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Student Center B Building Project #4699 | University of California San Diego

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Detailed Project Program Prepared by: Kevin deFreitas Architects

08.21.13


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Draft 95% DPP Table of Contents Table of Contents Programming Participants Programming Exhibits

1 2 3

01 Project Introduction

5

02 Overall Site Analysis

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Site Location & Description Context & Master Plan Natural Systems Pedestrian, Bicycle, and Vehicular Access Parking & Public Transportation Open Space & Landscape Service/ Utility Access

03 Base Building Analysis General Fire/ Life Safety Structural| Mechanical Plumbing| Electrical Exterior Envelope Interior Finishes| Civil Site Improvements| Vertical Circulation Signage| Accessibility Upgrades

04 User Group Analysis Overview of User Groups International Center Academic Enrichment Program Other Potential User Groups Building Allocation Analysis

05 Building Programming Organizational Requirements Functional Design Criteria Basic Systems Criteria

7 8 10 10 11 14 15

17 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

29 29 29 30 30 30

43 43 51 61

06 Sustainability

67

07 Executive Summary

69

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4722 Student Center B Renovation 4699 University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Programming Participants UCSD Programming/ Planning Work Group Ed Spriggs, Associate Vice-Chancellor Student Affairs Don Chadwick, Director, Facilities Planning & Management Student Affairs Carylyn Landt, Student Affairs Sports Facilities Roark Miller, Director, International Faculty & Scholar Office Kirk Simmons, Dean International Center Dr. David Artis Director, Academic Enrichment Program Kirsten Kung Coordinator, Academic Enrichment Program Michelle Baniqued, Facility Requirements Analyst, Capital Planning Michelle Perez, Sustainability Manager, UCSD Building Commissioning & Sustainability

UCSD Facilities Design & Construction Office Joel King, Senior Director of Project Management

Craig Johnson, Senior Mechanical Engineer

Jamie Bohannan, Project Coordinator

Anka Fabian, Senior Civil Engineer

Consulting Design Team Members Kevin deFreitas, AIA Principal in Charge with KDA

Frank Shadpour, P.E., LEED AP, CxA President/ Mechanical Engineer with SC Engineers

Manish Desai, Associate Architect with KDA

Robert Fagnant, Associate AIA Senior Designer, Electrical & Lighting with Syska Hennessey

Harry Jones II, S.E. Principal Engineer with DCI Engineers Inc.

Michael Teggin, CPE Director Cost Estimation with TBD Consultants

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4722 Student Center B Renovation 4699 University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Programming Exhibits List Exhibit 02.1 Overall Site Analysis Exhibit 02.2 Campus Map Exhibit 02.3 Existing Utility Services Exhibit 03.1 Preliminary Scope Table Exhibit 03.2 Base Building Assessment (Level 1) Exhibit 03.3 Base Building Assessment (Level 2) Exhibit 04.1 User Group IFSO (International Faculty & Scholar Office) Exhibit 04.2 User Group AEP (Academic Enrichment Program) Exhibit 04.3 User Group International Center (Level 1) Exhibit 04.4 User Group International Center (Level 2) Exhibit 04.5 International Center Staff Requirements Exhibit 04.6 AEP Staff Requirements Exhibit 04.7 Area Tables for AEP, SRI, SATS, SLS, SC Exhibit 04.8 Space Allocation by User Group Exhibit 05.1 Program Adjacencies: International Center Hierarchy Exhibit 05.2 Program Adjacencies: IFSO Exhibit 05.3 Program Adjacencies: ISPO Exhibit 05.4 Program Adjacencies: PAO Exhibit 05.5 Program Adjacencies: AEP Prospective Tenant Adjacency Exhibit 05.6 Program Adjacencies: AEP Room Layout Diagrams: Advisor/ Shared/ Directors Offices, Workstations, Reception, Break Room, Conference Room Exhibit 05.7 Proposed Utility Service Concept Plan Exhibit 07.1 Option A with Associated Cost Table Exhibit 07.2 Option B1 with Associated Cost Table Exhibit 07.3 Option B2 with Associated Cost Table

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP

01Introduction The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) proposes to renovate the existing building known as Student Center B located at the heart of Muir College. The building contains assignable square feet (ASF) located on two floors and currently houses a mix of student support organizations, primarily International Faculty & Scholars Office, Academic Enrichment Program and University Events Offices. The University has identified the following as the major project objectives: •

• • • •

Update the original 1976 Type V construction to provide modern and comfortable office space, this will require completely upgrading the existing buildings infrastructure, fire/life safety, structural (seismic), mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and IT systems. Bring the overall facility into current Accessibility code compliance by improving the access of restrooms, vertical circulation, interior access, and exterior path of travel. Reconfigure the existing warren of small spaces into open, flexible, “surge” type space to maximize and best accommodate a wide range of future University needs as yet to be determined. Improve the energy efficiency, resource utilization, and acoustical efficiency of the overall building in line with campus standards. Sustainability features + practices shall be incorporated into the new design work consistent with LEED Silver

Designed as “surge” space, the newly renovated Student Center B building will need to accommodate a range of future user groups. Initially, the build could possibly house members of the International Center staff while their existing facility is being rebuilt/renovated. Upon completion of their new facility, the International Center staff will relocate, vacating Student Center B which will then house several other campus student-orientated organizations going forward. This Detailed Project Program (DPP) is intended to provide the executive architect and consulting design team with the detailed information necessary for the design and construction phases of the building project. The program has been determined through a progressive series of meetings with a workgroup of key stakeholders including current and potential building occupants, campus leadership, and the campus project team (Facilities Design and Construction and Campus Planning.). The program content reflects the size and types of functions that will support the needs of a diverse range of student service user groups.

Existing Student Center B building, view from south Eucalyptus Grove.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP

02Site Analysis Site Location & Description UC San Diego campus is vast and somewhat disconnect from the adjacent City, not offering a traditional “college town” setting. To provide the services, amenities, and atmosphere typical of a college town the University has designated the eastern periphery of Muir College as the University Center. Centrally located in the geographic center of campus and within easy walking distance for many of the campus “neighborhoods”, Student Center B is part of this 28 acre area that serves as a de facto “town center.” The buildings in this area are oriented to pedestrians, offering shops, restaurants, performance venues, galleries, an outdoor café, student services, even a tree house study space. Though Student Center B abuts the University Center neighborhood to the west, it stands alone surrounded by the iconic eucalyptus grove. This visually prominent site is experience by pedestrian and vehicular traffic on nearby Gilman Drive as well as those crisscrossing campus on the network of foot paths. &YJTUJOH#VJMEJOH 4UVEZ"SFB -FHFOE 1SPQPTFE/FX#VJMEJOH4JUF 1SJNBSZ1FEFTUSJBO $POOFDUPST 3JEHF8BML .BKPS1FEFTUSJBO$POOFDUPST .BKPS1FEFTUSJBO *OUFSTFDUJPOT &YJTUJOH#VJMEJOH 4UVEZ"SFB 1SPQPTFE/FX#VJMEJOH4JUF

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Access, Circulation and Parking Framework

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Constructed in 1976, clad in wood siding and modest in scale, the building is decidedly residential in character compared to its for more institutional neighbors, the Mandeville Center to the north and SOM to the south. The building essentially has two front facades, a multitude of direct exterior access doors, and very inconspicuous signage which complicates way finding and further diminishes its physical presence. Student Center B subtly nestles into the natural topography appearing as a two story structure when viewed from the south and east vantage points. However when viewed from the north and west, the building is perceived as single story. As the topography continues to rise heading west of the building the flat roof plane is completely visible along the main pedestrian approach making it almost a fifth elevation. The large recessed depression along the northwest façade of the building, with an associated elevated landscape berm, create a dark unusable exterior basement space; an opportunity to be considered.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Several signature features like the oversized sloped eaves, large canted roof mounted skylight element, and vertical bands of original wood jealousies flanking each window aesthetically connect this standalone structure into the larger adjacent complex of Student Center buildings that have previously been renovated over the years and were once the center of campus student life. The newly renovated building will specifically address improving the building’s physical presence with the goal of making it easier to find, access, and use; repurposing the structure to best serve the staff that supports student oriented campus programming.

Context & Master Plan The campus’ natural resources, the Eucalyptus groves, canyons, hillsides, and bluff areas, have been conceptualized collectively as The Park. This integrated system of open spaces contributes significantly to the campus’ character, and permanent preservation of these natural resources is recognized in the 1989 UCSD Master Plan Study and included as a land use in the 2004 Long Range Development Plan (LRDP). The UCSD Park is comprised of three land categories: Ecological Reserve, Grove Reserve and Preserve Lands. Student Center B is located within The Grove Reserve boundaries, a 112 acre area that feature major Eucalyptus stands, stretching south from Genesee Avenue to the northern end of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography campus. The mature Eucalyptus groves are a valuable aesthetic resource contributing to UCSD’s natural and distinctive identity. UCSD’s overall intention is to make The Grove accessible so that people may experience this forested landscape, and to provide campus neighborhoods with “breathing space”.

Facilities Development Framework

Consequently, UCSD’s plans have consistently emphasized the importance of preserving and enhancing The Grove as an important resource and amenity in perpetuity, which led to the creation of the The Park Grove Development Guidelines (2004). Student Center B’s location in The Grove means that modifications to the existing building are subject to the Park Grove Development Guidelines, in addition to other applicable neighborhood and campus wide design and planning documents. Figure 6 - Illustrative Plan -FHFOE Proposed Academic Building Existing Academic Building Proposed Residential Building Existing Residential Building Proposed Student Life Building Existing Student Life Building Proposed Parking Structure

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Per The Park Grove Development Guidelines, new development in The Grove is prohibited and expansion of existing facilities discouraged, and should only be considered if there is a compelling programmatic justification. The guidelines go on to state, wherever possible, efforts should be made to eliminate buildings and restore the Eucalyptus groves to enhance the integrity of this open space. Any proposed expansion would require amendment of the Master Plan entailing review by the Park Committee, Campus/Community Planning Committee, the Design Review Board and approval by the Chancellor (see see UCSD Master Plan Study pages 30 and 112). 112 1989 Master Plan Study

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DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Applicable Campus Planning Plans & Guidelines Master Plan Study (1998) http://physicalplanning.ucsd.edu/plans/masterplan.html UCSD Long Range Development Plan (2004) http://physicalplanning.ucsd.edu/plans/lrdp.html Revelle & Muir Colleges Neighborhoods Planning Study (2006) http://physicalplanning.ucsd.edu/plans/revelle-muir.html Muir College Historic Resources Plan (2006) http://physicalplanning.ucsd.edu/plans/muirhistoric.html Park Grove Development Guidelines (2002) http://physicalplanning.ucsd.edu/plans/docs/Grove_development_guidelines.pdf Park Groves Management Plan (1999) http://physicalplanning.ucsd.edu/plans/parkmgmt.html Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Planning Study (2012) http://physicalplanning.ucsd.edu/plans/bike.html

Natural Systems West prevailing winds are off of the ocean and bring some moisture with a moderate salt content. Consistent with other coastal patterns, cooling of inland areas can cause offshore breezes, particularly in the evenings. September and October can occasionally be visited by dry Santa Ana winds from the east that can elevate temperatures into the 90's while appreciably dropping humidity levels for several days at a time. Occasional tropical storms cause more extreme conditions of wind and rain. Refer to the Exhibit 02.1 for prevailing wind orientation. Southern California has abundant natural day light though there are extended periods of time (May & June), specifically in the morning, when the coastal marine layer produces flat diffused daylight. New windows and skylights should be configured to take advantage of this constant source of natural light to reduce artificial lighting demands while minimizing associated heat gains. In a sunny environment, sun and shadow can be important and predictable design elements. Refer to Exhibit 02.1 for the sun’s general path of daily travel relative to the site.

Pedestrian, Bicycle, and Vehicular Access The University’s mobility plan envisions a campus where the majority of students, staff, faculty and visitors commonly walk, bike, or use public transportation to get to and move around the campus. Pedestrian paths form an important network between the various campus areas and are the primary way to access the Student Center B building due to its location in the grove. Pedestrian access from the south comprise of several informal unpaved trails that weave through the Eucalyptus grove. Located on the north side of the building the main pedestrian/bike artery that connects to Muir and Revelle Colleges heading to the west and Library Walk and the campus center to the east.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP The building is served by numerous direct exterior access points, which is both convenient and confusing for building users. There are three primary building access points; one is located on the upper level of the north elevation connecting to the main pedestrian path via a wooden bridge. The other two are located on the lower level, one on the south elevation adjacent to the elevator and the other on the east elevation accessible by a narrow asphalt path through The Grove. The upper level also has two significant secondary access points at each end of the north and southwest wings that also connect into the informal asphalt path system; the one on the north end is served by a set of stairs with no alternate accessible options. The narrow asphalt paved walkways that wrap the exterior of the building connecting the lower level to the upper level of the building negotiate approximately 10’-0” of vertical grade change. These existing paths dramatically exceed accessible slope limits and are further compromised by root intrusions that have lifted the surface level considerably out of plane.

