2016 MHK Performance Report

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2016 MHK PERFORMANCE REPORT


Dear Citizens, As you will see in this report, the City of Manhattan had another successful year in 2016. First, we have Manhattan voters to thank for their support of a 0.20% sales tax initiative to fund street maintenance repairs. The tax takes effect April 1, 2017, and projects are anticipated to begin fully in 2018 using this new funding source. Second, our $18 million terminal expansion project at Manhattan Regional Airport reached completion, allowing passengers to fully utilize new amenities such as two passenger boarding bridges, additional car rentals, a baggage carousel and expanded waiting areas. We also opened the fixed base operator facility leased by Kansas Jet Center to improve service to general aviation customers at the airport. Additionally, many of our Parks and Recreation staff relocated to new office space with a $1.1 million addition to City Hall. Parks and Recreation also saw record numbers of attendance at the Flint Hills Discovery Center, waterparks and in total participation in the department’s activities and events. Our partnerships in the community continued as designs came together for potential projects along the North Campus Corridor to serve anticipated growth associated with Kansas State University and the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility, which is continuing construction. The City of Manhattan is committed to providing quality services and facilities to help our community be successful while striving for efficiency and effectiveness in a safe environment. The significant activity and growth happening in and around Manhattan make our community a great place to live, learn, work and play.

TABLE OF CONTENTS COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS......................................................... 3 ADMINISTRATION........................................................................... 4 AIRPORT.......................................................................................... 6 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT........................................................ 8 FINANCE.......................................................................................... 9 MANHATTAN FIRE DEPARTMENT.................................................. 10 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION............................................................ 12 PROPERTY MAINTENANCE............................................................ 13 PARKS & RECREATION................................................................... 14 PUBLIC WORKS................................................................................ 16 SAFETY............................................................................................. 18


PARTNERSHIPS KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY (KSU) The City-University Special Projects Fund provides funding for projects of benefit to the City of Manhattan and Kansas State University. In 2016, approximately $629,000 was spent on five projects, including multi-year allotments for North Manhattan Avenue improvements and intersection improvements to realign Lover’s Lane with Thurston Street. The City participated in an economic study with KSU regarding the potential growth surrounding the North Campus Corridor in conjunction with the construction of the National Bio and AgroDefense Facility. The study showed an additional 3,620 jobs and $168M in wages could be seen by 2035 from growth in the corridor, and state and local governments could realize $13M annually from that growth.

USD 383

Coaches, school administrators and the USD 383 school board have provided input throughout the last year on a Facility Feasibility Study that would build multi-purpose gymnasium space at Manhattan’s two middle schools and improve ballfields at CiCo Park. The school representatives have weighed in on playing surfaces, potential facility uses and how their programs could benefit from these potential community-wide improvements.

RILEY COUNTY The City has been an active participant in Riley County’s discussion of improvements to the Denison/Marlatt corridor. The project includes roadway and intersection improvements that will help feed traffic into Manhattan. It also features trail improvements to provide additional connectivity along Linear Trail.

Recommended

RILEY COUNTY POLICE The City worked with Riley County Police Department (RCPD) to help them establish a self-funded worker’s compensation plan, which will save Riley County and the City of Manhattan approximately $350,000 annually in coming years. Additionally, 36 special event permits were issued in 2016, which requires coordination and approval from RCPD.

FORT RILEY A military entrance ramp was constructed at Manhattan Regional Airport to allow for better access to the military apron for Fort Riley’s personnel. The $540,000 project was funded by the city’s stormwater fund and economic development fund.

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ADMINISTRATION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The economic development program uses sales tax funds to assist local companies with workforce expansion. Voters renewed a Riley County halfcent sales tax for roads and jobs in 2012 to support these efforts. For every $1 the City has spent or committed toward economic development since 1995, approximately $9.47 in private sector or other investments have been made.

NEW ORDINANCES The Manhattan City Commission adopted a new noise ordinance, nondiscrimination ordinance and e-cigarette ordinance in 2016. The City worked with stakeholders in the community that would be affected by such ordinances. Trainings were offered for businesses in the community in regards to the new non-discrimination ordinance so they could learn about it and how it might affect their business.

1,531

jobs created from economic development investment — 12% over projected totals to date

ADMINISTRATION STATISTICS Number of cases with charges filed in Municipal Court Number of open records requests received

6,120 123

COMMUNITY PROGRAMS City Snow Partners began in 2014 as a way to connect volunteers with elderly and disabled residents in need of assistance with snow removal each winter. Volunteers are responsible for clearing public sidewalks, but many also assist with clearing driveways and other walkways.

