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mandy ashley chung | selected works


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How can architecture improve quality of life and the built environment through design and the addressment of interdisciplinary questions?


DESIGN WORK 1 THE MEMORY SEQUENCE How can design address local needs and international presence in physical vastness?

15 WATNEY How may digital form be translated into physical space?

19 AUSTIN EVENT CENTER How can infrastructure narrate architectural experience and further the concept of structure holding space?

27 RIVER CENTER CULTURAL MUSEUM How can architecture address and challenge interdisciplinary issues such as the nature of a border, imposed politically, yet shared geographically?

35 MARIO CAMPOS GARDEN PARK How can landscape and program mediate between physical and social barriers as expressed by a form driven by contextual abstraction?

PROFESSIONAL WORK 49 OLD SAN ANTONIO ROAD 51 SOL WILSON 53 WEISS/MANFREDI

OTHER WORK 57 GINKGO CHAIR 63 HYBROOT 65 WELL 75 XINJIN ZHI MUSEUM 77 COLLECTIVE PLACE 85 MONET IMPRESSIONS RÉSUMÉ

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THE MEMORY SEQUENCE Year: 2018 | Spring Studio: Design IX Professor: Kevin Alter Site: Hofsós, Iceland Program: Library / Pool / Research Lab / Archive Tower Partner: Katie Mark How can design address local needs and international presence in physical vastness? Through the concretization of the ephemeral, The Memory Sequence introduces a chain of programs which desires to connect the individual to the larger human body. It makes accessible the elements which makes us human - our memories and our genetics. Located on the Northern coast of Iceland, Hofsós remains a nostalgic town of bygone days. History runs deep in the landscape of one of Iceland's oldest trading centers. A major emigration port in the 20th century, the town's four Emigration Museums have begun to revive Hofsós as a cultural place for Icelanders and those of Icelandic descent.

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The task of introducing architecture soon became a question of how to design in vastness, how to pass along identity in a place rich in heritage preservation and generational connections. Proposed at the sole, immediate crossing from the town is a Library. It introduces an assortment of literature and genetic research data to the local community before a descent into the Idea Exchange, comprised of a pool and bread bar. There, ideas and memories may be shared with other visitors in parallel with the nearby discussions from the Research Lab. Genetic coding and research will be conducted alongside genetic counseling in a new government initiative. The Sequence culminates in a Memory Bank and Genetic Archive Tower. Here, the individual may be able to browse and listen to others' memories of Iceland as well as to deposit one of their own. Memories will accumulate over time and once reaching the top, shall overflow into the lower archive. The Tower concretizes the ephemeral by making accessible genes and memories for generations to come, giving further pilgrimage identity to the town of Hofsós. Skagafjörður

Harbour

Vesturfararsetrið

Frændgarður

Pakkhúsið


Local Presence, International Connections

Icelandic Emigration 1850 - 1860s 1870 - 1880s 1890 - 1900s 1910s 2015 Places of Memory Genetic Research Center Gene Database

The Memory Sequence, Hofsós

Proposal

Fell Akureyri Baer Art Center

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Building Typologies of Hofsós Icelandic Emigration Center The Memory Sequence Swimming Pool Community Institutions Church Guesthouse Residential Farm Reykjavik

Nýja Konungsverslunarhúsið


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11

4

5

3

16 17

14

15

13

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7

9 8

1

6

3

2

4

Plans_Entrance Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Nýja Konungsverslunarhúsið Pakkhúsið Frændgarður Vesturfararsetrið Basalt Column Sun Dial Plaza Basalt Column Garden Plaza Lobby Library Reading Room Genetic Counseling

Plans_Pool Surface Level 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Changing Rooms Idea Exchange Pool Conversation Pit Bread Bar Genetic Research Lab Tower Atrium Memory and Genetic Tower Archives


The Spine is an integrated design feature of the Memory Sequence. It supports the organization and intended experience of the programs. Running in parallel to the harbor edge and main pedestrian circulation, the Spine introduces a third path of programs. It becomes a tool for wayfinding as it supports the organization and double helix experience of the programs by engaging the human body as one travels through the project. The spine transitions from a reading table and book shelf in the library to the lobby reception desk; from the subsequent ramp handrail to Idea Exchange wall seats; from the following Bread Bar counter to the floor threshold of the second Knuckle; and finally from the wall seats of the descending ramp to the Tower. 5

Program Spine, Roof Undulations Library 1 Reading Room Table 2 Featured Bookshelf 3 4 5

Display Case Reception Desk Handrail

Idea Exchange 6 Wall Seat 7

Bread Bar

Research Lab 8 Observation Wall Seat Tower 9 Wall

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6

7 8

6

5

2

4 3

1


sky / water / ground

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research lab / idea exchange / library


The continuity of the Spine is reinforced by the interior flow of the roof undulations. The roof serves as one being within, but formally distinguishes the three programs on its exterior. The three interlocking volumes are further connected by light tunnels and articulation of fenestration which wraps the sky, water, and ground. On the Library volume, the window touches the ground, inviting visual connection with those from the community who approach the Memory Sequence. Windows at the water level reside in the Idea Exchange volume. Here, users of the pool, conversation pit, and basalt column sun dial plaza may share visual connection to the water's reflections. Finally, in the Research Lab volume, the window reaches for the sky, flooding the laboratory and discussion spaces with light and views to the harbor beyond.

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Spine Transitions

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Idea Exchange Knuckle


Spine at Entrance Knuckle

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Program sequences tie the local context and international presence in a vast landscape through the creation of universal connections of the concrete (genetics) and the ephemeral (memory).


Rotating Collection

Chronology

Recording Studio

Encode

Consolidate

Browse

Retrieve

Store

Library

Archive

Individual

Network

Hypothesise

Generating Ideas

Stories

Idea Exchange

Pool

Research Lab

Debate

Research Lab 20' - 0" Entrance 16' - 0" Pool Surface Level 10' - 0"

Test

Iterate

Challenge

Roof 30' - 0"

Serendipity

Organizing Ideas

Efficiency

Discuss

Reading Room

Reflect

Deposit

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Explore Discover

Document

Error

Noise


12 Idea Exchange Pool and Conversation Pit


13 Research Contemplations

Platform 72' - 0"

Solo Path 47' - 0"

Tower Exit 7' - 0" Tower Entry 0' - 0" Recording Studios -7' - 0"

Group Audio Path -27' - 0" Mem/Gen Archives -35' - 0"


In landscape vastness lies a lineage of time who will you find there? Traces were found here of them, of you, of us all: The Memory Sequence.

