Page 1

J oy (mostly!) Third Prize Winner — The Frank Ticheli Composition Contest

�ica� Lev� C o n c

e

r t

B a

Manhattan Beach M�sic

n d


Recording Credits for Joy (Mostly!): Performance by members of the Peabody Wind Ensemble, Trent Hollinger, conductor

This virtual conductor score and recording are designated “private,� and any publication or distribution beyond the web sites of Manhattan Beach Music is prohibited


JOY

( MOS T LY! ) 足F O R

C O N C E R T

B A N D

MICAH LEV Y I N S T R U M E N T A T I O N 1 Full Score

1 Bassoon 1

2 Trombone 1

1 Piccolo

1 Bassoon 2

2 Trombone 2

4 Flute 1

2 Eb Alto Saxophone 1

2 Bass Trombone

4 Flute 2

2 Eb Alto Saxophone 2

3 Euphonium B.C.

1 Oboe 1

1 Bb Tenor Saxophone

2 Euphonium T.C.

1 Oboe 2

1 Eb Baritone Saxophone

1 Eb Clarinet

4 Bb Trumpet 1

4 Bb Clarinet 1

4 Bb Trumpet 2

4 Bb Clarinet 2

1 F Horn 1

4 Bb Clarinet 3

1 F Horn 2

2 Bb Bass Clarinet

1 F Horn 3

1 Eb Contra Alto Clarinet

1 F Horn 4

4 Tuba 1 Timpani 1 Glockenspiel 1 Xylophone 2 Cymbals Sizzle Cymbals, Crash Cymbals

1 Bass Drum

P R I N T E D O N A RC H I VA L PA P E R

Gg Manhattan Beach Music 1595 East 46th Street Brooklyn, New York 11234 Web: www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com E-mail: customerservice@manhattanbeachmusic.com Voicemail: 718/338-4137

M A N H AT TA N B E A C H M U S I C


.


J O Y ( M O S T L Y ! ) is the T H I R D P R I Z E W I N N E R ( T I E ) of the S E C O N D I N T E R N AT I O N A L F R A N K T I C H E L I C O M P O S I T I O N C O N T E S T Category Two: Concert band music for more experienced players


F R O M

O

T H E

C O M P O S E R

ne of the great joys in life is a good friend. I could not ask for a more supportive, steady friend, colleague and mentor than Gary Scudder. We met during high school when we played with the CSUF wind ensemble. We became the best of friends, and remained friends throughout college. After graduating, we went in different directions and rarely saw each other. Eventually, we lost touch altogether. Luckily

for me, one day I tracked him down. He had made his life in Bakersfield, California, where he was doing what he loves best — teaching music, in this case to the members of a middle school band. The last he knew, I had been conducting a professional orchestra. But by the time I renewed my friendship with Gary, I had discovered the pleasures of writing music and was pursuing composition with vigor. Yet, despite having played band music for many years, I had never written any. Gary encouraged me to try my hand at it, and the result was Joy (Mostly!). Composers often create musical fragments — little musical ideas — that they save. Some are later selected to be developed into complete compositions. I have a large collection of musical fragments that I have written and filed away. For a long time I had thought that one particular fragment might be a good seed for a wind piece. I took that fragment and created this work around it, developing the theme and adding others to it. The outer sections are exuberant while the inner section is a bit wistful (deliberately so). I named the piece Joy (Mostly!) to accurately reflect its affects. Though on a casual examination it might appear that the main ingredients of the piece are chord progressions and displaced accents, there is in fact a melody. Since the melody is not obvious I attempted to bring it into relief by marking different dynamics for whichever instrument or instruments play it at any particular time. As an example, in the first complete bar, the melody is played by trumpet 1. They are marked forte whereas all other instruments are marked mezzoforte. Please keep in mind that (as we all know) dynamics are not exact. The melody in the outer sections should not tower above the rest of the instruments, but merely be a little more audible. In the more lyrical middle section of the work, naturally, those instruments with the melody should be more present — singing. Make sure that the mezzo-forte is good and strong. It's up to you, the conductor, to find the right volume for the work in your particular performance space. You will see many meter changes. In those areas where the players have 5/8 or 7/8, etc., some players have what appear to be straight eighth notes. On the first note of each group there should be a slight, and I mean VERY slight emphasis. I deliberately did not notate accents in these places (with a few exceptions) because I did not want heavy accents. Seven eighth notes grouped as 2 + 2 + 3 is exciting to the ear. Seven eighth notes played all the same is not. Again, be careful that metric accents do not become huge. They should be subtle. Please note that the tempi I have indicated are precise. For example, the beginning is 144, then 112 and so on. I have not indiciated any wiggle room. These tempi should be followed exactly. Preceding the middle section of the work I have written a sort of terraced decelerando: bar 74 is marked quarter = 108; bar 78, quarter = 104; bar 82, quarter = 100; bar 87, quarter = 96. The piece ritards in bars 96 and 97 all the way down to 50. Then, it accelerates in one bar up to quarter = 104. Subsequently, the rest of the acceleration back to the original tempo is done in a terraced manner: bar 99, quarter = 104; bar 105, quarter = 112; bar 110, quarter = 120; bar 115, quarter = 132; bar 119, quarter = 140; bar 123, quarter = 144. I find that it is more dramatic to have sudden increases in tempo in these sections with terraced decelerando and accelerando. Take care to observe the terraced manner of decreasing or increasing tempo here. Please do not revert to the more usual graduated decelerando or accelerando. Have fun (mostly!) MICAH LEVY


