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Classes in Turlock, Modesto, Ceres & Ripon By GL EN N K AHL 20 9 Health y Liv ing

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wo Ripon seniors – Jim and Dottie Love – are praising the Healthy Aging Association’s “Young at Heart” program that meets twice a week at the Senior Citizen Center where they join others exercising for an hour from 9 to 10 a.m. Some 30 other classes are set up for seniors in Modesto, Ceres, Grayson, Patterson, Turlock and Waterford. The goal is to develop a healthier heart and to give them more strength in their muscles. The exercise sessions are led by Nancy Vander Veen, who wants seniors to be “older, wiser and stronger” through her leadership for the past dozen years. “We train volunteers to aid in the classes that are peer led,” she said. There are usually some 17 enrolled in any given week, she noted. The cost is donationbased, she added, with a suggested amount of $2. The center in Ripon is located at 433 South Wilma Avenue at Fourth Street. Vander Veen is a former Ripon Christian High School physical education teacher. She explained that her program is trying to regain and retain the strength the seniors should have in their bodies. “We also work on balance that becomes harder as we age and show the seniors how to stand with their feet at right angles and to put their weight on the whole foot.” That helps in preventing falls, she added. They also work on stretching every muscle group from the face to the toes. Students are sent home with supporting exercises, an exercise tube and

GLENN KAHL/209 Healthy Living

Jim and Dottie Love of Ripon have nothing but good things to say about their exercise program through the Healthy Agency’s program at the Ripon Senior Citizen Center every Tuesday and Thursday. They say it has given them a new lease on life after having multiple surgeries.

a free T-shirt. All the exercises come from certified programs through a licensed physical therapist, she said. Ripon has a second Healthy Heart exercise class that is designed primarily for the residents at Bethany Home. Jim Love, a long time construction worker, stressed that the healing value of the exercise classes is very uplifting. “Since we both have had shoulder surgeries, the option of coming home from the hospital and just sitting down causes the healing to take forever,” he said. He added that their instructor is a great person with a good sense of humor, making it fun to exercise under her tutelage

as well as her abilities in being quite a story teller. Love said before they began the program they both had electric carts to use instead of walking as it had become very difficult. Now the carts are stored in the garage and seldom used, he added, in addition to their being in a better state of mind and health. Estimates of the U.S. population in 2010 revealed more than 40 million adults were then 65 and older. By the year 2030. that number is expected to increase to some 72 million. By encouraging healthy lifestyles, along with improving the delivery of preventative services that help older Americans stay healthier longer and

improve their quality of life in their later years. A 2015 Healthy Aging Summit July 27-28 in Washington, D.C., has set its goals of exploring the science of healthy aging, identifying knowledge gaps that need to be filled, promoting the role of prevention and preventative services in improving quality of life in seniors later years and mobilizing actions to improve the delivery of care for those aging in place or in transition. For those wanting more information on the Ripon program call 209.523.2800. To contact Glenn Kahl email gkahl@mantecabulletin.com or call 209.249.3539.

SPRING 2015

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209 healthy living march 2015