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WATNEY Year: 2015 | Fall Studio: Design V Client: SXSW Professor: Kory Bieg Awards: 2015 Design Excellence Nominee Program: Team Installation How may digital form be translated into physical space? Watney is an installation that explores structural rib systems within the context of digital design and fabrication. It was discussed to be exhibited in March 2017 in downtown Austin’s Republic Square Park, where Watney would be a part of the annual and internationally-renowned South by Southwest Festival [SXSW] in its Eco Light Garden. The form was created using Boolean commands and 3DS Max. The final 6’ wide x 9’ deep x 11’ tall mass was divided into 21 individual components according to a three dimensional Voornoi distribution using the 3DS Max script VooroFrag. The Rhinoceros 5 plug-in Grasshopper was used to digitally produce the individual parts and files to be cut on the CNC router during Watney’s production out of alpolic, an aluminum and plastic composite material donation from Mitsubishi Plastics Composites America, Inc. 15

From this definition, four main components of each chunk were created: Vertical Ribs, Horizontal Ribs, Primary Shell,

and Offset Reveals. The Ribs intersect at right angles to form a structural waffle to be surrounded by the Primary Shell, a wrapper that stiffens the waffle and allows a point of attachment from one chunk to another. Offsets of 3.5 inches accentuate the idea of separate solid pieces coming together to form an integrated whole. Production was aided by the organization of a Kickstarter™ and fundraiser. A total of approximately $2750 was raised and funded for the coverage of the steel frame and additional material costs. Watney was produced and assembled in three weeks at the School of Architecture at the University of Texas at Austin. Author involvement in the schematic form design, production of digital files, operation of the CNC router, assembly of the installation, and organization of Kickstarter fundraiser allowed for an in-depth understanding of the project and respective design-build process.


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An exploration of digital form and physical space as expressed by a structural rib system, implying the occupiable and the void, blurring the public and private.

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Inputs

A.Waffle-to-Shell Connection

Mesh Offset

Contours

Tooth Addition

Detail Addition

Slit Addition

Offset Holes

Endcaps with Tooth Insertions

Reveals

B.Waffle-to-Shell-to-Offset Joints [Offset Reveal Connection] Connection Details

Primary Shell

A

Vertical Ribs

B

Horizontal Ribs


AUSTIN EVENT CENTER Year: 2016 | Spring Studio: Design VI Professor: Judith Birdsong Site: Downtown Austin, Texas Program: Event Center How can infrastructure narrate architectural experience and further the concept of structure holding space? The Lady Bird Lake waterfront on the foregrounds of central downtown Austin creates a lively and contrasting site of inverted programs. Outlined by the Cesar Chavez Street and Colorado River, the site falls within the pre-existing Butler Hike and Bike Trail. A buffer between urban and natural experiences alongside public and private programs, the Event Center intersects the pre-existing and proposed commercial and residential districts. Despite lying at a primary locus of downtown Austin, the current site fosters no destination or guided mediation between its various uses and users. With regards to the landscape, an emphasis and rerouting of trails with the proposed island serve to redirect views on and across the site. The Event Center investigates the concept of structure holding space. 19

Bridging across West Cesar Chavez Street and the island, the Event Center serves as a destination into the lake, completely detached from the city. The platform of the project is a steel space truss frame which serves as the primary structural system. This 192 feet x 96 feet rigid frame is supported by twelve concrete mega columns spaced 24 feet North to South and 48 feet East to West. The trusses are 10 feet in depth and run on orthogonal and 45° grids. Narrating an experience from street to island as well as above, within, and below the truss are three suspended volumes. In addition to creating a hub of workshop and community space for residents and visitors, these volumetric intersections also act as a 48 feet x 120 feet rigid box of shear walls to reinforce the rigid frame platform despite the voids.


NEW CENTRAL LIBRARY

GREEN WATER TREATMENT PLANT BLOCK REDEVELOPMENT / MIXED-USE PROPOSALS

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DN DN

DN DN

DN

DN

open to below open to below

DN

open to below

DN

DN

open to below

open to below open to below

DN

DN DN

Street Level

DN

UP

DN UP

DN

UP

DN

DN

UP

DN

UP

DN

UP DN DN

21 Truss Level

Lake Level

UP UP

UP


5 6 8 10 12

432 1

14

7 9 11 13

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Vertical Section 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29

well-rounded gravel ballast; 10 psf minimum metal fascia epdm flashing and lap splice applied with splicing cement galvanized metal dam above epdm roofing membrane treated wood nailer and galvanized roofing nails 2 - 2 x 6 wood support 1/2 “ gypsum board 5-1/2 ” fiberglass batt insulation vapor barrier building paper over 1/2 “ plywood sheathing 2 - 2 x 8 header cladding facade attachment to exterior wall through welding of aluminum section cover plate window jamb double pane glass windows 2 ” floor finish exterior plate metal fascia 6 “ deep metal decking cantilever open web steel joist bolted to steel column soffit 4’ x 4’ square steel tube 6 ‘ deep truss bolted to steel column wood joist resting transversely on 6 ’ deep truss 16 ” deep open web steel joist steel space truss 2 x 6 sleepers with wood deck anchor bolts base plates set on leveling nuts before grouting end bearing pile foundation

17 18 19 20

16

15 21 22

23

24

25 26

27 28 29


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Infrastructure as a way to bridge and connect past, present, and future developments to readapt, reconnect, and reenergize a fragmented site at the center of downtown Austin.

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R IVE R C E NTE R C U LTU RAL M U S E U M Year: 2016 | Fall Studio: Design VII Professor: Fernando Lara Site: Ciudad Acuña / Del Rio Border Program: Infrastructure / Museum How can architecture address and challenge interdisciplinary issues such as the nature of a border, imposed politically yet shared geographically? 2.4 feet separates a body of water from being a flooding river or tranquil stream. The two border cities of Ciudad Acuña and Del Rio in Mexico and the United States, respectively, have experienced four major floods within 60 years. Separated by the intersections of the Rio Grande and San Felipe Creek, the water body is regarded as a constant threat to occupy the floodplain region that encompasses the city edge of Ciudad Acuña and the lower edge of Del Rio.

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The proposal introduces three dams at the rivers’ confluence to control water levels, reinvigorating water as a shared amenity of the region. Above the water height is a River Center Cultural Museum. Organized from realistic to utopian thought, security measures are integrated on the outermost rings of vehicular and pedestrian circulation to allow for increased porosity and binational interactions within the centre. Closest to the river, this central museum space immerses its visitors with views of the water around and below. Integrating with the two cities via pedestrian bridges and boardwalks, the proposal challenges the imposed border of the two nations that is the Rio Grande River as well as highlights the water’s fundamental and connecting potential for the two river cities.

