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manilabui.com 865 . 964 . 9343 manila.bui@gmail.com


manilabui.com 865 . 964 . 9343 manila.bui@gmail.com


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first year 06 | paint tube 10 | flower

second year 14 | feather 18 | portraits 20 | weedcutter

third year 26 | repair 30 | puzzles 34 | lf one 36 | movement 38 | grace

fourth year 42 | woven 46 | draft 48 | protect


Final object home The box is a landscape of exaggerated facets. Tumbling rolls hug the tube. The formations carve out a path for the paint to travel through.

Iteration of object home This was the beginning explorations of the haphazard textures of the tube.

Iteration of object home This study emphasized the importance of the paint in the tube.

Section studies These sections were cut from the final object home model. They were used to understand how the forms from the box could become inhabitable space.

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PAINT TUBE Professor // Brad Collett + Christina Geros + David Matthews Location // Knoxville Museum of Art This project started with finding one of the objects hidden at the museum. Then, studies of the object were made by drafting the object as well as building it a personalized physical home. My object was a used tube of paint. Throughout the project, I specifically paid attention to the the textures that the facets of the crinkled container and the rolled-up ends of the tube created. I also kept in mind what happens when the main feature, the paint, is released from the tube.

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Drafted paint tube study Regulating lines were kept in mind as precise drawings of the the tube were carefully composed onto the sheet. The various movements the tube makes were documented in order to get a clear understanding of how the object is used.

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Final composition Detail of cross-hatching Photograph of background flowers

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FLOWER Professor // Brian Ambroziak This project started with photographing a chosen natural element from the UTK gardens and rendering the texture. I chose a bright orange flower with delicate leaves and pointy bulbs. The elegant leaf in the foreground made up the entirety of the original composition. The background flowers were added later to add some complexity to the composition, adding more visual interest.

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Downy feather model This model looks at the softness of downy feathers while studying the texture resulting from a steady repetition.

Pin feather model New feathers look like this in their stage of growth.

Feather layering model The shapes of feathers may lay together in this way.

Section The ceiling in the entryway uses the pin feather texture.

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FEATHER Professor // Ryann Aoukar Location // Knoxville, TN (Sequoyah Hills) This project called for an in-depth study of a natural element looking into history, cultural relevance and structure. Further explorations were made with geometric compositions, color studies, diagrams, patterns and models. After these studies, residences were designed for a University of Tennessee employee, who was interviewed for the program criteria, with the natural element as the concept. Study models and patterns were to be incorporated as materials. I studied the feather for this project. My client was a married woman requiring four bedrooms and ample entertainment space.

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Floor plan The main feature of this plan lies in the angled walls, which are like the angled branches of a feather. Feathers have branches upon branches that are woven together with hooks resulting in one smooth surface. This house works in the same way with the major components branched off the central living room. Those big branches each contain their own smaller branches. These angled walls make it possible to have a minimal amount of doors, because the angles prevent a direct line of vision into many of the spaces.

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Two palettes/compositions These studies were useful in showing color adjacencies, especially when making the compositions. I ended up using the first color palette for my residence due to its subtle, elegant hues with bit of a pop.

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Quilt portrait Skull Wilted

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PORTRAITS Professor // Mary Beth Robinson The first portrait was designed for a class quilt project, inspired by the AIDS memorial quilt, in which every class member created a piece reflecting themselves. This began a personal portrait series which resulted in the next two portraits. My goals were to explore rendering with pencil as well as experiment with color. This project forced me to look at the subtle details, because one small move made the person look completely different.

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Face This piecewas used as the charging bar at reception.

Phone This model was extruded and used as an overhang.

Hat This component was used as the gaming booths and goody dispensers.

Longitudinal section Transverse section

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WEEDCUTTER Professor // David Matthews This project required finding a machine to take apart, photograph and model in Rhino. The modeled pieces were to be used in the design of an exhibition space where Sony will be introducing Little Big Planet 3’s new mechanical theme. My machine was a weedcutter. I incorporated three of the thirty components that were modeleled. I designed an experience that is meant to be engaging and interactive, so users can be immersed into the game.

