Issuu on Google+

FIRST EDITION | SEASON 2013

THE SWOOP MONDAY, 8 JULY 2O13 | ROUND 17

OLD MAN FOZ

WHY KIERAN FORAN’S AHEAD OF HIS TIME

HEAD TO HEAD

DCE v SANDOW BATTLE OF THE HALVES

COACH’S CORNER

THE SECRETS OF DONNY SINGE

Major Sponsor

PROUDLY PRINTED BY

THE OFFICIAL MATCH DAY PROGRAMME FOR THE MANLY WARRINGAH SEA EAGLES


CONTENTS

CONTENTS 3 6 7

FEATURE STORY HEAD TO HEAD

WRAP UP FROM LAST WEEK’S MATCH

8 9

7

SEA EAGLES IN THE COMMUNITY SOCIAL SNAPS

10 11

12 13

14 15

JUNIOR LEAGUE

COACH’S CORNER

NYC & NSW CUP CHEERLEADER OF THE WEEK

FROM THE VAULT

CAPTION THIS PHOTO & FIND-A-WORD CLUB CONTACT DETAILS PO Box 607 Brookvale, NSW 2100 02 9970 3000 seaeagles.com.au

11

ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES For all advertising enquiries please contact the Sea Eagles on 02 9970 3000 or email: corporate@manlyseaeagles.com.au

ROUND 17 MATCH DAY PARTNER

PHOTOGRAPHY All game shots courtesy of Action Photographic

SHADE TO MEASURE

2

THE SWOOP

13


FEATURE STORY

FEATURE STORY

by Neil Evans

Kieran Foran might just be one in a million. Okay, they’re big odds! Maybe one in a thousand. Still too big? Let’s just say, one in a generation. Most call him “Foz.” Some inside the camp have christened him “40/20”, but that has nothing to do with his kicking game or his looks. They say he has 40 years of footy experience all wrapped up in an explosive 20-yearold’s body. He actually turns 23 in a week, but you get my drift. He never dies wondering, he’s tough, game-breaking and fearless. We joke about it all the time - what is a player worth? When does he peak? What will life be like when he reaches his 30s or even 40s? I’ll tell you one thing; as a bloke, Kieran Foran won’t have changed a bit. Nor will his attitude to footy, long after the boots have been thrown in the cupboard. Foran – the Sea Eagles left-side “general” – is an old-fashioned line-bender. When the side needs direction and the opposition needs denting, he grabs the ball and says, ‘let’s rip!’ Like a messiah, he must be followed. Just ask Justin Horo. The left-edge power back-rower has cashed in big on Foran’s strength and ability to put his nose through the line. Often in tight spaces, the reward comes, often when Manly needs it most. It’s no coincidence too that left-side centre Steve Matai has crossed for seven tries this season, playing outside Foran. Further out, Jorge Taufua has scored nine. But rugby league is about alternatives, and this has always been a club blessed with by options in either direction. To the right, there’s Daly Cherry-Evans, Glenn Stewart, Jamie Lyon – our co-captain is still one of the attacking game’s great opportunists – and finally, scouting the right touchline, David Williams. And I dare not forget the selfless hard yards done by the middle men. The best outside oil in the world won’t work if the engine’s not finely tuned. Foran, though, comes with a no-nonsense approach to just about everything. What you see is what you get. From his early schoolboy days in Auckland with the Ellerslie Eagles, to St Ives North Primary School and Marist College in Sydney’s north, then brief stints with the

ROUND 17, 2013 SEA EAGLES Vs PARRAMATTA EELS

3


FEATURE STORY feature story continued Asquith Magpies and North Sydney. Having played Australian Schoolboys in 2007, Foran signed with the Sea Eagles the following year, but 2009 was his break-out year, touring the UK for the World Club Challenge and later debuting in first grade, remarkably still at the tender age of 18. He then made his Test debut for New Zealand on November 7, 2009 at age 19 in the centres. Whirlwind? He doesn’t think twice about it! Whoever coined the phrase – “if you’re good enough, you’re old enough” could have easily had Foran in mind. So how does the uncompromising Sea Eagles and Kiwi Test pivot really approach his footy? “For me, the greatest respect you can earn and have is the respect of your teammates,” Foran said in an almost speechlike delivery. “I think about it after every match. “If I can sit back and know deep within myself that I gave everything and did all I could for the team, and knowing my teammates are thinking the same thing about me, then that’s all I can do. And that’s what drives me playing this game!”