Existing Conditions of Ciudad Acuña and Del Rio

Flood Conditions of the U.S.-Mexico Border


2

0

1

6 BORDER CITIES

DEL RIO U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION PORT INDUSTRIAL WAREHOUSES STATE LOOP 239

2 22 0 00 1 11 6 BORDER 66 BORDER BORDER CITIES CITIES CITIES

INTERNATIONAL BORDER RIO GRANDE FLOOD PLAIN > 5.5 FT WATER CREST LEVEL SAN FELIPE CREEK CIUDAD ACUÑA MEXICO CUSTOMS AND BORDER PORT

0

2

0 WATER NEIGHBORS

ADAPTIVE REUSE RIVER TREATMENT CENTER RIVER DAMS DAM SYSTEM TO CONTROL FLOOD WATERS

CITY INVITATION PHASE 1 BEGIN REDEVELOPMENT OF FLOOD PLAIN RIVER CENTER CULTURAL MUSEUM FOSTER BINATIONAL CONNECTIONS

2 0 4 0 RIVER CITY

2040 20 2040 RIVER 40 RIVER RIVER CITYCITY CITY

GREEN CONNECTION CONSTRUCT BERM LINEAR BINATIONAL PARK BOARDWALK PHASE I RECONNECT BISECTED CIUDAD ACUÑA WITH IMPROVED BRIDGES

2 202 020 202 RIVER 00 RIVER RIVER NEIGHBOURS NEIGHBOURS NEIGHBOURS

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CITY INVITATION PHASE II EXTEND URBAN BLOCKS AND RECONNECT TO DEL RIO BOARDWALK PHASE II EXPANSION AND CONTINUATION OF PATHS GREEN CONNECTION CONTINUE REFORESTATION OF LINEAR PARK AND INTEGRATION OF BERM

RIVER BINATIONAL CONTROL, FILTRATION, AND DISTRIBUTION OF WATER RESOURCES RIVER CENTER CULTURAL MUSEUM

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CONTEXT

SITE

RIO

GR

REFERE

AN

SAN FELIPE CREEK

DE

SITE DESIRES

SITE

SITE URBAN DENSITY

The studio began with conceptual explorations of what constituted a “border.” Studio design process included five border seminars with interdisciplinary scholars, a built domestic wall within living spaces, and paper diagrams of the border concept.

INCREASE HUMAN ACTIVITY AND EXCHANGE

CONTEXT

REFERE

CONTEXT RIO

GR

AN

RIO

R

SAN FELIPE CREEK

DE

GR

AN

DE

PORTS TO PLAINS PROJEC

SAN FELIPE CREEK

Propose Flood Control / Increase Human Activity and Exchange SITE DESIRES

INCREASE HUMAN ACTIVITY AND EXCHANGE EXPAND COMMERCIAL SPHERES

SITE DESIRES

COMMERCIAL DISTRICTS URBAN DENSITY

INCREASE HUMAN ACTIVITY AND EXCHANGE

URBAN DENSITY

For the author, the ambiguous nature of a border was established and explored with specific focus on the environmental, commercial, and psychological borders we construct.

PORTS TO PLAINS PROJEC 60,000 SQ FT_WAREHOUSE + DISTRIBUTION

NEW INFRASTRUCTURE FOR ANTICIPATED GROWTH EXPAND COMMERCIAL SPHERES

INDUSTRIAL DISTRICTS + INFRASTRUCTURE

INDUSTRIAL DISTRICTSDISTRICTS + INFRASTRUCTURE COMMERCIAL AREAS INDUSTRIAL DISTRICTSOPEN + INFRASTRUCTURE

PORTS TO PLAINS PRO

EXPAND COMMERCIAL SPHERES

COMMERCIAL DISTRICTS

Through a proactive and cohesive exploration of all facets of a border, an interdisciplinary understanding aided the design development. Studio work was edited and compiled by the author into a book, Border Without a Wall / Frontera Sin Muro, in conjuction with the parallel Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León studio.

115,000 SQ FT_MANUFACTURING 60,000 SQ FT_WAREHOUSE + DISTRIBUTION

60,000 SQ FT_WAREHOUSE + DISTRIBUTION

115,000 SQ FT_MANUFACTURING

Expand Commercial Spheres CONNECTFOR OPENANTICIPATED AREAS NEW INFRASTRUCTURE GROWTH

NEW INFRASTRUCTURE FOR ANTICIPATED GROWTH

PERMEATE + HUMANIZE THE BORDER

PSYCHOLOGICAL OPEN AREAS PERCEPTIONS

CONNECT OPEN AREAS

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115,000 SQ FT_MANUFACTURING

OPEN AREAS

CONNECT OPEN AREAS

Connect Open Areas PSYCHOLOGICAL PERCEPTIONS

PERMEATE + HUMANIZE THE BORDER

THE SITE DESIRES A PLACE OF PERMEABLE CONNECTION, ADDRE INFRASTRUCTURAL, AND MORAL CONCERNS.

A PROGRAM THAT BLURS THE BORDER INTO A MERE BOUNDAR

+ NEW BRIDGE / RAIL / ID SYSTEM THAT WEAVES THROUGH NEW T + NEW HUB INTERSECTING TRANSPORTATION, SECURITY, AND SOC

HUBS AS NEW TRANSPORTATION STATIONS THAT CONNECT AND PR OF CIUDAD ACUNA AND DEL RIO. NEW AGE TRANSPORTATION / SECURITY NODES

PROPOSAL

PSYCHOLOGICAL PERCEPTIONS

PERMEATE + HUMANIZE THE BORDER

THE SITE DESIRES A PLACE OF PERMEABLE CONNECTION, ADDRE INFRASTRUCTURAL, AND MORAL CONCERNS.

PROPOSAL

A PROGRAM THAT BLURS THE BORDER INTO A MERE BOUNDAR THE SITE DESIRES A PLACE OF PERMEABLE CONNECTION, A INFRASTRUCTURAL, AND MORAL CONCERNS. + NEW BRIDGE / RAIL / ID SYSTEM THAT WEAVES THROUGH NEW T + NEW HUB INTERSECTING TRANSPORTATION, SECURITY, AND SOC A PROGRAM THAT BLURS THE BORDER INTO A MERE BOUN HUBS AS NEW TRANSPORTATION STATIONS THAT CONNECT AND PR + NEWACUNA BRIDGEAND / RAIL / ID SYSTEM THAT WEAVES THROUGH N OF CIUDAD DEL RIO. + NEW HUB INTERSECTING TRANSPORTATION, SECURITY, AND CIU NEW AGE TRANSPORTATION / SECURITY NODES HUBS AS NEW TRANSPORTATION STATIONS THAT CONNECT AN OF CIUDAD ACUNA AND DEL RIO.

PROPOSAL

NEW AGE TRANSPORTATION / SECURITY NODES

CIU


1

3

2

5 6

4

Outermost Top Ring_Vehicular Realism 1 2 3 4 5 6

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1 VEHICULAR TRAFFIC FROM DEL RIO 1DROP-OFF AREA FOR PUBLIC BUSES AND POV’S 1 VEHICULAR TRAFFIC TO DEL RIO 1 VEHICULAR TRAFFIC FROM CIUDAD ACUÑA 1 DROP-OFF AREA FOR PUBLIC BUSES AND POV’S 1 VEHICULAR TRAFFIC TO CIUDAD ACUÑA


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10 11

12

8 13

7 14

18 17

16

15

Center Middle Ring_Pedestrian Permeance 71 81 91 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

SW PEDESTRIAN CONNECTION TO CIUDAD ACUÑA OPEN MARKET / EXHIBIT SPACE NW PEDESTRIAN CONNECTION TO PARK AND GARDENS STORAGE REST / HELP CENTER RESTROOMS NE PEDESTRIAN CONNECTION TO RECREATIONAL SPACES OPEN MARKET / EXHIBIT SPACE SE PEDESTRIAN CONNECTION TO DOWNTOWN CIUDAD ACUÑA RESTROOMS REST / HELP CENTER THEATRE / SMALL LECTURE ROOM

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21 19 20

Innermost Bottom Ring_Binational Idealism 33

19 PERMANENT EXHIBITION 20 TEMPORARY EXHIBITION 21 RIVER OCULUS

Juxtaposition of an imposed political border and shared geographical boundary as an opportunity of spatial collaboration.