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Axon The experience I created involves coming in and grabbing a magnet pack from a dispenser, which the individual will place wherever they wish to within the exhibit. The individual may sit down for a short presentation about the new game in the open seating, then continue around to demo the game in a more enclosed space. Upon leaving, there will be a dispenser with a pack of items that individuals may take with them.

Reception To the left, part of the neon cables spelling out “Sony� can be seen. The charging bar is in the middle of the image , and the magnet dispenser is on the far right.

Game demo zone This was a lighting study of the more private area where individuals may demo the actual Little Big Planet 3 game.

Color study Photographs were taken before, during and after taking apart the machine. This was taken before.

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Concept azon The design elements representing the four stages of the bone repair process are exploded in the diagram.

Longitudinal section This section shows the physical therapy clinic and administration facilities upstairs (4th floor). Downstairs the nurse stations and exam rooms can be seen as well as the conference room at the end of the hallway.


REPAIR Professor // Liz Teston Location // Knoxville, TN (Downtown) Collaboration with Kristin Bowman and Julia McClintic to design a healthcare facility, involving orthopaedic and physical therapy clinics, in downtown Knoxville for Tennessee Orthopaedic Clinic. We used the bone repair process to inform our program and circulation. When a bone breaks, blood leaks into the fracture, forming a clot. Next, blood vessels inject into the clot as they grow. Then, the clot becomes a callus, which toughens as it bridges the fracture. The skin encases the process from beginning to end.


4th floor (Above) 3rd floor (Below)

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Reception + Waiting (Leaking) In the clinic, patients enter, or leak into, the reception.

Corridor + Nurse’s station (Bridging + Injection) Nurses and doctors wait in the nurse stations, the injection space, to heal the wounded. Bridging happens when the patient, nurse, and doctor come together in the exam rooms.

Break area/Lounge (Encasement) The administration takes care of functional aspects so the clinic can run, making this area the encasement, holding the process together.

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Office desks The desk space along the windows is one long counter with portions that fold out for more desk space, making it easier for employees to collaborate. Foldout chairs fit neatly under the desks.

Reception The foldout private office can be seen next to the green reception desk.

Lounge This private lounge is important because the main office space is so open. Employees can come here for a break or a phone call.

Plan The layout uses a continuous rhythm, following an orderly pattern while still allowing for flexibility with so much foldable furniture. This makes it easier for the company to host events.

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PUZZLES Professor // Lisa Mullikin Location // UTK Art + Architecture Collaboration with Coleen O’ Leary to come up with an incubator, then design the brand for the company as well as the office space. Our incubator was a social media startup which involved individuals plugging their calendars into an app and filling out a short questionnaire about their hobbies and interests. The app then suggests events and activities, which you may choose to engage in with others. The app takes care of the puzzle of your schedule. Such an app requires innovation from a creative staff. Therefore, we designed a space that is meant to be inspiring and comfortable for the employees to ideate.

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Foldout table These tables are available to aid collaboration in case employees need to add more space in addition to their counter-top desks or in the case that they would like to work elsewhere in the space.

Foldout chair These chairs, like the foldout tables, can also be moved throughout the space.

Foldout private office This office is not always necessary, so we made it possible to just fold away. Private meetings may be held here.

Open space This is the space where employees may engage in various activities, maybe even with people outside of the office. Employees may choose to work in this space instead of at their desks.

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Chandelier Mahjong Final My final geometric and textual compositions both show a stagnant container holding elements that spring up and out to the side.

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MOVEMENT Professor // Diane Fox This project started with the creation of compositions conveying movement. Only black and grey rectangles were used. Next, one of the compositions were chosen and a similarly-balanced composition had to be made using only text. This forces the designer to see text as an object and aids in the understanding of the weight of each element on the page. My geometric composition contains many more pieces than the textual composition, which contains only three elements, yet the two are still visually balanced.

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“Realms interpenetrate; distinctions are vague and latent rather than definitive and frozen.” is situated north of the exhibition hall, partly shifted into the volume of the hall and submerged into the ground to take advantage of the earth as a climatic buffer. The roof over the sunken centre becomes an open mezzanine within the exhibition space. This mezzanine in turn participates in a second route through the building linking the raised public path to the path intersecting the building, at ground level.

