OPTIONS *WILL NOT LAST*WILL NOT LAST 1 AT THIS PRICE 1 AT THIS PRICE 1 AT THIS PRICE

13,999 13,999

$

$

$

2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 * LOCAL ONE OWNER * LOCAL ONE OWNER 2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 FRESH TRADE IN FRESH TRADE INLS EXT CAB $ $ EXT CAB LS * PREMIUM WHEELS & TIRES * PREMIUM WHEELS & TIRES BEDLINER, TOW PKG. 38,016 MILES.

15,952 15,952 $

Net Cost Cost To To You You 26,869 Net 26,869

NetCost CostTo To You You Net

$$

2014GMC GMC*ACADIA AWDSLT SLT * 7 PASSENGER 7ACADIA PASSENGERAWD 2014

22,295 22,295

BEDLINER, PKG.VIN#336953 38,016 MILES. * IMMACULATE *TOW IMMACULATE STK#T1756P STK#T1756P VIN#336953 * CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED 1 AT THIS PRICE 1 AT* CERTIFIED THIS PRICEPRE-OWNED

2014 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN 4X4 * GM CERTIFIED * GM CERTIFIED 2014 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN 4X4 PREMIUM SOUND, LEATHER, ALLOYS,

33,19533,195

ALLOYS, PREVIOUS DAILY RENTAL. 21,722 MILES *LEATHER, AWD WITH 3RD SEAT * AWDDAILY WITH 3RD SEAT 21,722 LEATHER, ALLOYS, PREVIOUS RENTAL. MILES

$

$

STK#T1745P VIN#351798 * BACKUP CAMERA * BACKUP CAMERA STK#T1745P VIN#351798 * POWER LIFTGATE * POWER LIFTGATE * CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED * CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED 1 AT THIS PRICE 1 AT THIS PRICE

$

31,557 31,557

$ $

2012CHEVROLET CHEVROLET SILVERADO SILVERADO 2500 2500 2012

38,49538,495 $

PLUS ADDITIONAL MOS. PLUS ADDITIONAL 12 MOS. PREMIUM 12 SOUND, LEATHER, ALLOYS, * PROFESSIONALLY LIFTED PROFESSIONALLY LIFTED TOW PKG, PREVIOUS DAILY RENTAL. 29,722 MILES HDCREW CREW CAB* DURAMAX 4X4 DIESEL DIESEL OR 12,000 WARRANTYDAILY OR 12,000 MILE 29,722 WARRANTY TOW PKG,MILE PREVIOUS RENTAL. MILES HD CAB 4X4 DURAMAX W/ 20” WHEELS W/ 20” WHEELS STK#T1759P VIN#242541 ABS,&LEATHER, TOWOFF PKG.ROAD 24,424 MILES STK#15T0336A VIN#186073 * DUAL DVD’SSTK#T1759P & MOONROOF* DUAL DVD’S & MOONROOF VIN#242541 OVERSIZED OVERSIZED OFFVIN#186073 ROAD TIRES ABS, LEATHER, TOW PKG. 24,424TIRES MILES& STK#15T0336A 1 AT THIS THIS PRICE * LOADED WITHPRICE LUXURY * LOADED WITH LUXURY1 AT THIS PRICE * LOCAL11ATOWNER TRADE * LOCAL 1 OWNER TRADE

47,995$47,

$

SALES HOURS SALES HOURS

Mon-Fri 8am-7pm Mon-Fri 8am-7pm BUICK BUICK 1285 1285 EAST EAST “F” “F” STREET, STREET, OAKDALE OAKDALE SaturdaySaturday 9am-5pm9am-5pm CHEVROLET CHEVROLET $ employees $1-800-660-2261 Closed Sunday for$ our Closed Sunday and their for family, our employees but you can andstill theircome family, andbut browse you can around. still come and browse around. 1-800-660-2261 Free$Free CLOSED SUNDAYSSUNDAYS CLOSED $ $13,999 $$22,295 $$33,195 BUICK BUICK Toll Toll 38,495 15,952 $ * 7 PASSENGER * LOCAL ONE OWNER * GM CERTIFIED * 7*PASSENGER * LOCAL OWNER * GM AWD WITH 3RD SEAT FRESHONE TRADE IN PLUSCERTIFIED ADDITIONAL 12 MOS. * AWD WITH CAMERA 3RD SEAT FRESH TRADE WHEELS IN PLUS ADDITIONAL 12 MOS. * BACKUP * PREMIUM & TIRES OR 12,000 MILE WARRANTY *PERFECT FOR SKI SEASON * BACKUP CAMERA * PREMIUM WHEELS & TIRES OR* 12,000 MILE WARRANTY * POWER LIFTGATE *PERFECT FOR SKI fees SEASON * IMMACULATE DUAL DVD’S & MOONROOF Plus government fees taxes, anyOPTIONS finance charges, any dealer document preparation charge, any electronic filing fee, and any emission testing charge. Prices good through 1/9/15. Plus government and taxes, any finance charges, any dealer document preparation charge, any electronic filing fee, and any emission testing charge. Prices good through 1/9/15. *ALLand THE PREMIUM * POWER LIFTGATE * IMMACULATE * DUAL DVD’S & MOONROOF * CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED * CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED 1 AT THIS PRICE 1 AT THIS PRICE *ALL THE PREMIUM OPTIONS 1 AT THIS PRICE AT THIS PRICE filing Plus **Must government fees and taxes, any dealer document preparation charge, any 1electronic fee, PRE-OWNED and any emission testing charge. Expires* LOADED MarchWITH7,LUXURY 2018. a ‘99 or newer vehicle. trade in aany ‘99fianance or newercharges, vehicle. * CERTIFIED * CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED 1 AT THIS PRICE 1 AT THIStrade PRICE in**Must 1 AT THIS PRICE * LOADED WITH LUXURY 1 AT THIS PRICE