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MARIO CAMPOS GARDEN PARK Year: 2017 | Fall Studio: Design VIII Professor: Fernando Lara Site: Mario Campos, Minas Gerais, Brazil Program: Market / Landform Partner: Melissa Chen How can landscape and program mediate between physical and social barriers as expressed by a form driven by contextual abstraction? Mario Campos is a rural town located within 25 miles to both the urban city of Belo Horizonte and the 5000-acre worldrenowned contemporary art museum park of Inhotim. Despite its close proximity to places of significance, Mario Campos remains a dormant municipality void of desire to invest in meaningful placemaking. Sparse vegetation, low accessibility, and informal housing characterize the simplicity or lack of desire towards urban planning. The effective town center is a market to which people walk across town and train tracks to reach. 35

Informal Expansion

City Hall

This distance from the town center for this increasing population to the north of the railroad is highlighted by a 30-foot topographic drop from the railway to the street. Bounded by the tracks and interregional water pipe, this site is a huge physical and psychological barrier which ostracizes this poorest part of the town from the rest. Existing City

The Garden Park serves as a satellite pavilion to Inhotim, introducing a vegetative gathering space and marketplace. Derived from a projected series of existing grids of the urban plan, rail, and waterpipe structures, the proposal connects this northernmost region to the rest of Mario Campos through accessibility and form.


New Informal Housing Physically and socially isolated from the town

+0’

+12’

Cliff

New Town Hall Currently inaccessible and detached from the town

+30’

Established Town South of the rail tracks

Terrain Void Maintains disconnection

Water Pipe Further bisects new development. Interregional water movement

Diagram of Discerned Disconnections

Town Center Marketplace and commercial shops Railroad Tracks Interregional goods delivery. Divides Mário Campos

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Mario Campos Building Typologies

Grocery

Education

Commercial

Health

Government

Hotel

Religious

Industry - Mining

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5M

IN

10 M

IN 2 MIN

2 MIN

Heat Distribution and Pedestrian Feasibility to Marketplaces


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Site Proposal

Dense Loose

Triangulated Intersections

28'

Railway Grid

200'

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Urban Grid

40'

The form of the Mario Campos Garden Park is drawn from the existing infrastructures which define it. In a barren plot, the overlaying of the railway, urban block, and water pipe grids gave the proposal flexibility to explore the nature of form derivation. The final form was a result of the triangulated intersections and the design decisions of program and accessibility.

Water Pipe Grid

Form Generation


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

North Mario Campos New City Hall Market Place Light Path Garden Hill Proposed Road Interregional Water Pipe Existing Neighborhood

1

3 2 4

5

7 6

8

40


41 East Path Above Market

Angiosperms rocky field vegetation

Roof Garden

Piptolepis ericoides

Mandevilla pycnantha

Baccharis helichrysoides

Aspilia diffusiflora

Calliandra sessilis

Cambessedesia salviifolia

Justicia ascle


Site movement was designed with the desire to connect program with landscape. A place traditionally barren of vegetation, greenery was to be introduced with the proposal. The Garden Park and market will serve the community and become a respite destination. as well as a connective landscape between North Mario Campos and the existing town.

Trematodon longicollis

Desired Site Movement

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Sun Garden

Bryophyte rocky field, cerrado

Rain Garden

Tylimanthus laxus

Angiosperm rocky field, cactaceae

epiadea

Proposed Site Movement

Erythroxylum gonocladum

Cipocereus minensis

Pilosocereus aurisetus


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Looking South from Market Interior

Proposed outdoor market pavilion is situated closer to residents in the informal neighborhood. Establishes presence as central public space of northernmost area of Mario Campos. New City Hall located northeast of the site. Brings potential for urban planning and connectionin the residential area. Park plaza offers an intermediate space between the active market program and looser garden paths.


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Existing neighborhood filled in. Residential area is more integrated with the rest of Mario Campos than that of the previously isolated and informal expansion pattern.

Pathways rise and fall to connect people, gardens, and views.

Meandering landform path introduces a vegetated connection between park entrances across the topographic change.


Landscape as a means and design to create connections beyond topographic and social inequalities.

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46


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PROFESSIONAL WORK 49 OLD SAN ANTONIO ROAD 51 SOL WILSON 53 WEISS/MANFREDI


OLD SAN ANTONIO ROAD Year: 2016 | June through August Office: Steve Zagorski Site: South Austin, Texas Program: Residential Housing Development

A site in South Austin, the development serves as a housing destination for incoming new residents to the larger Austin area. With a strong street presence and continuous neighborhood circulation, the 57 units will be built on a lot of 136,900 square feet. Each three story unit reflects individual character and rhythm with varieties of colour, fenestration, and balcony locations following an exploration and establishment of faÇade morphology. A variety of choice and living experiences of the exterior contrasts with the interior’s essentially identical three stories of approximately 2080 total square feet.

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Author involvement included schematic design, design development, and presentation material production of renderings, floor plans and video walkthrough of the project for marketing use. Client communication was fostered as well as aided by the use of Revit, Sketchup, Photoshop, Premiere, and Illustrator.


Design as an economic and efficient solution to Austin’s growing population, offering individual and communal identity of spatial organization.

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SOL WILSON Year: 2016 | June through August Office: Steve Zagorski Site: East Austin, Texas Program: Residential

S S X

A

DISTANCE A

5' BUILDING LINE

6' - 0"

A 546.3

C 544.5

DW

PROPOSED TWO-STORY RESIDENCE DW

CE B DISTAN

DISTANCE A

PROPOSED TWO-STORY ADU

FF @ 549.0

30' - 11"

FF @ 550.5

DISTANCE C

- 0"

LINE

548' - 6"

548'

0"

- 0"

547'

PROPERTY LINE N 77°51'32" E (9.52')

- 0"

PROPERTY LINE S 28°01'02" W (32.31')

6'

54

0"

0"

'22

LM

0"

SLOPE CALCULATIONS FINISH FLOOR AT VISITABLE ENTRANCE TO:

10' BUILDING

LINE

548' - 6"

- 0"

547'

6'

54

5' BUILDING LINE

PROPERTY LINE S 02°09'49" E (101.16')

PRIN OF 5' BEGINNING 54

R

PROPERTY LINE N 77°51'32" E (9.52')

PROJECT NO: DRAWN BY: CHECKED BY: ISSUE DATE:

PROPERTY LINE PROJECT NO: DRAWING TITLE S 28°01'02" W (32.31') DRAWN BY:

A. DRIVEWAY: VARIES: 2'-8" RISE / 6'-0" RUN = 45% SLOPE CALCULATIONS FINISH FLOOR AT VISITABLE ENTRANCE TO: B. STREET: 5'-7" RISE / 40'-9" RUN = 14% A. DRIVEWAY: VARIES: 2'-8" RISE4'-6" / 6'-0" RUN = 45% = 15% C. SIDEWALK: RISE / 30'-11"

UCTURE CIPAL STR

UCTURE CIPAL STR

"E

22

- 0"

548'

5' BUILDING LINE

LINE

LM

0"

"E

0" 543' -

TALLED TO BE INS

544'

FF @ 550.5

14' - 3"

PROPERTY LINE S 02°09'49" E (101.16')

0"

22

'22

- 0"

25' BUILDING

PRIN OF 5' BEGINNING 54

R

SIDEWALK

TALLED TO BE INS

544'

PROPOSED TWO-STORY ADU

14' - 3"

FF @ 549.0

LINE

SIDEWALK

0" 543' -

PROPERTY LINE S 80°57'49" W (46.72')

DW

PROPOSED TWO-STORY RESIDENCE DW

25' BUILDING

9" 40' CE B DISTAN

B 543.4

LINE PROPERTY E (56.37') N 81°50'48" LINE PROPERTY E (56.37') N 81°50'48"

9"

10' BUILDING

UE ON AVEN SOL WILSVENUE ON A SOL WILS

6' - 0"

A 546.3 30' - 11" DISTANCE C 40' -

PROPERTY LINE S 80°57'49" W (46.72')

CHECKED BY: ISSUE DATE:

DRAWING NO DRAWING TITLE

B. STREET: 5'-7" RISE / 40'-9" RUN = 14%

PS_SWITCHBACK WAIVER REQUEST 3/32" = 1'-0"

1

12205

E OF T E

07/22/2016

LOT SIZE: 6122 SF

C 544.5

B 543.4

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H

SK OR

AT

5' BUILDING LINE

ZAG

CT ITE I

ST

PROPERTY LINE N 00°52'09" W (27.42')

PROPERTY LINE N 04°08'07" W (99.79')

X

06-25-13

A

STEP H

12205

07/22/2016

LOT SIZE: 6122 SF

H

E O F TNE E STEP H

AT

REG IS

ST

PROPERTY LINE N 00°52'09" W (27.42')

PROPERTY LINE N 04°08'07" W (99.79')

ZAG EN 06-25-13

CT ITE

REG IS

Author involvement included design development and production of permit sets and floor plans for use in meetings with the city and clients. Design communication was aided by the use of Revit.

SK I OR

Located within three miles of the University of Texas at Austin school campus, the residence offers an open and simple spatial organization of program that may accommodate any lifestyle or client. The accessory dwelling unit provides additional living space in a uniquely shaped lot. Similar in orientation and plan organization, the two buildings balance out the site.

DRAWING NO

COPYRIGHT 2015 * STEPHEN ZAGORSKI, ARCHITECT * THESE DRAWINGS ARE INSTRUMENTS OF PROFESSIONAL SERVICE AND ARE LICENSED FOR A SINGLE CONSTRUCTION PROJECT.

C. SIDEWALK: 4'-6" RISE / 30'-11" = 15%

PS_SWITCHBACK WAIVER REQUEST 3/32" = 1'-0"

9' - 1"

10' - 0"

- 0"

0"

54

5

UCTURE CIPAL STR

40' - 0"

PROPERTY LINE N 77°51'32" E (9.52')

BUILDING TENT

40' - 0"

BUILDING TENT

2

1

PROPERTY LINE S 28°01'02" W (32.31') 20' - 8 1/2"

BUILDING TENT

HP TENT 2 549.3

14' - 8"

HP TENT 3 549.8

HP TENT 3 549.8

PROPERTY LINE N 77°51'32" E (9.52')

A/C 9 SF

550.5 HP ADJ GRADE

29' - 7"

0'14'-- 8"4"

7' - 2 1/2"

LINE

6' 54

547.3

3' - 7"

9' - 1" 3' - 7"

14' - 3 1/2"

3' - 7"

FF @ 550.5 BUILDING OVERHANG 27 SF

14' - 3"

11' - 1 1/2"

8' - 11 1/2"

5' - 0"

17' - 6"

17' - 6"

3' - 7"

41' - 6"

14' - 3 1/2"

8' - 11 1/2"

5' - 0" 1' - 6" 41' - 6"

24' - 0"

10' - 0" 1' - 6"

547'

HP TENT 2 549.3

COVERED PORCH 14 SF

DW A.D.U. BUILDING FOOTPRINT: 441 SF 2 STORY WOOD FRAMED CONSTRUCTION

LINE

5' BUILDING LINE

PROPERTY LINE S 02°09'49" E (101.16')

548' - 6"

- 0"

PS_SITE PLAN 3/32" = 1'-0"

550.5 HP ADJAVG ADJ GRADE GRADE @ 547.25'

LP ADJ GRADE 548.3

548' - 6"

17' - 6"

9 SF

In order to assure that trees are adequately preserved, tree protection DING TENT 1 fencing is required for BUIL trees within the limits of construction. Fencing should protect the entire Critical root zone (CRZ) area. Fencing is required to be chain-link mesh at a minimum height of five feet. A 6-inch layer of mulch within the entire available root zone area is required for trees which have any disturbance indicated within any portion of the critical root zone. A.4. VISITABLE DWELLING ENTRANCE A minimum of 50% of the CRZ must be preserved at natural grade, with 1. Dwelling will be acccessible by at leastPS_SITE no stepPLAN entrance 1 one natural ground cover, and No cut or fill greater than four (4) inches will be with a beveled threshold less than 1/2" and3/32" a door=with a clear 1'-0" located closer to the tree trunk than the ½ CRZ width of at least 32".

1

COVERED PORCH 173 SF A/C 10' BUILDING

17' - 6"

FF @ 550.5

549.5

LINE PROPERTY E (56.37') N 81°50'48"

OVERHANG 19 SF

BUILDING OVERHANG 27 SF

OF PRIN BEGINNING' - 0"

A minimum of 50% of the CRZ must be preserved at natural grade, with natural ground cover, and No cut or fill greater than four (4) inches will be located closer to the tree trunk than the ½ CRZ Protected trees to be in compliance with the minimum tree preservation criteria: 40' - 0"

A/C 9 SF

FF @ 549.0 DW A.D.U. BUILDING FOOTPRINT: 441 SF BUILDINGFRAMED CONSTRUCTION 2 STORY WOOD

LINE

547.3

LM

- 0"

0"

"E

22

'22

544'

546.0 LP ADJ GRADE

14' - 3"

548'

R

- 0"

0" 543' -

TALLED TO BE INS

e adequately preserved, tree protection thin the limits of construction. Fencing al root zone (CRZ) area. Fencing is required mum height of five feet. A 6-inch layer of le root zone area is required for trees which d within any portion of the critical root zone. must be preserved at natural grade, with cut or fill greater than four (4) inches will be than the ½ CRZ