L F1

The project is designed to serve as an event and exhibition space for the gardening show in Weil am Rhein 1999. Rather than being articulated as an isolated object, the building is physically and formally embedded in the large and topographically rich garden-scape. The built spaces emerge gently from the fluid geometry of the surrounding network of paths, three of which entangle to form the building: one path snuggles up to the south side of the building, while another, gently sloping, rises over its back; the third describes a shallow S-curve and cuts diagonally through the interior. Four parallel and partly interwoven spaces are caught in this bundle of paths. The two main spaces—exhibition hall and café—are stretched along the contours of these paths, allowing for ample light and visibility. Ancillary rooms disappear within the “root” of the building. An outdoor terrace is located to the south of the café, continuing its slightly sunken floor level. Another part of the programme—a small environmental research centre—

The space-bundle “LF one” for the gardening show (Landesgartenschau 1999, Weil am Rhein) is part of a sequence of projects that try to elicit new fluid spatialities from the study of natural landscape formations such as river deltas, mountain ranges, forests, deserts, canyons, ice-flows, oceans and so on. The most important general characteristics we look for in landscape spaces, in distinction to traditional urban and architectural spaces, are the multitude and subtleties of territorial definitions as well as the smoothness of transitions between spaces. Both characteristics, which from a traditional architectural vantage point might be regarded as lacking in order and definition, allow more complex and nuanced order of spaces and activities. Realms interpenetrate; distinctions are vague and latent rather than definitive and frozen. These latent distinctions and spatial definitions are revealed and amplified by the temporary activities that hook on to features that might otherwise remain mute and unobtrusive. Landscape spaces remain flexible and open, not due to a modernist blank neutrality, but by virtue of an overabundance and simultaneity of soft articulations. Whereas architecture generally channels, segments and closes, landscape opens, offers and suggests. This does not mean that we abandon architecture and surrender to brute nature. The point here is to seek out potentially productive analogies to inspire the invention of new artificial scapes and land forms, pertinent to our contemporary complex, multiple and transient life processes.

The project is designed to serve as an event and exhibition space for the gardening show in Weil am Rhein 1999. Rather than being articulated as an isolated object, the building is physically and formally embedded in the large and topographically rich garden-scape. The built spaces emerge gently from the fluid geometry of the surrounding network of paths, three of which entangle to form the building: one path snuggles up to the south side of the building, while another, gently sloping, rises over its back; the third describes a shallow S-curve and cuts diagonally through the interior. Four parallel and partly interwoven spaces are caught in this bundle of paths. The two main spaces—exhibition hall and café—are stretched along the contours of these paths, allowing for ample light and visibility.

LF ONE

Ancillary rooms disappear within the “root” of the building. An outdoor terrace is located to the south of the café, continuing its slightly sunken floor level. Another part of the programme—a small environmental research centre—is situated north of the exhibition hall, partly shifted into the volume of the hall and submerged into the ground to take advantage of the earth as a climatic buffer. The roof over the sunken centre becomes an open mezzanine within the exhibition space. This mezzanine in turn participates in a second route through the building linking the raised public path to the path intersecting the building, at ground level. The space-bundle “LF one” for the gardening show (Landesgartenschau 1999, Weil am Rhein) is part of a sequence of projects that try to elicit new fluid spatialities from the study of natural landscape formations such as river deltas, mountain ranges, forests, deserts, canyons, ice-flows, oceans and so on. The most important general characteristics we look for in landscape spaces, in distinction to traditional urban and architectural spaces, are the multitude and subtleties of territorial definitions as well as the smoothness of tran-