13,999 OAKDALE OAKDALE

15,952

22,295

33,195

38,495 $ 47,995 www.StevesChevrolet.com www.StevesChevrolet.com 47,995 1 AT THIS PRICE 1 AT THIS PRICE

* PROFESSIONALLY LIFTED * PROFESSIONALLY DURAMAX W/ 20”LIFTED WHEELS DURAMAX W/ 20” & OVERSIZED OFFWHEELS ROAD TIRES & OVERSIZED OFF TRADE ROAD TIRES * LOCAL 1 OWNER * LOCAL 1 OWNER TRADE

1

RED, ALLOYS, 6 CYL, TOW PKG RED, ALLOYS, 6 CYL, TOW PKG Since Since *PERFECT FOR THE SKI TRIPS 1974THE SKI TRIPS 1974 *PERFECT FOR *GREAT VALUE *GREAT VALUE *WILL NOT LAST *WILL NOT LAST

MOD0001462406-01

NetCost CostTo ToYou You Net


Farm & Ranch • Wednesday, March 21, 2018 — 11

HORSESHOE TRIVIA Horseshoes bring more than good luck and serve as more than a tool for the popular backyard game. Horseshoes keep working horses’ feet healthy and safe from wear and tear while also providing support and traction. People who frequently work with horseshoes may know a lot about them, but others can test their knowledge by seeing how many of these trivia questions they can answer correctly. 1. A person who shoes horses is known as what? Answer: Farriers trim and apply horseshoes. 2. True or false: Attaching horseshoes to the animal is a painful process. Answer: False. The density and relative insensitivity of the hoof makes it possible to secure the shoes to the horse without causing discomfort. 3. How are horseshoes attached? Answer: A farrier may use nailing or gluing to attach the shoes. 4. Who invented the horseshoe?

Answer: According to Encyclopedia Britannica, horseshoes are a Roman invention. The Roman poet Catullus mentioned a mule’s loss of its shoe in the first century BC.

six weeks. If a shoe is overly worn or if the toe is overgrown, this may happen more frequently. 9. Do race horses wear horseshoes? Answer: Yes. Racing horses tend to

5. What were primitive horseshoes made of? Answer: Materials included booties made from hides and woven from plants. Romans were the first to use leather and metal in horseshoe designs. 6. How many nail holes are in a horseshoe? Answer: Seven. 7. Can a shoe help improve a horse’s health? Answer: Yes. A skilled farrier can create shoes to alleviate gait flaws and conformation issues in a horse. Conformation is the outline of a horse as dictated primarily by his bone and muscle structures. 8. How often do shoes need to be replaced? Answer: Horses tend to be shod every

L ENDING

A general rule is that horses tend to be shod every six weeks, though each case should be evaluated individually.

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wear shoes made of aluminum because of their light weight. Show horses also may wear aluminum shoes. The material used can be customized depending on the need of the shoe for the horse.

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12 — Farm & Ranch • Wednesday, March 21, 2018


Farm & Ranch • Wednesday, March 21, 2018 — 13

The Health Benefits Of Avocados

Food trends come and go. But one such trend that has seemingly enjoyed more staying power than other flavors of the month is avocado toast, a popular dish that might trace some of that admiration to how easy it is to prepare. The popularity of avocado toast has exploded in recent years, but it has actually been around for decades. Many trace the origins of avocado toast to Australia, though it’s hard for food historians to say with utmost certainty where the dish was first served. Avocado toast might be as healthy as it is popular. Avocados boast a host of health benefits, some of which might surprise even the most ardent devotee of avocado toast. Avocados are loaded with vitamins. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Nutrient Database, avocados are a great source of numerous vitamins, including C, E, K, and B-6. Avocados also contain beta-carotene, which the human body converts into vitamin A that promotes healthy skin and a strong immune system. Avocados can benefit vision. Avocados

contain lutein and zeaxanthin, a pair phytochemicals concentrated in the tissues in the eyes. Lutein and zeaxanthin are believed to block blue light from reaching structures in the retina, thereby reducing a person’s risk of developing macular degeneration. In fact, studies published in the American Journal of Epidemiology,

the American Journal of Ophthalmology and The Archives of Ophthalmology found that diets high in lutein and zeaxanthin are associated with a lower risk of macular degeneration, which the American Macular Degeneration Foundation notes is the leading cause of vision loss in the United States.

