Page 1

Terpsichorean Dances

Jodie Blackshaw

C

O

N

C

M a n h a t t a n

E

R

T

B

A

N

D

B e a c h

M u s i c


Recording Credits for Terpsichorean Dances: Performance by Castle Hill RSL North West Wind Ensemble; James Brice, musical director (Australia)

This virtual conductor score and recording are designated “private,� and any publication or distribution beyond the web sites of Manhattan Beach Music is prohibited


TERPSICHOREAN DANCES F O R

C O N C E R T

B A N D

JODI E BL AC K S H AW I N S T R U M E N T A T I O N 1 Full Score

2 Bb Tenor Saxophone

2 Euphonium T.C.

1 Piccolo

1 Eb Baritone Saxophone

4 Tuba

4 Flute 1

3 Bb Trumpet 1

1 String Bass

4 Flute 2

3 Bb Trumpet 2

2 Mallets 1

1 Oboe

3 Bb Trumpet 3

4 Bb Clarinet 1

2 F Horn 1

4 Bb Clarinet 2

2 F Horn 2

4 Bb Clarinet 3

2 Trombone 1

2 Bb Bass Clarinet

2 Trombone 2

1 Bassoon

2 Bass Trombone

3 Eb Alto Saxophone 1

3 Euphonium B.C.

3 Eb Alto Saxophone 2

Glockenspiel, Woodblock

2 Mallets 2 Xylophone, Turkish Finger Cymbals, Lagerphone

2 Percussion 1 Snare Drum, Tambourine (without skin)

2 Percussion 2 Frame Drum (a very large tambourine without jingles), Crash Cymbal, Tambourine

2 Percussion 3 Timpani, Djembe (or floor Tom)

P R I N T E D O N A RC H I VA L PA P E R

 Manhattan Beach Music 1595 East 46th Street Brooklyn, New York 11234 Web: www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com E-mail: customerservice@manhattanbeachmusic.com Voicemail: 718/338-4137

M A N H AT TA N B E A C H M U S I C


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This piece is dedicated to all of the students enrolled in the St. Patrick’s College Band Program, Sutherland, New South Wales, Australia, from 1999–2002 Their infectious enthusiasm, unwavering support, and raw talent will always be an inspiration to me


.


P R O G R A M

N O T E

Michael Praetorius (1571-1621), German composer and archivist, was fanatical about recording the details of the many countries he visited, with a focus on the kind of music and musical instruments he encountered. The culmination of this fascination was his three-volume treatise, Syntagma Musicum, a compendium of information on German music, musical instruments, and performance practice. But much more well-known today is Praetorius’ 1612 collection of 312 dances from the royal courts of France, known as Terpsichore, named for the Greek Muse of dance. These dances were not composed by Praetorius; instead, he recorded and harmonized the melodies into three, four, five, and sometimes even six parts in order to avoid their imminent extinction. In my setting for concert band, three dances from the collection are featured; Springtanz, Leaping Dance; Der Lautenspieler, the Lute Player; and Der Schutzenkönig, the Archer King. To favor Praetorius’ infatuation with different musical instruments, this setting for band employs a variety of colors, and features the soloist and section alike. Performers are invited to play in a most animated nature to reinforce the strong sense of pulse required in all dance music. And though we are sure the lagerphone was unknown to Praetorius, we are equally sure he would have delighted in its joyous jangle! T O

