Page 1

FASHION ISSUE

OUR

Presenting 2 YEAR ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

SUSPECT STARRING

for

OLI LACEY BY BELL SOTO

Man of Metropolis

1


CELEBRATING 2 YEARS OF FASHION & CULTURE

MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


manofmetropolis.com


22 104

52 MAN OF METROPOLIS | THE FASHION ISSUE TREND REPORT 16 The Essentials Our top picks

18 Trend Reports Colors & textures of the seaon

4 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM

FASHION SPOTLIGHT 92 Nick Wooster One-on-one with Nick

178 Bruce Pask Fashion, Trends & Inspiration


94

114

Master Lucas

182

130

AMERICAN MADE 50 Todd Snyder Fall & Winter 17 Review

120 Michael Bastian The New Grey Label

MUSIC 8 Braeden Wright Model to Musician

122 Drake White Country Star At Home

5


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Two years of Fashion & Culture and the future of MAN of METROPOLIS exist in the next 200 pages of this issue. It’s not a small feat that we are here today. Two years has sometimes felt like a decade to me and at times hours. I can’t help but look back to where I was in 2010 where MAN of METROPOLIS all started. I was working for the digital business at Ralph Lauren, swallowing my pride over a small salary, and an even smaller role. I was living off of Subway sandwiches because it was all I could afford. There I was walking the streets of New York, master’s degree in hand filled with the determintaion to make my mark in this great city. It was pretty obvious it wasn’t going to be though an entry level job that was ‘my foot in the door’ for a bigger future. So I rolled up my sleeves one Fall afternoon like any unhappy employed person and started a blog called MAN of METROPOLIS. Yep, I blogged. I sat in my ivory tower (so to speak) on 154th and Broadway and wrote about skinny ties, then a review on the Kings of Leon album, a trend report on black jacket’s; ground-breaking. I know. I did this for about 2 years off and on first from New York, then from Miami. Then the blogging stopped. Yep, I quit. I was too busy with my career as a Creative Director collecting my pay check and building a very beautiful product, voice and brand for another business. I had made it, I was making good money, traveling when I wanted, and buying all those clothes I liked to blog about. There I sat in my big office in my new well tailored digs but, I still hadn’t made my mark. Not for me at least. I was working tirelessly for someone else — building their brand while feeling like I was running out of time to do it for myself. Nothing will make you start planning your exit faster then feeling like someone else is getting your best work. So I picked up a camera and started there. I shot models, my trips and in 2015, after an important lunch meeting with a mentor I commited to this whole MAN of METROPOLIS thing again. I pulled double duty working all day at my job and every evening and weekend for the magazine the first year, I couldn’t go back to those Subway sandwiches or give up shopping, yet. The first issue was almost all my own work, my writing, and about 10,000 people saw it online. Then we shot Cullen Jones for the cover; the first African American Swimmer to Gold Medal in the Summer Olympics. We had some great features inside that issue including Donald Robertson a talented artist and executive at Estee Lauder. Next came a really great project with model Chad White. I could see people needed me to answer the question; who is the MAN of METROPOLIS? So we set out to answer that with a special Fall preview issue and a fashion film produced by Rick Day and Steve Benisty. We launched the entire project at Bloomingdale’s in Miami. It was a huge success, but we had just gotten started. We had our logo, a fashion film, two issues under our belt and two more covers with Sullivan Stapleton and Trai Byers to round out our first year. We did a lot of learning that first year. It’s really expensive to print. Working with multiple creatives can be super rewarding and it can also be extremely difficult. You live, you learn, you make adjustments, and then you make more adjustments. We made some changes and put out a stunning spring fashion issue with model Filip Wolfe and Actor Gino Anthony Pesi on our covers. We were finding our stride and finding talent who could bring their expertise to the table. Our Summer 2017 cover starred the face of POLO RED actor Luke Bracey photographed by John Russo. It was hands down out 6 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM

best shoot for the magazine since we started. And just about a month ago we launched a September Issue that in many ways was a tribute to one of the greats, Bruce Weber. We made a big decision this summer to move our headquarters back to New York. The talent in this city is really second to none. Our growth as a media brand and a magazine has never been more promising and the response since returning where MAN of METROPOLIS started has been extremely positive for us. People say it’s ‘all about relationships’, but I’d like to add ‘…and location.’ Two years of Fashion and Culture and the future of MAN of METROPOLIS exist in the next 200 pages of this issue. It’s our biggest issue yet. Every story started with a mood board, an email, a phone call, a cup of coffee or a meet and greet. This issue was an incredible undertaking. I want to thank everyone for their time, talents, and commitment to excellence in story telling and letting MAN of METROPOLIS be a place they trust their work to. If you are reading this, I want to thank you for considering ‘MM’ enough to stop and take a look at what we are doing. I think you’ll agree it’s something really special.

Seth Travis CEO, FOUNDER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


7


Culture | Music

BRAEDEN WRIGHT

Interview by Seth Travis Photography by JON WONG

8 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Braeden Wright can sit for a nice picture, but that is not all he is since he started in the modeling industry Wright has embarked on a new journey as a singer songwriter. We sat down with him following the release of ‘What Once Was Gold (The Demo Sessions) to talk modeling, music and style. Take us back to when you were a kid, when did you first start loving music and who did you listen to when you were 7/8/9? I’ve always loved music. Some of my earliest memories have to do with me just singing along to whatever I was exposed to around then, either on the radio or in my parents’ collection. My family always told me stories of how I would just get up and sing whatever was in my head. Apparently Billy Ray Cyrus’ ‘Achy Breaky Heart’ was a big one when I was three (laughs)… But I was always really drawn to whatever pop music was on the radio. Ace of Base and Backstreet Boys were big for me when I was a kid. So even from my earliest memories—I have always loved that Max Martin school of pop. Did your musical influences change in Jr. High or High School when you started ‘coming of age’? Then who did you listen to? I still listened to a lot of pop in Jr. High. Growing up in the ‘90s—we were inundated with boybands and pop music. My family listened to a lot of different stuff when I was really little—I grew up on Alanis Morissette, The Eagles, Eric Clapton, U2, Fleetwood Mac, Michael Jackson—but when their favourite station changed formats to a Top 40 station, I began to hear a lot of ‘90s pop. My parents never really had a hard and fast preference on musical genres— and we definitely listened to a lot of what was currently on the radio, so back then I was never really exposed to very much from before the ‘80s... Led Zeppelin and The Beatles just weren’t in my atmosphere for a very long time. But I really did love pop music. At that age, MTV and MuchMusic (growing up in Canada) were at their cultural peak… but it was deep in the era of ‘90s pop. I have always loved melody above all else—so even despite things being what they were at that time, I loved all of it. You just can’t dispute some of the great pop songwriting of that era. The melodies were amazing. There was a reason you had an entire generation going up in a frenzy for it, and back then—I just wanted to go from only listening to actually somehow being a part of it myself. By Junior High and High School though, there was definitely a turning point. I was getting really into alternative and rock at the time. Coldplay’s ‘Parachutes’ was the first album I ever actually decided to buy and listen to on my own. I was listening to that and a lot of Blink 182, Sum 41… I had joined this band in eighth grade, as the singer, and we would get together and play covers at my friend’s house. There was a lot of Jimmy Eat World. But when they wanted to play New Found Glory, and I didn’t want to—they kicked me out of the band (laughs). I remember going home being so upset, and my older sister (who has incredible taste in music) sat me down, gave me a bunch of music to listen to and told me I was better off without them. She gave me Oasis, Stereophonics, and Travis. I remember that day so clearly. That was the beginning of the rest of my musical life. Tell us about your musical background, did you play any instruments growing up and when did you discover you could sing? I have always sang. My earliest memories are of me singing, or trying to drum on whatever was around. Somehow beats and melodies always seemed to make sense to me, even just as a little kid. I was always humming along and banging on something… But I was never formally trained. I wasn’t the kid who had piano lessons. I didn’t want to join the school jazz band or something like that. I always had kind of rebelled to that sort of thing, being locked inside a room and having to read the music lesson of the day. That to me seemed to destroy the purity of the love of music I felt inside. Music made me feel free. I didn’t want to sit down and learn today’s lesson-- I just wanted to sing. But that just wasn’t really something anyone did where I was growing up, and definitely not in the way that I wanted to. For the longest time, I didn’t play any instruments