A future on-street bike route is proposed along Gillman Drive linking the pedestrian bridge at Villa La Jolla Drive north and then east through to Russell Drive and beyond. The renovated building will provide bicycle racks for at least 5 % building occupancy, or as otherwise stated in the 2012 Campus Parking Survey, whichever is greater. Please refer to UCSD’s 2012 edition of the Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Planning Study (BPMPS) for a comprehensive framework of campus non-motorized transportation strategies http://physicalplanning.ucsd.edu/plans/docs/2012_UCSD_BPMPS.pdf . Vehicular access is limited to the site, drop offs could potentially occur along the building frontage on Mandeville Lane; however there is no designated parking in this area. Service vehicles can access the paved fire lane/pedestrian path area on the north side of the building between Student Center B and the Mandeville Center. Otherwise the closest parking lot is P113 to the south. Emergency vehicle access is provided to the east of the building on Mandeville Lane and on the partially paved fire lane designated on the north side of the building perpendicular to Mandeville Lane.

Parking & Public Transportation Student Center B is served by a single remotely located surface parking lot, P113 which is just to the southwest behind Porter’s Pub and the main Student Center buildings. This lot was previously upgraded to included Accessible parking spaces necessary to support this building. Its location at the intersection of Gilman Drive and Mandeville Lane is ideally served by City public transportation with several stops along Gilman Drive. These stops are also shared by the Campus Loop Shuttle, however the noise associated with frequent bus drive-bys is a significant problem for the building’s occupants and must be addressed. Refer to the Exhibit 02.2 for the location of adjacent parking lots. DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP

Exhibit 02.1 Overall Site Analysis

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Draft 95% DPP

Exhibit 02.2 Campus Map North

CAREER SERVICES CENTER

LIBRARY WALK NORTH

B Gilman Dr.

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Open Space & Landscaping The existing Student Center B building is located in a rustic Eucalyptus grove reflecting the College's distinctive characteristics of human-scaled structures with connecting courtyards and walkways that make users feel that they are part of a cohesive community intimately linked to the landscape. The Eucalyptus trees give Muir the sense of being a campus in the forest, apropos since the college is named for noted naturalist John Muir. Small intentionally designed landscape areas directly abutting the building on the north and south entry plazas have long been abandoned with the majority of plant material completely non-existent. This has led to erosion issues and an overall diminished entry aesthetic. An elevated berm on the northern edge of the sloped depression obscures a portion of the façade and unnecessarily encloses the lower level exterior space resulting in a darker, cooler, inaccessible exterior area. The design team believes there is an opportunity to expand the useable footprint of the building by reconfiguring this outdoor space to accommodate special events and/or overflow needs. On the lower level east elevation there is a large concrete patio slab that has no direct building access or furniture and thus is completely unused. The design team strongly encourages the rehab of these spaces as part of the renovation. The Mandeville Plaza is actively patronized by the University community utilizing the café and associated large outdoor seating area to enjoy a beverage or snack throughout the day. The pedestrian path between Student Center B and the Mandeville Theater is a major thoroughfare for foot, skateboard, and bicycle traffic as is a designated fire lane for emergency fire access. Campus tours for prospective students pass the front of the building on a regular basis, thus improving the aesthetics of this student serving building is desirable. Student Center B is prominently located on two major visual axis’ created by the 90 degree bend of Gilman Drive. As a result, all entering campus on Gilman Drive traveling north, view the building’s southern elevation while those traveling west on Gillman Drive toward La Jolla Village drive are orientated on the east elevation. The building’s low slung proportions, wood siding, dark color, and minimal signage all serve to camoflauge the structure that subtly blends into The Grove. Robert Irwin’s contribution to the Stuart Collection of permanent outdoor sculptures, Two Running Violet V Forms can be seen in the distance just to the north of the Mandeville Center.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Service/Utility Access The utilities for the campus comprise an expansive network of buried tunnels, trenches and underground conduits. Major utilities servicing the building are underground and access the building on the south west side. Student Center B is not currently connected to the high temperature hot water or chilled water campus loops, though these services are located. Communications and electrical branches access the building from south west. Refer to Exhibit 02.3 Existing Utility Services.

Gas: There is currently no gas service to the building, smaller gas lines exist in the vicinity at a couple of locations including beneath Mandeville Lane. A 6” gas line exists in the service tunnel to the southwest. Electric: Service enters the building from a transformer located to the south of the building into the existing 120/208 volt distribution board. Chilled Water/High Temp Water: There is currently neither chilled water or high temp water service to the building. Domestic Water: Existing 2” service enters the building from the southwest via underground supply. Telcom: Enters the building from the southwest via an underground duct bank originating in the utility tunnel.

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Sewer: Existing 4” service enters the building from the southwest via underground supply in the same location as the D.W. service. Storm Drain: Existing 6” underground line is located on the on the south side of the building and daylights onto Gillman Drive.

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DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

Fire Alarm: Enters the building from the southwest via an underground duct bank originating in the utility tunnel.

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Draft 95% DPP

Exhibit 02.3 Existing Utility Services Location of main utilities and services shown are based on university as-built information. All utilities are approximate in size and location and need to be surveyed and verified in the field.

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Draft 95% DPP

03 Base Building Analysis General Student Center B is a key facility of the Student Affairs program at UC San Diego, currently housing offices, meeting rooms, and conference areas that support various faculty & student mentoring programs and support organizations. The building was designed by Paul McKim Executive Architect with A. Quincy Jones serving as the Consulting Architect. Constructed in 1976, Student Center B is a two-story office building. It is a wood frame structure with a wood roof deck over a concrete floor slab. The exterior facades consist of wood panel siding and single pane windows. The roof is a flat built-up system. Clark Benneche Architect remodeled an interior portion of the building in 1986, leaving the exterior original in design.

Exhibit 03.1 Elective

Code Required Title 24 Energy/ Cal-Green

Code Required Accessibility

Code Required CBC/ CPC/ CMC

Existing Non-Conforming

The University intends to upgrade all the building’s systems bringing the facility into compliance with current code required Life/Safety, Accessibility, and Title 24 Energy standards. The University has expressed a desire to reconfigure the interior layout creating open and flexible surge type space to best accommodate a wide range of future user groups. ISES Corporation was retained by the University to produce a comprehensive Facilities Condition Assessment of Student Center B which was accomplished based on a site observation that occurred 8 November 2011.

Preliminary Scope Table Scope Category (Description) Fire Life Safety (fire alarm, sprinklers, structural fire separation) Structure (shear walls, relocate supports, foundation) Mechanical Systems (heating, cooling, ventilation) Plumbing (new restrooms, kitchenettes, drinking fountains, custodial) Electrical (upgrade main supply, sub-panel, & circuits) Lighting/ Tel-Data (emergency, task, general illumination, exterior) Exterior Envelope (windows, doors, insulation) Roofing System (waterproofing, drainage, insulation, exterior decks & bridge) Vertical Circulation (elevator and exit stairways) Interior Finishes (new partitions, flooring, ceilings, painting, casework, doors) Civil (Upgrade Gas, Domestic Water, Chilled Water, Sewer, Electric, Storm Water, grading, erosion, drainage control) Site Improvements (New hardscape, ramps/pathways, guardrails) Landscaping (storm water quality, plant material & irrigation) Signage (New code required signage, room signs, path of travel) Architectural Enhancements (way finding signage/ graphics, exterior painting, FFE items, audio-visual, accoustic mitigation)

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Fire/Life Safety Central Fire Alarm System currently protects this facility. The devices for this system include manual pull stations and associated audible devices. The fire alarm panel located in Utility Room 113 was manufactured by Notifier and appears to be original and antiquated. Some pull stations are mounted in excess of 4 feet from the floor. The fire alarm system is inadequate compared to modern standards. This system will need to be replaced and updated.

#201

Fire Sprinklers, Sprinklers this facility is protected by a comprehensive automatic wet-pipe fire suppression system. The majority of this system is original to the building construction. It was extended to serve the exterior soffits in recent years. The sprinkler heads on the new portion are glass bulb-type and should continue to provide reliable service though any changes to the buildings floor plan layout will affect the current spacing and location of the individual sprinkler heads. The original heads that have not been replaced are fusible link-type and recommended for replacement to ensure that proper protection is available. The statistical life cycle for a sprinkler head is approximately twenty years. During this time, scale can accumulate inside the head and cause it to malfunction when needed. It has been identified that the supply pipes have a lead based primer coat that needs to be remediated. Fire Separations are not maintained according to code requirements for new construction in select areas of this facility, such as telecom and mechanical spaces. Any changes to the occupancy may create additional instances of required fire separations. Although only these instances were noted, other fire separation compromises may exist elsewhere in this building. It is recommended that the entire building be surveyed for similar problem areas, especially in conditions and spaces that are similar to those that were observed. Intumescent passive fire-stopping and some minor structural fire separation repairs should be accomplished. Illuminated Illuminated Exit Signs, Signs there are a handful of exit signs identifying egress paths in the facility. Some are self-illuminating, and others are aged units with fluorescent or incandescent lamps and have battery back-up power. There are some new LED illuminated signs serving the renovated spaces in the east wing. The exit signage in the east wing of the first floor is adequate and should continue to provide reliable service. The units in the remainder of the facility are recommended for replacement with new LED illuminated exit signs with battery back-up power. Additional exit signage will be required to accommodate any floor plan modifications.

#60

Emergency Egress Lighting, Lighting the existing building generally lacks emergency lighting supported by battery back and will be required as part of any proposed interior lighting upgrade.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Structural The existing building is a two story conventionally framed wood framed Type V structure. The original design was based on the 1973 UBC. The gravity system consists of the following: • • • •

Foundation system consists of concrete spread footings and strip footings. First floor is typically a concrete slab on grade however there is a portion of the north and west ends that are wood framed with a crawl space. Second floor is framed with 2x joists spanning between a combination of wood beams and wood stud bearing walls. Roof is framed with 2x joists spanning between a combination of wood beams and stud bearing walls.

The lateral system consists of plywood floor and roof diaphragms spanning between plywood shear walls. Based on a limited site visit performed by DCI (structural engineer) they did not observe any obvious signs of structural distress or concerns associated with the gravity system. However it is important to note that the elevator is an exterior feature and appears to have been added to the building shortly after the original construction. It is attached to the building only at the second floor and with only minimal seismic connections. A closer look at this feature from a seismic standpoint is recommended.

Mechanical (heating, cooling & ventilation) Taking advantage of the mild year-round weather, the design of Student Center B’s original HVAC system is straightforward and quite simple utilizing electric radiant heat and a series of operable jalousie louvers to naturally ventilate and cool the building. This ductless system is antiquated, idiosyncratic, and has exceeded its operational life expectancy needing to be completely reconceived, as opposed to merely being upgraded or replaced in kind. Building occupants note that the temperature outside is effectively the temperature inside and that there is little control over the heating or cooling of the various spaces. As a result, over time the system has been augment with a mix of alternate sources supplying specific spaces. The renovated conference room in the east wing of the second floor is served by a roof mounted package HVAC unit. The renovated portion of the east wing on the first floor is served by a direct expansion (DX) split heat pump system. This building is not currently connected to the campus’ central plant for either chilled or high temp water, located in the underground service tunnel some distance west, (see Proposed Utility Service Concept Plan Exhibit 05.7). 05.7) Heating Heating: ing The majority of the interior spaces within the building are heated by the original ceiling mounted electric radiant system. This system is antiquated, largely ineffective, and highly energy inefficient. Due to a highly porous exterior envelop, minimal insulation, and single pane glazing the radiant system is also not very practical, primarily heating the upper volume, while poorly heating the lower portion of the room where the occupants sit.. There is limited ability to thermostatically control this heat source within individual spaces. Cooling: Cooling Building cooling/ventilation is largely passive, and thus highly energy efficient relying on the operable jalousie louvers that flank both sides of each window for fresh air and cooling. The jalousies do not properly seal the interior space with daylight visibly seen at the perimeter of each and every louver allowing for noticeable drafts. A handful of spaces are served by window mounted air conditioning units.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Ventilation, Ventilation air exchange depends exclusively on natural ventilation via numerous vertical bands of wooden jalousie louvers taking advantage of the predominantly west-east air flow patterns. Fresh air intakes on the west side of the building are ideal since vehicular exhaust is concentrated from the transit routes directly to the south and east of the building. The double loaded corridor interior layout interrupts natural ventilation air-flow from one side of the building to the other compromising the effectiveness and ability to control this passive strategy. Building occupants on the south and especially the east sides of the building mention that the noise associated with constant bus traffic is quite disruptive, even more so when the operable jalousies are in the open position forcing a choice between thermal or acoustic comfort on warm days. #325/ 307/ 215

Plumbing Potable water is distributed throughout this facility via a copper piping network. Sanitary waste and storm water piping is of cast-iron construction. The restrooms were renovated within the past ten years. The supply and drain piping networks are adequate condition, but undersized. Any modifications to the restroom will necessitate associated modifications to the plumbing service. The plumbing fixtures are fitted with automatic, touch-free faucets and flush valves. The plumbing fixtures are in good working order. Domestic water is heated by an electric, residential-grade water heater, but most likely will need to be replaced and enlarged to accommodate an increase in expected user demand.