115

elderly and disabled residents assisted by 65 individuals, 3 fraternities and 1 church through City Snow Partners

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Citizens’ Academy, in its 18th year in 2016, is an adult education program that allows Manhattan residents to go behind the scenes of local government. Participants tour various city facilities and operations and are introduced to various services, programs and partnerships.

17 graduates of the 2015-16 Citizens’ Academy class


ADMINISTRATION HUMAN RESOURCES

9.87

27.9

years — the average tenure of a city employee

YEES O L P M E ED DEDICAT

average number of applicants per full-time job opening

LE JOBS B A R I S E D

ONLINE SERVICES & COMMUNICATIONS The Manhattan City Commission continues to set a goal of creating efficiencies in city government by emphasizing online services. E-notification only rates rose to 25.2% at the end of 2016, and the city received $4.5 million in revenue from utility bill payments made online throughout the year, an increase of 17% from 2015.

30

E-NOTIFICATION UTILITY BILL CUSTOMERS

25

20

15

17.1%

ALANCE B E F I L K WOR

681,704 unique pageviews at CityofMHK.com

40%

16.9%

website traffic using mobile devices

9.1% June 2015

vacation days available that were used in 2016

25.2%

10 5

94.4%

Dec. 2015

June 2016

Total reach of Facebook posts Growth of Facebook followers Average engagement rate* *1% industry standard

295,599 807 4.5%

Dec. 2016 Total Twitter impressions Growth of Twitter followers Average engagement rate* *1% industry standard

1,049,200 1,109 1.3%

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MANHATTAN REGIONAL AIRPORT TERMINAL EXPANSION Manhattan Regional Airport’s (MHK) terminal expansion project reached substantial completion just before the end of 2016. The second phase included construction of a baggage claim area, a larger hold room and revolving doors out of the secure room that do not allow re-entry. A meet-and-greet area is available for people meeting travelers through MHK. A second and larger jet bridge is at Gate 2 and can accommodate a wide variety of aircraft including charter flights. The first phase of the terminal opened to the public in February 2015. The second phase brings the total footprint of the terminal to 42,000 square feet to accommodate projected growth through 2030. Federal Aviation Administration grants funded approximately 75% of the $18 million project.

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MANHATTAN REGIONAL AIRPORT

0

discrepancies on FAA annual commercial service airport inspection

FIXED BASE OPERATOR

A new fixed base operator (FBO) facility opened at Manhattan Regional Airport. The FBO is leased by Kansas Jet Center and provides a variety of support services for charter flights, private aircraft fueling, air ambulance services, de-icing, aircraft tie 80000downs and rental car coordination.

ENPLANEMENTS 60,000

60000

load capacity on American Airlines flights out of MHK

40000 20000

73%

2012 61,757

2013 62,459

2014 63,229

2015 63,814

2016 60,035

Enplanements capture commercial airline passengers taking off from MHK.

COMMUNITY OUTREACH

“Airports should be part of their community, not just located in one.” The airport took part in a number of outreach activities in 2016, including the Riley County Fair, Taste of Home Show and Sunset Zoo’s Spooktacular.

84

athletic charters for Kansas State University teams taking off from MHK

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COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

AGGIEVILLE COMMUNITY VISION CDBG PROJECTS The City used $717,612 in Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding in 2016. This funding is used for projects that benefit low- and moderateincome individuals and areas in the community. Many times that includes infrastructure such as sidewalks, intersections and park improvements. It also includes the housing rehabilitation program, which assists homeowners with making critical repairs such as HVAC, roofing, accessibility and other repairs. Fourteen homes received repairs in 2016.

SECTION 108 LOAN

A Section 108 guaranteed loan was identified as a funding source for a new multi-purpose gymnasium in Douglass Park. The South East Neighborhood Recreation Center is proposed to be located in an area classified by U.S. Housing and Urban Development (HUD) as low and moderate income. This allows the center to quality for a loan program from HUD. The City would use part of its annual CDBG distribution to make payments on the loan for the $3.3 million project.

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The Aggieville Community Vision was developed through extensive public engagement with Aggieville business and property owners, the community, a steering committee, Planning Board and City Commission. This update provides a comprehensive and cohesive planning document with clear direction for future redevelopment and civic improvements in the district. It provides for improved parking, pedestrian, bicycle and streetscape amenities, and an expanded range of businesses.