T H E

C O N D U C T O R

Terpsichorean Dances is divided into 4 main sections: Fanfare: Bar 1–20; Springtanz (Leaping Dance): Bars 20– 100; Der Lautenspieler (The Lute Player): Bars 101–208; Der Schutzenkönig (The Archer King): Bars 209–end. Educational Focus: To gain the most out of this work, it is imperative that the conductor understands the need for the repetition of pitch material without variation. Whilst the material remains the same, it is the scoring and expressive techniques that are varied. This will allow your students to ‘learn the notes’ and then focus on the other detail. Not only is this piece a joyous collection of dances, it is also a two-part technical study. Firstly, it is a study of many different types of expressive techniques. This includes staccato verses legato, terraced dynamics and an intricate selection of articulation patterns designed to encourage all students to play high on the downbeat. Secondly, the work focuses on sectional playing. Take a close look at the first dance, Springtanz. Bar 21: Reduced band scoring, playing short and pulsed Bar 33: Full band, playing in a legato style. Bar 43: Brass choir, joined in staggered entries by lower woodwind and percussion from bar 48. Bar 62–68: Single reed instruments, playing the same figure as the brass choir with altered articulation. Bar 69: Staggered entries from Horns, Percussion, Trombones and Flutes. Bar 73: Full band. Bar 81: A deliberate reduction in texture with cross-sectional scoring of Flutes, Horns, Euphonium, Trombone 1 & 2, + Glockenspiel and solo Snare Drum. Bar 91–100: Clarinet quartet playing the original material. Conductors should focus on their stylistic interpretation of the varied expressive techniques used within each section, and then should encourage their students to listen to each other to ensure that uniformity of style is maintained throughout the band at all times. Once again, the repetition of the melodic material will give the students room to think of important musical aspects such as style and expression in their own individual playing, and to consider that how they play as an individual contributes to the ‘sound’ of the band as a whole.


R E H E A R S A L

N O T E S

Fanfare (Bar 1–20): Energy plus! Lean on the accent on the downbeat of each bar and ensure each entry matches the tempo set by the Trumpets and Horns in Bar 1. Highlight the entries by each section, then allow them to disappear into the framework of the dominant chord. Trumpet entry at Bar 12 can be Solo if desired. Timpani must be strong and ‘high’ on the beat, otherwise the entry will sound late. Springtanz, Leaping Dance (Bar 21–100): This dance is introduced with a lighter scoring and is marked mf. Emphasize the lighter, staccato markings, as this will draw attention to the change at Bar 33. Keep the volume limited to mf and pay particular attention to the inner moving parts to maintain vibrance and momentum. Bar 43 is a reduction in scoring to brass only. Articulation patterns are a combination of the opening two styles and should be played exactly as written by every player for maximum impact. The pickup to bar 49 should be subtle, and suggest change — not demand it. Pay particular attention to the terraced dynamics in this section up to Bar 81. The first f since the Fanfare is not reached until Bar 77 and it is imperative that all players are made aware of the whole band dynamic, not just their own, in order to achieve this gradual dynamic contrast across the ensemble. Bar 81–100 gradually reduces the texture to lead to the Oboe solo. In these softer sections, focus on the elements provided for colour and rhythmic variation; e.g., the Snare drum solo against the combination of gentle timbres at Bar 81, then contrasted by a Clarinet quartet and Tambourine at Bar 91. Der Lautenspieler, The Lute Player (Bars 101–208): Tempo remains the same and the transition from bar 100–101 should be seamless. The Oboe solo is clearly marked, and once again, all articulations should be read meticulously. It is also important that the joining soloists at Bar 115, Bar 125 and Bar 135 match their interpretation of the articulation markings to those of the Oboist. Percussion should be delicate through to Bar 145. Bars 145–164: Saxophone quartet should be raw, reedy, almost mischievous. Players are invited to play hard on the reed to achieve a slightly raspy tone. I was thinking of the buzzy 16th/17th century musical instrument, the Rackett, in this section; this quartet is followed by likewise “buzzy” muted brass at Bar 155. Percussion entries at bar 164 should lead the joyous, full band scoring through to Bar 175. It is important to maintain energy through the entire Percussion soli from bars 175–8. Like Springtanz, Der Lautenspieler also looks texturally forward to the next dance, starting small with a Flute and Oboe Quartet at Bar 179, adding all Brass and Bassoon at Bar 189, on to the maximum orchestration from 199–208. Throughout these sections the color and rhythmic vivacity of the Lagerphone will provide necessary drive and should be played by a competent percussionist with an excellent sense of pulse — one who has a lot of energy. (See Lagerhone construction tips on the next page.) Der Schutzenkönig, The Archer King (Bar 209–end): This is the simplest of the dances and was arranged for my Middle School band in the South of Sydney. It started the idea of using alternate staccato and legato phrasing as well as sectional passages. While it has been successfully interpreted at a slower tempo with a royal supposition, I feel that this dance works best between quarter = 120–144. If the dance is taken too fast, the intricate middle lines and the simplicity of the writing is lost. If taken too slow, the feeling of ‘one in a bar’ is also lost and the piece loses the spirited finale that was intended.