Electrical Main Service, Service this facility is fed with 120/208 volt power. A main distribution panel rated for 600 amp service distributes this 120/208 volt power throughout the building. The power distribution network is original to the building construction. It should be anticipated that this system will require a significant renovation/upgrade coordinated with the proposed HVAC and lighting upgrades. Unsightly surface mounted electrical service has been added in several locations on the interior and exterior of the structure and should be incorporated into the structure as part of the renovation work. #15/199/207/213

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Lighting, Lighting the interior spaces of the renovated east wing are illuminated predominately by fluorescent fixtures with T8 lamps. The interior lighting in this area is in good working condition. The interior spaces in the remainder of this facility are illuminated by fixtures that utilize compact and T12 fluorescent lamps. This interior lighting has generally served beyond its expected life cycle and is in need of replacement. All specified replacement lighting fixtures should be energy-efficient, and occupancy sensors should be utilized wherever possible to meet energy efficiency goals. Emergency lighting functionality should be incorporated into the new interior lighting systems. The exterior areas adjacent to the building are illuminated by building-mounted HID fixtures. These fixtures are currently in good condition, but should be replaced with new energy-efficient fixtures on a lighting control system or by photocell.

Exterior Envelope Exterior Facade: Facade The exterior facades are a mixture of wood siding and flat wood paneled surfaces. These finishes appear to be in fair condition.

674

Exterior doors: doors Doors are wood-framed glass units at primary entrances and metal at service and secondary entrances, some are in poor condition due to age and need to be selectively replaced with units that maintain the architectural integrity of the overall composition, and energy efficient. Many exterior doors will require new hardware sets installed due to age and to satisfy Accessibility requirements. Windows: Windows Glazing throughout the project is single pane clear float glass which are part of a custom system with integrated wooden jalousie ventilation louvers. A significant renovation of this building will trigger 2013 Cal Green energy code requirements (effective January 1, 2014), which will mandate that all single glazing be replaced with a dual paned insulated glazing system. Dual glazing will reduce future heating and cooling loads and help mitigate the external acoustic impacts for building user caused by nearby transit bus traffic. Roof: oof The roof is essentially a flat modified bitumen system. Drainage is poor coupled with a continuous buildup of debris from the adjacent trees has shortened the useful life span of the system. The Facilities Condition Assessment report has noted that the roof should be replaced as part of any future renovation work.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Interior Finishes Flooring: The floor finishes consist of carpeting in most of the facility and applied epoxy applications in the restrooms and south patio. These finishes are generally aged and otherwise worn. The Facility’s Condition Assessment recommends that they be replaced throughout with durable replacements. Interior Partitions: The gypsum board substrate with the standard applied paint finish is generally in good condition. Reconfiguring the floor plan will most likely also necessitate demo and replacement of interior partitions.

193

Ceilings: Ceilings: are primarily painted gypsum board hard lids with a remodeled portion of the lower level utilizing a dropped lay-in acoustical tile ceiling system. Both types of ceiling are generally in good condition. Modifying interior wall locations and replacing ceiling mounted lighting, fire life/safety equipment, and adding thermal and acoustical insulation during the renovation will most likely impact most if not all of the existing ceiling areas. Insulation: Insulation Building occupants mention negative impacts associated with high levels of interior noise originating from the frequent inter-campus bus shuttles. Having to open the jalousies louvers for fresh air and natural ventilation exacerbates this acoustical issue even further. The exterior walls and roof are under insulated. Adding insulation in these areas would have a positive impact on the overall energy efficiency of the building post renovation, while having the additional benefit of mitigating exterior noise issues. Interior doors doors in existing locations will most likely be affected as part of the floor plan reconfiguration. In addition to Accessibility issues previously mentioned, certain doors aren’t properly fire rated and may need to be relocated to maintain minimum clear egress passage dimensions. The Facility’s Condition Assessment report recommends replacing the interior door systems as part of a comprehensive renovation effort.

Civil Based on a review of the utilities servicing Student Center B by Anka Fabian (FD&C Civil Engineer) and third party consultant Ashkan Mozaffarian (Energy Systems Engineering Inc.) a determination was made that the existing electrical, domestic water, waste water, and storm drain service is all undersized and will need to be upgraded to support either a renovation or demo/rebuild option. It was also confirmed that Student Center Building is not connected natural gas, high temp, or the chilled water campus loops, (see Proposed Utility Service Concept Plan Exhibit 05.7). 05.7).

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Site Improvements Pedestrian pathways: pathways: Paths are a mixture of concrete, asphalt, and brick pavers. The pathways are in fair condition though root intrusion, irregular widths, non-existent handrails, and slopes significantly exceeding Accessibility codes and will necessitate modification and/or complete replacement.

339/350/412

Parking/Vehicular access: access There is no dedicated parking or vehicular drives associated with this building. Since many of the user groups provide food and beverages as part of their formal and informal programming access for catering and service vehicles is desired. A designated pull out parking area that doesn’t restrict traffic adjacent to the building on Mandeville Lane would conveniently address this issue. Emergency vehicular vehicular access: access Is served by Mandeville Lane on the east side and a dedicated fire lane on the north side of Student Center B that is accessed from the west and terminates prior to connecting to Mandeville Lane. Landscaping: Landscaping The landscaping on this sloped site consists exclusively of the trees that are part of The Grove. All other former planting areas such as the north sloped area surrounding the bridge entry and the south area adjacent to the elevator are bare dirt. As a result drainage and erosion has become an issue where stabilizing landscaping no longer exists. The site requires some fine grading and a new decorative landscape plan should be developed and installed to improve drainage & storm water control as well as improve overall aesthetics. 455/740/477/ 680

Vertical Circulation This facility is served by a hydraulic passenger elevator that was manufactured by the US Elevator Company. Installed in 1976, this unit has a capacity of 2,000 pounds and a travel of two floors. It is operated using non-proprietary solid state controls that were manufactured by MCE. The controls for this system were updated in 2000, however, the remainder of the major components are original. It is recommended that this elevator be modernized within the scope of this report. This work entails, but is not limited to, a new machine, safety and Accessibility features, pump, and controls. It is assumed that the cylinder will have to be replaced with a double-walled application. DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Signage Emergency Egress: Egress signage will need to be incorporated throughout the entire building.

333/491

Accessible codecode-compliant signage is virtually nonexistent and this will need to be incorporated throughout the entire building. WayWay-Finding: Finding Existing exterior code-compliant and wayfinding signage is either too subtle or non-existent. Proper signage will need to be incorporated onto the exterior, especially to help users navigate the multiple exterior doors are to be used.

Accessibility Upgrades Due to the age of the building, a significant amount of the existing construction does not meet current Accessibility code requirements and will have to be brought up to current University standards as part of any future renovation project. Area of needing the most attention to remedy Accessibility issues include path of travel, vertical circulation, restrooms, doors (hardware and thresholds), and signage are all severally deficient. Student Center B is a split level building with main at-grade access on both the upper and lower floors taking advantage of the approximately 10.5 feet of drop in topography from the northwest to the southwest side of the building. Of the three main access points serving the upper level, the two on the west and northwest elevations are fully Accessible, while the third located on the end of the north wing is exclusively served by a flight of stairs without an Accessible route connecting to the path of travel. The two perimeter pathways, one on each side of the building, that connect the upper and lower floors negotiate the 10.5 feet of grade differential with slopes that are far steeper than allowable Accessible code maximums, which is one foot of ramp length for each one inch of vertical elevation change required. The lower level is primarily served by main at-grade access points facing southeast and east. These access points are generally accessible and connect to the above mentioned network of pathways around the building and through The Grove that are not to current code. Reconfiguring the accessible path of travel serving the building will be extensive and costly, (see see Civil comments on Proposed Utility Service Concept Plan Exhibit 05.7 05.7). Elevator: Elevator: The upper and lower levels of Student Center B are also served by the original single passenger elevator externally located on the southern side of the building. In addition to needing significant mechanical attention, the elevator lacks all the required Accessible features, handrails, interior and exterior signage, and will require extensive rehabilitation to be brought into compliance.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

684

Page | 24 9


Draft 95% DPP Stairs: Stairs Directly adjacent to the elevator is an exterior egress stair that is also significantly out of code compliance, open risers, top of guardrail is too low, open picket guardrail spacing exceeds 4” maximum, the handrail is an incorrect profile and also mounted too low. The finish, exposed to weather, has deteriorated and needs refinishing. There is one interior stair case that shares the exact same set of issues and will likewise require comprehensive rehabilitation. Restrooms: Restrooms: The building only has single set of restrooms located on the extreme west end of the lower level. These restrooms are accessed exclusively from the exterior of the building, the women’s from the north, and the men’s from the south elevation. Not centrally located, the path of travel to access the restrooms is circuitous and especially inconvenient for upper level occupants. Restroom interiors, though previously renovated, are considerably out of Accessible compliance, lacking minimum clear turning radius and interior stall dimensions. Improper counter heights, fixture types, and bathroom accessories are also all out of compliance. A significant renovation will trigger a code required increase in the overall fixture count. Restroom facilities ideally should be located on both floors.

82/87

Interior hallways and doors: have several Accessibility related issues. Certain hallway, doorway, and strike side clearances are less than code required minimums and will need to be modified. Many doors throughout the building still have the original ball type door handles which are also non-compliant.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

56

Page | 10 25


Draft 95% DPP

Exhibit 03.2 Base Building Assessment Level One

North

M E LL E N LA

a rm Are

Maze of offices/ Interior daylight

I EV D

Tall Be

AN

Tall Berm Area

Trapped outdoor space Access

Elev. ns

Wome

Existing restroom facilities PM

(E) interior staircase General circulation and access issue

Mens Access

AM South

summer breeze

> Multiple access points, confusing user experience. > Angular floor plan results in numerous awkward interior corners and an inefficient layout. > Interior is a convoluted warren of spaces, lacks rational order. > Existing dead end corridors not code compliant. > The buildings only restrooms are located on Level 1 and only accessible from exterior. > The split level floor plan, coupled with double loaded corridors, impedes natural light and air penetration into the building.

> Exit doors beneath the entry ramp is a dead end condition, with no egress up and out. > Poorly located interior stair bifurcates floor level.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

26


Draft 95% DPP

Exhibit 03.3 Base Building Assessment Level Two

North

M AN

Double-loaded corridor

E LL

Maze of offices

I EV D

Tall Berm Area

N LA E

Tall Be

a

rm Are

Air Flow

Multiple entry points Elevator access exterior to building

PM

ess

(E) interior staircase

Acc

General circulation and access issue Air Flow

summer breeze

AM South

Both sides open required for passive air flow

> Multiple access points, confusing user experience. > Angular floor plan results in numerous awkward interior corners and an inefficient layout. > Interior is a convoluted warren of spaces, lacks rational order. > Existing dead end corridors not code compliant. > The buildings only restrooms are located on Level 1 and only accessible from exterior. > The split level floor plan, coupled with double loaded corridors, impedes natural light and air penetration into the building.