whatsoever. I dreamed of playing the drums and the guitar—but that just wasn’t something I had access to growing up, and there was no way in hell I was going to be that kid in the hallway carrying a tuba (laughs). It wasn’t until high school that I finally started to pick up the guitar. My best friends and I all saw Green Day in my hometown—back when the American Idiot tour was happening. That album was so great. It was after that show that I remember turning to my best friends and saying “fuck it, let’s start a band… I think we could do it.” So we each picked an instrument to start learning and that was it. We ended up playing an acoustic cover of the Foo Fighters’ ‘Times Like These’ at our high school graduation… Which actually was a pretty big deal to me. I went to one of the biggest high schools in Canada—so our ceremony was at this huge concert hall where all of my favourite bands had played… I got to sing in front of a few thousand people on the same stage where I saw Death Cab and The White Stripes play for myself. That was one of the greatest nights of my life. And that’s when I knew with absolute certainty—that this was what I wanted to do, every night, for the rest of my life. Did you have a personal anthem (song) while you were getting started and thinking about doing a record? There were definitely many albums, many artists, but no single particular song that I can think of. I was listening to so many of my influences at the time, trying to soak it all in and blend it up in my subconscious I suppose. Songs like ‘Run’ by Snow Patrol or anything off of the first two Coldplay albums, something by Oasis or U2… I’m sure at some point it was one of those. My current anthem right now though is definitely ‘Run For Cover’ by The Killers, off their new album Wonderful Wonderful. I’ve had it on single song repeat the last three days straight. Your music has a few sounds that are familiar, including Coldplay, 30 Seconds to Mars, and some folk/country flairs. Talk to us about what or who influenced this sound? Those two bands are definitely influences of mine, especially Coldplay. I have always been incredibly influenced by Britrock and the British Alternative movement of basically anything ‘90s or after. Oasis, Travis, Coldplay, U2, Radiohead—those are all heroes of mine. Basically any band that was either influenced by or influenced those bands is music that I hold very personally to who I am as an artist and a songwriter. Even though I always loved Max Martin and pop music too—britrock is just my absolute obsession and identity. So much of it is just incredibly melodic and sweeping… there’s a lot of stadium anthems mixed with pop hits mixed with some of the saddest but most affecting music of all time in that whole cannon. As a Canadian, and as someone with a lot of British heritage—for some reason I just completely connect to that style of music. Other songwriters like John Mayer, Ryan Adams, Jeff Buckley, and Ed Sheeran influence me massively as well… and as far as the folk/country flairs—I do love Keith Urban as well as the bluegrass flair of Black Rebel Motorcycle Club. Mumford & Sons’ ‘Wilder Mind’ is one of my favourite albums of all time. Ryan Adams was definitely a gateway for me into alt-country and then later into more country and folk. He will always for me be one of the greats. He is such a genius. I love how with every album he can be so much at one time—he never confines himself to one space. I like to think I can be that same way. I know who I am, but who I am is many sides all at once. I guess that comes with being a Gemini. The description fits. What is your favorite track of the album? Why? That’s incredibly tough to answer. I love them all on different days in different moods for different reasons. But if I had to choose—I’d say ‘Give You Love’ is my personal favourite. So much of this album was

9


Culture | Music written from a place of deep personal heartbreak-- but that song to me always makes me feel hopeful. It came to me in a dream and I wrote it as soon as I woke, completely whole. It just arrived. So even though the lyrics are somewhat desperate, longing for that love to return and be whole again… the music and the feeling comes from that place of optimism for it. It feels like being on the edge of reclaiming what once was-- everything you ever really wanted. So when I hear that, when I sing that, when I play that—it gives me that feeling back. Like you are one word, one look, one kiss away from this deep love. That’s the only reason anyone wants to be alive anyways… so what better feeling could you ask for than that? Tell us about the album artwork, why the location is that Joshua Tree? OR...? During the conception of this album—it quickly morphed from a four track demo EP into something more full length. At first, I wasn’t as concerned about the album art… But I am a huge believer in the album format, and artwork to me is such an integral piece of what an album means. One night I was writing, up ‘til 5AM, and working on one of the interludes on the album… I was just feeling very experimental with the whole thing. I was writing down ideas in my notebook and out of nowhere this idea for the perfect album cover came into my head. I drew this terribly novice looking sketch of my idea: me standing in the California desert, mountains in the background, a few palms scattered, with me holding this rose about to fall to the ground. That exact artwork you see came to me exactly as it is. I sketched it before I found it. I spent the next two days researching spots all over California that looked like what I had imagined. I just had this feeling. I have always been mesmerized by the Mojave Desert—and Joshua Tree. Eventually somehow, I found this place called ‘Oasis of Mara’ just outside of Joshua Tree. I had never seen it in my life, but when I saw the picture of it, I had shivers. It was perfect. It was exactly as I had imagined in my mind, exactly as I had drawn. It is this tiny area outside of Joshua Tree that has this collection of palms… they call the town it’s in ‘Twentynine Palms’, after this formation. They are the only palms in the area, as the story goes, there used to be a spring just in that spot—just enough for Palms to grow, but only in that cluster. Eventually though, that spring dried up… and now the palms remain, but only as this kind of reminder of what used to be an Oasis. It’s a reminder of something that once was. It was the most perfect physical representation of the music—the title, the feeling, everything. So my friend and I drove out three hours to the exact spot, at sundown and took that photo. That is definitely one of my favourite parts of the whole album-- because it quite literally turned out exactly as I had imagined, story and all. It is such a magical thing to me how it all happened the way that it did. I’ve had a lot of photographs taken of me over the years, but that one to me is by far the most special. How has the modeling industry influenced your craft or your work ethic as a musician? The modeling industry definitely is a place where you begin to realize exactly who you are. You are constantly under a microscope, both physically and socially—especially now in this age of social media. You are simultaneously rejected and complimented constantly, day in and day out. Eventually, for me, that helped me get quite a thick skin, and just become completely comfortable being myself,

Shirt: Diesel 10 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM

no matter who I was in front of. It helped me realize that everyone is just human. It doesn’t matter if it’s Madonna or the guy busking with a Strat in Venice Beach. We are all just people with the same hopes and fears, no matter how big or small the outside world wants to perceive us. It also helped me burst the bubble I had growing up outside of these creative cities like LA and New York… It really helped me realize that you can be whoever you want to be, no matter what. You just have to start, and work your ass off. Eventually it will come in ways you could never, ever predict. If you aren’t, someone else will be, so why can’t it be you? You have to have that mentality or else it will really never happen. Realizing that definitely increased my drive one hundred fold, and also my comfort in allowing myself to take a risk, even if that means you might fail. So many things are within reach if only you actually try to reach them, but at the same time, you have to make peace with constant rejection. Failure and pain need to become your best friend in order to be wildly successful, to be someone who pushes your own barriers in life. Once you accept failure as actually the key to success, nothing can stop you. The rest is up to you—with a little bit of help from the universe, of course. But if you don’t just start, it really will never happen. How is music completely different than modeling? Modeling involves a lot of slipping into a role someone else creates for you. It’s like acting, but for still shots. Sometimes you are more yourself—but you are almost always just trying to serve the vision of the photographer as best as you can. It is a creative collaboration in that way. Music, for me at least, is a lot more personal. It all comes completely from me—I decide what melodies, what sounds, what words, what image, what emotion— and then I get to step into those. Sometimes they are extremely personal, sometimes they are a heightened form of myself, a bit of a character… but it is always something that comes directly from within me. I am emanating in my communication as opposed to being captured. It’s a lot more of sending something outwards for people to connect to than someone else’s vision coming to you and shaping you. Favorite wardrobe item on stage when you are performing? My ALLSAINTS leather biker jacket. Describe your style onstage; describe your style off stage? My styles don’t change too much. Who I am on stage is very much who I am off stage. Maybe it’s a more heightened side of me—but it is still very much me. All of the characters I might want to play aren’t anyone else but the ones that already exist within me on some level. So maybe off stage I might dress a little less loud—a little more casual—but you will always find me in similar style: a lot of black, a lot of band tees, boots, Converse, leather jacket, neutral tones… and my favourite jewelry. I love to fuse Britrock fashion with some of the high fashion I’ve grown up with in this industry, but you won’t see me stray too far from that. I like to keep it simple. I like to be myself. Hopefully people see that, and connect with me just as that: just me trying to be who I am.


11


Grooming | Skincare

BACK TO BASICS

Expert Grooming & Beauty tips with Mary Guthrie

One of the first things I notice during the winter months when a client sits in my chair is how underhydrated their skin is. Hydration is one of the basic, key fundamentals to maintaining healthy skin, especially during dry climate change. To maintain healthy, youthful skin, Hydration should be incorporated into your daily grooming routine; after shower and or daily face wash and skincare. 12 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


WHY MASK? During dry/harsh weather, opt for a non- abrasive Overnight Mask to achieve the deep hydration needed during the dryer fall/winter months. Top picks: LANEIGE Water Sleeping Mask & Embryolisse Hydrating Cream Mask

BEARD THERAPY To maintain healthy, happy, hydrated facial hair, deep clean and condition using a mild facial soap followed by some beard oil/conditioner. Top Pick: BEARD OIL GUYZ (25 Blend Beard Oil)

PROTECT

Low Humidity during the winter months can damage & dry out your Scalp & Hair, leaving it lackluster. Be sure to use a hair mask once weekly or as needed. (Apply, let sit 5 mins, rinse) Top pick: KĂŠrastase CrĂŠam Chronologiste

model: John King / Wilhelmina grooming: Dana Arcidy using Benefit Cosmetics photo: Standa Merhout 13


Grooming | Fragrances

FRAGRANCES

5 SCENTS Seasons are changing and so should our fragrances. It’s time to put away those light citrus enfused colognes and eau de toilet sprays and replace with something new for autumn and winter. We have rounded up the best scents of the season with fragrances from Calvin Klein, Lacoste, and Hugo Boss.