JOY (MOSTLY!) FOR CONCERT BAND

= 144 1

2

3

4

MICAH LEVY 5

6

7

Piccolo

Flutes

1 2

Oboes

1 2

E Clarinet

1

B Clarinets

2

3

*B Bass Clarinet a2 Bassoons

1 2

E Alto Saxophones

1 2

B Tenor Saxophone E Baritone Saxophone

1 B Trumpets 2 Hn. 3.4. 1 2 F Horns 3 4

a2 Trombones

1 2 unis. (Note: Euph. always higher notes or stems-up notes, Bs. Trb. lower or stems down.)

Euphonium Bass Trombone

Tuba

hard mallets Timpani hard mallets Glockenspiel

Xylophone

Cymbals Bass Drum should be played dry, with soft beater—dampen—no ring. Bass Drum

* An E Contra Alto Clarinet part is provided that exactly doubles the B Bass Clarinet and always plays the lower note of the Bass Clarinet’s divisi. This part is especially useful if the Bass Clarinet lacks the low E and low D. Copyright © 2011 Manhattan Beach Music — All Rights Reserved — Printed and Engraved in the U.S.A. ISBN 1-59913-122-6 (complete set) ISBN 1-59913-123-4 (conductor’s score) Purchase music, download free MP3s, view scores, and more at www.ManhattanBeachMusic.com


9

13

8

10

11

12

14

Picc.

Fls.

1 2 (Fl. 2

Obs.

1 2 (Ob. 2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1 B Tpts. 2 Hns. 3.4. 1 2 F Hns.

Hns. 1.2. 3 4 (Hn. 4

a2 Tbns.

)

1 2

Euph. & Bass Tbn.

Tuba

Timp.

Glock. hard rubber mallets Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

2

)

a2

)


← 15

16

→ sempre

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl. a2

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

mute

1 B Tpts. 2

1 2 (Hn. 2 ) Hn. 1 & 2

F Hns. 3 4

Tbns.

1 2 unis.

Euph. & Bass Tbn. Bs. Trb.

Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

3


24

25

26

27

28

29

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

unis.

mute out 1 B Tpts.

(no mute)

mute

2

1 2 F Hns. 3 4 a2 Tbns.

1 2

Euph. & Bass Tbn. Bs. Trb. Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

4


30

31

32

33

34

35

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

a2

E Cl. unis. 1 unis. B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

a2 Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

a2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1 B Tpts.

unis.

mute out 2

a2 1 2 F Hns. 3 4 a2 Tbns.

a2

1 2 unis.

unis.