0"

must be preserved at natural grade, with cut or fill greater than four (4) inches will be than the ½ CRZ ance with the minimum tree preservation

5 54

LM

0"

"E

22

'22

- 0"

6' 54

R

0"

TALLED TO BE INS

544'

L STRUCTURE OF PRINCIPA BEGINNING' - 0"

SIDEWALK

E

HP ADJ 549.5 GRADE 549.0

2600 SOL WILSON AVE LP ADJ AV OF OLT 14 DIVISION B GRADE COVERED BUILDING FOOTPRINT: 783 SF 548.3 PORCH 2 STORYDW WOOD FRAMED CONSTRUCTION 14 SF

545.5

E 547'

SIDEWALK

5' BUILDING LINE PROPERTY LINE S 80°57'49" W (46.72') PROPERTY LINE S 02°09'49" E (101.16')

545.5

G W WW

8' - 6"

AVG ADJ GRADE @ 547.25'

E

E

T

A/C 9 SF

G W WW

CARPORT FOOTPRINT COVERED PORCH 315 SF 173 SF FINISHED FLOOR AT 546'

ET

LINE

ET

72')

BUILDING OVERHANG 19 SF

ET

ET

CARPORT FOOTPRINT 315 SF FINISHED FLOOR AT 546'

546.0 LP ADJ GRADE

E

T

8' - 6"

FF @ 549.0

B CUT

8' - 6"

G W WW

25' BUILDING

8' - 6"

T

COVERED PATIO 21 SF

548.7

10' BUILDING

G W WW

HP ADJ GRADE E 549.0

18' - 0"

5' BUILDING548.7 LINE

LINE PROPERTY - 0" E (56.37') 548' N 81°50'48"

18' - 0"

E

T

25' BUILDING

G

CONCRETE DRIVE 1195 SF

ET

W WW

CUR EXISITNG

G

T

2600 SOLGWILSON AVE G G G W AV OF OLT 14 DIVISION BW WM WW WW BUILDING FOOTPRINT: 783 SF 2 STORYDW WOOD FRAMED CONSTRUCTION

E

T

AVENUE

WM

W WW

COVERED PATIO 21 SF

E

T

5' BUILDING LINE T

ET

G

E

E

12' - 0"

T

CONCRETE DRIVE 1195 SF

T

ET

12' - 0"

E

ET

ON SOL WILS

T

E

24' - 0"

546.5

PROPERTY LINE HP TENT 1 PROPERTY LINE 547.7 N 04°08'07" W (99.79')N 00°52'09" W (27.42')

546.5

HP TENT 1 547.7

0' - 4"

ET

ET

ET LOT SIZE: 6122 SF

ET

ET E

11' - 1 1/2"

E

PROPERTY LINE N 04°08'07" W (99.79') E

7' - 2 1/2"

E

ET ET LOT SIZE: 6122 SF

PROPERTY LINE N 00°52'09" W (27.42')

COPYRIGHT 2015 * STEPHEN ZAGORSKI, ARCHITECT * THESE DRAWINGS ARE INSTRUMENTS OF PROFESSIONAL SERVICE AND ARE LICENSED FOR A SINGLE CONSTRUCTION PROJECT.

ET

29' - 7"

1

PROPERTY LINE S 28°01'02" W (32.31') 20' - 8 1/2"

40' - 0"

BUILDING TENT

2

3

A.4. VISITABLE DWELLING ENTRANCE 1. Dwelling will be acccessible by at least one no step entrance with a beveled threshold less than 1/2" and a door with a clear width of at least 32".

BUILDING TENT

3


PROPERTY LINE

5' SETBACK

TENT #3

TENT #1

10' - 0" TOP LEVEL 1

15' - 0"

18" FLOOR TRUSS

15' - 0"

FF @ 548.5

1' - 6"

5' - 0"

3' - 0"

LEVEL 1 - MAIN 0' - 6" 3' - 0"

27' - 10"

PS_EAST 1" = 10'-0"

2' - 0"

547.7 HP TENT 1 AVG ADJ GRADE 547.3

1'0" /

1'0"

1'-0" / 1'-0"

HP ADJ GRADE 549.0

9' - 0"

TOP LEVEL 2

1' - 6"

3' - 0"

3' - 0"

STANDING SEAM METAL ROOF

BOARD AND BATTENS

LEVEL 2 10' - 6"

LEVEL 2 10' - 6"

16" FLOOR TRUSS

PROPERTY LINE

LEVEL 2 ADU T.O.P. 21' - 6"

15' - 0"

10' SETBACK

FF@ 549.0

9' - 0"

1' - 8"

18" FLOOR TRUSS

TOP LEVEL 1

18" FLOOR TRUSS

TOP LEVEL 2

SS METAL ROOF

TOP LEVEL 1

1'0"

9' - 0"

BOARD AND BATTENS

1'0" /

1'-0" / 1'-0"

0" 1'-

1' - 8"

BEGINNING OF PRINCIPAL STRUCTURE

/ 0" 1'-

LP ADJ GRADE 546.0 25' - 0"

4' - 0" 2.6.E.4.b.i. GABLE EXCEPTION: GABLE PROTRUSION NOT MORE THAN 18'

10' - 0"

32' - 0"

LEVEL 1 - MAIN 0' - 6"

2' - 0"

0" 1'-

LEVEL 2 - MAIN 12' - 2" LEVEL 1 T.O.P. 10' - 6"

3' - 0"

LEVEL_2_INT_ELEV_BATH_A LEVEL_2_INT_ELEV_BATH_A 4 1/2" = 1'-0" 1/2" = 1'-0"

/ 0" 1'-

HABITABLE ATTIC MAIN 22' - 10" LEVEL 2 T.O.P. 21' - 2"

28' - 5 1/2" HEIGHT TO MIDPT OF GABLE FROM AVG ADJ GRADE

25' SETBACK

PROPERTY LINE

4

24' - 4" HEIGHT TO MIDPT OF GABLE FROM AVG ADJ GRADE

549.8 HP TENT 3

6' - 8"

6' - 8"

15' - 0"

15' - 0"

15' - 0"

FF @ 548.5 547.3 AVG ADJ GRADE

3' - 0"

32' - 0"

#1

LEVEL 1 T.O.P. 10' - 6"

549.3 HP TENT 2

HP ADJ GRADE 549.0 FF @ 549.0

HP TENT 1 550.1

1' - 6"

LEVEL 2 - MAIN 12' - 2"

18" FLOOR TRUSS

METAL SIDING

LP ADJ GRADE 546.0

1

5' - 0"

1' - 6"

9' - 0"

1' - 6"

2' - 4"

2' - 4"

PROPERTY LINE

PROPERTY LINE

PROPERTY LINE

#3

#2

T N TE

BOARD AND BATTEN

HABITABLE ATTIC MAIN 22' - 10" LEVEL 2 T.O.P. 21' - 2"

T N TE

T N TE

TENT #2 TENT #1

1' - 0"

1' - 0"