T H E

L A G E R P H O N E

The Lagerphone, also referred to at the Murrumbidgee River Rattler, is an Australian bush-band instrument believed to have been invented by a rabbit catcher working in the Riverina, New South Wales, in the early 1950s. It is used extensively today as the central rhythmic accompaniment in a bush band, along with an accordion (or ‘squeeze-box’ as we call it) and bush bass (another story altogether). The Lagerphonist is often the ‘Caller’ at the bush dance, telling the participants what dance step they are about to do next. There are multiple variations on the design of a Lagerphone. However do not despair, to make your own simple but effective Lagerphone is easy and will take no time at all. What you need: • 192 x metal, beer bottle tops; • 1 x long, wooden broom stick (approx. 5 foot long and three quarters to one inch thick); • 64 x 3 inch long nails (approx. one eighth of an inch thick) and a hammer; • 1 x rubber foot to fit one end of the wooden broom stick; • 1 x short, thick piece of dowel (approx. three quarters of an inch thick and 12 inches long). Use this piece to play the instrument, it is not involved in the construction.

Clamp

(during construction only)

How to build it: Step 1: Using a single nail and hammer, pierce a hole through the middle of each metal bottle top. Step 2: Thread three metal bottle tops onto a single nail. You should end up with 64 nails each threaded with three metal beer bottle tops. Step 3: Clamp one end of the broom stick firmly into a vise. Hammer 16 nails with bottle tops threaded onto them into the wooden broom stick, starting about 6 inches from the other end (the one NOT clamped). Space each nail approx. two inches apart.

Nails (two inches apart, with metal beer bottle tops threaded onto each, hammered into the wooden broom stick)

Step 4: Rotate the wooden broom stick 90° and repeat Step 3. Do this two more times until all the nails are attached to the broom stick. Step 5: Firmly place the rubber foot onto the end of the Lagerphone, closest to the nails. Congratulations! You have just made your very first Lagerphone! To play: Hold the instrument vertical in one hand, at the end without any nails. With the other hand, grab your short, thick piece of dowel (fondly known as the ‘Whacker’). Now ‘Bang’ the end with the rubber foot onto the ground and hit the section between your hand and the nails with the stick. That’s it!!

Rubber foot

For Further information: There are many excellent websites about the Lagerphone, containing variations in design and playing methods, but this is my favourite. It will provide further information on the history of the instrument, how to play it, and has a good collection of photographs. Have fun! http://www.apex.net.au/~keiths/Lagerphones/lagerphones.htm J O D I E B L A C K S H AW O R A N G E , N E W S O U T H WA L E S , A U S T R A L I A


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TERPSICHOREAN DANCES 1

Presto! Fanfare

FOR CONCERT BAND

= 72 2

3

4

5

JODIE BLACKSHAW (after Prætorius) 6

Piccolo

1 Flutes 2

Oboe

1

B Clarinets

2

3

B Bass Clarinet

Bassoon

1 E Alto Saxophones 2

B Tenor Saxophone E Baritone Saxophone

1

B Trumpets

2

3

1 F Horns 2

1 Trombones 2

Bass Trombone

Euphonium

Tuba

String Bass

Glockenspiel 1 Mallets 2

Snare Drum—snares off 1

Percussion

2

3

Copyright © 2010 Manhattan Beach Music — All Rights Reserved — Printed and Engraved in the U.S.A. ISBN 1-59913-110-2 (complete set) ISBN 1-59913-111-0 (conductor’s score) Purchase music, download free MP3s, view scores, and more at www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com

7


8

9

10

12

11

13

Picc.

div.

1

div.

Fls. 2

Ob.

div. 1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

defiantly 1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

(Glock.) 1

Mallets

Xylophone 2

(S.D.) 1 3

Frame Drum (a very large tambourine without jingles)—dampened Perc.

to Crash Cymbal

2

Timpani 3

2

defiantly


14

15

16

17

18

19

20

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

defiantly B Tpts.

2

defiantly 3

defiantly 1 F Hns.

defiantly 2

defiantly 1

defiantly

Tbns. 2

defiantly Bass Tbn.

defiantly Euph.

defiantly Tuba

defiantly String Bass

1 Mallets 2

1

Perc.

2

(Timp.) 3

3


21 Springtanz (Leaping Dance) 22

23

24

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

Euph. cue B Tenor Sax.