1. ETERNITY Calvin Klein - Classic and sexy 2. BOSS Hugo Boss - Elegant and understated 3. L’HOMME Lacoste - Full Bodied and masculine 4. OBSESSED Calvin Klein - Light and sophisticated 5. BOSS BOTTLED TONIC Hugo Boss - Sensual and clean


Fashion | The Essentials

THE EXECUTIVE He doesn’t do suits, ties, or board room style meetings. A good leaders walks slow and doesn’t spend too much time on his clothes; but he should still look good. He entertains investors and clients while always wearing a dark color palette that is easy to mix and match without sacraficing his style DNA or his love for time pieces and his beloved sneaker collection. Breitling Navitimer LJRG Limited $9225 Distinguished by its all-black exterior, three black sub-dials and transparent caseback, the watch houses a Manufacture Breitling Caliber 01 in-house movement, chronometer-certified by COSC. Polo Ralph lauren Shawl Sweater $495 A western inspired print in black and grey make this the perfect sweater for any urban enthusiast for the office, airport or cabin in the woods. Ted Baker London Fragrance $85 Copper. Made for the discerning gent.A refined blend of grapefruit, fresh aquatic, warm pepper and cedarwood,this enigmatic scent embodies those who dare to be different. Incotext Slim-Fit Trousers $400 Availble in varous nuetral tones including navy, these Italian made trousers will keep you looking sharp. Ralph Lauren Croc Belt / Sterling Belt Buckle $~ Adding crocodile to your belt and sterling silver buckle elevates any look even with chinos or denim. Pelle Tessuta Portfolio by Ermenegildo Zegna Couture $1,495 Sleek, and modern this portfilio can store small notebook, a smart phone and tablet devices for the manon the go. VULCANIZED FLEX VITTORIO SNEAKERS by Ermenegildo Zegna $495.00 Street style has played a major role in sneakers having a fashion moment, but these italian made shoes are elegant, sporty and comfortable. Shirt: BURBERRY / T-shirt: CALVIN KLEIN UNDERWEAR / Sweatpants: Y-3 / Boots: MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION 16 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


THE INFLUENCER He is always on the move. Flying from west coast to east coast like it’s a sport. He’s gotta be comfortable while looking good from the main cabin to cocktails with clients. He cares about what is wearing but he doesn’t take himself too serioulsy; he values well tailored clothing and products that can handle his busy lifesyle. THE BLACKJACK WATCH by TIMEX & Todd Snyder $138 A great piece for yoru wrist that has tones of style without the weight or the cost. GREY PREMIUM CASHMERE HOODED JUMPER by Ermenegildo Zegna $2950.00 Heather greay is sporty, masculine and goes with any skintone, so add this to your in-air look or commuter style for any destination. SUDIO REGENT - BLACK HEADPHONES Simple and light headhones for travel or working, thanks to swedish design. $99 Incotext Slim-Fit Trousers $400 Availble in varous nuetral tones including navy, these Italian made trousers will keep you looking sharp. Tumbled Calfskin Backpack by Ralph Lauren $1,500 Everyone needs a bag for their essentials to any destination and this calfskin book bag from the folks at Ralph Lauren will keep you organized and looking cool. TIZIANO XXX SNEAKER by Ermenegildo Zegna $895.00 If you are looking for something other than Jordan’s look no further than to this new deisgn by Zegna in great colors of the season. NEW ERA + CHAMPION FITTED HAT by Todd Snyder $78 The Todd Snyder team always have cool collaborations and this one with New Era and Champion is esspecially good with more styles at toddsnyder.com

Sweater: POLO RALPH LAUREN 17


Fashion | Trend Report

TODD SNYDER FW17


PANTONE 16-1439 TPX Caramel

We know everyone is saying camel, but we think a richer darker Caramel is where your color palette should go. If you are looking to dress for the season while elevating your style game add a version of this color to your wardobe and you will be golden.

Beenie Hat by H&M Shop hm.com Blazer & Shearling Coat by ZARA Shop zara.com/us Suede gloves by Ermenegildo Zegna Shop: zegna.us Polo Ralph Lauren Nickson Suede Wingtip Boot Shop ralphlauren.com Tiziano sneakers Ermenegildo Zegna Couture Shop zegna.us Miansai Leather Casing Bracelet Shop miansai.com VICUNA SMOOTH CALFSKIN BUSINESS BAG by Ermenegildo Zegna Shop zegna.us Duval Duffle by Miansai Shop miansai.com


Fashion | Trend Report

A SHEARLING THING We saw it all over the runway last winter and past decades but now it’s bac. Shearling has arrived online and in-store, everyhwere. Yes, the shearling lined vest, coat, jacket are trending at every price point so everyone can join this very cozy movement. Even the classic denim jacket has shearling this season. We also love the FLIGHT JACKET with shearling lining (not shown here) by Todd Snyder. No matter your budget you can add shearling to your wardrobe; shop our favoites at H&M, Ralph Lauren, Ermenegildo Zegna & Giorgio Armani and more.

Ermenegildo Zegna FW17


ZARA

NAUTICA

ZARA

ZARA


Photographer Carolyne Teston Photo assistant Landon Ford Styling Julian Antetomaso Grooming Kaori Yamamoto Models Jordan Paris and Terence Telle SOUL


TITLE PAGE Sweater: Raf Simons Pants: Sandro Sneakers: Converse NEXT PAGE Sweater and pants Bottega Veneta Shirt Burberry Tie: Prada Sneakers: Converse 23


Hat and Striped Shirt: Ralph Lauren 24 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


25


Brown Suede Jacket: Ports 1961 White Thermal, Belt, Pants: Ralph Lauren 26 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


SLEFT Hoodie: Alexander Wang RIGHT Jacket and Sweater: Sandro Shirt: Burberry Tie: Prada Jeans: Tommy Hilfiger Briefs: Versace

27


Jacket, shirt and pants: Tommy Hilfiger Tie: Givecnhy


Jacket, sweater and pants Alexander Wang Shirt Burberry Sunglasses Giorgio Armani 30 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM

Shirt: Ralph Lauren


32 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


LEFT: Shirt and pants Alexander Wang Boots Bottega Veneta RIGHT: Jacket, tank and pants: Issey Miyake Sneakers: Converse


Fashion | Spotlight

ADAM DALTON BLAKE

THE NEW BOY IN TOWN BY KRISTOPHER FRASER

Every young design student dreams of moving to New York and having their fashion career dreams come true. Life isn’t a CW series though, unless of course you’re Adam Dalton Blake. The menswear designer, only a year fresh out of design school, debuted his latest collection under his eponymous label at New York Fashion Week in September. Blake was one of three lucky designers chosen to be part of the CFDA and LIFEWTR showcase, where he also got to design a special LIFEWTR bottle that was available for guests at Fashion Week. His design featured a crowd of people who were literally every color of the rainbow wearing every style of sunglasses from star to heart shaped. While he’s enjoyed meteoric success at a young age, Blake didn’t grow up with dreams of being a designer. “My mother wanted me to be a soap opera star. I got my name because she thought it sounded actor worthy” Blake said. However, his true loves growing up were opera and art. Eventually, he decided to go the art route focusing on becoming a painter. He applied early decision to Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), and describes the moment he got his acceptance letter as the happiest day of his life. Blake describes his time at RISD as “being at art camp for four years.” Like all RISD students, he went through his first year of basic foundation classes before he declared his major. Up until the end of his freshman year, he was still focused on painting. The turning point for him came when he went to the senior critique for the apparel design majors, and he left realizing fashion design was his calling. The first menswear piece he designed his sophomore year was thanks to Nicole Miller. As an alumnus of RISD, Miller is still very involved with the apparel design program. She provided one of his classes with prints from some of her previous collections to create something new. Blake created a rainbow Amish inspired man romper, and thus his design aesthetic was born. 34 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