> Exit doors beneath the entry ramp is a dead end condition, with no egress up and out. > Poorly located interior stair bifurcates floor level. > Existing elevator is exterior and exposed to weather.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

27


Draft 95% DPP

04 User Group Analysis Overview of User Groups The University identified several potential user groups that will most likely occupy the Student Center B building post renovation. This section summarizes fact finding information about the functional needs of two of these potential user groups, the International Center (IC) and the Academic Enrichment Program (AEP) developed over a series of meetings with members from both of these specific user groups. To best accommodate a compatible range of future student serving user groups not necessarily known at this time, the existing divided-up floor plan is to be re-purposed to accommodate more flexibility. International Center (office centric) The International Center is the umbrella entity housing four related, but different work groups, 1) Dean’s office, 2) International Faculty & Scholars Office (IFSO), 3) International Student Programs Office (ISPO), and 4) Programs Abroad Office (PAO). Their existing facility is a series of discontinuous spaces totaling in excess of 12,000 assignable square feet. Each work group has unique requirements that are tangentially related but somewhat independent. As a result, all four departments don’t necessarily need to be co-located in the same facility while they are waiting for their new facility to be completed. Refer to Exhibit 04.1, 04.3, and 04.4 for supporting information. A majority (80%-90%) of International Center work is advising and/or counseling on a one on one basis, ideally taking place in a private office setting. International Faculty & Scholars and the International Student Programs Office handle visa and immigration related issues associated with the large population of Internationals on campus. The highly personal nature of visas and immigration issues, and the fact that this work is monitored and periodically audited by the Federal government, dictates a higher level of confidentiality and secure record storage than general office use. Campus caps on accepting International students, faculty, and researchers have recently been lifted. The current number of 2,400 International scholars and faculty is expected to grow to 3,400-4,400 by the Fall of 2013. To meet the expected demand, the International Center is preparing to grow by an additional 11-20 more immigration officers in the next year. See Exhibit 04.5 for current IC staffing requirements. The International Center currently supports several reoccurring social gatherings in support of Internationals on campus and thus desire a meeting space large enough to accommodate +40 person events that always include some sort of food service, however this function can occur remotely to the majority of private offices required to accomplish the core work of the organization.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Academic Enrichment Program (meeting centric) AEP is a student centered work group focused primarily on getting undergraduates involved in lab experiences at UCSD to augment traditional classroom work. Matching students with campus faculty mentors and researchers provides invaluable exposure, experience, and preparation for future graduate or professional school opportunities. An estimated 70% of all campus pre-med students engage AEP services on some level through, training workshops, conferences, guest speakers, and summer research placement. AEP intentionally reaches out to minority, disadvantaged, and first generation college students to provide additional academic support and counseling. Based on the consistently high level of student contact and interaction, to function properly, AEP requires a wide range of meeting spaces related to their various programs and events. Faculty and staff have several one on one counseling/advisement appointments per day which ideally are handled within private offices. Several times per week medium sized groups of 20-25 people meet during and after business hours. Larger presentation space accommodating 40-45 people is required on a weekly or bi-weekly basis and needs some ancillary lobby space for pre and post event gathering which tend to be noisy and interactive functions potentially impacting other building tenant groups. Most of these events require A/V and some sort of refreshment services and can be shared with other work groups within the building. AEP does require secured storage, but it can be located off site assuming it is fairly accessible. Their staffing needs current and anticipated are tabulated, see Exhibits 04.2 and 04.6. 04.6. Other Potential User Groups Other modestly sized student support organizations such as OASIS, I.C., SATS (Student Affairs Technical Services), SRI (Student Research & Info), Student Legal Services, Student Conduct are also logical potential tenants due to the building’s close proximity to other student centered services. Since none of these organizations were part of the initial user group interviews, their specific space requirements, functional needs, and particular operational issues are unknown at this time.

Building Allocation Analysis Possible Phase I The University may possibly house the displaced International Center faculty and staff in the new renovated Student Center B building while their new permanent facility is being constructed. The International Center currently maxes out their existing 12,000 s.f. complex. The number of International faculty, scholars, and students on campus is expected to significantly increase in the near future which potentially would necessitate 10-20 additional immigration officers, each needing work space not yet accounted for. Their specific requirements associated with confidential advisement

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP are best satisfied by individual private offices which is in opposition to the open surge space the University envisions providing to accommodate future user groups. It is clear that not all four work groups that comprise International Center can be accommodated within the much smaller Student Center B building (9,659 g.s.f.). It is estimated that there will be an approximately 4,149 g.s.f. deficit of needed work space, equivalent to an entire additional floor plate at Student Center B, please refer to Exhibit 04.8 4.8 for complete analysis. Possible Phase II When the International Center’s new facility is completed, the University has identified AEP as a potential new anchor tenant of Student Center B building along with other similar student support organizations to fill out the building’s available assignable square footage. AEP’s needs differ from that of International Center’s in that fewer private offices are required with a premium put on having close and readily available access to varying sized conference rooms to host their wide range of programs and events. Refer to Exhibit 04.8 04.8 for complete analysis.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Exhibit 04.1

User Group: I.F.S.O. (International Faculty & Scholar Office) Areas listed for user groups are net square foot values based on current assigned space. Areas shown do not account for future space needs or requirements. Areas noted do not include circulation space within each dept. or group.

International Faculty & Scholar Int. Scholar OfficeOffice

Rm# 102 103 104 105 106 108 114A 115 116 117 118 125

*

Sq Ft. 101 88 108 89 118 118 115 115 150 212 115 269 134

Dept ISO ISO ISO vacant ISO ISO ISO ISO ISO ISO ISO ISO

Student Center B Space Allocation

Use office

Current

Occupant Charmagne H

FTE 1

Jennifer H

1

Kevin D

1

Dalia A Roark M Karla M

1 1 1

Becky G Jerry L

1 0.75

stor./ office equip

reception office office storage office office office conference rm office office

1,463 nsf

1,463 nsf

* Located in International Center Building

Revision: 04.25.13/ 06.12.13

32


Draft 95% DPP

Exhibit 04.2

User Group: A.E.P. (Academic Enrichment Program) Areas listed for user groups are net square foot values based on current assigned space. Areas shown do not account for future space needs or requirements. Areas noted do not include circulation space within each dept. or group.

Academic Enrichment Program Rm# 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 213 217 217A 219 220 230 231

Sq Ft. 98 96 152 96 99 112 96 65 99 86 811 201 83 73 99 94 118

Dept RA AEP AEP AEP AEP AEP AEP AEP AEP AEP AEP AEP AEP MULTI RA AEP AEP

Student Center B Current Space Allocation

Use office office office office office office office office office storage conf rm brk rm office brk rm office office office

Occupant M. Micou T. Jarrett D.Artis S.Tsai J.Azize-Brewer T.Brown K.Van Ness D.Strom A.Savage

2,478 nsf

R.Bruckman S.Ponting V.Bejar K.Kung

Kitchen, Copier, Storage Area

Shared Conference Room

Revision: 04.25.13/ 05.07.13

33


Exhibit 04.3

User Group: International Center (Deans/ ISPO/ IFSO/ PAO) Areas listed for user groups are net square foot values based on current assigned space. Areas shown do not account for future space needs or requirements. Areas noted do not include circulation space within each dept. or group.

DEANS/ CGE Rm# 200B 217 217 218 123 123 124 125

Sq Ft. 15 390

Deans/ Central-Global Engagement

Dept

100 142 142 269 134

Use office office office office office office office office

COMMON/SHARED Rm# 122 28 27/26 24 25 201 211

Sq Ft. 589 1532 1125 534 288 136 431

Dept IC IC IC IC IC IC IC

International Int. ScholarFaculty Office& Scholar Office Rm# Sq Ft. Dept 102 101 ISO 103 88 ISO 104 108 ISO 105 89 vacant 106 118 ISO 108 118 ISO 114A 115 ISO 115 115 ISO 116 150 ISO 117 212 ISO 118 115 ISO 125 269 134 ISO

Revision: 06.25.13

Occupant Adams Espinoza Schmidt Ross Enriquez-Almaguer Lahtov Simmons UNFILLED

FTE 1 1 1 1 1 0.5 1 0.5

923 nsf

All International Center Depts.

Use conference conference dining kitchen area storage/ mtg wrk area wrk area

Occupant used by all 4 groups used by all 4 groups used by all 4 groups used by all 4 groups used by all 4 groups used by all 4 groups used by all 4 groups

Student Center B Space Allocation

Use office

FTE

4,635 nsf

Current

Occupant Charmagne H

FTE 1

Jennifer H

1

Kevin D

1

Dalia A Roark M Karla M

1 1 1

Becky G Jerry L

1 0.75

stor./ office equip

reception office office storage office office office conference rm office office

1,463 nsf

*Located in International Center Building

34


Draft 95% DPP International Center Building Level 1 Utilized by Others Common space shared by all depts of I.C. Deans/ CGE ISPO PAO IFSO

shared conference

35


Exhibit 04.4

User Group: International Center (Deans/ ISPO/ IFSO/ PAO) Areas listed for user groups are net square foot values based on current assigned space. Areas shown do not account for future space needs or requirements. Areas noted do not include circulation space within each dept. or group.

PAO Rm# 221 208 220 31 30 29 29 212 223 207 210 211A 219 224

Sq Ft. 114 105 165 112 157 276 138 147 135 102 121 295 213

Programs Abroad Office

Dept PAO PAO PAO PAO PAO PAO PAO PAO PAO PAO PAO PAO PAO PAO

ISPO

Use office office office office office office office office office office office office office recept/ wrk area

Sq Ft.

Dept

Use

217 104 103 103 102 13 13 13 13 13 13 8 6 14 7 101 5 TBD

390 103 143

ISPO ISPO ISPO ISPO ISPO ISPO ISPO ISPO ISPO ISPO ISPO ISPO ISPO ISPO ISPO ISPO ISPO ISPO

office office office office office office office office office office office office office office office stor/ office stor/ office office

134 129 91 141 184 186

FTE 1 1 1 1 1 0.6 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0

2,080 nsf

International Student Programs Office

Rm#

145 1551

Occupant Vatch York Minert Tarbell Burton Rigoli Hilburn Galvin Erlich Pizer Pentz O’Sullivan UNFILLED

Occupant

FTE

Fass-Holmes Manlapaz Robertson Schober Dorado Reese Hoffmann Casas-Silva Page Swid Rosas Taskin Chan-Schueler Conway UNFILLED General General UNFILLED

1 1 0.5 0.5 1 1 1 1 0.5 1 1 1 1 1 1

3,197 nsf

1 36

Revision: 06.25.13


Draft 95% DPP International Center Building Level 2 Utilized by Others Common space shared by all depts of I.C. Deans/ CGE ISPO PAO IFSO

37


Draft 95% DPP

Exhibit 04.5

International Center Staff Requirements

Current Dean's Office/ CGE

Future Added

= 08 staff

50% FTE IEO vacant

Int. Faculty & Scholar Office

= 08.75 staff 75% summer FTE 2013

See Exhibit 01 for (e) space utilization within Student Center B.

vacant

Int. Students & Programs Office

= 17.50 staff

50% FTE

vacant

Programs Abroad Office

Part-time Student Workers

= 12.10 staff 50% 60% TEMP FTE

= 42.35

= 04

CURRENT staff

FUTURE staff

x 37

(08)

student workers

workspaces needed

= 46.35 TOTAL

International Center Student workers during school year. Utilize flexible work spaces.

38


Draft 95% DPP

Exhibit 04.6

A.E.P. Staff Requirements

Current

Future Added

Full-time Employees

= 12staff

General Staff (PT)

= 01staff

Research Affairs (FTEs)

Part-time Student Workers

Not Permanently attached to AEP

= 02staff

= 12

= 03

CURRENT staff

FUTURE staff

x3

(03)

student workers

workspaces needed

Part-time Graduate Student Workers

= 15 TOTAL Staffing numbers provided by AEP. Above numbers reflect total persons, both part-time and FTE.

x3 student workers

(03) workspaces needed

39

Revision: 04.25.13/ 05.07.13


Draft 95% DPP

Exhibit 04.7

Area Tables for AEP, SRI, SATS, SLS, SC Areas listed for user groups are net square foot values based on current assigned space. Areas shown do not account for future space needs or requirements. Areas noted do not include circulation space within each dept. or group.