Bass Cl. cue E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

Bass Cl. cue String Bass

1 Mallets

(Xylo.) 2

(S.D.) 1

Perc.

Crash Cymbal

to Frame Drum

(Timp.)

Djembe (use floor Tom if not available)

Frame Drum—dampened—use butt end of sticks

2

3

4

25

26


27

28

29

30

31

32

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

Play B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

Soloists at m.42 do not play here (if only 1 player available, play on Cornet/Flugelhorn from m.32) 1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

(Glock.) 1

(Xylo.)

Mallets 2

(S.D.) 1

(F.D.) Perc.

2

3

5


33

34

35

36

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

Play E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

Play String Bass

(Glock.) 1 Mallets 2

(S.D.) 1

(F.D.) Perc.

2

Djembe (use floor Tom if not available) 3

6

37

38


39

40

41

42

43

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

Flugelhorn or Cornet solo 1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Trombone cue Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

(Glock.) 1 Mallets 2

(S.D.) 1

(F.D.) Perc.

2

(Djm.) 3

7

44


45

46

47

48

49

50

51

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

clingingly B Cls.

2

clingingly 3

B Bass Cl.

clingingly Bsn.

clingingly

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

Bass Cl. cue

clingingly Play

E Bar. Sax.

clingingly to Trumpet 1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1

clingingly

Tbns. 2

clingingly Bass Tbn.

clingingly Play Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

clingingly

1 Mallets 2

(S.D.) 1 3

(F.D.) Perc.

2

(Djm.) 3

8


52

53

54

55

56

57

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3 clingingly

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph. clingingly Tuba

String Bass

1 Mallets 2

(S.D.) 1

(F.D.) Perc.

3

3

2

(Djm.) 3

9

3


58

59

60

62

61

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

Oboe cue 1

Bassoon cue B Cls.

2

3

Bari. Sax. cue B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

1

(Xylo.)

Mallets 2

(S.D.) 1 3

3

(F.D.) Perc.

2

(Djm.) 3

10

3

63


64

65

66

67

68

69

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

Play 1

Play B Cls.

2

3

Play B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

Clarinet cue 1 E Alto Sax.

Clarinet cue 2

Clarinet cue B Tenor Sax.

Bass Cl. cue E Bar. Sax.

Trumpets (tutti) 1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2 Bass Tbn. Euph. Tuba

String Bass

(Glock.) 1 (Xylo. simplified)

Mallets

(Xylo.)

2

solo

1 Perc.

2 3

11

70


71

72

73

74

75

76

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

Play 1 E Alto Sax.

Play 2

Play B Tenor Sax.

Play E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

(Glock.) 1 (Xylo.)

Mallets

(Xylo.)

2

(S.D.) 1

(F.D.) Perc.

3

3

3

2

(Djm.) 3

12

3

3

3


77

79

78

81

80

82

Picc. div. solo

1 div.

Fls.

solo

2

Ob. div.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl. solo

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2 Hn. 2 & Tbn. cue

B Tenor Sax. Euph. & Bsn. cue

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3 solo

1 F Hns.

solo

2 solo

1 Tbns.

solo

2

Bass Tbn. solo

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass (Glock.)

solo

1 (Xylo.)

to Turkish Finger Cymbals

(Xylo.)

to Turkish Finger Cymbals

Mallets 2

solo

(S.D.)

1 3

3

3

3

3

Perc.

3

to Tambourine with skin

(F.D.)

2 (Djm.)

3

13

3

3

3


83

84

85

86

87

88

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

(Glock.) 1 Mallets 2

(S.D.) 1 3

Perc.

3

3

3

3

2

(Djm.) 3

14

3

3

3

3


89

91

90

92

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

(Glock.)

to Woodblock

1 Mallets 2

(S.D.) 1 3

Perc.

3

3

Tambourine with skin

2

(Djm.) 3

15

93

94

95


101 Der Lautenspieler (The Lute Player) 96

97

98

99

100

102

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

1

Turkish Finger Cymbals

Mallets 2

1

(Tamb.) Perc.

2

3

16


103

105

104

106

107

Picc.

Oboe cue 1 Fls. 2

solo Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

1 Mallets

(Cyms.) 2

1

Perc.

2

3

17

108

109

110


111

112

113

115

114

Picc.