35


Fashion | Spotlight

Four years of so-called art camp culminated in his NYFW debut during the RISD graduating class of 2016 showcase. The theme for his collection was baseball, where he did a kitschy take on masculinity called “Big League Chew.” Since then, he’s done two other collections, including fall/ winter 2017’s “Riot Boys”, based on the 2016 election cycle, and his collection that debuted with CFDA and LIFEWTR titled “Fifteen Love,” a tennis inspired collection based on his affinity for sweaters and short shorts. He might have a love for color and flamboyant aesthetics, but everything he does has a deeper meaning. “Riot Boys was my analysis of how politics could be used as a sales tactic rather than a system of beliefs,” Blake said. That collection gave us pieces with statements like “United States of America Ferrera” and “Redo” emblazoned in sequins. It debuted right after inauguration day, just the perfect timing to get the public’s attention. The designer is no stranger to getting his work noticed though. In 2016, prior to getting involved with CFDA and LIFEWTR, Blake was highlighted by the CFDA + program, which highlights exemplary graduating talent, as a designer to watch. When he got the phone call with the offer to be involved with CFDA and LIFEWTR, he had only been living in New York for two months. “It was insane,” Blake said. “I just moved to the city and I find out I have an opportunity a recent graduate could only dream of. To have the support of both CFDA and LIFEWTR is crazy. After they called me, I just remember immediately calling my mother to freak out.” In addition to his eponymous line, Blake also works as an assistant designer at Bonobos, so, yes, you probably have him to thank for some of those recent Bonobos purchases in your closet. As for how he handles both working at Bonobos and doing his own line, Blake simply said, “You always find the time do what you love, plus I draw all the time!” With everything he does, Blake wants to make sure his appreciation for diversity always shines through. “I learned so much about different cultures from the international students at RISD, and it really helped make my work more impactful,” Blake said. “The more knowledge you have about people with different cultures and beliefs helps you create work that’s more impactful. That’s what my whole print for the LIFEWTR bottle was about, embracing diversity and showing how everyone is interconnected.” That little boy with a paint brush grew up to be one of the most talked about young American menswear designers. Blake is proof dreams really can come true. 36 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM

COURTESY OF ADAM DALTON BLAKE


Cardigan: HERMES / Sweater: BURBERRY / Cargo Pants: MONCLER / Boots: MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION 37


PHOTOGRAPHER Brendan Wixted STYLIST Bronson Vajda  HAIR Gonn K  MAKEUP Alex T  VIDEOGRAPHER Hunter Lyon  ASSISTANT Quinn Garvey MODEL Spencer James   AGENCY Heroes New York 38 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


39


Jacket Lemaire, Polo Necessity, Trousers Lemaire, Glasses Blyszak, Bag Vintage 40 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


41


Flannel Represent, Turtleneck Necessity Sense, Trousers Represent, Belt COS, Glasses Blyszak Footwear- Filing Pieces 42 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


43


Overcoat Necessity Sense, Hoodie One DNA,T-shirt Uniqlo, Denim Represent, Footwear Filing Pieces 44 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


45


46 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Leather Jacket Musika Frere Turtleneck Uniqlo, Denim & Boots Represent 47


Overcoat Necessity Sense, Denim Shirt Allsaints, Track Pant YOSSI New York, Boots Represent 48 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


49


Fashion | Review

50 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


TODD SNYDER Fall & Winter 2017

BY MARTIN LERMA & PHOTOGRAPHY BY CAROLYNE TESTON

“I took varsity, military and prep, put it all in a blender and this is what came out,” Todd Snyder told reporters backstage during his blockbuster fall show. Snyder is one of the leading menswear designers on the New York calendar in terms of reach and recognition with a presentation setting that matched his ambition. Rows of long black benches with show notes and seat numbers neatly laid out greeted throngs of guests as they descended on the moody space that would prove a pointed counterbalance to the clothes themselves. Snyder went back to his roots at Iowa State University for this particular collection where he discovered everything from the joys of thrift shop finds to music from the Cure all of which came through the clothes with precision. There was a late 70s/early 80s spin on everything from the slim track suits in camel velvet to a stunning shearling coat with the fur on the exterior to the narrow collegiate scarves tossed behind shoulders. It was a comfortable balance of showpieces designed to excite and what is actually going to be hanging on the racks in a few months’ time.

With day clothes the core message of this collection, Snyder seemed to offer comfort through the generous use of texture with corduroys in caramel tones, washed leather and great knits comprising a trinity of recurring elements that lent consistency while reinforcing the houses aesthetic codes. The show had an undeniable energy that created a crescendo for Fashion Week: Men’s, an initiative that is still gaining steam amid a struggling system. If the crowd that came out in force to support Snyder is any indication, he has no cause for concern. Though he only launched his namesake label in 2011, Snyder has enjoyed incredible professional experience at Polo Ralph Lauren and the Gap learning what men desire at many different price points. Snyder’s New York Left Image Pants and Sweater by Nautica Shirt by Steven Alan City flagship store is officially open for business and his momentum shows no Hat by: Krammer & Stoudt Right Image Sweater by Filson signs of dissipating soon. Shirt by Krammer & Stoudt Pants by Matiere Sneaker by Billyanytime Reid

51


Model CORY BOND Photographer AMBER MCKEE Wardrobe Stylist BETH HITCHCOCK Groomer SARA CHESTNUTT-FRY

52 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Shirt and pants Just Cavalli, Jacket Vintage Shoes Thursday Boots 53


RIGHT: Jacket Just Cavalli, Turtleneck, Mr. Turk 54 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


55


58 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Sweater: Calvin Klein Trousers: David Hart

LEFT: Jumpsuit Mr. Turk Shirt Zadig and Voltaire 59


60 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Page Left: Shirt : Top Man

Page Right:The T-ShirtKooples, : H&M Vest : Pants LEFT: Hat Resistol, Shirt Tommy Hilfiger Pants : Zine Collection Just Cavalli RIGHT: Jacket Topman, Sweater Zachary Prell, Pants Roberto Cavalli, Shoes Thursday Boots 61


64 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


65


Photographer: Sean Patrick Watters Stylist: Rashida Meggett Make-up/Groomer/Hair: Theo A. Faulkner Market Editor: Rashad Minnick Stylist Asst: Brandi Murray Retoucher: Marco Massa Models: Rudnei Gracyk, Q Models Dylon Adonis, Anti Model Management Randy Aquino, Surface Models 66 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Sweater Off-White, Pant Bally Shoes, GOLA 67


68 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


RIGHT: SHIRT SELECTED HOMME, Undershirt H&M, Pants BALLY, Shoes, LEFT: Jacket 3.1 Phillip Lim, Shorts Public School, ShoesRucksack: Nike Agentry PR, Rings Lucas Plus Go Forth Goods / Shirt: Diesel / Jeans: Zara 69


70 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


LEFT: ShIrt Hugo Boss, Undershirt H&M Pants & Boots 3.1 Phillip Llim, Jacket Lucio Castro Rings Lucas Plus, RIGHT: Sweater Lucio Castro, Shirt H&M, Pants Joseph Abboud, Necktie JCREW Shoes, GOLA Shirt: Diesel / Jeans: Zara 72 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


73


Shirt: Diesel / Jeans: Zara 74 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


RIGHT: Coast & Pants Krammer & STOUDT, Shirt H&M, Shoes GOLA, LEFT: Coat & Pants Joseph Abboud 75


LEFT: Shirt & Jacket BALLY, Pants H&M, Shoes FLORSHEIM, RIGHT: Sweater & Pants Joseph Abboud, Shoes 3.1 PHILLIP LIM, Vest Joseph Abboud, Shirt MODEL’S OWN, Pant BALLY Shirt: Diesel / Jeans: Zara 76 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM

PHOTOGRAPHERS: JOHN RUSSO & BLAKE STYLIST: JAVON DRAKE GROOMER: GREG CLARK MODELS: KENNETH GUIDROZ, SOUL ARTIST MANAGEMENT PRODUCTION COORDINATOR: CAMACHO SHOT ON LOCATION MONTECITO CALIFORNIA


77


SUN SOAKED SATURDAY Photographer: Frederic Pinet Stylist: Veronica Garrote, Utopia the Agency Stylist Assistant: Jasmyne Boivin


AMERICAN

COOL STYLE DIRECTOR GREGORY WEIN PHOTOGRAPHY AYDIN ARJOMAND GROOMING JOHNNY LAVOY at ABTP.COM TALENT TUCKER RAJALA

COTTON T-SHIRT, CASHEMERE SWEATER, CORDUROY OVERCOAT DENIM JEANS & LEATHER SHOES BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, brunellocucinelli.com, JEWELRY EDITIONS DE RE, editionsdere.com. TIMEPIECE OMEGA, omegawatches.com


CASHMERE T-SHIRT, CASHMERE BLAZER, CASHMERE TROUSERS, SHEARLING LOAFERS & LEATHER BAG, BOTTEGA VENETA, bottegaveneta.com 80 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


CASHMERE KNIT SWEATER, DOWN FILLED OVERCOAT, WOOL TROUSERS, LEATHER LACE-UP BOOTS, ERMENEGILDO Sweater by Massimo Dutti ZEGNA, zegna.com 81