URBAN CORE RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT

As part of implementation of the Manhattan Urban Area Comprehensive Plan, the Urban Core Residential District was drafted to facilitate development of high-density, university-oriented residential buildings. These may incorporate ground floor accessory neighborhood-scale services and would be located in a 5-block area east of North Manhattan Avenue and north of Aggieville. The district is designed to promote a more walkable, bicycle-friendly neighborhood that embraces its close proximity to Kansas State University, Aggieville and Manhattan Christian College.


FINANCE FINANCIALS

The City of Manhattan finished the 2016 budget year at approximately $209,232 under budget. That means the City’s starting cash reserve balance for 2017 is higher than anticipated, allowing the City to better react financially in case of emergency or need for those “rainy-day” funds. Property tax collected 1-cent sales tax collected* Debt issued Debt retired General Obligation Bond debt per capita General Fund cost per capita

$478.80

BOND RATINGS Best Quality High Quality

S&P AAA AA+ AA AA-

Of the $67.2 million in City purchases made in 2016, $34.6 million went to local vendors. The largest portion of the $21.1 million spent with Kansas vendors went to the state of Kansas for projects that were bid competitively.

$22,330,245 $11,196,423 $20,115,000 $26,305,000 $1,017

*The City collected a record amount of sales tax in 2016, topping $11 million for the first time. The collections were 2.1% higher than in 2015. An additional $2.5 million was collected as part of the 0.25-cent quality of life sales tax that pays for debt service on pool improvements and the construction of Sunset Zoo’s Nature exploration Center.

Fitch AAA AA+ AA AA-

LOCAL PURCHASES

Moody’s Aaa Aa1 Aa2 Aa3

City of Manhattan has high quality bond ratings from all three ratings agencies.

GRANT FUNDING The City of Manhattan continues to leverage grant funds for important projects across the community. Community Development Block Grants Federal Aviation Administration Other

$926,456 $3,299,538 $49,444

Local Manhattan vendors (51.5%) Non-local vendors located in Kansas (31.5%) Non-local vendors (16.4%) Local Manhattan vendors with corporate offices elsewhere (0.6%)

19

straight years of recognition for budget excellence by the Government Finance Officers Association

0

significant findings in annual audit of City financials

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MANHATTAN FIRE DEPARTMENT INVESTING IN THE COMMUNITY

$90

cost per Manhattan resident for fire protection

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Life safety is always our No. 1 priority. CIVILIAN DEATHS CIVILIAN INJURIES PROPERTY LOSS PER CAPITA TOTAL PROPERTY LOSS

2014 0 2 $26.29 $1,535,830

2015 1 5 $12.59 $735,558

2016 0 4 $103.98 $6,073,620

FOUNDERS HILL FIRE — $4 MILLION LOSS

224

average training hours per fire department staff

$4.8M total budget for emergency services

85%

cost recovery for building and fire code enforcement through user fees

RESPONSE TIMES

The Manhattan Fire Department (MFD) worked with Riley County dispatch and its department personnel to more accurately track turnout, travel and total response times to emergency calls in 2016. The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) sets standards for response times to medical and fire calls. The turnout time is measured from the first notification of the call to the beginning of travel time; many factors play into how fast firefighters are able to get out of the building. Medical Calls 5:00

NFPA MFD

1.37

firefighters per 1,000 residents

10

4:29 Fire Calls

NFPA

5:20

MFD

4:26 — TURNOUT TIME

— TRAVEL TIME


MANHATTAN FIRE DEPARTMENT 3-YEAR INCIDENT DATA INCIDENT TYPE

2014

2015

2016

FIRES EMS OTHER CALLS TOTAL INCIDENTS PER YEAR

129 1,043 1,391

135 1,013 1,433

127 1,092 1,173

TOTAL INCIDENT TYPES 2014-2016 391 3,148 3,997

2,563

2,581

2,392

7,536

3,443 aircraft standbys for departures and arrivals at Manhattan Regional Airport

8

average calls per day on Fridays and Saturdays — the busiest days

BY THE NUMBERS

2,527

fire inspections of commercial and residential properties conducted

162

36 training events conducted with outside agencies, meeting the department’s goal

99%

public education events spanning 250 hours

citizen satisfaction rating with fire protection according to 2016 online suvey

71

46

special operations units deployed including haz-mat and boat rescue crews

structure fires, with an average of <50 structure fires per year over last three years due to fire prevention efforts

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BUILDING CONSTRUCTION ISO RATING The Insurance Services Office Inc. (ISO) completed an evaluation of the City of Manhattan’s Code Services division. The evaluation assigns grades for adoption and enforcement of one- and twofamily residential construction codes, as well as commercial construction codes. The ratings are on a scale of 1 to 10 (highest to lowest). Manhattan received a rating of Class 4 for residential construction and Class 3 for commercial construction. Manhattan is now among approximately the top 18 percent of all jurisdictions nationwide to rank in Class 3 or higher for commercial construction.