The space-bundle realizes some of the aspects of landscapes that we have identified as most liberating: the figure of our building is not contained. It literally bleeds out and dissolves into the surrounding landscape. It emerges gradually from the tangle of paths, leaving it to the visitor to define and realize its beginning and end, according to his or her perspective, purpose or mood. Also, the size and boundary of the building is rendered soft as its order and geometry ripples out into the garden scape, via the sunken terrace and the adjacent southern path, which is articulated as one more contour in the sequence of related lines, cascading down from the highest roof edge. The rigid distinction between circulation space and occupied space is blurred via an overabundance of potential movement spaces and the overall fluid geometry. The ground plane as stable reference is subverted through its multiplication. The public path sweeping over the building and the terrace carving into the ground makes any definition of “ground” ambiguous. The levels within and around the building are subtly staggered, so that they may potentially congregate into a single event, while allowing for temporary (or simultaneous) intimacy. Multiple competing fluid boundaries abound in the interior and blur the interior-exterior dichotomy: column rows are misaligned through level shifts in the floor which are countered by shifts in the ceiling, continuous geometries cut against the façade and thermal definition of the interior. The result is a compressed space full of overlap and visual oscillation, as alignments, rhythms and textures are played off against each other. Caption: Facestia cument quas Pa sit ent, consequam Catem quunt omnis Ro volorae as ex etur

Office Zaha Hadid

sitions between spaces. Both characteristics, which from a traditional architectural vantage point might be regarded as lacking in order and definition, allow more complex and nuanced order of spaces and activities. Realms interpenetrate; distinctions are vague and latent rather than definitive and frozen. These latent distinctions and spatial definitions are revealed and amplified by the temporary activities that hook on to features that might otherwise remain mute and unobtrusive. Landscape spaces remain flexible and open, not due to a modernist blank neutrality, but by virtue of an overabundance and simultaneity of soft articulations. Whereas architecture generally channels, segments and closes, landscape opens, offers and suggests. This does not mean that we abandon architecture and surrender to brute nature. The point here is to seek out potentially productive analogies to inspire the invention of new artificial scapes and land forms, pertinent to our contemporary complex, multiple and transient life processes. The space-bundle realizes some of the aspects of landscapes that we have identified as most liberating: the figure of our building is not contained. It literally bleeds out and dissolves into the surrounding landscape. It emerges gradually from the tangle of paths, leaving it to the visitor to define and realize its beginning and end, according to his or her perspective, purpose or mood. Also, the size and boundary of the building is rendered soft as its order and geometry ripples out into the garden scape, via the sunken terrace and the adjacent southern path, which is articulated as one more contour in the sequence of related lines, cascading down from the highest roof edge. The rigid distinction between circulation space and occupied space is blurred via an overabundance of potential movement spaces and the overall fluid geometry. The ground plane as stable reference is subverted through its multiplication. The public path sweeping over the building and

“Realms interpenetrate; distinctions are vague and latent rather than definitive and frozen.”

Caption: Facestia cument quas Pa sit ent, consequam Catem quunt omnis Ro volorae as ex etur

the terrace carving into the ground makes any definition of “ground” ambiguous. The levels within and around the building are subtly staggered, so that they may potentially congregate into a single event, while allowing for temporary (or simultaneous) intimacy. Multiple competing fluid boundaries abound in the interior and blur the interior-exterior dichotomy: column rows are misaligned through level shifts in the floor which are countered by shifts in the ceiling, continuous geometries cut against the façade and thermal definition of the interior. The result is a compressed space full of overlap and visual oscillation, as alignments, rhythms and textures are played off against each other.

Office Zaha Hadid

Integration The images of the spreads in this iteration have a visual connection. This spread also shows the relationship between day and night.

Layering

“Realms interpenetrate; distinctions are vague and latent rather than definitive and frozen.”

L1

The project is designed to serve as an event and exhibition space for the gardening show in Weil am Rhein 1999. Rather than being articulated as an isolated object, the building is physically and formally embedded in the large and topographically rich garden-scape. The built spaces emerge gently from the fluid geometry of the surrounding network of paths, three of which entangle to form the building: one path snuggles up to the south side of the building, while another, gently sloping, rises over its back; the third describes a shallow S-curve and cuts diagonally through the interior. Four parallel and partly interwoven spaces are caught in this bundle of paths. The two main spaces—exhibition hall and café—are stretched along the contours of these paths, allowing for ample light and visibility.