82 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


COTTON BRIEFS, CALVIN KLEIN UNDERWEAR, calvinklein.us, COTTON SWEATPANTS, TODD SNYDER + CHAMPTION, toddsnyder.com. JEWELRY, EDITIONS DE RE, editionsdere.com, TIMEPIECE, OMEGA, omegawatches.com 83


Carson Blue orange and pink shorts: Rufskin Blue tinted sunglasses: American Eagle

BRIEFS, CALVIN KLEIN UNDERWEAR, calvinklein.us, JEWELRY, EDITIONS DE RE, editionsdere.com TIMEPIECE, OMEGA, omegawatches.com 84 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Eduardo Dark green palm tree shorts: Hydrogen luxury swimwear Straw hat: Stylist Own Wrap Bracelet: Miansai Valentina Stripe bikini: Montce swim Jewelry: Stylist Own Choker: Stylist Own COVER: Karl: Henley: Vince, Pant: Jeans by Seven John: Top: J. Crew, Body Chain: Crave Salt

Khakis: Sacoor Brothers, Necklace: Aldo Lucas: Sweater: Vince, Jeans: Models Marcus: Henley: Vince, Jacket: Jbrand, Pant:85 Jbrand


Eduardo Dark blue & white stripe trunks: Selected Homme Black snapback: Urban Outfitters Wrap Bracelet: Miansai Shoes: Converse Gabe White palm printed shirt: Ralph Lauren Yellow shorts: Lacoste Sunglasses: Hydrogen by Jplus Necklace: Fender Shoes: Nike Carson Floral shorts: 2(x)ist Tropical island orange shirt: Vintage 60s/70s from FlyBoutique.com Sunglasses: Vintage Shoes: Vans Valentina Orange bikini top: Model’s Own Snapback hat: Little Rio Studios Miami Short jeans: 1990s Bongos Jean Shorts Jewelry: Stylist Own Body Chain: Crave Salt TJ Woodard (Jeep Driver) Blue white and red shorts: Tommy Hilfiger Chambray Shirt: Ralph Lauren Watch: Rolex Submariner Bracelet: Fitbit Shoes: Sperry Top Siders Sunglasses: Tom Ford 86 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


COTTON / CASHMERE BUTTON DOWN SHIRT, KNIT TIE, CASHMERE DOUBLE-BREASTED BLAZER, CASHMERE POCKET SQUARE CASHMERE OVERCOAT AND DENIM JEANS, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, brunellocucinelli. com. JEWELRY, EDITIONS DE RE, editionsdere.com. TIMEPIECE, OMEGA, omegawatches.com NYLON WRAP BELT, EDDIE BAUER, eddiebauer.com LEATHER LACE-UP BOOTS, ARMANDO CABRAL, armandocabral.comi 87


LEFT: COTTON TURTLENECK, SUEDE MOTO JACKET & WOOL TROUSERS SELECTED HOMME, selected. com. RIGHT: COTTON SHIRT, NYLON PARKA WITH FUR HOOD, DENIM JEANS AND LEATHER BOOTS, TOMMY HILFIGER, tommy.com JEWELRY, EDITIONS DE RE, editionsdere.com 88 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Gabe SweaterBlue byand Massimo Dutti red shorts: Chubbies 89


Fashion | Spotlight

NICK WOOSTER DOES IT FOR THE CLOTHES BY SETH TRAVIS

Nick Wooster has done it all and he’s not afraid to talk about it. His career is a virtual MBA in Fashion with stints at Barneys New York, Bergdorf Goodman, Neiman Marcus, Calvin Klein, Polo Ralph Lauren and Thom Browne. But his demeanor doesn’t scream fashion god, he’s actually very laid back, soft spoken, and refreshingly humble. And after at least a decade of following him, it was a nice surprise to witness one of fashion’s tatted-out trailblazers — is a nice guy! Wooster is the first to tell you his journey in menswear and fashion didn’t start on Instagram or online it started decades ago on the store floor and continued with major roles as a men’s fashion director at Neiman Marcus and Senior Vice President at JC Penny. He has gone ‘free agent’ now where he resides in air as often as he does walking the streets at every fashion week. He often flys to Italy, Asia, to name a few almost as frequently as a commercial pilot flys his weekly route. Yeah, sure he attends all the shows sitting front row, and is visible on Instagram for his famed street style game. “I thought in order to work in the business, you had to dress well. I was doing this since I was 16 years old. What it boils down to — I just love clothes. I think about them a lot. There isn’t a place I go in the world that I am not shopping. Of course I go to museums, but until I go into a store and buy something I’m not happy. Really a trip isn’t complete until I’ve bought something.” There was a time where Nick Wooster was in it for the cocktails and the parties but now this is not the time. It is all-out the clothes. “My access is better today than it was eight years ago, and it’s certainly better than it was when I was 16 years old. The only reason I work in fashion is because one 100% I am in it for the clothes and I am not in it for anything else.” Wooster drove home. Though events are impressive and make Wooster thankful to be there; he talks about the sense duty that goes along with his place in the industry and admits he doesn’t deserve an A for his attendance, “I give myself a C- because there are a lot of things I don’t attend that I should — everyone has a stake in this. Somebody has gone through the trouble of inviting me but there is now way I can do all of them.” During our sit-down I shared the digital landscape on social media especially places a false representation of experts in the field of menswear; and It’s clear these days a lot of people out there are saying they know everything about fashion but, Wooster is happy to admit ‘I don’t know everything.’ When asked about what the hell is going on in fash-

90 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM

ion right now, he replies; I don’t think anyone knows. Wooster pivots to the one who might know everything about menswear, Thomas Kalenderian, the 59 year old Executive Vice President of Men’s Merchandising, Barneys New York. “I don’t know another soul on the planet who possesses as much knowledge as that man does.” Wooster stresses that we are on cusp of something; a lot of brands, a lot of stores and publications are not going to make it. It is going to separate the men from the boys when it comes to talent and knowledge.” He points to upstarts as the possibility of future success and not just the established companies and media brands. But what is the real problem with men’s fashion I asked Wooster and he leveled with us bluntly; “If you are a retail store and you are having trouble, I guarantee — it’s because your merchandise sucks. Because you buy it terribly and your products are horrible, period. And I believe the same thing for Brands, if your a brand and your struggling it means that your not resinating with your customer. Until those two things are resolved the stronger will continue to be stronger and the weak will be eliminated.” He admits it’s a very hard ass truth but, the casualties are coming. The opportunity ahead for those who are nimble shall inherit the earth according to Wooster, much like trying to catch a train; the person with a carry-on is more likely to get their ride while others with more bag will be left at the station. These companies, some amazing institutions may not make it to the next destination as a result. “If you work at Barney’s (which I recommend highly) you will learn more about the world, and people and every single brand than sitting behind a computer or getting your picture taken and posting it on Instagram (that’s not teaching you anything). The point is, you understand about delivery, you understand quality and product. Then you understand hey wait this shirt really sells, there is a business here. To learn about that from the ground up is liking earning an MBA, expect they are paying you.” “I hear people say that social media and blogs are terrible, and in a certain way they are because it has upended the system; but you know what it doesn’t matter what I think. The point is they have and this is what exists, now.” Wooster says he is not that special and explains the world shouldn’t be interested in him. But they are interested in Nick Wooster, what he thinks and what he wears, including what parties he attends. In a time where people and brands grasp to stay relevant — Wooster stays true to himself does it all for the clothes and knows that nothing lasts forever. PHOTOGRAPHER: JOHN RUSSO


photo by Chiun-Kai Shih 91


Sweater and Trousers by Ermenegildo Zegna 92 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


FA L L I N G S L O W LY Story by Erik Carter Styling by Mike Stallings Model Isaiah Hamilton

Blazer by Billy Reid Hoodie by Selected Homme Pants by Krammer & Stoudt Bracelet by Miansai 93


LEFT: Jacket Ralph Lauren RIGHT: Sweater by Paul Smith 94 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


96 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


LEFT: Jacket and pants Calvin Klein Sweater by Massimo Dutti RIGHT: Jacket TOM FORD, Top & Pants Paul Smith 97


Jacket by Z. Zegna, Top by Gucci Belt by Calvin Klein, Pants by Ermenegildo Zegna, Shoes Saint Laurent 98 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Left Image Sweater: Life After Denim Shirt: Steven Alan Pants by LACOSTE Boots by Diesel Right Image Coat by Filson Shirt by Steven Alan 99


100 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Jacket by Ralph Lauren, Top by Top Man, Shirt: Steven Hat: Pants by Ralph Lauren, Gray Alan Boots byFilson YSL 101


SUSPECT Story by Bell Soto Model Oli Lacey with IMG Styling by Nicholas Whitehouse Grooming by Mary Guthrie with ABTP Produced by Seth Travis