Avocados can promote healthier bones. Because they’re high in vitamin K, a nutrient that is crucial for bone health, avocados may help reduce a person’s risk of developing osteoporosis, a condition characterized by bones becoming fragile and brittle due to loss of tissue. Vitamin K may help improve the intestinal absorption of calcium. That’s a significant benefit, as calcium deficiency has long been associated with a greater risk for osteoporosis. Avocados may help fight depression. Avocados are loaded with omega-3 fatty acids, which benefit the body in myriad ways. One of those ways is by helping to reduce the symptoms of depression. Polyunsaturated fats such as omega-3 fatty acids are thought to antagonize inflammatory cytokines that can contribute to feelings of depression. Trendy foods come and go, oftentimes falling off the radar when their health benefits are overstated or proven dubious. However, the documented benefits of avocados may ensure the staying power of avocado toast.


14 — Farm & Ranch • Wednesday, March 21, 2018

USDA Announces More Local Control For School Meals

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Deputy Secretary Steve Censky earlier this month announced two new efforts to provide states and school districts with additional flexibility and support to operate more efficient school meal programs. Censky made the announcement during a speech at the School Nutrition Association Legislative Action Conference in Washington, D.C. Child Nutrition Hiring Flexibility Rule In 2015, USDA established education and training requirements for nutrition professionals as part of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. While this strengthened many school meal programs, some small school districts faced challenges finding qualified applicants to direct their local food service operation. This proposal would provide much-needed relief for school districts with less than 2,500 students, allowing them more flexibility in the hiring of new school nutrition program directors. “Small and rural school districts will no longer have to overlook qualified food service professionals because of one-size-fitsall standards that don’t meet their needs,” said Censky. “We trust our local partners to hire talented school nutrition program directors who will manage the meal service

in a way that protects the health and wellbeing of students.” USDA is in the midst of hosting a 60-day public comment period and will then develop a final rule that responds to the needs of partners and stakeholders. Child Nutrition Integrity Efforts To support states’ efforts to improve program integrity, USDA also rolled out a suite of customizable resources to help local school districts improve the accuracy of their school meal application processes. These resources include support for online applications, evidenced-based materials, and best practices to simplify the process for families and ensure that eligible children receive free and reduced-priced meals. “USDA’s goal to do right and feed everyone starts with our children,” said Censky. “We are committed to giving states and school districts more tools and options to build a bright, self-sufficient future for America’s children through well-managed school meal programs.” As part of this package, USDA is offering guidance to help schools utilize its awardwinning, open-source online school meal application model. USDA developed the application with input from local food service professionals. The customer-friendly

design of the model is intended to increase the integrity of the application process by reducing common mistakes families make when applying for free or reduced-priced school meals. “These tools are the benchmark for future innovation and give schools 21st century resources and strategies to run efficient food service operations, now and into the future,” Censky said. “Schools can ensure the proper use of funds for feeding students in need, protecting the taxpayer dollar through high integrity programs.” USDA invites software developers in private industry to join schools in delivering customer service by helping them tailor their own applications. The announcement is the latest in a series of recent USDA actions to expand flexibility and ease challenges for partners and stakeholders who help feed the nation’s children. Other actions include: • Publishing the School Meal Flexibility Rule, which provides local food service professionals the flexibility they need to serve wholesome, nutritious, and tasty meals in schools across the nation. • Releasing “The Food Buying Guide,” a mobile app that puts critical information at the fingertips of food service professionals and makes it easier for them to plan whole-

some, nutritious, and tasty school meals. • Selecting Kansas State University to direct the Center for Food Safety in Child Nutrition Programs, which will help improve food safety across all of USDA’s child nutrition programs. • Inviting the public to submit ideas on food crediting, the system that defines how each food item contributes to meal requirements under the National School Lunch Program and other federal child nutrition programs. About 100,000 schools and institutions feed 30 million children through the National School Lunch Program and nearly 15 million children through the School Breakfast Program. Many of these children receive their meals at no cost or for a reduced price according to income-based eligibility.

*Program and finance subject to change at anytime. Financing based OAC. See dealer for details.