4

THE SWOOP


ROUND 17, 2013 SEA EAGLES Vs PARRAMATTA EELS

5


HEAD TO HEAD

HEAD TO HEAD

by John Chammas

TONIGHT’s battle of the halves is sure to be full of surprises with Daly Cherry- Evans eager to secure his QLD Origin spot and Chris Sandow desperate to drag the Eels out of wooden spoon territory. What will these busy halfbacks pull from their bags of tricks at Brookvale Oval? DALY CHERRY- EVANS With a spring in his step and still reasonably fresh from his first Origin appearance, Daly Cherry-Evans will look to tonight’s clash against the Eels as a chance to cement his spot in the Maroons’ side ahead of game three in Sydney. Despite playing out of position in game two and with only one Origin game under his belt, the signs point towards a booming representative future for the young Manly halfback. Benefiting this season from the one-on-one training with Manly’s assistant coach and former Blues great Andrew Johns, Cherry-Evans’ game has gone to another level in season 2013. The 24-year-old has justified his position in the Maroons side having scored six tries this season for the Sea Eagles (second behind Titans’ Albert Kelly, 10), five try assists, three line breaks and line break assists and 16 offloads (the most of any halfback). CHRIS SANDOW Rocks or diamonds. One minute you love him, the next you cant stand the sight of him. It’s been the theme for Parramatta fans ever since Chris Sandow’s arrival in 2012. He can be the most enthusiastic player on the field one week and then the most disinterested the next. But it’s Chris Sandow hot, rather than cold, who the Sea

6

THE SWOOP

Eagles will be wary of as the Eels search for their first win since Round 9. Despite his ordinary start to the season, Sandow will be looking to bounce his side off the bottom of the ladder against a Manly side keen to make amends of their average home record this season. If Parramatta is to have any chance of causing an upset, Sandow will need to be at his attacking best. His reluctance to run the ball has seen him score just the one try this season.


WRAP UP FROM LAST WEEK’S MATCH

WRAP UP FROM LAST WEEK’S MATCH

by Richard Maxton

We have to be better. That was Sea Eagles coach Geoff Toovey’s summary after Monday night’s 18-12 loss to the Roosters at Allianz Stadium Manly showed their tenacity once again at Allianz Stadium, taking the game down to the wire despite the Tricolour’s apparent dominance, but near enough is not good enough for the coach or this competition. “We’ve been playing well, just not well enough,” Sea Eagles coach Geoff Toovey said. “We have been in every contest. “We’ve have been a bit unlucky in a couple of situations but look, that’s Rugby league. Our players have just got to play better to get us across the line. “We’re there or thereabouts in every game but we’ve got to do better.” It was the third consecutive narrow loss for the Sea Eagles and another lesson on the importance of execution. Manly started strongly, piling pressure on home side from the kickoff. But despite battering the Roosters’ line for no less than eight consecutive sets, the Sea Eagles could not find a hole. The loss of Kieran Foran to a stomach virus just before kickoff was certainly a big blow to Manly’s penetrative power but bluntness in attack has been a theme throughout their last three matches. Hooker Matt Ballin did his best to fill the void, peppering the Roosters with a series of precision kicks and pinning them on their own line. It looked like an impressive display of the patience that Manly have been lacking in recent matches but as the sets mounted and Ballin’s bombs and grubbers remained just out of reach, it became clear that something had to give.

Unfortunately it was the Sea Eagles who broke first, dashed against rock solid Roosters defence. A huge cheer from the home crowd indicated a shift in momentum and the Chooks looked to be in control of the match from that point, although Boyd Cordner’s wayward boot meant Manly only trailed by eight as they entered the sheds. The predictable spark came from co-captain Jamie Lyon after the restart, crossing in the corner and converting his own effort to keep his side in touch. As always the Sea Eagles’ dug their talons in, keeping themselves in the contest, and George Rose’s barnstorming try in the 77th minute raised a glimmer of hope but the hooter soon drowned it out.

night to stay in touch with the top three. Parramatta welcome back star fullback Jarryd Hayne from a hamstring injury which sidelined him for a month – and Toovey has his troops on guard for an Eels assault. “He [Hayne] always causes us a bit of trouble,” he said. “We are well aware of what they [Parramatta] are capable of. They’ve got some great individual players and whilst collectively they aren’t playing that well in the sense of the competition ladder, they’ve played some great football this year.”