Student Affairs Technology Services Rm#

Sq Ft. 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 163 150 144 245 1549 148 84

Dept SATS SATS SATS SATS SATS SATS SATS SATS SATS SATS SATS SATS SATS SATS SATS SATS SATS

Use office office office office office office office office office office office office storage storage open work area break room open office

Occupant

3,483 nsf

cubicles+desks

Student Research & Info

Student Conduct Rm# 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 516A 516B 517 518 519

Sq Ft. 95 108 119 258 100 101 178 76 78 111 78 267

Dept SC SC SC SC SC SC SC SC SC SC SC SC

Use cubicle reception vacant meeting kitchenette office office vacant reception office storage storage

Occupant

Director

Rm# 500 500A 501 502 503 504 505 506 507

Sq Ft. 106 128 162 151 131 120 122 120 109

Dept SR&I SR&I SR&I SR&I SR&I SR&I SR&I SR&I SR&I

Use reception reception office office storage office office office office

Occupant

Director

1,149 nsf Grad Assist

1,569 nsf

Student Legal Services Rm# 523 524 526 527 527A 528 528 529 530

Revision: 05.07.13/ 6.10.13

Sq Ft. 151 120 184 95 97 171 32 203 120 109

Dept SLS SLS SLS SLS SLS SLS SLS SLS SLS

Use storage office office office reception storage office vacant vacant

Occupant

Director

1,250 nsf 40


Exhibit 04.8

Exhibit 04.8

Space Allocation by User Group

Space Allocation by User Group

detailed project program

Area Usage Table

Building Footprint

Areas listed for user groups are net square foot values based on current assigned space. Areas do not account for future space needs or requirements just existing. Areas noted do not include circulation space within each dept. or group

9,659 gsf

Total Student Center B Building

680 gsf 550 gsf 280 gsf

Interior fixed Wall Partitions

1,510 gsf

Total Restroom, Lobby, Walls:

+

4262 sf

Programs Abroad Office (PAO) Common/ Shared Space (Deans, PAO, ISPO) Total IC User Group Allocation:

12,298 nsf

Academic Enrichment Prog. (AEP) Student Research & Info. (SRI) Student Affairs Technology Services (SLS) Total (AEP,SRI, SATS) User Group Allocation: Student Legal Services (SLS) Student Conduct (SC) Multi-Use Conference/ Kitchen Total (SLS,SC) User Group Allocation: Revision: 06.10.13

Possible Phase 01

2,478 nsf 1,149 nsf 3,483 nsf

7,110 nsf 1,250 nsf 1,569 nsf 459 nsf

3,278 nsf

9,659 SF

9659 sf

Required Restroom & Lobby 1230

280

Int. Faculty Scholar Office (IFSO) 1463

*

Deans Office/ CGE

Prog. Abroad Office (PAO)

923

Int. Student Programs Office (ISPO)

2080

3197

I.C. Common/ Shared Space (Deans,PAO,ISPO) 4635

+4,149 gsf

Possible Phase 02

Possible Other Tenants

Required Restroom & Lobby 1230

280

Student Legal Services (SLS) 1250

Academic Enrichment Prog. (AEP) 2478

Student Conduct (SC) 1569

Student Research & Info. (SRI) 1149

Student Affairs Technology Services (SLS)

Excess GSF Needed

3483

3,278 SF

Int. Student Programs Office (ISPO)

Floor Level 2

=

Student Center B Building Gross Area

Fixed Walls

Int. Faculty & Scholar Office (IFSO)

923 nsf 1,463 nsf 3,197 nsf 2,080 nsf 4,635 nsf

Fixed Walls

Deans Office/ CGE

0 SF

Floor Level 1

5397 sf

13,808 SF

Circulation/ Entry Lobby

8,620 SF

Required Restroom

459

Space Allocation Graph

* International Scholars Office total area allocation is inclusive of reception area, conference rooms, and storage.

Draft 95% DPP

41


Draft 95% DPP

05 Building Programming Organizational Requirements It is expected that the Student Center B (SCB) facility will be vacated while the building is being renovated. The University is contemplating two phase post construction tenant occupancy. Phase I, could provide an interim home for the majority of the International Center’s, faculty, staff, and student workers while their facility is being rebuilt. Under this scenario, upon completion of their new facility the International Center work group would relocate. Phase II, would occur once the International Center vacates. A collection of smaller work groups affiliated under the Student Affairs umbrella will then occupy the building moving forward. 1) Internal relationships: relationships a. Phase I - The International Center has been identified as the first post renovation occupant of Student Center B, temporarily relocating out of their much larger facility while it is being reconstructed. Due to existing programmatic needs that far exceed the capabilities of a much smaller Student Center B building, it is most likely that not all four International Center (IC) internal work groups, (Dean’s Office, International Faculty & Scholars, International Students & Programs Office, and Programs Abroad Office), can be simultaneously accommodated. Which work groups move over to SCB will need to be determined. b. Phase II - The Academic Enrichment Program (AEP) has been identified by the University as the anchor tenant after the International Center vacates Student Center B to move back into their new facility. Several student serving organizations affiliated under the Student Affairs umbrella are being considered as candidates to collocate with AEP into Student Center B such as; Student Affairs Technology Services (SATS), Student Research Affairs (SRA), Regents Scholars, OASIS, Cross Cultural Center, Student Legal Services (SLS), and Student Conduct (SC). Further direction will need to be provided by the University to determine the exact mix of organizations that will ultimately inhabit Student Center B building since not are all universally compatible uses, refer to Exhibit 04.8. 2) General program adjacencies - General programming adjacencies have been formulated in a series of diagrams for the International Center and AEP. Refer to the adjacency diagrams, Exhibit 05.1 thru 05.6. 3) Flexibility - The anticipated multi-year gap between Phase I & II is the basis for the University’s request to produce flexible surge space, providing the maximum number of future options. While flexible floor plans supports a wide range of potential occupants, it often does so generically and with limitations. 4) Interaction – Both the International Center and AEP have emphasized the vital importance of interactions between colleagues, students, and the constituency groups. These interactions happen on several different scales. A majority of daily staff time is spent advising one on one, much of if it requiring privacy and confidentiality. Mediums sized meetings of 20-30 people take place several times on a weekly basis, while larger 40-50 person group presentations and orientations occur on a less frequent monthly cycle. Many associated student groups are provided use of conference spaces off-hours for their meetings, an important secondary function that needs to continue. This will necessitate controllable and secure direct access to conference spaces.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP 5) Circulation Circulation – Consolidating the multitude of exterior entrances by creating a clear centralized lobby space connecting both floors would improve way finding for users, access to vertical circulations (stairs and elevator), and restroom facilities. This common area reception space should also be designed to comfortably provide space for those waiting to being served, handle pre/post conference room activity, and having physical or electronic message boards to promote events and services. 6) Accessibility –Accessibility issues in and around Student Center B are numerous and extensive. Exterior path of travel, the exterior elevator, internal/external stairs, interior hallways, egress, lighting, missing signage, and restrooms all need to be completely redone to be brought into current Accessibility compliance. The University places high importance on maintaining public accessibility and will retain an Accessibility Consultant to review, assist, and assure the renovation fully complies with Federal & State Codes and all University requirements. 7) Noise Control – There are several different issues that need specific attention. External noise from buses on Mandeville Lane and Gillman Drive need to be mitigated as they affect the daily internal work and conference space activity. The passive ventilation strategy of utilizing operable window exacerbates this problem. Due to the confidential advising that takes place on a daily basis, acoustic privacy must be ensured between offices and general work spaces. Pre and post meeting assembly of people is another significant noise generator that needs to be anticipated and addressed to minimize disruption to those not a part of the gatherings and trying to work elsewhere in the building. 8) Day lighting – Natural day lighting to both interior and exterior work spaces is highly desirable with benefits being improved occupant comfort and energy efficiency. Retrofitted dual-glazed window units and newly proposed skylights should be utilized to address this issue.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP

Exhibit 05.1 Program Adjacencies

International Center Hierarchy

Deans Office

International Faculty & Scholar Office

International Students & Programs Office

Programs Abroad Office

Part-Time Student Workers

Each of the following can be a separate entity located away from rest if need be: Deans, IFSO, ISPO, PAO

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4722 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP

Exhibit 05.2 Program Adjacencies

International Faculty & Scholar Office

Building Entry Lobby

reception/ waiting

Surge Space for Orientations 30-40 persons

Shared Conference (10-15 person) off-hour access

Break Room

advisor offices (6) space for 3 persons + rolling table

with sink & refrigerator

secure storage

possible off-site storage

Archive and active files. Ease of retrieval desired.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4722 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP

Exhibit 05.3 Program Adjacencies

International Students & Programs Office

Building Entry Lobby

reception/ waiting reception desk for (3) persons (2) computers for guest (8-10) student waiting space

Surge Space for Orientation/ Events

Shared Conference (20 person)

70-100 persons

off-hour access

Break Room with sink & refrigerator

advisor offices (12) space for 3 persons + rolling table

advisor cubicle (4)

secure storage

Student Workspace (14)

possible off-site storage

10-12 Active Drawers Archive and active files. Ease of retrieval desired.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4722 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP

Exhibit 05.4 Program Adjacencies

Programs Abroad Office

Building Entry Lobby

PAO Library

reception/ waiting

4 computer stations/ guest use

Surge Space for Orientation/ Events

Shared Conference (20 person)

30-100 persons

off-hour access

Break Room

advisor offices (12) space for 3 persons + rolling table

Student Workspace

4 stations

with sink & refrigerator possible off-site storage

secure storage

Archive and active files. Ease of retrieval desired.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4722 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP

Exhibit 05.5 Program Adjacencies

AEP Prospective Tenant Adjacency (Dr. David Artis) Office of Graduate Studies CrossCultural Center

AEP

Student Life Orgs.

Regent Scholars International Center

Financial Aid Office

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4722 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

OASIS

Research Affairs

SATS

* Non-Related User Groups: Student Legal Services Student Conduct University Events Office Student Research & Info. Registrars Office

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Draft 95% DPP

Exhibit 05.6 Program Adjacencies

Academic Enrichment Program

Building Entry Lobby

reception/ waiting

Surge Space for PT & Grad. Student Staff 5-10 persons

Shared Conference (25 person) off-hour access

Break Room

advisor offices (10)

with sink & refrigerator

possible off-site storage

director office (1)

secure storage Archive and active files. Ease of retrieval desired.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4722 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Functional Design Criteria General Space Planning Objectives Programming for the Student Center B (SCB) renovation is based on the University’s desire to reconfigure the existing layout of primarily private offices to provide predominately flexible surge type space initially to serve the International Center on an interim basis while they await the construction of their new facility, and then for future user groups yet to be fully determined. This is a somewhat unique approach to programming that typically is tailored to meet the specific operational needs and criteria of an identified user group. Private offices, conference rooms, lobby/reception, administrative, and other support spaces will also be incorporated into the plan.

Office Configuration A basic strategy is to generally locate private offices continuously along the perimeter of at least one exterior elevation in order to provide access to natural light, ventilation, and potentially to mitigate/buffer acoustical issues generated by the heavy bus traffic on Mandeville Lane. The existing wood floor and roof framing cannot clear span the building’s existing width of approx. 32 feet; intermediate walls associated with new offices can effectively provide needed midspan structural support to assist the overall objective of opening up surge space. Enclosed office space ensures confidentiality and privacy, though it is desirable to maintain proximity to adjacent surge and support spaces to facilitate group contact and informal discussions between colleagues. The precise number of individual closed offices will be left open for further study during the design process. Offices will be subject to dimensional constraints for the purposes of planning. Basic office modules vary between 10.5 and 12.0 feet wide has been established for consistent planning purposes. Adherence to common planning modules for all office occupancies will assure maximum flexibility for reassignment in the future. Refer to the standardized office diagrams on page for specific programmatic requirements.

Surge Space Surge space is generally described as open floor plate that can be easily reconfigurable to meet the needs of the various user groups that will assigned to the space. Self-contained (integrated lighting, power, and data) systems furniture will populate the surge space and provide the desired flexibility needed to support future and potentially unknown user groups. The circulation spaces must be carefully configured to not inhibit movement between the different functional areas of the building and to enhance opportunities for informal encounters between colleagues in the facility.

Work Space Day lighting All offices should have an exterior window. It is recommended that the surge space work areas be directly or indirectly exposed to natural light and views to the outside. There are multiple benefits to the use of natural light in work environments. Natural day lighting is pursued in this facility not only because buildings illuminated with natural light have been shown to increase individual productivity DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP and human comfort but because when daylight is used as part of an integrated design strategy it can provide substantial energy savings as well.