CONSTRUCTION INSPECTION

5,207

total number of construction inspections in 2016

20.75 average number of inspections per day with 3 inspectors

RESIDENTIAL UNITS PERMITTED 800 800

New single-family units New multi-family units

600 600

100%

certified staff by the International Code Council (ICC)

400 400

200 200

0

439

plan sets reviewed by two plan reviewers

12

2016 marked the highest number of multi-family residential units permitted in the city’s history *614 units are part of The Links project

2012

2013

$131M

total construction valuation of all permitted buildings in 2016 — the second highest in history

2014

2015

2016

942

permits issued, including 468 building permits and 474 trade and sign permits


PROPERTY MAINTENANCE CODE & ZONING ENFORCEMENT CONSOLIDATION Zoning and code enforcement officers consolidated into the Code Services division of the Manhattan Fire Department in 2016. The move allowed the four code and zoning officers to be more proactive in identifying code nuisances, needed property maintenance repairs and zoning violations. There is no cost for the inspections.

49% increase in number of nuisance inspections conducted after addition of zoning enforcement staff to Code Services

TOTAL: 2,916 1,219

5000 5000

2015

4000 4000

3000 3000

NUISANCE INSPECTIONS

2000 2000

0 0

1000 1000

They were able to conduct routine exterior structure inspections for the first time, totaling 292 for the year. They were also able to deal with some of the more time-consuming abatements such as inoperable vehicles and property maintenance repairs.

851

TOTAL: 4,351

2016

ng

Pa rk i

In op e

ra b

le V S eh in ide icle Fr wa s on lk tY s ar d M isc el la ne ou s

& h Tr as

Gr

as s

&

W ee ds

De br is

1,420

1,895

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE DATA Nuisances Abated

Existing Structures Inspected

2015 2016

0

50

100 100

150 150

200 200

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PARKS & RECREATION ANNEBERG PARK

FACILITY FEASIBILITY STUDY

With guidance from a steering committee, Bruce McMillan Architects and Parks and Recreation staff continued a Facility Feasibility Study to identify potential recreation improvements in the community. Concepts were developed for three indoor neighborhood recreation centers that contain multi-purpose gymnasiums. They would be located at Anthony and Eisenhower middle schools and at Douglass Park. The City submitted a Section 108 guaranteed loan application to use Community Development Block Grant Funding to make annual loan payments for the construction of the center at Douglass Park.

A $3 million project to install synthetic turf and sports lighting at Anneberg Park. The field safety and playability improvements were completed prior to the start of the 2016 spring sports season. A synthetic turf field was installed at Manhattan Soccer Complex, and synthetic turf baseball/softball infields were installed at Twin Oaks Sports Complex.

Concepts were also developed for improvements at CiCo Park, including synthetic turf installation on ball fields and increasing the number of tennis courts.

547

teams that played at Anneberg Park tournaments in 2016, an increase of 210 teams

150000 150000 150000 150000 120000 120000 120000 120000

$311

PARKS & RECREATION ATTENDANCE The Flint Hills Discovery Center set a record for guest attendance in 2016, thanks in part to the popular “Amazing Dinosaurs!� exhibit.

90000 90000 90000 90000

80,070

economic impact per person who play in weekend tournaments at Twin Oaks Sports Complex

annual economic impact to the Manhattan community from games played at Twin Oaks

14

0 0 0 0

120,652

82,043

60,555

60000 60000 60000 60000

$3.7M 30000 30000 30000 30000

85,897

132,234

16,123 16,432

Ice Rink

Discovery Center

Sunset Zoo

Pools


PARKS & RECREATION BY THE NUMBERS

40,175 hours of park and trail maintenance by City staff

130 trees planted throughout the community by the forestry division

73%

animal placement rate for animals receiving service at T. Russell Reitz Animal Shelter

4,000

Puerto Rican Crested Toad tadpoles hatched at Sunset Zoo as part of mission to save endangered animals

73

additional parking stalls created at City Park Pool through quality of life sales tax project

10.3

acres of parkland for every 1,000 residents (national standard = 10)

TRAIL EVALUATION STUDY

Parks and Recreation conducted a trail evaluation study with the help of the Center for Research Strategies. We received input on the quality and use of trails from more than 2,000 community members. Results will be used to prioritize future trail and maintenance projects.