102 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Brown Coat - Bottega Veneta Light Brown Sweater - Michael Kors Striped Button Down Shirt - Salvatore Ferragamo Sunglasses - Georgio Armani 103


Grey Suit - Salvatore Ferragamo White Button Down - Z Zenga Grey Turtleneck - Uniqlo Sunglasses - Prada 104 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


106 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Fur Sweater - Hermes Black Pants - Hermes 107


Shirt: Diesel / Jeans: Zara 108 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM

PHOTOGRAPHERS: JOHN RUSSO & BLAKE Grey Knit Suit - Tomas Maier STYLIST: JAVON DRAKE Cream GREG Sweater - Z Zegna GROOMER: CLARK Black Sneakers - Hermes MODELS: KENNETH GUIDROZ, SOUL ARTIST MANAGEMENT Glasses -CAMACHO Ray-Ban PRODUCTION COORDINATOR: SHOT ON LOCATION MONTECITO CALIFORNIA


109


Trench Coat - Burberry Striped Sweater - Salvatore Ferragamo Jeans - Tomas Maier 110 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


111


Navy Coat - Michael Kors Cream Sweater - Bottega Veneta Cream Knit Pants - Botteg Veneta Brown Boots - Michael Kors


Leather Trench - Bottega Veneta Suit - Z Zegna Striped Shirt - Salvatore Ferragamo Tie - Theory Black Boots - Paul Andrew Glasses - Ran-Ban 115


Fashion | Spotlight

Life Lessons from Raul Lopez of Luar BY KRISTOPHER FRASER

There are those who spend six figures on design school to hone their craft. Then there’s Raul Lopez, who didn’t want the restrictions of formal education and decided to make a fashion career happen anyways. Lopez came to fame as co-creative director of Hood by Air alongside Shayne Oliver. Despite his lack of formal design training, he had an eye for something different and never let himself be placed in a box. Growing up when he was a kid, he was always into fashion. In junior high he used to stay up until 5 a.m. sewing his own clothes. In high school he started making clothes for his friends. Eventually, he met Oliver and they became fast friends. Oliver was the one who originally had the idea for Hood by Air, and thought that it would really work for Lopez if he came on board to design the brand with him. Thus, Hood by Air was born, where Lopez would spend seven years of his life. While many successful designers pride themselves on their intensive and extensive design educations, he never saw the need to have a brand name fashion school on his résumé. “While I think education is important, I don’t think you need formal design training to be a great designer,” he says. “School is a way to teach you how to pay back debt. All these design students go through so much education, but then they create the same thing you could find at Zara. They have all these tools at their disposal, but they can’t create something unique. If you have talent you have it, you can’t be taught talent.” Lopez’s design approach is based on designing for himself and his experiences. He never let’s anyone tell him how to design. Given his lack of formal fashion education, his initial learning experiences came from his time at Hood by Air where he learned both the professional aspects of the business as well what it was like to work with someone you really connect with. “It was crazy for me meeting Shayne,” Lopez says. “He’s so advanced for his age, we were both into the same things, both from Caribbean backgrounds, both raised in Brooklyn, and we both wanted to do something that would make both traditional fashion people uncomfortable and people in the hood uncomfortable.” 116 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM

While Hood by Air became his baby, Lopez felt that after seven years with the brand it was time to move on and do his own line. “Stepping away from Hood by Air was like getting a divorce, and having Shayne get all the custody,” he says. His separation from the brand and his business partner was amicable, as Oliver understood Lopez’s desire to branch out. In 2011, he started his current brand Luar, originally called Luar Zepol (his name spelled backwards.) However, after three years of doing designs considered ahead of the curve, Lopez went on a hiatus from designing. “I spent half my time for the next several years doing nothing, and the other half trying to design,” Lopez says. “I didn’t know what I was going to do. I kept doubting myself. Finally, I had a friend who told me snap out of it and do another runway show. He promised me that he would be there to keep pushing me every step of the way. That really helped me get out of a dark spot.” While his comeback process was a tough one, he lived for every moment of it. “I was sleeping in a factory on the floor,” Lopez says. “I forgot how good really designing felt. It was like being a heroine addict, then going to rehab to get cleaned up, and then relapsing and remembering how good drugs felt. Coming back was such a good high.” He rebranded his line as just Luar, spent two months working on his collection for New York Fashion Week: Men’s, which was inspired by post-gender streetwear and chaos, and the fashion world welcomed him back with open arms. His September women’s show was a last minute decision done in two and a half weeks, and marked his first time doing a women’s line. His design process is a particularly unique one. “I will go and sit in one spot and just look at water until I get an idea,” Lopez says. “I will not move from that spot until I get a good idea.” As for some final words of advice for aspiring designers and young designs students, “Read!” He says. “Go to the library. Research is key. The library is 24 hours now because of the internet. Don’t get inspiration from Tumblr and Instagram.”


photo by Elvin Tavarez 117


Fashion | Spotlight

MICHAEL BASTIAN GRAY LABEL BY SETH TRAVIS

Michael Bastian founded his name sake menswear brand in 2006 following an illustrious career at both Ralph Lauren as a menswear designer and 5 years at Bergdorf Goodman as men’s fashion director. Before there was the influencer boom; The Sartorialist’s Scott Schuman shot Bastian’s first look book for his first collection. Bastian also secured impressive collaborations with GANT, and GAP twice in partnership with GQ magazine. He also has been nominated five times for CFDA Menswear Designer of the Year, and won in 2011. Full disclosure, Michael Bastian has been one of my favorite designers since he set out on his own and it has been incredible watching this career change and evolve along with the changing industry. Just more than a decade as a brand, Michael Bastian has returned with a spinoff brand called Michael Bastian Gray Label, a more affordable collection without sacrificing the design elements that made his brand name so sought after by menswear enthusiasts, and retailers alike. “The idea of; I am going to take you on a trip, is a little old. I want to focus more on a color story — it’s a more modern take on building a collection.” the designer outlined to us. When asked who the ‘guy is’ his customer, he said it was always him. A guy who is in his 30’s or 40’s and loved dressing up. “Now, it can’t just be about me. It’s got to have a much more broader audience.” Bastian calls out the look book as a prime example or how his new brand has evolved. When asked who the designer would like to see in his new 118 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


MICHAEL BASTIAN GRAY LABEL AW17

Gray Label, Bastian replied, actor Justin Theroux. Michael Bastian’s new gray label is grown-up, very rugged, yet still possesses that all-American classic look. These clothes are an alternative to shopping at J.Crew, Banana Republic, and some of the emerging fast fashion brands that just can’t compete with the quality of the garments Michael Bastian Gray Label offers. You can shop it on gilt.com and other retailers which reinforces his mission for accessiblity. When asked about the change in direction for Michael Bastian the designer answered confidently, “I had an amazing 10 year run with the collection doing what I was doing, and I stepped back and was looking at it all. I am in a position where I can either do something else with my life, or I can take my brand and treat it like a business. I can find the proper level of price, value, I can make it more accessible to customers.” For fans that grew up with Michael Bastian’s products at Bergdorf Goodman and Mr. Porter his new pieces for Fall Winter 2017 are more affordable than ever and helpful to the customer looking for style and substance but who also might have a mortgage, a family and other expenses. “Everything feels new again, and personally it’s a new start for me. I am out there hustling a new brand, I am in Vegas selling a new brand.” Bastian explained. As for Michael Bastian the person? “The biggest thing that happened to me personally, was letting go of my office. Because that office was where we had every meeting. It became an extension of my apartment — it looked like my apartment. I was really connected to that office. When we were reevaluating where all the money was going, ya know it’s expensive having an office in the Chelsea Art District and having all these employees and two warehouses. We just didn’t need it anymore. Now my life was different. Instead of sitting in an office with the design team — the design team has been decentralized. There are teams that work on shoes, small leather goods and so on and I visit these teams. Just the fact of letting go of that office was weirdly liberating.” The ‘right timing, the right everything’ as Bastian puts it was with Bluestar Alliance a brand management firm that took on Michael Bastian Gray Label. They also represent English Laundry, bebe, and others. Most recently Bastian made an appearance at New York Men’s Day showing his SS17 Gray Label which was not originally listed in the program of designers at the presentation, so we are seeing some strategic moves by Bastian and Bluestar that will get his new brand on everyone’s lips and into everyone’s closets.