F

Ancillary rooms disappear within the “root” of the building. An outdoor terrace is located to the south of the café, continuing its slightly sunken floor

This iteration of the spreads used symmetry, layering and the boomerang shape.

level. Another part of the programme—a small environmental research centre—is situated north of the exhibition hall, partly shifted into the volume of the hall and submerged into the ground to take advantage of the earth as a climatic buffer. The roof over the sunken centre becomes an open mezzanine within the exhibition space. This mezzanine in turn participates in a second route through the building linking the raised public path to the path intersecting the building, at ground level. The space-bundle “LF one” for the gardening show (Landesgartenschau 1999, Weil am Rhein) is part of a sequence of projects that try to elicit new fluid spatialities from the study of natural landscape formations such as river deltas, mountain ranges, forests, deserts, canyons, iceflows, oceans and so on. The most important general characteristics we look for in landscape spaces, in distinction to traditional urban and architectural spaces, are the multitude and subtleties of territorial definitions as well as the smoothness of transitions between spaces. Both characteristics, which from a traditional architectural vantage point might be regarded as lacking in order and definition, allow more complex and nuanced order of spaces and activities. Realms interpenetrate; distinctions are vague and latent rather than definitive and frozen. These latent distinctions and spatial definitions are revealed and amplified by the temporary activities that hook on to features that might otherwise remain

Final The reflection of the two spreads shows the blurring of the exterior and interior and the building’s transition from day to night. The spreads also show off the clean lines and simple material palette. of the building

Daytime view of the wood and raw concrete interiors

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LF ONE Professor // Diane Fox Design double-page spreads for an architectural project that reflects the essence of the project. I chose Landscape Formation One, or LF One, a pavilion designed by Zaha Hadid. The building is integrated into the landscape, which results in its boomerang-like shape. The fluidity of the curves is the reason for the serif body text. The title is sans serif, however, in order to create clean alignments. The building has a simple material palette.

mute and unobtrusive. Landscape spaces remain flexible and open, not due to a modernist blank neutrality, but by virtue of an overabundance and simultaneity of soft articulations. Whereas architecture generally channels, segments and closes, landscape opens, offers and suggests. This does not mean that we abandon architecture and surrender to brute nature. The point here is to seek out potentially productive analogies to inspire the invention of new artificial scapes and land forms, pertinent to our contemporary complex, multiple and transient life processes. The space-bundle realizes some of the aspects of landscapes that we have identified as most liberating: the figure of our building is not contained. It literally bleeds out and dissolves into the surrounding landscape. It emerges gradually from the tangle of paths, leaving it to the visitor to define and realize its beginning and end, according to his or her perspective, purpose or mood.

The ground plane as stable reference is subverted through its multiplication. The public path sweeping over the building and the terrace carving into the ground makes any definition of “ground” ambiguous. The levels within and around the building are subtly staggered, so that they may potentially congregate into a single event, while allowing for temporary (or simultaneous) intimacy. Multiple competing fluid boundaries abound in the interior and blur the interior-exterior dichotomy: column rows are misaligned through level shifts in the floor which are countered by shifts in the ceiling, continuous geometries cut against the façade and thermal definition of the interior. The result is a compressed space full of overlap and visual oscillation, as alignments, rhythms and textures are played off against each other.

Plan

Office Zaha Hadid Also, the size and boundary of the building is rendered soft as its order and geometry ripples out into the garden scape, via the sunken terrace and the adjacent southern path, which is articulated as one more contour in the sequence of related lines, cascading down from the highest roof edge. The rigid distinction between circulation space and occupied space is blurred via an overabundance of potential movement spaces and the overall fluid geometry.

Daytime view of exterior

Nighttime view of the glass exterior facade

Nighttime view of the interior lighting

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Grace Kelly by Andy Warhol

First Friday exhibit Displayed December 2013 in Downtown Knoxville

Pattern

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GRACE Professor // Ashley Pace The assignment required picking a masterpiece and finding the proportions of the colors in the masterpiece. Then, we had to create a composition using the same proportions of the same colors. The composition was then turned into a repeat pattern that was produced on fabric. I chose the portrait of Grace Kelly by Andy Warhol. The portrait has many subtle changes in shade, which I wanted to use in my composition in order to get a more threedimensional effect.

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Level 5 (Apartments) Tenants and hotel guests get the same experience.

Level 1-4 (Hotel rooms) Each type of room has a difference set of materials.