The Sea Eagles still hold their spot in the top four but the Bulldogs, Sharks and Titans are queuing up, each just one point behind. The Eels will provide a stern challenge for the out of form Sea Eagles who desperately need to win on Monday

ROUND 17, 2013 SEA EAGLES Vs PARRAMATTA EELS

7


SEA EAGLES IN THE COMMUNITY

SEA EAGLES IN THE COMMUNITY Steptember – Kicking Goals for Cerebral Palsy When the Manly Warringah Sea Eagles signed up to Cerebral Palsy Alliance’s annual health and fundraising challenge, Steptember, no - one was more excited than 15 year old Nick Esposito. This year his beloved Sea Eagles will once again be participating in Steptember – a 4 week health and wellness initiative to raise funds for Cerebral Palsy Alliance and cerebral palsy research. Born with cerebral palsy (CP) and a passionate Sea Eagles fan all his life, Nick thinks it’s fantastic his favourite team is ‘stepping up’ for the organisation that has helped him and his family since he was a toddler. ‘When I was younger, I needed a lot of therapy from Cerebral Palsy Alliance to help improve my movement and speech. Now I also use their gym which has modified equipment so I can stay fit and strong. I wish I could be there tonight, but I’ve just had surgery, so I’ll be loudly cheering on the boys in front of the TV at home,’ said Nick. Mr Rob White, CEO of Cerebral Palsy Alliance says Steptember is about engaging all Australians in becoming actively involved to help enhance the lives of the 1 in 500 Australians living with CP. ‘Steptember is a great opportunity to improve fitness, to build a team and have fun working out creative ways to meet both step and fundraising targets’, Mr White said. ‘And Steptember is not just about walking – you can get out and do any activity you enjoy.’

How to Get Involved •

Diarise Steptember - Wednesday 4 September – Wednesday 2 October

• Register a team at www.steptember.org.au of four people •

Track and record online your daily steps / activity levels by wearing a pedometer

Walk 10,000 steps a day to help your team reach the top of 7 mountain summits in the online virtual mountain climbing course

Promote Steptember to your colleagues, friends, family etc.

Use the online step converter to convert your favourite activity into steps (there are 40+ activi ties you can do!)

For more information contact Marie Gamble on 02 9975 8765. CP Facts CP affects children, adults and families from all walks of life. It is a permanent disability affecting movement, caused by an injury to the developing brain usually before birth. Cerebral Palsy Alliance supports children, teenagers and adults with cerebral palsy, and their families and carers, by providing therapy, technology and equipment, family and individual support, respite, recreation and mentoring. ‘33% of children with cerebral palsy can’t walk, and 20% can’t talk’, Mr White said. ‘With the help of Steptember teams across Australia we can continue to provide much needed therapy, services and research to support people with cerebral palsy and their families.’ And the rest of the world is following our example. Like many great Australian ideas Steptember has spread overseas with local cerebral palsy organisations in the USA, the Netherlands, Canada and the UK taking up the baton to raise funds to support people with cerebral palsy. Registrations for Steptember close on 18 August 2013. All donations above $2 are tax deductible.

8

THE SWOOP


SOCIAL SNAPS

SOCIAL SNAPS TAG YOUR PHOTO WITH #GOMANLY & YOU COULD BE FEATURED HERE @manlyseaeagles

Manly Sea Eagles

@manlyseaeagles

Tweet of the week: @gorgeousgrose And a huge shout out to my man @mattballin9 for putting me over!!! Who has the best coffee on the northern beaches so I can shout him one?