LEVEL 2 T.O.P. LEVEL 2 T.O.P. 20' - 6" 20' - 6"

3' - 8"

18" FLOOR TRUSS

TENT #3

5' SETBACK

1'-0" / 1'-0"

0" 1'-

EGRESS

CEDAR SIDING

1' - 8"

0" 1'-

/ 0" 1'-

5' SETBACK

2.6.E.4.b.i. GABLE EXCEPTION: GABLE PROTRUSION NOT MORE THAN 18'

/ 0" 1'-

HP TENT 1 547.7 5' - 0"

SS METAL ROOF

3' - 8"

4' - 0"

AVG ADJ GRADE 547.3 36' - 6"

9' - 0"

15' - 0"

1' - 8"

BOARD AND BATTEN

549.8 HP TENT 3 549.3 HP TENT 2

PROPERTY LINE

TOP LEVEL 2

TENT #2

9' - 0"

1'0" 1'0" /

1'-0" / 1'-0"

1' - 8" T TE N

TE N

32' - 0"

EGRESS

5' - 0" LP ADJ GRADE 546.0

28' - 6" HEIGHT TO MIDPT OF GABLE FROM AVG ADJ GRADE

18" FLOOR TRUSS

FF @ 549.0 HP ADJ GRADE 549.0

LEVEL 1 - MAIN 0' - 6"

PS_SOUTH - MAIN 1/8" = 1'-0"

EGRESS

SS METAL ROOF

A compact lot that is compositionally balanced and psychologically extended by two residential dwellings of flexible floor plans.

PS_NORTH - MAIN 1 1/8" = 1'-0"

2

1'0"

#1

#2 T

TE N

15' - 0"

LEVEL 2 - MAIN 12' - 2" LEVEL 1 T.O.P. 10' - 6"

1'0" /

28' - 8" HEIGHT TO MIDPT OF GABLE FROM AVG ADJ GRADE

5' SETBACK

PROPERTY LINE

PROPERTY LINE

PROPERTY LINE

T

#3

HABITABLE ATTIC MAIN 22' - 10" LEVEL 2 T.O.P. 21' - 2"

2.6.E.4.b.i. GABLE EXCEPTION: GABLE PROTRUSION NOT MORE THAN 18'

HP ADJ GRADE 550.5 FF@ 550.5

AVG ADJ GRADE 549.2 549.3 HP TENT 2 LP ADJ GRADE 548.3

549.8 HP TENT 3

13' - 3"

10' - 0"

40' - 0"

40' - 0"

BUILDING TENT 1

BUILDING TENT 2

23' - 3" BUILDING TENT 3

LEVEL 2 ADU 12' - 6" LEVEL 1 ADU T.O.P. 11' - 0" LEVEL 0 - ADU 2' - 0"

52


WEISS/MANFREDI Year: 2017 | January through August Program: University of Texas at Austin's Professional Residency Program Projects: Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine Expansion, Tulane Dining Commons, Artis Naples Master Plan, U.S. State Department New Delhi, Longwood Gardens, Competition Over the course of 8 months, project involvements spanned the SD to CA phases. For the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine Expansion project, FF&E and signage packages were finalized. Overall, contributions to the projects and competition included visual graphics, studies, and digital/physical models.

53

1’-0” PLAN

S’ SUITE NORTH ELEVATION STUDY

ELL CVM CLASS EXPANSION

WEISS / MAN


54


55


OTHER WORK 57 GINKGO CHAIR Wood Design

63 HYBROOT Project Assistant

65 WELL ULI Hines Student Competition

75 XINJIN ZHI MUSEUM Construction III

77 COLLECTIVE PLACE Spatial Stories / Architectural Photography

85 MONET IMPRESSIONS Advanced Drawings

RÉSUMÉ

56


GINKGO CHAIR Year: 2017 | Fall Studio: Wood Design Professor: Mark Maček How may design balance literal and abstract interpretations? Emerging from a long-standing admiration for the only two ginkgo trees on campus, the Ginkgo Chair explores the fine line between metaphor and form. Built with the bent plywood lamination process, the chair is comprised of four leaves--one for the back, two for the seat, and one as the supportive connection. Iterative studies of ergonomics and leaf forms were conducted to examine the comfort and aesthetics of one such abstraction of nature.

57

Every aspect of the chair was completed in the woodshop with exception to the veneers, courtesy of The Wood Gallery, Inc. in Dallas, Texas. Each leaf was bent in the vacuum press on a polystyrene foam form cut out from plywood jigs. Using the vacuum press, 1/16" bent plywood layers were glued together on the forms and left overnight. The veneers were adhered to the layered wood one side at a time upon the forms in the vacuum press. To express the ginkgo metaphor past the physical shapes of its leaves, the veneers were ordered with a sunburst pattern to emulate its veins and midribs. As such, the grain orientations of the veneers were laminated to the bent wood pieces with respect to the overall composition of the chair. The final four leaves were jigsawed out before being sanded and assembled together.

seat studies_process ≤1 ”

gingko chair 18 “

ashley chung

seat studies_process gingko chair

ashley chung

An investigation of how design may balance the natural metaphor of gingko leaves and constructed wood design, the Ginkgo Chair sits as a piece rooted in the imperfections of the wood and craft and the precision of the bent plywood lamination process. The metaphor gave notion to the design, and the design gave form to the metaphor.

1/2 “

24 “

seat studies_process

gingko chair

ashley chung

1 “ 1/4 “

5 7/32 “

5 7/32 “

20 ”

2 15/16 “

6 5/8 ”

3/4 “

dimensions_process gingko chair

ashley chung


58

Balancing the abstraction of nature through the precision of bent plywood lamination.


59

veneers_wood gallery veneers_wood (dallas) collaboration gallery (dallas) collaboration gingko chair

ashley chung

gingko chair

ashley chung


5 1/2"

reused formwork and dimensions for mirrored opposite seat leaf

24" 1/2" 4 sheets of 1/8" bendable plywod

90.0°

7/8" 7 sheets of 1/8" bendable plywood

15 3/4"

60 seat leaf_formwork and construction gingko chair

ashley chung

seat leaf_formwork and construction gingko chair

ashley chung


61


62


HYBROOT Year: 2015 | Fall Assisted: OTA+ Site: Austin, Texas Program: Installation

How may digital technology generate discussion of the natural environment? HYBROOT is one of four winners of the 2015 Field Constructs Design Competition [FCDC]. FCDC is an international competition that seeks to encourage innovation through works that actively engage with natural and cultural factors specific to Austin and its surrounding region. The four proposals were realized in a temporary installation sited at the Circle Acres Nature Preserve in Austin in November of 2015 as part of a week-long event series promoting design and community programming at the site. 63

Reimbursed with a $5000 budget, the four projects were installed and opened to the public. Participation in the construction and assembly of HYBROOT introduced a larger understanding of a design-build installation process with

regards to fabrication time, scale, and impact to site terrain. The CNC-lathing process requires two passes on the material. An initial rough pass gives a hint of the form, refined by the smooth pass. Each segment of HYBROOT is comprised of four quadrants. Overall, almost 30 hours were spent on the CNC. From OTA+: HYBROOT reflects the balance between urban fabric and natural landscape indicative of the project site. The form, color, and material of HYBROOT mimic the surrounding grasses and tree canopy, while the fabrication, assembly, and surface patterning evoke a more synthetic sensibility. At first glance the two are inseparable, but on closer inspection one notices artificial formal compositions, unnatural pixelation of colors, and the artifact of the CNC-lathing process left as surface texture. The sheen and reflectivity of each paint color varies between the natural and plastic. It is root and robot.