84%

number of electronic survey respondents who said they use trails primarily for recreation

15


PUBLIC WORKS 2750

WATER DISTRIBUTED

2.5B 2500

2250 2000 2750

1750

2014 2.468

2015 2.417

2016 2.514

Billions of gallons of water distributed

2500

2000

BLUE TOWNSHIP WATER LINE EXTENSION

5,809

The project addressed anticipated residential, commercial 2250 and their future water and industrial growth in Blue Township needs. The $5 million project was jointly funded between Pottawatomie County Rural Water District No. 1 (71%) and 2000 the City of Manhattan (29%). The City anticipates the district purchasing more than 100 million gallons of water annually within five years, with expected revenues of nearly $500,000 1750 per year.

1750

hours of overtime, call back and on-call hours worked to plow 1500 snow, fix water main breaks and maintain utility service

1250 2000

WASTEWATER TREATED 1000

1.8B

1750 1500 1250

MILLER PARKWAY EXTENSION

The City completed a $1.8 million project to extend Miller Parkway from its previous dead-end near the Lee Mill Heights 9 subdivision to Scenic Drive. The project included new roadway, a multi-use path and traffic lights at the new intersection of Miller Parkway and Scenic Drive. The street will facilitate construction of additional subdivisions in the area. The project was completed on time and on budget, opening to traffic in November.

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1000

2014 1.761

2015 1.853

2016 1.885

Billions of gallons of wastewater treated

33,885 blocks swept to keep streets clean


PUBLIC WORKS PAVEMENT CONDITION INDEX

The Pavement Condition Index (PCI) is a quality rating system of the City’s streets. The index takes into account factors such as ride quality, potholes, cracking and weathering. Public Works uses the PCI to determine what streets are in need of major repairs as part of the annual street maintenance program. There are 3.7 million square yards of pavement in the city. 100 80 60 40

36%

31% 20%

20 0

12% 1%

Excellent

Good

Fair

Poor

Very Poor

100-80

80-70

70-60

60-40

40-0

AWARDS The Kansas Ready Mixed Concrete Association presented the City with two awards for concrete projects completed: Grand Mere Parkway Extension and Manhattan Regional Airport Terminal Expansion. The Bureau of Oral Health of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) awarded the city with the Water Fluoridation Quality Award for consistent adjustments of water fluoride content level for oral health.

STREET MAINTENANCE

Voters approved a sales tax ballot question to fund street maintenance and Safe Routes to School projects. The measure passed with 65% of the vote. The 0.20% sales tax will go into effect April 1, 2017, and is expected to generate $2 million per year. Of that, $1.9 million will be dedicated to street maintenance in addition to the $2 million already being spent to improve existing streets. The other $100,000 will go to Safe Routes to School projects to fill sidewalk gaps, build crosswalks and install signs and lighting to make it safer for children to walk or bike to Manhattan’s eight elementary schools.

329,318 feet of sewer line maintenance

1,461 traffic signs produced

23,276 cubic yards of concrete streets repaired

$288 average expenditure for the 986 vehicle repair orders completed in-house

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SAFETY Safety and employee training became a significant focus for the City of Manhattan with the hiring of its first safety specialist in late 2015. Since then, full-time, part-time and seasonal employees have been though thousands of hours of training. That includes 187 employees completing OSHA 10-hour training courses that focus on awareness of common job-related safety

and health hazards. Projects that have enhanced awareness of safety-related issues in the workplace include: • Building safety inspections at every City facility • Purchase of backup cameras for City vehicles • Re-organized citywide safety committee • Employee incentive safety program

3,575

$84,180

total number of employee trained hours

dollars saved through in-house training

SAFETY STATISTICS Incidence Rate KS

5.0

MHK

3.49 Calculated on the number of injuries per 100 FTE

DART Rate KS MHK

2.30

0

1

2

2.18

3

4

5

DART = days away, restricted or transferred

0 1 2 3 4 Number of worker’s compensation cases filed Dollar amount of worker’s compensation cases filed Worker’s compensation claim costs as % of total city wages Number of vehicle/equipment accidents Dollar amount of vehicle/equipment accidents Accident rate per 1,000 miles driven

18

5 24 $149,945 0.71% 11 $10,269 1.42%

TRAININGS OFFERED • Trench training • Traffic control training on MUTCD • Confined space classes/permit required confined space • Winter driving • Fire extinguisher training • Dust mask/respirator class • CPR/AED training • Basic first aid • Safety briefings to seasonal employees at pools • New employee orientation safety briefings • Cold weather/hot weather safety • Personal protective equipment (PPE)


CITYOFMHK.COM/ANNUALREPORT City of Manhattan, Kansas 1101 Poyntz Ave. Manhattan, KS 66502 785-587-2404 CityofMHK.com