TWEET OF THE WEEK:

ROUND 17, 2013 SEA EAGLES Vs PARRAMATTA EELS

9


JUNIOR LEAGUE

JUNIOR LEAGUE JAMIE LYON CUP 2013 The Grand Final of the Jamie Lyon Cup competition was held Thursday 27th June at Brookvale Oval. After the pool matches final standings for the competition were as follows; Northern Division

Southern Division

1st – Narrabeen SHS

1st – St.Pauls Red

2nd – Barrenjoey HS

2nd – Cromer Campus

3rd – Mater Maria CC

3rd – The Forest HS

4th – Pittwater HS

4th – St.Pauls Black

St.Pauls contested their 3rd Grand Final in the four years since the competition began against defending champions, Narrabeen. With both teams undefeated in the regular season, it was going to be interesting to see how the form of the two divisions measured up. St.Pauls started with too much enthusiasm for Narrabeen and raced away to an unexpected 26-0 lead at half time. Narrabeen were their own worst enemy, making too many unforced errors and were never able to show the form that earned them a Grand Final spot. St.Pauls were outstanding on the day and won convincingly 36-4. Player of the match from St.Pauls was Zac O’Brien. There was a real buzz and excitement around this competition this year with strong links being created between the school, junior league club and the Manly Sea Eagles communities. Parents were thrilled with the competition and the opportunity for their kids to play a regular rugby league competition after school.

10

THE SWOOP

A big thank you goes to Narrabeen Sharks JRL, Christian Brothers JRL and Pittwater HS for their assistance and use of their venues and equipment for games each week. Also a huge thank you to all the teachers and coaches who take the teams each week after school - without them, the competition wouldn’t be possible. And finally, to Jamie Lyon for his continued support of the competition. He makes himself available to all teams entered in the competition each week, running training sessions or assisting in some way. He is always at the Grand Final to hand out all the awards and spend some time with the kids - a true champion.


COACH’S CORNER

COACH’S CORNER Head Strength and Conditioning Coach Donny Singe answers some FAQs from our Facebook fans. WHICH YOUNG PLAYER HAVE YOU BEEN MOST IMPRESSED WITH FROM A STRENGTH/CONDITIONING PERSPECTIVE? That’s a tough one. There isn’t one new player who doesn’t put everything into their training here but someone like Michael Chee-Kam does stand out. WHY? With Andre Rickenbach (Physio) and Brendan Inkster (High Performance Analyst) rebuilding his structure and form, he demonstrates a patience and determination day in, day out. He never misses a beat with training or with his contribution to the team. He’s a very strong and powerful man (with a lop-sided haircut!) and will bring something special to the NRL when he gets his chance.

HOW DID YOU COME TO BE A S&C COACH? I have a military background and a very extensive work history in Australian Sport. I have been qualified in NZ, the UK and Australia since 1988 but if you want to be considered for a Strength and Conditioning position you will need to do the ASCA courses. I am a Level 2 Strength and Conditioning Coach. I came back from Rugby Union in Japan to take on the role at Manly for preseason 2003.

WHO IS THE FASTEST SEA EAGLE? I’m not going to name one because they are so competitive they will do a hamstring trying to prove me wrong! Brenton Lawrence on repeat 15 second runs scores the highest. He’s a very, very quick man.

DO YOU HAVE ANY FUNNY STORIES ABOUT SOMETHING THAT’S HAPPENED DURING A GAME? A few years back, Michael Robertson (Mr Safe Hands) was knocked down and I had to do a concussion check. This involves asking him select questions to test his memory and determine the severity of the blow and his recovery. After answering the first set of questions correctly the last question was, “Who did we play last week”? Michael furled his brow, focused, squinted and replied, “I don’t know”! Problem was I couldn’t remember either! When I returned to the bench it became a topic of debate. Needless to say and thankfully, Michael, myself, our Doc and Andre were all cleared of concussion, despite that hiccup.

WHICH PLAYERS PERFORM BEST IN TERMS OF POWER, STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE? Matt Ballin. Matt Ballin. Matt Ballin.