Euph. & Bass Tbn. Bs. Trb. Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

5


36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

44

Picc. a2 Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

a2 Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1 B Tpts.

unis. 2

a2

Hns. 3.4.

1 2 F Hns. Hns. 1.2.

3 4

Tbns.

1 2

Euph. & Bass Tbn.

Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

6

45


46

47

48

49

50

51

52

53

54

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

a2 Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

a2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1 B Tpts.

unis. 2 Hns. 3.4. 1 2

F Hns.

Hns. 1.2. 3 4 a2

Tbns.

1 2 Euph. upper notes, Bs. Trb. lower notes

unis.

Euph. & Bass Tbn.

Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

7

unis.

unis.

unis.


55

59 56

57

60

58

61

62

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl. a2 Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

a2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1 B Tpts.

unis. 2 a2 1 2

F Hns.

a2 3 4 a2

Tbns.

a2

1 2 unis.

Euph. & Bass Tbn. Bs. Trb. Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo. Crash Cym. Cyms.

B.D.

8

unis.


63

68 Slower

67 64

65

66

= 112 69

70

71

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1 B Tpts. 2

1 2 F Hns. 3 4 a2 Tbns.

1 2

Euph. & Bass Tbn.

Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo. Sizzle Cym. soft mallets Cyms. B.D.

9

72


73 Slower

77 Slower

76

= 108

75

74

= 104 78

79

80

Picc. a2 Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

a2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl. a2 Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1 B Tpts.

unis. 2

Hns. 3.4.

(cued in 2.)

1 2 F Hns.

Hns. 1.2.

Hn. 1

3 4

Tbns.

1 2

Euph. & Bass Tbn.

Tuba

soft mallets Timp.

Glock.

Xylo. Crash Cym.

Sizzle Cym.

Crash Cym.

Cyms.

B.D.

10

Sizzle Cym.


81 Slower

= 100

82

83

84

85

86 Slower

= 96

87

88

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

a2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

solo 1 B Tpts. 2

a2 1 2 F Hns.

a2 3 4

a2 Tbns.

1 2

Euph. & Bass Tbn.

Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

11

a2


rit.

90 89

91

92

93

94

95

96

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

a2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl. a2 Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

tutti 1 B Tpts. 2 a2 1 2 F Hns. a2 3 4 a2 Tbns.

a2

1 2

Euph. & Bass Tbn.

Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

12


97

= 50 accel.

104 Faster

= 104 98

99

100

101

102

103

= 112 105

106

107

108

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

3

3

E Cl.

unis.

3

unis.

3

1

B Cls.

2

3

3

3

B Bass Cl.

3

Bsns.

a2

1 2 3

E Alto Sax.

1 2 3 3

B Tenor Sax. 3

E Bar. Sax.

3

1 B Tpts.

unis.

3

2 a2

1 2 3

F Hns. 3

3 4

a2 Tbns.

a2

3

a2

1 2 3

Euph. & Bass Tbn. 3

Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. 3

B.D.

13

a2

a2


109 Faster

= 120

114 Faster 110

111

112

= 132 115

113

116

117

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1 B Tpts. 2

1 2 F Hns. 3 4 a2 Tbns.

a2

a2

1 2 Euph. (higher notes)

Euph. & Bass Tbn. Bass Tbn. (lower notes) Tuba

hard mallets Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

14


122 Faster 118 Faster

= 140

119

120

= 144

121 123

Picc.

Fls.

Obs.

1 2

3

3

3

3

3

3

1 2

E Cl. 3

3

1 3

B Cls.

3

2 3

3

3 3

3

3

3

B Bass Cl.

3

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

3

3

3

B Tenor Sax.

3

E Bar. Sax. 3

3

3

3

1 B Tpts. 2 3

3

(loco)

1 2 opt. 8ba

3

3

F Hns. 3

3 4 3

a2

Tbns.

1 2

3

3

unis.

Euph. & Bass Tbn. 3

3 3

Tuba

3

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo. Cyms. 3

B.D.

15

124


125

130

126 127

128

129

131

Picc.

Fls.

1 2 (Flute 2

Obs.