119


MUSIC | Spotlight

DRAKE WHITE MM: You have a fun & playful sound plus that raspy growl who did you get your influences from? DW: The raspy growl and just the soulfulness, and gospel comes from just that. It comes from church. I grew up on a lot of Ray Charles records and just have always been a far of the blues and a fan of soul music, you know? Old Otis Reading and artists like that. MM: You are an Alabama Boy, what does that mean to the rest of us, what was it like growing up -- tell us more about Bama life? DW: Alabama was great. I grew up right in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains in a small town called Hokes Bluff, Alabama. And, uh, there was about 4300 people that live in Hokes Bluff, I graduated with 88 folks, and we grew up on the river. We grew up fishin’, and huntin’, and water skiin’ and, you know, pontoon boats and horseshoes and, and just real simply. We grew up simply and faith-driven and it was a great way to grow up. MM: You must tour a lot. Where is your home away from home, Nashville or? DW: We do tour a lot. Nashville is my home, I’ve been living there since 2007, and I have a house out there and a small farm and me and my wife love it. We consider Nashville our home. It’s became a part of us, you know, just the creative juices that flow through that city are amazing. The people that live there are great, and uh, I was born in Alabama and will always call Alabama home but Nashville is definitely where I’m planning my roots now.” MM: Recording must be super digital these days, but country music is pretty stripped down and raw (authentic) talk to us about getting that live sound during the studio time for SPARK? DW: Aw man, recording is digital. It’s always changing, and my style – I love that roots-y, organic style, and it’s just really putting your fingers to the strings and really voicing what you want out of your music. We rely on our hearts and our muscles and everything, you know just truly playing our instruments… and that live sound is what we love to create, so we just, in the studio, we take that live sound in and we try to reenact that.

120 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM

MM: What do you enjoy for fun? DW: When I’m not writing or touring or hangin’ out, you know, we’ve got a pool at the house, I love to go out, and, you know, I love working out, exercising, I love good food and having friends over. We love to entertain, you know, we love to have people over and just chill out. I love fireworks and, you know, just the outdoors. Anything I can do outdoors and get my shoes off and get my soul and my spirit clean out there, that’s what I like to do. Whether it be hikin’, kayakin’, climbin’, huntin’, fishing, you know. Just being outside and bringing up people over and lovin’ on them, and entertaining at the house.” MM: Describe your personal style? DW: My personal style is just, I call it “Appalachian chic,” I know that’s funny but, you know, it’s really just… I love natural tones, I love natural colors, snappy clothes, you know, I’m a big denim guy. Love a cool hat, I love some jewelry with a story. You know, bracelets with a story, necklaces with a story, you know, we make a lot of our necklaces from the wildlife and from the natural stuff that’s around our house in Tennessee and Alabama. My must-have item would probably have to be my shades. You know, a good pair of shades in the day, to get you through, is something I’ve always worn. MM: Tell us a piece you tried that was out of your comfort zone? DW: A kind of piece, that, it is those hats. A piece that I wasn’t sure about at first, the things that I wear, you know, when you first start wearing a hat, I believe a hat finds you. I don’t think you find a hat. It was kind of a, I went out on a limb, uh, years ago, and the hat just ‘came a part of me, you know, I felt comfortable with it on and that’s how…every good piece of clothing, that’s kind of the scale there. If it makes you feel good, then rock it. MM: Are you Livin’ the Dream? DW: I’m absolutely living the dream. I think we work really hard at coming out here and doin’ our thing, and you know, it’s about family for me, you know, me and my wife, and doing what we wanna do when we wanna do it, and uh, lovin’ on people, and accomplishing goals, and not taking ourselves too seriously, and just making great music and, uh, yeah. Creating family, you know, and that’s my dream; I’m definitely living it.


Blazer: L.B.M. 1911 Shirt: Resistol T-shirt: Rail Jeans: Levi’s Jacket: Zadig and Voltaire 121


RIGHT: Jacket: Zadig and Voltaire Shirt: Ruckle and Rye of Nashville LEFT: Jacket and Vest: Zadig and Voltaire jeans and boots: Drake’s own 122 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


123


Jacket: Zadig and Voltaire Bolo tie: Ruckle and Rye of Nashville 124 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


125


126 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Hat Resistol Photographer AMBER MCKEE Wardrobe Stylist BETH HITCHCOCK Groomer SARA CHESTNUTT-FRY 127


128 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


GIVE ME SHELTER Photography by Douglas Mott Fashion Stylist: Alison Hernon Coat by Filson Cardigan Sweater by Life After Denim Pants by LACOSTE Boots by Diesel


130 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Sweater by Massimo Dutti 131


132 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Blazer by Billy Reid Hoodie by Selected Homme Pants by Krammer & Stoudt Bracelet by Miansai 133


134 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


LEFT: Sweater: Life After Denim Shirt: Steven Alan Pants by LACOSTE Boots by Diesel RIGHT: Coat by Filson Shirt by Steven Alan 135


136 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Massimo Dutti Boots by Florsheim 137


138 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Shirt: Steven Alan Hat: Filson 139


LEFT: Pants and Sweater by Nautica Shirt by Steven Alan Hat by: Krammer & Stoudt RIGHT: Sweater by Filson Shirt by Krammer & Stoudt Pants by Matiere Sneaker by Billy Reid 140 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


141


Cardigan Sweater: Life After Denim Shirt: Steven Alan 142 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


143


B E A U T Y is in the eye of the

B E H O LD E R

photo & casting BRENT CHUA creative director SETH TRAVIS stylist JUNGLE LIN grooming SHIMU models BRANDON GOOD @ NEW YORK MODELS, CHRISTOPHER GEORGE @ DNA, DAVID BYWATER @ DNA, DAVID HOWLAND @ WILHELMINA, HAKIL HAXHIU @ SOUL, RAFAEL MILLET @ NEXT, STACEY EDWARD @ MAJOR, and WON JUNG JO @ RED

144 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


145


David Howland Jewelry by Bernard James Jacket by Emporio Armani & Bottega Veneta 146 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


147


Hakil Haxhiu Jewelry by Bernard James Top by Calvin Klein 148 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


149


Christopher George Jewelry by Bernard James Coat by Emporio Armani Jeans by Model Own 150 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


151


152 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Stacey Edward Jewelry by Bernard James Coats by Prada Jeans by Model Own 153


Won Jung Jo Jewelry by Bernard James Coats by Bottega Veneta

154 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


155


156 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


David Bywater Jewelry by Bernard James Coats by Balenciaga 157


Rafael Miller Jewelry by Bernard James Jeans Model’s own

158 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


159


160 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Brandon Good Jewelry by Bernard James Jacket by Ermenegildo Zegna Jeans model’s own

161


162 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


C O O L t h e

f o r W I N

T

E

R

Photographer: Dennis Tejero Casting: Eric Cano Photo Assistant: Kevin Sikorski Styling: Desyree Nicole Makeup: Magdalena Major 163


On Brodie Jacket: Zara Men Shirt: Todd Patrick Pants: Control Sector Shoes: Stampd x Puma On Eric Jacket: Salvatore Galliano Shirt: Salvatore Galliano Pants: Control Sector Shoes: Robert Wayne 164 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


165


On Brodie Jacket: Todd Patrick Shirt: Control Sector Pants: Joseph Aboud Shoes: Calvin Klein On Eric Jacket: ElĹ?y NYC Sweater: Todd Patrick Pants: Todd Patrick Shoes: Steve Madden 166 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


167


168 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


On Brodie Jacket: Control Sector Shirt: Todd Patrick Pants: Control Sector Shoes: Robert Wayne On Eric Jacket: ASOS Shirt: Salvatore Galliano Overalls: Control Sector Shoes: Calvin Klein 169


170 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


171


On Brodie Jacket: Control Sector Jacket under: Control Sector Pants: Todd Patrick Shoes: Calvin Klein On Eric Jacket: Todd Patrick Shirt: Todd Patrick Pants: Control Sector Shoes: Van Heusen 172 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


173


Fashion | Review

Left Image Pants and Sweater by Nautica Shirt by Steven Alan Hat by: Krammer & Stoudt Right Image Sweater by Filson Shirt by Krammer & Stoudt Pants by Matiere Sneaker by Billy Reid 174 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


BRETT JOHNSON Fall & Winter 2017

Part showroom, part art gallery, part meeting space for the creative set, Cadillac House in Manhattan’s tony Soho neighborhood provided the airy space for Brett Johnson’s Fall 2017 presentation. This outing marked Johnson’s third time participating at New York Fashion Week and his first runway show. Originally from Virginia, he used the majestic Blue Ridge Mountains as a point of inspiration for his earthy color palette. The majority of the garments crafted were made in shades of dark gray, chocolate brown, tan and navy with shots of sunrise yellow, lavender and pale sky blue that recalled misty landscapes lush with foliage. Johnson’s proposal for the season was based on a layered, sporty look with slim turtlenecks beneath button-up shirts and cropped outerwear (like a beautiful black leather bomber jacket with contrast fur collar) over louche separates. In fact, most of the outerwear shown was cropped with iterations of baseball jackets and military jackets featuring patchwork leather components being the most prominent examples. Johnson himself said, “The mixed-media field jacket in a cotton-cashmere blend best represents the message of the entire collection,” when describing his favorite piece. Classic English footwear purveyor Gola completed the look with sneakers in the same muted shades as the clothes.