Family Owned Since 1976

3516 Newton Road, Stockton CA 95205 (800) 266-9631 www.bobcatcentral.com Fresno

Merced

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Sacramento

Reno


Farm & Ranch • Wednesday, March 21, 2018 — 15

Nine Farm Bureau Members Participate In Leadership Program

Young California Farmers, Ranchers Earn Recognition

A rticle Prov ided Cour t e s y Ca l i f or ni a F a r m B ur e a u F e d e r a t i o n

Ar t i cl e P r o v i d e d C o ur t es y Cal ifo r nia Far m Bur eau Fed er at io n

Intensive training on agricultural issues and leadership methods has begun for the nine members of the Leadership Farm Bureau Class of 2018. The class was formally introduced during the annual California Farm Bureau Federation Leaders Conference in Sacramento earlier this month. Participants in the Leadership Farm Bureau program receive personal-development, teambuilding and communications training, and advocate on behalf of Farm Bureau in both Sacramento and Washington, D.C. Participants will learn about agricultural issues and make field-studies trips to both Northern and Southern California. Sponsored by CFBF, the program includes seven sessions that involve more than 250 hours of training. The LFB Class of 2018 includes: • Joseph Alexandre of Ferndale, a dairy farmer, CEO of the family dairy-products business and second vice president of the Humboldt County Farm Bureau; • Brittney Blankenship of Visalia, program coordinator for the Tulare County Farm Bureau; • Joe Ferrari of Linden, a walnut farmer and member of the San Joaquin Farm Bureau Federation board of directors; • Rachael Fleming of Lodi, a program director for the San Joaquin Farm Bureau Federation; • Brad Fowler of Penn Valley, a cattle rancher and president of the Nevada County Farm Bureau; • Jason Gianelli of Bakersfield, a farm manager specializing in almonds and row crops, and a member of the Kern County Farm Bureau board of directors; • Erin Johnson of Anderson, executive director of the Shasta County Farm Bureau; • Jessica Sweeten of Hilmar, a sales representative for an agricultural products company who is active in the Stanislaus County Farm Bureau Young Farmers and Ranchers Committee; • Taylor Zumstein of Fallbrook, owner of a breeding-sheep business and event and marketing coordinator for the San Diego County Farm Bureau. The program of activities for the 2018 Leadership Farm Bureau class will culminate in December with graduation during the 100th CFBF Annual Meeting in San Diego. For further information about the program, see www.cfbf.com/leadership-farm-bureau. The California Farm Bureau Federation works to protect family farms and ranches on behalf of nearly 40,000 members statewide and as part of a nationwide network of more than 5.5 million Farm Bureau members.

Service to community and Farm Bureau earned awards for participants in the California Young Farmers and Ranchers program, and a student from Fresno State University won the national Collegiate Discussion Meet, during the recent annual American Farm Bureau Federation YF&R conference in Reno. California Young Farmers and Ranchers earned three national awards related to food donations through the Harvest for All program – a partnership with Feeding America, the nation’s largest domestic hunger-relief organization. California earned first place in the number of volunteer hours donated, at more than 10,000 hours; placed second in the number of pounds of food donated, at 15 million pounds; and was among three national winners of the Most Innovative Award. That honor was awarded to California for a food donation partnership between the Kern County YF&R Committee and the Kern County Fair, which led to the collection of 100,000 pounds of meat and 54,120 pounds of other food. Each award included a monetary prize from sponsor Nationwide. Tim Truax of Turlock, who majors in agricultural education at Fresno State, emerged as the winner of the national Collegiate Discussion Meet, which simulates a committee meeting with active participation and discussion. As national winner, Truax earned a $2,200 prize sponsored by the CSH Foundation. The California YF&R Committee also distributed statewide awards during the Reno conference. San Joaquin Farm Bureau member Katie Veenstra of Escalon received the Star YF&R Award, which recognizes an outstanding young farmer or rancher in California who goes above and beyond in service to agriculture. The Kern County YF&R Committee earned the YF&R Committee of the Year Award for its activities during 2017. Composed of 50 members, the committee volunteered at many Farm Bureau and agricultural events. It raised money for people in need, such as for local food banks and the homeless, spent volunteer hours gleaning and developed the partnership with the Kern County Fair for food donations. The Farm Bureau Young Farmers and Ranchers program works with active agriculturists between the ages of 18 and 35 who are involved in production, business and many other areas of agriculture. For more information, see www.cfbf.com/young-farmers-ranchers.

The Kubota M5L-111 sets the highest standard for performance, versatility and comfort. Perfectly proportioned for work in orchards and other low-clearance applications, the M5L is packed with full-size features including an updated V-3800, 100 HP* Kubota diesel engine, highly versatile transmission and an ergonomic operator station. Visit your local Kubota dealer today. • 12F/12R Transmission, 6 Speed in 2 ranges

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16 — Farm & Ranch • Wednesday, March 21, 2018

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Farm and Ranch 2018  
Farm and Ranch 2018  
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