Play Solo 1 Fls. 2

Ob.

solo 1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

1 Mallets

(Cyms.) 2

1

Perc.

2

(Djm.) 3

18

116

117

118


119

120

121

122

123

124

125

126

Picc.

1 Fls.

solo 2

Ob.

1

solo B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

solo 1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

1 Mallets

(Cyms.) 2

1

Play on skin of Tambourine

(Tamb.) Perc.

2

(Djm.) 3

19


127

128

129

130

131

132

133

134

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

solo 3

B Bass Cl.

solo Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax.

solo 2

solo B Tenor Sax.

Bass Cl. cue E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

1 Mallets

(Cyms.) 2

1

(Tamb.) Perc.

2

(Djm.) 3

20


135

136

137

138

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

1 Mallets

(Cyms.) 2

(S.D.) snares on 1

(Tamb.) Perc.

2

(Djm.) 3

21

139

140


141

142

143

144

145

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

soli 1

reedy

E Alto Sax.

soli 2

reedy soli B Tenor Sax.

reedy soli E Bar. Sax.

reedy 1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

1 Mallets

(Cyms.)

to Lagerphone

(S.D.)

to Tambourine

2

1

(Tamb.) Perc.

2

(Djm.) 3

22

146


147

148

149

150

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

1 Mallets 2

1

Perc.

2

3

23

151

152

153


155

154

156

157

158

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

harmon mute, stem extended (if 2 or more players, 1 player uses harmon mute, the others use straight fibre mute) 1

harmon mute, stem extended (if 2 or more players, 1 player uses harmon mute, the others use straight fibre mute) B Tpts.

2

harmon mute, stem extended (if 2 or more players, 1 player uses harmon mute, the others use straight fibre mute) 3

tutti 1 F Hns.

tutti 2

tutti

straight metal mute

tutti

straight metal mute

1 Tbns. 2

straight metal mute Bass Tbn.

straight metal mute Euph.

String Bass cue straight metal mute Tuba

solo String Bass

1 Mallets 2

1

Perc.

2

(Djm.) 3

24

159

160


161

165 162

163

164

166

Picc.

tutti 1 Fls.

tutti 2

tutti Ob.

tutti 1

tutti B Cls.

2

tutti 3

B Bass Cl.

tutti Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

top line optional 1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Play Tuba

String Bass

1

Lagerphone

Mallets 2

Tambourine (without skin) 1

(Tamb.) Perc.

2 3

(Djm.) 3

25


167

168

169

171

170

172

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

Woodblock 1 Mallets

(Lager.) 2

(Tamb.) 1

(Tamb.) Perc.

2 3

3

(Djm.) 3

26

3


173

175

174

176

177

178

soli

Picc.

soli 1 Fls.

soli 2

soli Ob.

Oboe cue 1

Flute 2 cue B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

mute out 1

mute out B Tpts.

2

mute out 3

mute out 1 F Hns.

mute out 2

mute out 1 Tbns.

mute out 2

mute out Bass Tbn.

mute out Euph.

mute out Tuba

String Bass

(W.B.) 1 Mallets

(Lager.) 2

(Tamb.) 1

(Tamb.) Perc.

2 3

(Djm.) 3

27


179

180

181

182

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

1 Mallets

(Lager.)

lightly

2

to S.D.—snares off 1

to Frame Drum Perc.

2

3

28

183

184


185

186

187

188

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

1 Mallets

(Lager.) 2

(S.D.) 1

(F.D.) Perc.

2

3

29

189

190


191

192

193

194

195

196

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

top line optional 1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

1 Mallets 2

(S.D.) 1

(F.D.) Perc.

2

3

30


197

199 198

200

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

(W.B.) 1 Mallets

(Lager.) 2

(S.D.) 1

(F.D.) Perc.

2

(Djm.) 3

31

201

202


203

204

205

206

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

(W.B.) 1 Mallets

(Lager.) 2

(S.D.) 1

(F.D.) Perc.

2

(Djm.) 3

32

207

208


209 Der Schutzenkรถnig (The Archer King) 210

211

212

213

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

to Glockenspiel 1 Mallets

Xylophone

to Xylophone 2

(S.D.)

snares on

1

(F.D.) Perc.

2

to Timp.

Timp.