CHECK OUT MORE ANSWERS FROM DONNY SINGE AT seaeagles.com.au STAY TUNED TO HEAR FROM GEOFF TOOVEY IN OUR NEXT EDITION

WHAT’S UP WITH BEN FARRAR? Nothing, he is fine, strong and fit and pushing for an opportunity in 1st grade again. HOW’S BIG GORGEOUS GEORGE GOING? Fantastic, he is an outstanding athlete. DOES MANLY HAVE A HYPERBARIC CHAMBER FOR THE PLAYERS? No, but we can access one through the military if needed. IS IT TRUE YOU’RE A GREAT GUITAR PLAYER? I am a rhythm man, nothing fancy and my guitar teacher Damian is still trying to get me to use a plectrum!

ROUND 17, 2013 SEA EAGLES Vs PARRAMATTA EELS

11


NYC & NSW CUP

NYC & NSW CUP NYC Preview The Sea Eagles Holden Cup side is still mathematically a chance of playing in September, but having lost their previous five matches, hopes of semi finals football appear to be fading. With 10 rounds remaining, the Sea Eagles will need a miraculous turnaround as they sit second from the bottom, seven points behind Parramatta in eighth position.

by John Chammas

“We need to look at the future and educate the kids. Obviously fans are disappointed with some of the results but we need to look at the bigger picture. “They’ve been in a few games but with a young team, some of their decisions, particularly in the last 10 minutes of either half, have been crucial. Those decisions will only improve with experience.”

Sea Eagles Coaching and Development Manager Simon Healey wants fans to be patient with the current development structure as Manly builds for the future. “The U20’s is designed for education. It’s not about the result; it’s about educating the team,” Healey said. “There are six kids that are either under 18 or who have just turned 18 and another 20 kids that are only 19 years of age, so really it’s an U18’s/19’s team.

12

THE SWOOP

“Just the professionalism of the whole club in general, from the front office to the training staff and the boys. You can just see why it’s been such a successful club.”

Injuries to Jason King and Glenn Stewart earlier in the season provided Gower with the opportunity to impress his new coach as he remains on the cusp of the NRL team each week.

A loss against the Eels would be detrimental to their finals hopes as Parramatta would extend the margin between the two sides to nine points on the competition ladder.

The Sea Eagles are certainly capable of toppling any side on their day, but unfortunately, those days have been far and few between in 2013.

“When you look at the core group of players that have been here for a long time, it’s quite easy to see there’s a great bunch of senior players and they make the transition for new players, or younger players very easy.

Gower made eight NRL appearances in two years for the Dragons but is eager to add to that tally with the Sea Eagles.

The Eels surged into the top eight courtesy of back-to-back wins prior to their Round 16 bye. Having freshened up, the blue and gold will provide a stern challenge for the home side, who head into Monday night with their season hanging on by a thread.

Manly were courageous last week against the Roosters but poor execution let them down as costly dropped balls and poor decisions let the opposition off the hook.

“It’s been great. It’s an easy transition. The boys are unreal,” Gower said.

NSW Cup David Gower - Culture key for fledging Sea Eagles He’s only been with the club a short time, but new recruit David Gower didn’t take long to see that club culture is the key to the Sea Eagles’ success. Since joining the club in 2013, the former Dragons and Tigers forward has embraced the way of life in Manly and has played a role in several matches this season, filling in for the club’s growing number of casualties. The man they call ‘Gobbler’ admits the switch from Wollongong to the Northern Beaches has been a pleasant one, not simply because of the scenery but because of the welcoming attitude of his new teammates.

“Personally, if I can lock in a spot in the 17 that would be great but more importantly just doing my job for the team and for Tooves and Brad (Arthur) and the staff.”


CHEERLEADER OF THE WEEK

TECH TITAN CHEERLEADER OF THE WEEK When I was 8, I wanted to grow up and be? Excactly like my dance teacher What is your junk food weakness? Salt & Vinegar chips What song will always be on your ipod? Bust Your Windows - Jazmine Sullivan What is your dream job? Dance in the Moulin Rouge What is your dream vacation destination? Hawaii !!

What advice would you give anyone that wants to audition for the Manly Seabirds? Be open to everything!!! All the tips and advice from all the girls and the director Monique Carroll. Be prepared for a lot of fun and a lot of hard work! One thing most people would be surprised to learn is? How absolutely lovely everyone is to each other. It is a very fun and friendly environment. Do you have a game day ritual or superstition? No not really, I just get really excited when game day comes around !