Conference Rooms The Student Center B renovation will include small and medium size conference rooms which are vitally important to support the daily needs of faculty/staff, and the off hour needs of various associated student organizations. The conference rooms should have flexibility in room design and movable furniture to accommodate different functions: academic activities, confidential advisement, scholarly exchange, and social interaction. Due to the sensitive and confidential nature of specific counseling and advisement, the smaller conference rooms need to ensure privacy, both visually and acoustically. The small conference rooms need to be easily accessible from office and reception spaces. The medium size conference room will support a number of diverse uses; presentations, instruction, and social student gatherings which will occur during and after regular business hours and should have easy internal as well as direct exterior access. Functions in the medium size conference room often include refreshments so ideally would be adjacent to kitchenette/food prep space. All conference rooms should incorporate whiteboards, chair/display rails and concealed roll-down projection or LCD screens. Refer to the standardized conference diagram on page for specific programmatic requirements.

Lobby Space A lobby reception area has been requested to provide space for those waiting to be served in addition to handling pre/post meeting and event overflow. A central lobby space will unify existing entrances located on opposite sides and levels of the current building and provide improved access to common area restrooms and vertical circulation. The lobby space should have comfortable furniture, wall mounted message board and/or digital to serve different functions: academic activities, scholarly interexchange and social interaction.

Storage Space Current and anticipated user groups have clearly stipulated the need for the secure storage of confidential records. Active files need to be readily accessible, while others simply need to be maintained for up to five years on a running basis as mandated by Federal Government requirements. These files require a sizeable amount of floor plan area, though efforts are departmentally under way to digitize & archive files, allowing the physical copies to be stored off site in accordance with legal requirements.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Advisor office

desk countertop

wall-mounted bookcase above

AREA/UNIT: •131.25 Net Square Feet OCCUPANCY: •(1) person/ employee •(2) guest UTILIZATION: •10 hours/ day MECHANICAL: •Temperature 68-75 +/- 2 deg. F •Humidity 30-50% •6 Air Changes/ Hr minimum ELECTRICAL: •110v, 20A, 1 Phase power •Phone and Data outlets LIGHTING: •75 fc at desk level •Ceiling lighting LED/ Fluorescent type •Daylighting

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4722 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

ACOUSTIC: •Wall partitions STC rating 50 minimum •Ceiling Tile to be NRC factor .70 or better •Doors with perimeter seals •Interior Glazing to be 9/16” with Saflex inner layer- STC of 38 •Exterior Glazing to be 1” dual insulated. •Sound boot application at room return system. ARCHITECTURAL: •Carpet Tile Flooring •4” Vinyl Rubber Base •Partitions: Level 4 Gyp Board with Paint finish •2x4 Acoustic Ceiling Tiles •Height 9’-0” minimum •3070 solid core door with frosted vision panel •Locked access door hardware EQUIPMENT: •Group 1- White board, coat hook on door •Group 2- (1) L shape desk with office chair, (1) desk counter at window wall (2) guest chairs, (1) 18x36 lateral files, (1) 48” bookcases, and (2) wall mount bookcases above desk

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Draft 95% DPP Shared office

wall-mounted bookcase above

wall-mounted bookcase above

AREA/UNIT: •145 Net Square Feet OCCUPANCY: •(2) person/ employee UTILIZATION: •10 hours/ day MECHANICAL: •Temperature 68-75 +/- 2 deg. F •Humidity 30-50% •6 Air Changes/ Hr minimum ELECTRICAL: •110v, 20A, 1 Phase power •Phone and Data outlets LIGHTING: •75 fc at desk level •Ceiling lighting LED/ Fluorescent type •Daylighting

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4722 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

ACOUSTIC: •Wall partitions STC rating 50 minimum •Ceiling Tile to be NRC factor .70 or better •Doors with perimeter seals •Interior Glazing to be 9/16” with Saflex inner layer- STC of 38 •Exterior Glazing to be 1” dual insulated. •Sound boot application at room return system. ARCHITECTURAL: •Carpet Tile Flooring •4” Vinyl Rubber Base •Partitions: Level 4 Gyp Board with Paint finish •2x4 Acoustic Ceiling Tiles •Height 9’-0” minimum •3070 solid core door with frosted vision panel •Locked access door hardware EQUIPMENT: •Group 1- White board, coat hook on door •Group 2- (2) L shape desk with office chair,(4)14x24 lateral files, and (2) wall mount bookcases above each desk

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Draft 95% DPP Directors office

wall-mounted bookcase above

AREA/UNIT: •174 Net Square Feet OCCUPANCY: •(1) person/ employee •(3) guest UTILIZATION: •10 hours/ day MECHANICAL: •Temperature 68-75 +/- 2 deg. F •Humidity 30-50% •6 Air Changes/ Hr minimum ELECTRICAL: •110v, 20A, 1 Phase power •Phone and Data outlets LIGHTING: •75 fc at desk level •Ceiling lighting LED/ Fluorescent type •Daylighting

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4722 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

ACOUSTIC: •Wall partitions STC rating 50 minimum •Ceiling Tile to be NRC factor .70 or better •Doors with perimeter seals •Interior Glazing to be 9/16” with Saflex inner layer- STC of 38 •Exterior Glazing to be 1” dual insulated. •Sound boot application at room return system. ARCHITECTURAL: •Carpet Tile Flooring •4” Vinyl Rubber Base •Partitions: Level 4 Gyp Board with Paint finish •2x4 Acoustic Ceiling Tiles •Height 9’-0” minimum •3070 solid core door with frosted vision panel •Locked access door hardware EQUIPMENT: •Group 1- White board, coat hook on door •Group 2- (1) L shape desk with office chair,(2)18x36 lateral files, (2) wall mount bookcases, (1) 36" round table with (3) chairs, and (2) 12x36 low storage cabinets

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Draft 95% DPP Work StationCubicle +54" partial-height partition

workstation partition

bookshelf above

AREA/UNIT: •45 Net Square Feet OCCUPANCY: •(1) person/ admin.-support UTILIZATION: •10 hours/ day MECHANICAL: •Temperature 68-75 +/- 2 deg. F •Humidity 30-50% •6 Air Changes/ Hr minimum ELECTRICAL: •110v, 20A, 1 Phase power •Phone and Data outlets

ACOUSTIC: •Ceiling Tile to be NRC factor .70 or better •Sound boot application at room return system. ARCHITECTURAL: •Carpet Tile Flooring •4" Vinyl Rubber Base •Partitions: Level 5 Gyp Board with Paint finish •2x4 Acoustic Ceiling Tiles •Height 9’-0” minimum EQUIPMENT: •Group 2- (1) L-Shape Desk, (1) Office Chair, (1) 18x30 Front File Cab. (1) wall-mounted bookcase

LIGHTING: •75 fc at desk level •Ceiling lighting LED/ Fluorescent type •Systems Task lighting LED/ Fluorescent type •Daylighting

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4722 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Work StationHotel +54" partial-height partition

workstation partition-glass

storage base cabinet

AREA/UNIT: •29.25 Net Square Feet OCCUPANCY: •(1) person/ part-time-support UTILIZATION: •10 hours/ day MECHANICAL: •Temperature 68-75 +/- 2 deg. F •Humidity 30-50% •6 Air Changes/ Hr minimum ELECTRICAL: •110v, 20A, 1 Phase power •Phone and Data outlets

ACOUSTIC: •Ceiling Tile to be NRC factor .70 or better •Sound boot application at room return system. ARCHITECTURAL: •Carpet Tile Flooring •4" Vinyl Rubber Base •Partitions: Level 5 Gyp Board with Paint finish •2x4 Acoustic Ceiling Tiles •Height 9’-0” minimum EQUIPMENT: •Group 2- (1) Desk, (1) Office Chair, (1) 14x24 Front File Cab. (1) Storage Base Cabinet

LIGHTING: •75 fc at desk level •Ceiling lighting LED/ Fluorescent type •Systems Task lighting LED/ Fluorescent type •Daylighting

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4722 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Reception-Waiting

desk-counter over lateral

+42" floating counter

AREA/UNIT: •216 Net Square Feet OCCUPANCY: •(1) person/ admin. reception •(5) guest (waiting) UTILIZATION: •10 hours/ day MECHANICAL: •Temperature 68-75 +/- 2 deg. F •Humidity 30-50% •6 Air Changes/ Hr minimum ELECTRICAL: •110v, 20A, 1 Phase power •Phone and Data outlets LIGHTING: •75 fc at desk level •Ceiling lighting LED/ Fluorescent type •Daylighting

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4722 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

waiting area

ACOUSTIC: •Wall partitions STC rating 50 minimum •Ceiling Tile to be NRC factor .70 or better •Doors with perimeter seals •Interior Glazing to be 9/16” with Saflex inner layer- STC of 38 •Exterior Glazing to be 1” dual insulated. •Sound boot application at room return system. ARCHITECTURAL: •Carpet Tile Flooring •4" Tile Base •Partitions: Level 5 Gyp Board with Paint finish •2x4 Acoustic Ceiling Tiles •Height 9’-0” minimum •3070 solid core entry door with clear vision panel •Locked access door hardware EQUIPMENT: •Group 2- (1) L-Shape Desk with high bar, (1) Office Chair, (2) 18x36 Lateral Files, (1) Couch, (1) Coffee table, (2) guest chairs

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Draft 95% DPP Break Room/ Kitchenette

wall-mounted cabinets above

AREA/UNIT: •150 Net Square Feet OCCUPANCY: •(4) persons UTILIZATION: •10 hours/ day MECHANICAL: •Temperature 68-75 +/- 2 deg. F •Humidity 30-50% •6 Air Changes/ Hr minimum PLUMBING: •Potable Hot Water (HW) •Potable Cold Water (CW) ELECTRICAL: •110v, 20A, 1 Phase power •Phone and Data outlets

wall-mounted cabinets above

ACOUSTIC: •Wall partitions STC rating 50 minimum •Ceiling Tile to be NRC factor .70 or better •Doors with perimeter seals •Interior Glazing to be 9/16” with Saflex inner layer- STC of 38 •Exterior Glazing to be 1” dual insulated. •Sound boot application at room return system. ARCHITECTURAL: •12"x 24" Ceramic Tile Flooring •4" Tile Base •Partitions: Level 4 Gyp Board with Paint finish •2x4 Acoustic Ceiling Tiles •Height 9’-0” minimum •3070 solid core door with clear vision panel •Locked access door hardware EQUIPMENT: •Group 1- (2) high-pressure laminate counters with Base & Upper Cabinets, (1) Sink •Group 2- (1) 42" round Table, (4) chairs, (1) 36" Refrigerator

LIGHTING: •75 fc at desk level •Ceiling lighting LED/ Fluorescent type •Daylighting DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4722 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Conference Room- Medium

whiteboard

black out curtain ceiling mount projector

drop-down projection screen

table power/ data trough whiteboard

AREA/UNIT: •693 Net Square Feet OCCUPANCY: •(30) persons UTILIZATION: •10 hours/ day MECHANICAL: •Temperature 68-75 +/- 2 deg. F •Humidity 30-50% •6 Air Changes/ Hr minimum ELECTRICAL: •110v, 20A, 1 Phase power •Phone and Data outlets •Table mounted power/data outlets LIGHTING: •75 fc at desk level •Ceiling lighting LED/ Fluorescent type •Daylighting

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4722 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

ACOUSTIC: •Wall partitions STC rating 50 minimum •Ceiling Tile to be NRC factor .70 or better •Doors with perimeter seals •Interior Glazing to be 9/16” with Saflex inner layer- STC of 38 •Exterior Glazing to be 1” dual insulated. •Sound boot application at room return system. ARCHITECTURAL: •Carpet Tile Flooring •4” Vinyl Rubber Base •Partitions: Level 5 Gyp Board with Paint finish •2x4 Acoustic Ceiling Tiles •Height 9’-0” minimum •3070 aluminum storefront door with clear vision panel •Locked access door hardware EQUIPMENT: •Group 1- (2) White board •Group 2- (4) 48x120 conference tables, (30)chairs, (3) credenzas, (1) AV cabinet, (2) storage cabinets/ casework, and (1) black-out curtain

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Draft 95% DPP Basic Systems Criteria Applicable Codes Effective 1 January 2014 an updated set of governing codes are expect to be in place (to be verified): Building:

2013 California Building Code

Plumbing:

2013 California Plumbing Code (Title 24, Part 5)

Mechanical:

2013 California Mechanical Code (Title 24 Part 4)

Electrical:

2013 California Plumbing Code (Title 24, Part 3)

Energy:

2013 California Energy Code (Title 24, Part 6) 2013 California Green Code (Title 24, Part 11)

Gas:

2013 California Mechanical & Plumbing Codes

Fire:

2013 California Fire Code (Title 24, Part 9)

Accessibility:

2013 California Building Code (Title 24, Parts 1, 2, 3,4,5,8 and 12)

Ventilation/I.A.Q.: 2013 California Energy Code (Title 24, Part 6) Elevator:

2013 Elevator Safety Orders

Structural Systems (reviewed by consulting structural engineer DCI Engineers) The original structural system of Student Center B is a Type V conventionally framed wood system that bears on an ongrade concrete footings and slab. The existing floor plan layout is a double loaded corridor with multiple load bearing walls that provide intermediate support for the floor and roof framing above. Removing interior load bearing walls to create the desired open floor plan would compromise the structural integrity of the building. New load bearing structure and foundation reinforcement would need to be reintroduced to support existing structural loads, spans, and lateral forces. Prior embarking on a significant redesign and renovation of Student Center B, a more complete study of the structural issues listed below would need to be considered and addressed to satisfy life/safety code requirements and to generate more specific construction costs. •

The overall building foot print is a somewhat irregular “Y” shape with several large overhangs and jogs in the perimeter walls. This will make changes to the building more complicated for both gravity and lateral system modifications. Any new beams will need to span around these jogs. Changes to shear walls will need to ensure that loads are transferred back to the new shear wall locations. The second floor and roof are framed differently. Roof beams and bearing walls do not align with second floor beams and bearing walls. This will result in a more complicated framing system since changes to the second floor framing will not necessarily match changes to the roof framing and provide direct bearing or load transfer.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP •

The first floor at the west and north ends steps up and has a crawl space area rather than just slab on grade. This limits the changes that can be made in this area without doing excavation and major changes to the foundation. There are a large number of interior shear walls. Any floor plan modification that changes interior walls will require that new shear walls be added or that existing shear walls be strengthened, either option will also likely require changes to the foundations. The irregular footprint will make it harder to laterally support the building on just a few heavily loaded shear walls. The elevator is located on the exterior of the building and was added after the original construction. As previously noted any changes to the building should include a closer review of this feature.