Concept diagram The gaps in the weaves are the nooks, the living room space, whereas the interlocking parts are the grand space.

Hotel hallway Bedroom suite

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WOVEN Professor // Mary Beth Robinson Location // Cleveland, TN Collaborated with Macy Hale and Emily Johnson in a hospitality project designing the Cleveland Summit, which is currently Section 8 housing, and bringing back some of its former glory as Hotel Cherokee. This building is a historic icon for the city of Cleveland. We wanted to combine the old with the new in the redesign of the building as a hotel with penthouse apartments. We chose the concept “woven.” It was important to mesh the experience of a luxury hotel and a homey atmosphere.

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Street level Only the restaurant (left) and the lobby/ reception (right) occupy this level along with some administration space.

Longitudinal section This section shows off the amenities.The mezzanine floors above the street level house fitness and spa to the left on the lower mezzanine and a continental breakfast area/ lounge to the right on the upper mezzanine. We also proposed that the small brick building to the left of the hotel be a restaurant, and the building behind that restaurant can be retail.

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Lobby lounge This is a nook space, where you might sit back and watch people checking in or leaving the hotel as you wait for a friend.

Reception This is a grand space with a large chandelier and luxurious seating with a grand curved vintage mirror.

Restaurant Behind the glass, you can see the long farm table, which is a grand, open space. It is surrounded by more private booth seating, the nooks.

Transverse section This section shows the parking facilities, which involves mandatory valet at the entrance where the car is driven to the infrastructure behind. A bellhop takes care of the check-in process, so guests only need to go to reception for check-out and any other needs.w

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SUNDAY, March 3

Poster

11am Kickball (Cherokee Park)

MONDAY, March 4

This is the whimsical version where more of supposed imperfections can be seen.

1pm Banner Hanging (A+A Atrium) 1:30pm Olympics: Paper Plane Throwing, Egg Drop, Thumbtack Throwing (A+A Atrium)

TUESDAY, March 5 7pm AIAS Variety Show (A+A Rm 103a)

WEDNESDAY, March 6 6pm ASID Showcase (A+A Atrium)

Banner

THURSDAY, March 7 11am Beginning of Design+Build (A+A near Woodshop) 6pm Lecture (A+A Rm 113)

This version of the poster is more formal. It uses less colors due to the four-color process needed.

FRIDAY, March 8 1pm Design+Build Continues (A+A near Woodshop)

SATURDAY, March 9 5:45pm Reveal of Design+Build (site to be announced) 6pm MAX_minimum DesignCeremony (A+A Ewing Gallery) 7pm 65th Annual Student Art and Design Competition (A+A Ewing Gallery)

SUNDAY, March 10 7-11pm Beaux Arts Ball (Latitude 35 Market Square)

Tshirt The shirt is also produced with the four-color process.

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DRAFT Professor // Diane Fox Location // University of Tennessee (College of Architecture + Design) The objective was to design a banner, poster and tshirt for the Annual All-College Spring Thing, better known as TAAST, for the year 2015. The concept for the design was to reflect the college while providing the required information in a clear manner. I chose to hand-draft and hand-letter my design as an acknowledgment to the past, which gave the pieces an illustrative quality. I used a traditional banderoll and lit the text with an architectural lamp.

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Rhino iteration The computer model in which I first used the shadow piece as the chair’s base.

Metal iteration I liked the clean lines of this version. Unfortunately, the chair could only be used with a support piece under the back of the seat.

Final My chair is made up of four pieces of steel, which I folded and welded together to create one sittable unit.

First model This model represents breaking free from the “protective” confines.

Plywood iteration This model explored the aesthetic of “the diamond in the rough” with its harsh angles and jewel-like faceted surface. as well as ergonomics. It was an important step in figuring out basic dimensions

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PROTECT Professor // Matthew Culver Location // University of Tennessee (Downtown) The project began with making a model based on a concept of a space you would want in your home. We continued making gradually bigger iterations of our model until we hit full scale. The end result should be a sculptural chair that is comfortable to sit in. I chose to create a place where you are comfortable with the thought that you are never completely safe. The chair should make the user feel free and in control.

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