Why did you decide to audition for the Manly Seabirds? I went on the Seabirds Facebook page and thought it looked like a lot of fun and something I wanted to be a part of.

Cassie @mseabirds

What is the best thing about being a Manly Seabird? The opportunity to perform as often as we do, and all the gorgeous girls I get to spend time with each week.

The Official Manly Seabirds

@manlyseabirds

ROUND 17, 2013 SEA EAGLES Vs PARRAMATTA EELS

13


FROM THE VAULT

FROM THE VAULT

by Neil Evans

They may have entered the competition together in 1947, but the Sea Eagles and Eels had to wait 30 seasons before their fierce rivalry erupted in the 1976 Grand Final. Manly had broken its premiership drought with back-to-back titles in 1972-73, but three years later, the Eels were craving their first title after twice beating the Sea Eagles during the home and away season and again in the major semi-final. Under the mercurial leadership of centre Bob Fulton, it was the time of Manly’s influential English imports, with half Gary Stephens and back-rowers Phil Lowe and Steve Norton lining up against a hard-working Parramatta pack. But the constant danger was the pinpoint boot of five-eighth John “Bomber” Peard, coaxed from the Roosters juggernaut which had stormed to consecutive titles in 197475. The alarm bell sounded when a Peard bomb allowed winger Jim Porter to fly above the pack and give the Eels the lead. It became a classic arm wrestle of possession and territory, with the Eagles’ only try coming from the big-striding Lowe. Forward Geoff Gerard – who later joined Manly – added a second try for the Eels but it was the radar-like goal-kicking of fullback Graham Eadie, who kicked five, that kept Manly in the hunt. But the match will be best remembered for two bombed tries from Parramatta winger Neville Glover, the second late in the game still irks Eels fans today. In the end, Manly held on to win a gripping tussle 13-10. The blue and gold army agonisingly flirted with history 12 months later. After a gripping 9-all draw with St George, the Eels were spanked 22-0 in a mid-week replay. But the Sea Eagles rivalry with the Eels reignited in 1982. Having lured former Wests’ hardmen Les Boyd and 14

THE SWOOP

Ray Brown and flying back John Dorahy a couple of seasons earlier (known as the great Silvertails’ Fibro Raid), Manly was again dominant, beating Parramatta through the season before storming into the Grand Final after a shut-out in the major semi-final. But this was a new-style Parramatta Fuelled by their maiden premiership in 1981, the Eels relied on a relentless toiling pack and a brilliant set of backs from Peter Sterling and Brett Kenny in the halves, Mick Cronin and Steve Ella in the centres and rampaging winger Eric Grothe. It was those backs, spearheaded by a brilliant double from Test five-eighth Brett Kenny, that saw the Eels avenge the 1976 heartbreak and beat Manly 21-8. The following year, Fulton – now one of the game’s four Immortals – returned as coach, and again the Sea Eagles looked well placed against their

great rival, winning 19-10 in the major semi-final. But in a display similar to the year before, Parramatta’s backs ran the show again, Kenny crossing for another spectacular double and the Eels surging to an 18-6 win, completing a hat-trick of premierships Parramatta then lost a grinding Grand Final to the Bulldogs 6-4 in 1984, but two years later avenged that defeat with a remarkable 4-2 win over the Dogs and a fourth premiership. The Sea Eagles rebounded to add premierships in 1987 (v Canberra), 1996 (v Dragons), 2008 (v Melbourne) and 2011 (v NZ Warriors), but the Eels’ only tilts with glory since the mid 80s were a demoralising 30-24 loss to Newcastle in 2001 in the game’s first evening Grand Final, and a 23-16 loss to the Storm in 2009 after they had become the first team to reach the big one from eighth spot on the ladder.


CAPTION THIS PHOTO

CAPTION THIS PHOTO

No, no, no it’s left foot first THEN you shake it all about!

David Strong via Facebook

FIND-A-WORD CAN YOU FIND THE FOLLOWING WORDS IN THE SEA EAGLES FIND-A-WORD? EGOR GOAL WINGS FORTRESS MEMBER PENATLY PASS KICK TRY

ROUND 17, 2013 SEA EAGLES Vs PARRAMATTA EELS

15



The Swoop - Sea Eagles Game Day Magazine - Round 17