Mechanical Systems (reviewed by consulting mechanical engineer SC Engineers) The HVAC system at Student Center B relies on electric radiant heat and passive natural ventilation for cooling and fresh air. This ductless system is antiquated, idiosyncratic, and has exceeded its operational life expectancy needing to be completely reconceived, as opposed to merely being upgraded or replaced in kind. Replacing a ductless system with a more typical ducted version will require thoughtful integration to fit within the two foot deep interstitial space between the floor/roof structure and the dropped hard lid ceiling installed relatively low at 8’-0” a.f.f. The building’s conventionally framed wood structure also presents limitations with new ductwork and equipment needing to be strategically worked in and around existing floor and roof framing. It may be advantageous to eliminate the drop ceiling altogether exposing the mechanical ducts while visually opening up the interior space. Adding a network of mechanical ducts on top of the roof is an option. Park Grove Development Guidelines require that all equipment be held back a minimum of 10’-0” from the roof perimeter and be fully screened, which is relevant since the roof plane is entirely visible from the north and west campus approaches. This building is not currently connected to the campus’ central plant for either chilled or high temp water, located in the underground service tunnel some distance west, nor does the building have natural gas service (see Proposed Utility Service Concept Plan Exhibit 05.7). Option A – Renovation HVAC There are several options to renovate Student Center B’s HVAC system. Limited interstitial space above ceiling and the need to screen roof mounted equipment limits consideration of a VAV air handling units system in this case. Other types of HVAC systems, such as Chilled Beam or Variable Refrigerant Flow may be considered based upon economic computation and payback analysis. Therefore, the following is suggested as a generally viable, cost, and energy efficient solution given the parameters and constraints. • •

Remove existing HVAC systems including the existing through the wall heat pump units, exhaust fans and HVAC components and appurtenances. The proposed base HVAC systems for the retrofit shall be four pipe systems for coil units. The number and configuration of the fan coil units shall depend upon the architectural configuration and floor plans. It is estimated that there will be one fan coil unit for every 1,200 SF of floor area. This will allow for dedicated units to serve conference rooms and other zones with unique heating load. Each fan coil unit shall have a dedicated controller and temperature sensor

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Option B – Demolish and Rebuild HVAC The proposed base HVAC system for the new building would a hybrid natural ventilation variable volume reheats system. The base system shall consist of high efficiency roof mounted VAV air handling units. Each unit shall consist of heating coils, cooling coils, moisture eliminators, filter section supply air fan section and economizer section. Each zone shall be equipped with one VAV reheat box with DDC controller and CO2 monitoring for demand control ventilation. The building automation system shall be in accordance to UCSD DDC guidelines. The system will allow for automatic shutdown of the HVAC zone depending upon the position of associated windows for natural ventilation. Heating shall be provided by heating hot water coils at the VAV air handling units and the reheat coils at each VAV box. Other types of HVAC systems that may be considered based upon economic analysis and payback computation including the following: • •

Variable refrigerant flow Chilled beam with condensation drains

Plumbing Systems (reviewed by consulting mechanical engineer SC Engineers + FD&C Sr. Civil Engineer) It has been recommended, based on an internal review by FD&C’s Sr. Civil Engineer, that all existing wet and dry utilities currently serving Student Center B be replaced either because they are undersized per building occupant needs, code requirements, or due to the fact that they are simply non-existent in the case of natural gas and the chilled water (see Proposed Utility Service Concept Plan Exhibit 05.7). 05.7). Option A – Renovation Plumbing •

Remove existing plumbing fixtures and piping including toilets, sinks, drains, associated components and appurtenances.

The proposed plumbing system includes the fixtures and piping for the proposed restrooms, showers and sinks. Existing restroom facility will be upgraded to comply with current codes to allow for handicapped access and ADA compliance. Existing waste water piping would be repaired and upgraded a necessary. The heating hot water system shall be upgraded to accommodate the configuration and functionality of the building upgrade.

• •

Sprinkler Fire Protection system shall be completely replaced per applicable NFPA code.

Option B – Demolish and Rebuild Plumbing • •

The proposed plumbing system shall consist of fixtures, piping, wastewater piping systems and roof drains. The size and configuration of the plumbing system will depend upon the floor plan and the number and type of occupancy. The system includes roof drainage, overflow drainage and domestic cold and hot water systems. Sprinkler Fire Protection - New Building: Sprinkler Fire Protection shall be provided per applicable NFPA code.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Draft 95% DPP Power & Lighting Systems (reviewed by consulting electrical engineer Syska Hennessy Group) Service enters the building from a transformer located to the south of the building into the existing 120/208 volt distribution board. The electrical supply and distribution system has reached the end of its service life and will need replacing to meet the needs associated with a modern University administration demand. Several interior and exterior electrical retrofits have occurred resulting in unsightly surface mounted conduit and service boxes that will need to be removed and relocated. Similar complete whole building upgrades will affect Telco, fire alarm, interior and exterior general lighting. Option A: Renovation Electrical Renovation of the existing electrical will require a complete remodel of existing branch circuits. The proposed population of offices and functions within the building necessitate new devices and branch circuits be installed. Existing panel boards have also been identified as past their expected life and would need to be replaced. These would match the current University standards. As new mechanical and plumbing equipment are anticipated for a renovation of the building, new electrical equipment and circuits will be required. Some consideration should be made toward replacing the existing main electrical service equipment as well. This is essentially a complete rebuild of the existing electrical infrastructure. The costs for this option could be reduced if the electrical service and panel boards were to remain. Option B: Demolish and Rebuild Electrical A rebuild of the current facility to UCSD standards and the programmed use of the facility would require a new electrical service. This would most likely be a 3-phase, 208 volt service with a capacity dictated by the complexity of the mechanical systems, building lighting and other equipment. It is assumed that the existing utility service capacity to the site is adequate for the proposed functions of the facility. Option A: Renovation Lighting Renovation of the existing lighting within the facility would require a complete removal of the existing luminaires and lighting systems. The existing systems are inefficient and cannot accommodate the new building program. New luminaires and control systems meeting current energy requirements and program illumination requirements would be installed. It is expected that the new luminaires would use LED sources and be dimmable to meet Cal Green and Title 24 mandates. Additionally, a scheme using a combination of task and ambient sources would be applied for budget efficiency and to maximize controllability of the lighting systems. As none of the existing lighting would be retained this option is essentially a rebuild for lighting systems. Option B: Demolish and Rebuild Lighting A rebuild of the facility would essentially match the description above for the remodel. Costs related to the scope for these items could be based on a new construction SF basis.

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Exhibit 05.7 Proposed Utility Service Concept Plan

Draft 95% DPP

Civil Utility Plan prepared by Ashkan Mozaffarian, LEED AP Construction Engineer Energy Systems Engineering, Inc. Location of main utilities and services shown are based on university as-built information. All utilities are approximate in size and location and need to be surveyed and verified in the field.

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Draft 95% DPP

06 Sustainability Project Goals The UC's Sustainable Practices Policy is one of the most comprehensive and far-reaching institutional sustainability commitments in the nation and can be viewed at http://sustainability.universityofcalifornia.edu/policy.html. The Student Center B project will seek UC Office of the President approval for sustainable design approaches which requires that all newly constructed buildings achieve a LEED-NC (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Silver Certification level and outperform California's Title 24 Energy Code (Part 6) by at least 20 percent. All UC renovation projects with a budget that exceeds $5 million must meet the LEED for Commercial Interiors (LEED-CI) Certified level. Projects less than $5 million are not required to pursue LEED certification, though it is desired to meet the standards consistent with LEED CI at the Silver level.

Cal Green Code Requirements Effective 1 January 2014, all new construction in California will need to also satisfy Title 24 Cal Green Code (Part 11). These new requirements dramatically increase code required minimum thresholds for building performance, in essence bringing all new buildings up to a LEED Silver equivalency. Coupled with the University’s mandate to exceed all Title 24 minimums by at least additional 20%, energy efficiency performance thresholds for campus project are raised even higher. Complying with new Title 24 and Cal Green Code will necessitate a holistic building design approach. Thus requiring higher performing mechanical systems, insulation, glazing, lighting (LED), etc. This is easier to achieve in new ground-up construction where the design team can control more of the variables, unlike renovation projects where the converse is true. Significant code required increases in building performance and energy efficiency will impact overall project costs.

Project Design Decisions made in the planning phase of a project, that determine building orientation and other fundamental design and planning conditions, set the stage for future efficiencies and the success that design teams will have in meeting the mandated performance levels. Designing to take advantage of what the local climate has to offer, the Student Center B will return to their founding principles of a responsive architecture that is open, inviting and engaging. The five categories of LEED criteria illustrate the elements of facility design that combine to define sustainable design and should be contemplated during the planning phase to maximize the effects: 1) Sustainable Sites • • • •

Transportation Heat island effect Storm water management Light pollution

2) Energy and Atmosphere • • • • •

Solar Orientation Photovoltaics Glass types and sun shading Energy efficiency Daylighting

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

3) Materials and Resources • •

Exterior materials Material reuse

4) Indoor Environmental Quality • •

Thermal comfort Natural ventilation

5) Water Efficiency 6) Landscape and irrigation

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Draft 95% DPP

07Executive Summary General The existing Student Center B structure is a modest (9,659 total g.s.f.) two story wood framed building constructed nearly 40 years ago in a visually prominent location just off of Gilman Drive in The Grove. Built to standards more typical of a single family residence than an institutional structure, the building has essentially exceeded its useable life span. Initiating a major renovation will trigger a series of code required building upgrades associated with fire/life safety, accessibility, and energy efficiency, in addition to any desired aesthetic or elective interior modifications. The University’s Civil Engineer has determined that all the existing wet and dry utilities serving Student Center B are deficient (gas and chilled water are non-existent) and recommends that they be resized to meet code requirements and expected occupants needs. Code required work includes seismic upgrades to the structural footings, lateral bracing, and roof diaphragms (especially if the floor plan is opened up to create surge space), replacing single pane windows, non-compliant stairs, elevator, restrooms, insulation, and doors as well as reworking the entire building infrastructure; plumbing, electrical, fire/life safety, lighting, and mechanical systems. Elective work associated with the renovation includes new roof, interior partitions, interior finishes (floor, wall and ceiling), doors, acoustical mitigation, exterior paint, signage, audio/visual, Telco, and landscaping. Virtually no part of the original construction will go untouched. Idiosyncratic, small, elongated, and irregularly “Y” shaped floor plates negatively impacts the ability to create sizeable open “surge” space the University desires. An open-plan is also not functionally desirable for several of the potential tenants such as the International Center and the Academic Enrichment Program, which require confidential office, meeting, and storage spaces. The University retained a third party cost estimator to determine the value of the full renovation of the existing Student Center B facility, (see see attached attached Option A, Exhibit 07 07.1). .1 For comparison’s sake, costs associated with a complete demo and rebuild of a similarly sized facility are also provided (see see attached Option B.1, Exhibit 07 07.2). .2 A variation of the Option B.1 estimates costs to demo, but rebuild increasing the building’s size by approximately 7,150 g.s.f. (+73%), by adding an additional floor level (see see attached Option B.2, Exhibit 07 07.3). .3

DETAILED PROJECT PROGRAM 4699 Student Center B Renovation University of California San Diego

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Exhibit 07.1

Exhibit 07.1

Option A with Associated Cost Table

Option A with Associated Cost Table

Option A: Renovate Existing

Scope of Work:

N

9,659 gsf

The University has expressed a desire to reconfigure the interior layout creating open & flexible surge type space to accommodate a wide range of future user groups. While renovating this nearly 40 year old structure, the University intends to upgrade all the building’s systems bringing the facility into compliance with current code required Life/Safety, Accessibility, and Title 24 Energy standards.