3

33

214


215

216

218

217

219

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

(Glock.)

Glock.

1 Mallets

(Xylo.) 2

(S.D.) 1

(F.D.) Perc.

2

(Timp.) 3

34

220


221

222

223

224

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

(Glock.) 1 Mallets

(Xylo.) 2

(S.D.) 1

(F.D.) Perc.

2

(Timp.) 3

35

225

226


227

228

229

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

(Glock.) 1 Mallets 2

(S.D.) 1

(F.D.) Perc.

2

(Timp.) 3

36

230

231

232


233

234

235

237

236

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

String Bass cue B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

String Bass cue E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

(Glock.) 1 Mallets 2

(S.D.) 1

Perc.

2

(Timp.) 3

37

238

239

240


241

242

243

244

245

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

Play B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

Play E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

(Glock.) 1 Mallets

(Xylo.) 2

(S.D.) 1

(F.D.) Perc.

2

(Timp.) 3

38

246

247

248


249

250

251

252

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

(Glock.) 1 Mallets

(Xylo.) 2

(S.D.) 1

(F.D.) Perc.

2

(Timp.) 3

39

253

254


255

256

257

258

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

(Glock.) 1 Mallets

(Xylo.) 2

(S.D.) 1

(F.D.) Perc.

2

(Timp.) 3

40

259

260


261

262

263

264

Picc.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

(Glock.) 1 Mallets

(Xylo.) 2

(S.D.) 1

(F.D.) Perc.

2

(Timp.) 3

41

265

266


To the fore! 267

268

269

270

Picc.

div.

1 Fls. 2

Ob.

div. 1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsn.

1 E Alto Sax. 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1

B Tpts.

2

3

1 F Hns. 2

1 Tbns. 2

Bass Tbn.

Euph.

Tuba

String Bass

(Glock.) 1 Mallets

(Xylo.) 2

(S.D.) 1

(F.D.) Perc.

2

(Timp.) 3

42

271

272


.


PRESERVING OUR MUSIC I T I S I M P O R TA N T T O P R E S E R V E O U R M U S I C A L H E R I TA G E F O R F U T U R E G E N E R AT I O N S

Acidic paper has been in widespread use since the turn of the century, and has become the bane of archivists, librarians, and others who seek to preserve knowledge intact, because it literally will self-destruct as it ages. Some paper, only three or four decades old, already has become impossible to handle — so brittle it crumbles to the touch. Surely we do not want today’s music to be unavailable to those who will inhabit the future. If the music of the Renaissance had not been written on vellum it could never have been preserved and we would not have it today, some four hundred years later. Let us give the same consideration to the musicians in our future. It was with this thinking that Manhattan Beach Music in 1988 first addressed the needs of the archivist by printing all of its concert band music on acid-free paper that met the standards specified in the American National Standard for Information Sciences — Permanence of Paper for Printed Library Materials (ANSI Z39.48-1984). The standard was revised on October 26, 1992 to include coated papers; all of our new editions and reprints of older editions meet this revised standard. With proper care and under proper environmental conditions, this paper should last for at least several hundred years.

Technical notes: Paper permanence is related to several factors: The acidity or alkalinity (pH) of the paper is perhaps the most critical criterion. Archival paper (also known as acid-free paper, alkaline paper, and permanent paper) is acid-free, has a pH between 7.5 and 10, is tear resistant, has an alkaline reserve equivalent to 2% calcium carbonate (to neutralize any acid that might arise from natural aging of the paper or from environmental pollution), and contains no unbleached pulp or groundwood (no more than 1% lignin by weight). The specific standards summarized here are set forth in detail by the National Information Standards Organization in American National Standard Z39.48-1992. For more information, contact: NISO, 4733 Bethesda Avenue, Suite 300, Bethesda, MD 20814, http://www.niso.org/

This paper meets the requirements of ANSI/NISO Z39.48-1992 (Permanence of Paper)

BOB MARGOLIS — PUBLISHER N E I L R U D D Y — C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R COFOUNDERS P R I N T I N G : C H E R N AY P R I N T I N G , I N C .


.


w w w .

M a n h a t t a n B e a c h M u s i c .

c o m

Terpsichorean Dances for concert band by Jodie Blackshaw  

The complete conductor score of Terpsichorean Dances for concert band by Jodie Blackshaw

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