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Recording Credits for Pacific Fanfare: Performance by the University of Colorado Wind Ensemble, Allan McMurray, conductor


PA C I F I C FA N FA R E for

C O N C E RT B A N D

FRANK TICHELI I N S T R U M E N T A T I O N C H O I R

1 4 4 1 1

Piccolo Flute 1 Flute 2 Oboe 1 Oboe 2

C H O I R

2 2 1 1

I

6 6 2 1 1 1

Bb Clarinet 1 Bb Clarinet 2 Bb Bass Clarinet Bassoon 1 Bassoon 2 Contrabassoon

2 2 1 1 1

Eb Alto Saxophone 1 Eb Alto Saxophone 2 Bb Tenor Saxophone Eb Baritone Saxophone Timpani

2 2 3 2

Trombone 1 Trombone 3 (Bass) Euphonium B.C. Euphonium T.C.

2 Percussion 1

I I

Bb Trumpet 1 Bb Trumpet 3 F Horn 1 F Horn 2

Vibr., Chimes, Susp. Cymb. (sm.), Tam Tam, Sn. Dr., and 2 Tom Toms (sm. & med.)

O F F - S T A G E

1 Solo Trumpet off-stage (in Bb, C, & Eb, at player’s preference) 1 Solo F Horn off-stage C H O I R

I I I

2 Bb Trumpet 2 2 Bb Trumpet 4 1 F Horn 3

PRINTED

1 F Horn 4 2 Trombone 2 4 Tuba

ON

A RC H I VA L

2 Percussion 2 Xylo., Chimes, Susp. Cymb. (med.), Tam Tam, 2 Tom Toms (med. & lge.)

PA P E R

Gg M A N H AT TA N B E A C H M U S I C 1595 East 46th Street Brooklyn, New York 11234 Fax: 718/338-1151 World Wide Web: http://www.manhattanbeachmusic.com E-mail: mbmband@aol.com Voicemail: 718/338-4137


F R A N K W O R K S

F O R

T I C H E L I C O N C E R T

B A N D

Frank Ticheli’s works for concert band are published by Manhattan Beach Music

Amazing Grace (5 minutes, grade 3) An American Elegy (11 minutes, grade 4) Ave Maria / Schubert (4 1/2 minutes, grade 3) Blue Shades (10 minutes, grade 5) Cajun Folk Songs (6 2/3 minutes, grade 3) Cajun Folk Songs II (10 1/2 minutes, grade 4) Fortress (5 1/2 minutes, grade 3) Gaian Visions (9 1/2 minutes, grade 6) Loch Lomond (6 1/2 minutes, grade 3) Pacific Fanfare (5 1/2 minutes, grade 5) Portrait of a Clown (2 3/4 minutes, grade 2) Postcard (5 1/3 minutes, grade 5) Shenandoah (6 1/2 minutes, grade 3) Simple Gifts: Four Shaker Songs (9 minutes, grade 3) Sun Dance (5 minutes, grade 3) Vesuvius (9 minutes, grade 4)

Hear complete recordings online of all of the above works at www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com Hear Frank Ticheli talk about his compositions at www.BestMusicSeries.com


P R O G R A M

N O T E S

Pacific Fanfare, scored for woodwinds, brass and percussion, exploits several spatial characteristics of a large concert hall. Onstage, the brass and percussion sections are separated into two antiphonal choirs, with the woodwinds and timpani situated in the middle. Offstage, peripheral solo trumpet and horn project sounds from behind the audience. The piece is a tribute to the great Venetian composer, Giovanni Gabrieli, who brilliantly utilized the space of St. Mark’s Cathedral in his polychoral works and antiphonal fanfares. There are two main themes, one based on wide melodic leaps (successive ascending fifths), the other based on a rapid repeated-note figure. In the beginning they are nostalgic and elegiacal, but by the second half of the piece they take on more grand, fanfare-like personalities. Pacific Fanfare was completed in June of 1994 during a summer residency at Yaddo, an artist colony in Saratoga Springs, New York. It was composed as a gift to Carl St.Clair and the Pacific Symphony Orchestra. S E T- U P T H E