Floor Level 1

pace Crawl S

(2)

ITEMS INCLUDED IN SCOPE

Architectural Structural Mechanical Plumbing Electrical/ Lighting Accessibility Civil Landscape

- Exterior building envelope (incl. doors, windows, cladding, insulating, painting) - New Roofing system - Interior framing construction (floors, walls, ceilings)

detailed project program

(2) Surge 1

- Vertical circulation (stairs, elevator) - Interior finishes - Furnishings, fixtures - Selective demolition

(3)

Above number of private offices is an initial estimate based on cursory layout within the existing footprint of the building. This number is an approximation and is subject to change based on other factors and programmatic needs.

try

n Lobby/E

E

- Seismic Upgrades (shear walls), - Relocate new supports (columns/ beams) - Selective upgrade foundation system

Mech.

(2) Crawl Space

- New mechanical system (heating/cooling/ventilation) using chilled water from CUP

(4)

- New plumbing fixtures & equipment - Domestic water, sewer & vent distribution - New Fire protection system (sprinklers)

S

.

R AN D GILM

- New interior & exterior lighting fixtures - Upgrade Fire alarm system - Upgrade incoming service panel & circuits

N

- New Accessibility compliant paving, ramps, railings - Accessible Signage - New compliant stairways & elevator system

Floor Level 2

- Site demolition & excavation - Upgrade Utility lines: Gas, Sewer, Water, Chilled Water, Storm Drain - New Accessibility compliant paving, ramps, railings - Bioswales, grading/erosion control.

(3)

(4)

- New landscape plants/ trees and irrigation system

Surge 2

% Escalation (per year)

4.0%

Exclusions & Limitations:

Total Project Cost: (Estimate dated August 2013)

$ 6,202,913

try

n Lobby/E

Deck

EXCLUSIONS:

-MOVE OUT and MOVE IN -Land acquisition, feasibility studies, financing costs and all other owner costs -All professional fees and insurance Such items include, but are not limited to the following: -Site surveys, existing condition reports and soils investigation costs -Modifications to the scope of work subsequent to the -Items identified in the design as Not In Contract [NIC] preparation of this estimate. -Hazardous materials investigations and abatement -Unforeseen subsurface conditions. -Utility company back charges, including work required off-site and utilities rates -Special requirements for site access, off-hour work or phasing -Work to City streets and sidewalks, [except as noted in this estimate] activities. -Items defined as Vendor / Owner supplied and Vendor / Owner installed -Restrictive technical specifications, excessive contract or -Permits non-competitive bid conditions. -Owners contingency -Sole source specifications for materials or products. -Bid approvals delayed beyond the anticipated project schedule. -Construction or occupancy phasing or off hours’ work. -All loose furniture -Tel/data, security and AV networks, equipment or software (unless identified otherwise) -Rock excavation; special foundations (unless indicated by design engineers)

ITEMS THAT MAY AFFECT THIS ESTIMATE:

+13 Private Offices +01 Flexible Surge Space

E Mech.

(3)

Area 1 S (5)urge sf) (900

(3)

+18 Private Offices +01 Flexible Surge Space Above number of private offices is an initial estimate based on cursory layout within the existing footprint of the building. This number is an approximation and is subject to change based on other factors and programmatic needs.

Private Offices (120 sf)

S

R. AN D M L I G

(N) Restrooms Flexible Surge Space

Draft 95% DPP

71


Exhibit 07.2

N

Option B1 with Associated Cost Table Option B1: Demolish & Rebuild

9,659 gsf

Floor Level 1

Surge 2 ce

en

r nfe Co Mech.

+12 Private Offices +02 Flexible Surge Space +01 Shared Conference

y

Surge 1

(4)

ntr y/E bb Lo

(5)

ir Sta

The bare studs renovation option is extensive, essentially being rebuilt from the inside out. Preliminary third party cost estimates indicate that demolishing the existing building and replacing it with a new, efficient, modern, structure would only cost a fraction more than then the renovation option, while cohesively resolving all the programmatic, accessible, seismic, and fire/life safety issues in an integrated package that will serve the University’s student community for the next 50 yrs.

detailed project program

v/ Ele

Scope of Work:

Exhibit 07.2

Option B1 with Associated Cost Table

ITEMS INCLUDED IN SCOPE

Architectural Structural Mechanical Plumbing

- Vertical circulation (stairs, elevator) - Interior finishes - Furnishings, fixtures - Demolition of existing

Above number of private offices is an initial estimate based on cursory layout within the existing footprint of the building. This number is an approximation and is subject to change based on other factors and programmatic needs.

(3)

e Storag

S

- New foundation system - New steel/ concrete superstructure (columns/ beams/ decking) - New mechanical system (heating/cooling/ventilation) using chilled water from CUP - New plumbing fixtures & equipment - Domestic water, sewer & vent distribution - New Fire protection system (sprinklers)

Floor Level 2

Surge 4

- New interior & exterior lighting fixtures - New Fire alarm system - New incoming service panel & circuits

(4)

/En

by

b Lo

Electrical/ Lighting

- Exterior building envelope (incl. doors, windows, cladding, insulating, painting) - New Roofing system - Interior framing construction (floors, walls, ceilings)

try

% Escalation (per year)

Surge 3

- Site demolition & excavation - Upgrade Utility lines: Gas, Sewer, Water, Chilled Water, Storm Drain - New Accessibility compliant paving, ramps, railings - Bioswales, grading/erosion control.

(3)

ir

Landscape

(5)

Sta

Civil

- New Accessibility compliant paving, ramps, railings - New Accessible Signage - New stairways & elevator system

v/ Ele

Accessibility

n Co

re fe

e nc

+12 Private Offices +02 Flexible Surge Space +01 Shared Conference Above number of private offices is an initial estimate based on cursory layout within the existing footprint of the building. This number is an approximation and is subject to change based on other factors and programmatic needs.

- New landscape plants/ trees and irrigation system

4.0%

Exclusions & Limitations:

Total Project Cost: (Estimate dated August 2013)

$ 6,534,497

EXCLUSIONS:

-MOVE OUT and MOVE IN -Land acquisition, feasibility studies, financing costs and all other owner costs -All professional fees and insurance Such items include, but are not limited to the following: -Site surveys, existing condition reports and soils investigation costs -Modifications to the scope of work subsequent to the -Items identified in the design as Not In Contract [NIC] preparation of this estimate. -Hazardous materials investigations and abatement -Unforeseen subsurface conditions. -Utility company back charges, including work required off-site and utilities rates -Special requirements for site access, off-hour work or phasing -Work to City streets and sidewalks, [except as noted in this estimate] activities. -Items defined as Vendor / Owner supplied and Vendor / Owner installed -Restrictive technical specifications, excessive contract or -Permits non-competitive bid conditions. -Owners contingency -Sole source specifications for materials or products. -Bid approvals delayed beyond the anticipated project schedule. -Construction or occupancy phasing or off hours’ work. -All loose furniture -Tel/data, security and AV networks, equipment or software (unless identified otherwise) -Rock excavation; special foundations (unless indicated by design engineers)

ITEMS THAT MAY AFFECT THIS ESTIMATE:

Private Offices (120 sf) (N) Restrooms Flexible Surge Space Shared Conference Room

Draft 95% DPP

72


Exhibit 07.3

N

Option B2 with Associated Cost Table Option B2: Demolish & Rebuild

16,800 gsf

Floor Level 1

Surge 2 ce

en

r nfe Co Mech.

+12 Private Offices +02 Flexible Surge Space +01 Shared Conference

y

Surge 1

(4)

ntr y/E bb Lo

(5)

ir Sta

The bare studs renovation option is extensive, essentially being rebuilt from the inside out. Preliminary third party cost estimates indicate that demolishing the existing building and replacing it with a new, efficient, modern, structure would only cost a fraction more than then the renovation option, while cohesively resolving all the programmatic, accessible, seismic, and fire/life safety issues in an integrated package that will serve the University’s student community for the next 50 yrs.

detailed project program

v/ Ele

Scope of Work:

Exhibit 07.3

Option B2 with Associated Cost Table

ITEMS INCLUDED IN SCOPE

Architectural Structural Mechanical Plumbing

- Exterior building envelope (incl. doors, windows, cladding, insulating, painting) - New Roofing system - Interior framing construction (floors, walls, ceilings)

- Vertical circulation (stairs, elevator) - Interior finishes - Furnishings, fixtures - Demolition of existing

Above number of private offices is an initial estimate based on cursory layout within the existing footprint of the building. This number is an approximation and is subject to change based on other factors and programmatic needs.

(3)

e Storag

S

- New foundation system - New steel/ concrete superstructure (columns/ beams/ decking) - New mechanical system (heating/cooling/ventilation) using chilled water from CUP

Floor Level 2

Surge 4

(4)

% Escalation (per year)

Surge 3

- New Accessibility compliant paving, ramps, railings - New Accessible Signage - New stairways & elevator system

re

fe

n Co

(3)

- Site demolition & excavation - Upgrade Utility lines: Gas, Sewer, Water, Chilled Water, Storm Drain - New Accessibility compliant paving, ramps, railings - Bioswales, grading/erosion control.

+21 Private Offices +01 Flexible Surge Space +01 Shared Conference

- New landscape plants/ trees and irrigation system

4.0%

Total Project Cost: (Estimate dated August 2013)

$ 9,926,472

(4)

Floor Level 3

Surge 5

Exclusions & Limitations:

+12 Private Offices +02 Flexible Surge Space +01 Shared Conference Above number of private offices is an initial estimate based on cursory layout within the existing footprint of the building. This number is an approximation and is subject to change based on other factors and programmatic needs.

e nc

ir

Landscape

try

Civil

(5)

Sta

Accessibility

- New interior & exterior lighting fixtures - New Fire alarm system - New incoming service panel & circuits

v/ Ele

Electrical/ Lighting

/En

by

b Lo

- New plumbing fixtures & equipment - Domestic water, sewer & vent distribution - New Fire protection system (sprinklers)

(4)

EXCLUSIONS:

r fe

n Co

(6)

e

c en

ir

Sta

y ntr

y/E

bb Lo

(7)

v/ Ele

-MOVE OUT and MOVE IN -Land acquisition, feasibility studies, financing costs and all other owner costs ITEMS THAT MAY AFFECT THIS ESTIMATE: -All professional fees and insurance Such items include, but are not limited to the following: -Site surveys, existing condition reports and soils investigation costs -Modifications to the scope of work subsequent to the -Items identified in the design as Not In Contract [NIC] preparation of this estimate. -Hazardous materials investigations and abatement -Unforeseen subsurface conditions. -Utility company back charges, including work required off-site and utilities rates -Special requirements for site access, off-hour work or phasing -Work to City streets and sidewalks, [except as noted in this estimate] activities. -Items defined as Vendor / Owner supplied and Vendor / Owner installed -Restrictive technical specifications, excessive contract or -Permits non-competitive bid conditions. -Owners contingency -Sole source specifications for materials or products. -Bid approvals delayed beyond the anticipated project schedule. -Construction or occupancy phasing or off hours’ work. -All loose furniture -Tel/data, security and AV networks, equipment or software (unless identified otherwise) -Rock excavation; special foundations (unless indicated by design engineers)

Above number of private offices is an initial estimate based on cursory layout within the existing footprint of the building. This number is an approximation and is subject to change based on other factors and programmatic needs.

Private Offices (120 sf) (N) Restrooms Flexible Surge Space Shared Conference Room

Draft 95% DPP

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