Overall, the clothes were lovely and immensely wearable (no small accomplishment), but this presentation revealed just how much Johnson is still trying to find his footing. Though the collection is entirely crafted in Florence using exceptional materials, it didn’t seem to have a specific voice despite his efforts to create signatures via chevron vests or intricate suede patches. He has no formal training and while it certainly is not required, the results are a prime example of someone’s attempt to make something his own using surface-level alterations rather than questioning ideas from their foundations. I could

BY MARTIN LERMA PHOTOGRAPHY BY CAROLYNE TESTON

have dropped a given look into any number of other collections from the week and even the most discerning eyes would be hard pressed to find it out of place. The clothes were nice, but they were not unique. Johnson is a rare designer of color making things at the luxury level and the audience in attendance reflected his incredible social circles. A number of noted press, like The Washington Post’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Robin Givhan, and influential stylists were there, but the real showstopper was his extended family of close friends which was dressed to the nines in solidarity. I couldn’t help but notice that the models walking the runway seemed whitewashed in comparison. Johnson is in the difficult position of juggling his personal values and the pressure he must feel as one of the few black designers in fashion with his name above the door in a way that does not scare off an industry still remarkably skittish when it comes to issues of race and diversity. If Mr. Johnson can manage to capture the energy of his persona and that of his cohorts, there may be no stopping the momentum of his label.

175


Fashion | Spotlight

176 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


BRUCE PASK Bergdorf Goodman & Neiman Marcus Men’s Fashion Director Bruce Pask loves to explore fashion in it’s raw cultural surroundings and doesn’t see clothing in a vacuum as a compelling way to process fashion. He admits traveling inspires his ideas and emrbaces the idea that everything is information. So it’s no surprise that with his personal approach to his work and unique hands on experience in fashion that he was recently promoted from men’s fashion director of Bergdorf Goodman’s to pulling double duty at Neiman Marcus. I sat down with Bruce to find out more about his role as men’s fashion director and we got some tips on how to dress this season. BY SETH TRAVIS

MM: What does a fashion director do? BP:My background is in editorial so I am pretty hands on as fas as the fashion goes. I was trained as a fashion editor and a stylist. I would put shoots together, conceptualize them, execute them on set, making sure everything looks the way it is supposed to look. Which later lead itself into celebrity shoots, and then celebrity dressing and red carpets, including doing the Oscars two years in a row. So it’s pretty applied the concept of fashion for me. I think where I differ from others who have the same job title is I think my connection to the actual clothing is pretty direct, where people that rose to this from the merchant side is bit more conceptual. MM: How do you approach your role in relationship with other creatives? BP: We are a team here, and it’s a tight team. In magazines there was the editorial side and the business side of publishing. I grew up being trained to work hand in hand, and one side supports the other. We have a similar structure here at the store where the fashion office is a partner to the merchant. We work very very much as partners. I find it a very easy relationship to manage. Being a fashion director is not about being imperious. That way isn’t going to get anyone anywhere, it is a partnership it is a collaboration. I have grown up collaborating it’s a natural state for me.

Courtesy of Bergdorf Goodman’s: WCorduroy Page: Neil Gavin

177


Shoots bring many many people together cooperating to create an image is that is hopefully beautiful and successful. You have styling, photographer, photographer assistants, producers, hair and make-up, location producer; it’s so much — it’s always a team. MM: How do you manage the responsibly as a fashion director with such a big team whom you rely on? BP: I think when you are in a leadership role, you have to lead. Here at the store it is shared with others. When I am on set I know what my responsibilities are working with the creative director or an art director. It’s always a respectful collaboration — there is never one person on set that is saying ‘this is how it’s gonna be’, I don’t think that ever works. MM: What other projects do you touch or lead for the brand and retailer? BP: I head up the men’s component of the magazine, from conceptualizing the fashion stories and our AD looks, working with the merchant team and selecting those for the season. I also work on generating our private label knitwear so I design that. We work with factories in Italy on that. Above: Zegna Look Neil Gavin Below: Balenciaga Look: Paola Kudacki

178 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


MM: When you attend a fashion week how do you share what you see to your team? BP: I send out trend reports daily to the teams, along with a photo stream that I think are interesting that I want to make sure the teams are aware of. Everything is really connected even though we are one store, we are always referring each other to things, and as a fashion director I want to make sure that when I see something directional I am letting the team know. That information doesn’t mean anything unless it is shared and discussed. MM: Can you share some trends for men this season? BP: Wider pants, get ready. The shapes are not as hard as they look, we will see this in trousers, first. Corduroy would be the one thing I would absolutely say go out and find one piece that works for you, be it a five-pocket jean or a sport jacket. Also a fine gauge turtleneck sweater it’s such a great option underneath sport jackets and suits and even underneath tuxedo jackets for evening is such an easy thing that is underutilized by American men. As far a footwear there is a huge ski influence this season. We are seeing a lot of technical clothing from brands like Fendi, Moncler and Etro. Above: Boot Page: Robert Tardio Below: Moncler Ski Page: Jacob

179


Photographer: Giuseppe Vitariello Creative Team: Good Talent Management Producer: Jason Summerfield Model: Jesse Gwin Styling: Airik Henderson Hair and makeup: Crystal Gossman

LEFT: Turtleneck: Todd Snyder Fanny pack and Joggers: 3.1 Phillip Lim RIGHT: Coat: Landlord Shirt: Calvin Klein Pants: Todd Snyder Belt: Kenneth Cole


LEFT: Jacket: Eleven Paris Top: Siki IM Jeans: Telfar RIGHT: Shirt: Calvin Klein Pants: Issey Miyake Belt: Issey Miyake 182 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM

Shirt: Ralph Lauren


183


Jacket: Selected Homme Track jacket: Zachary Prell


“It’s really a scent I really connect with its authentic, masculine, and LEFT: Jacket Siki IM down to earth.” Sweater Life After Denim Pants Issey Miyake Belt Issey Miyake RIGHT: Jacket Marcelo Burlon Count of Milan Turtleneck Issey Miyake, Pants Kenneth Ning Hat Bickley & Mitchell Gloves 186 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM

Brown Suede Jacket: Ports 1961 White Thermal, Belt, Pants: Ralph Lauren


187


Hat: Y-3, Coat: 3.1 Phillip Lim Fanny Pack: Kenneth Ning Sweater: Salvatore Ferragamo Pants: Zachary Prell, Belt: Prada


Peacoat and Turtleneck: Ports 1961 190 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


Plaid Jacket: Levis / Jeans, Boots, Shirt: Ralph Lauren 191


MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


FA S H I O N ON FILM

Watch SUSEPCT a film by Bell Soto starring Oli Lacey for manofmetropolis.com

Watch ON SATURDAY a street style inspired film by Hunter Lyons, Bronson Vajda, and Brendan Wixted for manofmetropolis.com

Watch Give Me Shelter by Eric Crocombe, Doglas Mott and Alison Hernon for manofmetropolis.com 193


194 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


EDITORIAL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF SETH TRAVIS

FASHION DIRECTOR: SETH TRAVIS STYLE DIRECTOR AT LARGE: GREGORY WEIN GRAPHIC DESIGNER: JESSE TANG SPECIAL FEATURES: KRISTOPHER FRASER CONTRIBUTOR: MARTIN LERMA CONTRIBUTOR: MARY GUTHRIE

PHOTOGRAPHERS

BELL SOTO RICK DAY STEVE BENISTY CAROLYNE TESTON BRENDAN WIXTED AMBER MCKEE SEAN PATRICK WATTERS AYDIN ARJOMAND ERIK CARTER DOUGLAS MOTT BRENT CHUA DENNIS TEJERO CAROLYNE TESTON GIUSEPPE VITARIELLO

SPECIAL THANKS GREGORY KRESS ISAAC BERNER BRONSON VAJDA HUNTER LYON ERIC CROCOMBE TIMOTHY PRIANO VICTORIA & STUART MASCHMEIER

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR: SETH TRAVIS

195


196 MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM


CELEBRATING 2 YEARS OF FASHION & CULTURE

MANOFMETROPOLIS.COM

197


You’ve been entered to win!

Close up with Man of Metropolis Go behind the scenes with Editor-in-Chief Seth Travis. Enjoy a three-night stay at a Man of Metropolis-approved NYC hotel and get a high fashion editorial production experience. Finish the day with dinner and cocktails at the iconic Polo Bar.


Thank you for supporting Man of Metropolis

Want more entries? See how to increase your chances to win by clicking the link below.

GET MORE ENTRIES

GOLDEN ISSUE GIVEAWAY PROUDLY SPONSORED BY


MAN ELEVATED.

2 Year Anniversary - Fashion issue  

We celebrate our 2 year Anniversary Issue with our biggest Fashion Issue yet. Over 11 editorials and fashion and menswear trend reports and...