)

1 2 (Oboe 2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1 B Tpts. 2

Hns. 3&4 1 2 F Hns.

Hns. 1&2 3 4

Tbns.

1 2

Euph. & Bass Tbn.

Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

16

)


134 132

133

135

136

137

Picc.

Fls.

1 2 (Fl. 2

Obs.

1 2 (Ob. 2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1 B Tpts. 2 Hn. 3.4.

1 2 F Hns.

(Hn. 2

)

(Hn. 4

)

3 4 a2

a2 Tbns.

)

1 2

Euph. & Bass Tbn.

Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

17

)


138

139

140

141

142

143

144

145

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl. a2 Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

mute 1 B Tpts.

mute 2

1 2 (Hn. 2 ) Hn. 1 & 2

F Hns.

3 4 (Hn. 2

Tbns.

)

1 2 unis.

Euph. & Bass Tbn.

Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

18

146


147

151 148

149

150

152

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

E Cl. unis. 1 unis. B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

a2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

mute out 1 B Tpts.

mute out 2

1 2 F Hns. 3 4 a2 Tbns.

1 2 unis.

Euph. & Bass Tbn.

Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

19


153

154

156

155

157

158

Picc. a2 Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

a2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl. a2 Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

a2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1 B Tpts. 2

1 2 F Hns. 3 4 a2

a2 Tbns.

1 2 unis.

Euph. & Bass Tbn.

Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

20

159


164 160

161

162

163

165

166

167

Picc. a2

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

a2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

a2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1 B Tpts. 2 a2 1 2 F Hns. 3 4

Tbns.

1 2 unis.

unis. Euph. & Bass Tbn.

Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

21

168


173

172 169

170

171

174

175

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1 B Tpts.

unis. 2

a2 1 2 F Hns. 3 4

Tbns.

1 2

Euph. & Bass Tbn.

Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

22


180 176

177

178

184 181

179

182

183

185

186

Picc. a2 Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1 B Tpts. 2 a2 1 2 F Hns. 3 4 a2 Tbns.

1 2

Euph. & Bass Tbn.

Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

23

a2

a2


187

188

189

190

191

192

193

194

195

196

197

198

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

a2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl. a2 Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1 B Tpts.

unis. 2 a2

a2

1 2 F Hns. 3 4 a2 Tbns.

1 2

Euph. & Bass Tbn.

Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

24


199

200

204

201

202

203

205

206

207

Picc.

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

E Cl.

1

B Cls.

2

3

B Bass Cl.

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

B Tenor Sax.

E Bar. Sax.

1 B Tpts. 2 a2 1 2 F Hns. 3 4 a2 Tbns.

a2

a2

1 2 Euph. (upper)

Euph. & Bass Tbn. Bass Tbn. (lower) Tuba

Timp.

Glock.

Xylo.

Cyms. B.D.

25


208

209

210

212 short

211

213

214

Picc. short

Fls.

1 2

Obs.

1 2

short

short

E Cl. short

1 short

B Cls.

2 short

3 short

B Bass Cl. short

Bsns.

1 2

E Alto Sax.

1 2

a2

short

short

B Tenor Sax. short

E Bar. Sax. short

1 B Tpts.

unis.

short

2 ossia: 8ba

short

a2 1 2 F Hns.

short

3 4 short

a2 Tbns.

1 2

unis.

Euph. (upper) Bass Tbn. (lower)

short

unis.

Euph. & Bass Tbn. short

Tuba

short

Timp. short

Glock.

short

Xylo.

short

Cyms. short

B.D.

26

Crash Cym.

choke


.


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This paper meets the requirements of ANSI/NISO Z39.48-1992 (Permanence of Paper)

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.


J o� ( Mostly! ) Third Prize Winner — The Frank Ticheli Composition Contest

� ica� Le��

T o

h e a r

a

c o m p l e t e P l e a s e

r e c o r d i n g

v i s i t

www.ManhattanBeachMusic.

Joy (Mostly!) for concert band by Micah Levy  

The complete conductor score of Joy (Mostly!) for concert band by Micah Levy, Winner, Third Prize (tie), The 2nd International Frank Ticheli...