S U G G E S T I O N S

P E R I P H E R A L

a n d

T R U M P E T

S O L O

H O R N

P L AY E R S

The peripheral solo horn and trumpet players should be positioned behind the audience, as far away and as high as possible (e.g., behind the highest balcony, at the exit doors, or even behind closed exit doors). If the design of the performance hall does not allow for this set-up configuration, the two soloists may be positioned in other locations such as at ground level or offstage, but they should not be placed on stage with the other performers. T H E

O N S TA G E

B R A S S

a n d

P E R C U S S I O N

The onstage brass and percussion are separated into two choirs, one positioned at stage left, the other at stage right. The two choirs should be kept far away from one another so that the desired antiphonal effect is achieved, as illustrated on the next page.


( C H O I R

I )

Timpani Perc. 2 Tuba Trb. 2 Horn 4 Horn 3 Tpt. 4 Tpt. 2

I

)

Euph.

(

Perc. 1

C

I

Trb. 3 Trb. 1 Horn 2 Horn 1 Tpt. 3 Tpt. 1 I

O

R

H

I

(

I

C

H

R

O

I

W O O D W I N D S

I )

Conductor

A

U

D

I

E

N

C

E

On a small stage it may be impossible to maintain the desired degree of spatial separation, and it is reasonable to experiment with any of the following to enhance the audio-visual separation:

• acoustic screens, to enhance the directionality of the sound of each choir; • the brass choirs positioned on opposite sides of the audience, with only the woodwind choir positioned onstage;

• multilevel (rather than left-right) separation, with one choir at a greater height, located in box seats flanking both sides of the proscenium.

F O R M SECTION

MEASURES

TONAL CENTER

Introduction, and Chorale

1–19

E-flat

A section B section A' section

20–33 34–57 58–70

E-flat C — F — B-flat — E-flat E-flat

Coda

71–77

E-flat

Fanfare


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PRESERVING OUR MUSIC IT IS IMPORTANT TO PRESERVE OUR MUSICAL HERITAGE FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS

Acidic paper has been in widespread use since the turn of the century, and has become the bane of archivists, librarians, and others who seek to preserve knowledge intact, because it literally will self-destruct as it ages. Some paper, only three or four decades old, already has become impossible to handle — so brittle it crumbles to the touch. Surely we do not want today’s music to be unavailable to those who will inhabit the future. If the music of the Renaissance had not been written on vellum it could never have been preserved and we would not have it today, some four hundred years later. Let us give the same consideration to the musicians in our future. It was with this thinking that Manhattan Beach Music in 1988 first addressed the needs of the archivist by printing all of its concert band music on acid-free paper that met the standards specified in the American National Standard for Information Sciences — Permanence of Paper for Printed Library Materials (ANSI Z39.48-1984). The standard was revised on October 26, 1992 to include coated papers; all of our new editions and reprints of older editions meet this revised standard. With proper care and under proper environmental conditions, this paper should last for at least several hundred years.

Technical notes: Paper permanence is related to several factors: The acidity or alkalinity (pH) of the paper is perhaps the most critical criterion. Archival paper (also known as acid-free paper, alkaline paper, and permanent paper) is acid-free, has a pH between 7.5 and 10, is tear resistant, has an alkaline reserve equivalent to 2% calcium carbonate (to neutralize any acid that might arise from natural aging of the paper or from environmental pollution), and contains no unbleached pulp or groundwood (no more than 1% lignin by weight). The specific standards summarized here are set forth in detail by the National Information Standards Organization in American National Standard Z39.48-1992. For more information, contact: NISO, P.O. Box 1056, Bethesda, MD 20827.

This paper meets the requirements of ANSI/NISO Z39.48-1992 (Permanence of Paper)

PUBLISHER: BOB MARGOLIS C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R : N E I L R U D D Y PRINTING: CHERNAY PRINTING, INC.

Profile for Manhattan Beach Music

Pacific Fanfare for concert band by Frank Ticheli, in 3 choirs and 2 offstage instruments  

Pacific Fanfare for concert band by Frank Ticheli, published by Manhattan Beach Music

Pacific Fanfare for concert band by Frank Ticheli, in 3 choirs and 2 offstage instruments  

Pacific Fanfare for concert band by Frank Ticheli, published by Manhattan Beach Music