64

Integrating natural and digital potentials of design to activate a site and promote community awareness.


WELL Year: 2018 | Spring Advisors: Simon Atkinson and Edna Ledesma Competition: ULI Hines Student Competition Site: Toronto, Ontario Program: Urban Design Team: Evan Todtz, Molly Spetalnick, Katie Dictus, Bennett Holcomb What forces may human and ecological health play in how we envision the future of our cities? Well recognizes and celebrates the inseparable link between human health and wellness and the ecological vitality of our urban environments. In the spirit of strengthening the existing diversity of Toronto, a new community attracts a wide variety of residents who share a deep value and appreciation for the health and well-being of themselves and their neighbors. In order to achieve this vision, Well employs three strategies to leverage the restorative powers of water to heal the mind, body, and soul.

65

[Be]Well_To provide new active transportation connections, a newly renovated bicycle-pedestrian bridge crosses over the Don River from Corktown Common and links into a holistic wellness center. Therapeutic water gardens flow in and out of buildings, maintaining constant visual connections to water. An outdoor reflecting pond provides tranquil spaces to contemplate in the summertime as well as outdoor ice skating in the winter months. To nourish the mind, Green Thumb Grower’s Space climbs the façade of a residential housing community, providing ample space to grow healthy household produce as well as to gather and converse with neighbors. [D]Well_To bring residents closer to the river and the lake, The Source surrounds the heart of the neighborhood. At the center of this ring lies The Well, a community space with water-related playscapes for all ages to promote physically active and healthy lifestyles. Nearby, the local grade school, Well[Spring], focuses on expanding STEM and health-

celebrated water

related educational opportunities for neighborhood youth. Residential units terrace upwards to capture year-round sunlight for vertical farming and gardens. Larger residential rooftop garden plots and climate-controlled greenhouses are supported by innovative water-capture mechanisms which facilitate the storage and creative re-use of rainwater on-site. [S]Well_Local neighborhood momentum continues, along with the construction of a new GO Transit transportation hub, and buildings swell upwards to create a dense, urban entertainment and employment district. Local shops and restaurants front a vibrant local street with patrons coming from across Toronto to experience the diversity of foods and cultures present. From this street, a grand staircase ascends to [Grounds]Well where one can see the Port Lands and the naturalized mouth of the Don River. From this perspective, one begins to understand their connections to the larger watershed and their potential role in building healthier cities in the future. It is at this physical and spiritual intersection of human and ecological health that Well offers an unprecedented opportunity to challenge current city-building practices in favor of restoring our relationships to the environment, to one other, and within ourselves. Contributions made include participating in overall team design discussions, taking the lead on the research of existing housing typologies, designing the resultant massing design of [D]Well, and producing the digital model as well as the section perspective and both of the competition entry's visual renderings.

solar-driven form


2

4

3

5

s on cti m ne ste on sy il c ark tra to p

ne on w s Br tre oa et dv ca ie r li w ne Av e

6

1

ons ecti conn erdale new uth Riv o to S

future streetcar and subway station

7

Key Points of Interest Old Eastern Bike-Ped Bridge

2

Reflection Pond

3

Green Thumb Grower’s Space

4

The Source

5

University of Toronto Extension

6

The Well

7

Well Spring

8

Terraced Roof Gardens

9

Ground Swell

gs sin wy os k cr ey P led all na n V sig Do on

1

new GO Transit hub

66

8

9

n tio ec nn za co Pla ed er -p ev ke nil U to

bi

10m

connected neighborhoods

shared green space


open space industrial parking hotel retail office/commercial housing

184,800 sq ft 0 sq ft 264,976 sq ft 171,696 sq ft 171,696 sq ft 846,109 sq ft 213,879 sq ft

open space industrial parking hotel retail office/commercial housing

184,800 sq ft 0 sq ft 264,976 sq ft 171,696 sq ft 171,696 sq ft 846,109 sq ft 213,879 sq ft

PHASE 1 | [Be]WELL

67

open space industrial parking hotel retail office/commercial housing

PHASE 2 |

open space industrial parking hotel retail office/commercial housing

121,175 sq ft 0 sq ft 0 sq ft 0 sq ft 105,165 sq ft 0 sq ft 140,350 sq ft

open space industrial parking hotel retail office/commercial housing

121,175 sq ft 0 sq ft 0 sq ft 0 sq ft 105,165 sq ft 0 sq ft 140,350 sq ft

[D]WELL

64,364 sq ft 46,924 sq ft 35,026 sq ft 0 sq ft 254,497 sq ft 355,538 sq ft 120,100 sq ft

open space industrial parking hotel retail office/commercial housing

PHASE 3 | [S]WELL CURRENT SITE VALUE PROJECTED SITE VALUE

$103,050,000 $1,433,055,349

64,364 sq ft 46,924 sq ft 35,026 sq ft 0 sq ft 254,497 sq ft 355,538 sq ft 120,100 sq ft


health / medical office commercial office

% of total square footage: 13%

22%

9%

16%

21% 19%

commercial retail housing health / medical office

education / institutional

commercial office

hotel + entertainment

commercial retail

artist / studio space

housing

health-related use

education / institutional

+ entertainment LAND USE | FINALhotel BUILD-OUT artist / studio space health-related use

68

flood mitigation berm public space green roofs for rainwater capture green roofs for people green walls water channel

GREEN AND BLUE SPACES OCCUR AT VARIOUS HEIGHTS TO PROMOTE WELL-BEING THROUGHOUT THE SITE

UNILEVER BUILDING

TRANSIT

BROADVIEW ALIGNMENT PROVIDES VIEW OF HISTORIC UNILEVER BUILDING

STREETSCAPE STREETSCAPE STREETSCAPE STREETSCAPE STREETSCAPE LANDSCAPE LANDSCAPE LANDSCAPE LANDSCAPE LANDSCAPEFLOODFLOOD FLOOD + WATER FLOOD + +WATER WATER FLOOD + WATER + WATER BUILDINGS BUILDINGS BUILDINGS BUILDINGS BUILDINGS CONNECTIONS CONNECTIONS CONNECTIONS CONNECTIONS CONNECTIONS ENHANCEMENTS ENHANCEMENTS ENHANCEMENTS ENHANCEMENTS ENHANCEMENTS PROJECTS PROJECTS PROJECTS PROJECTS PROJECTS INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE


PARKS + TRAILS

HEALTH + MEDICINE DON RIVER NATURALIZATION REGIONAL CONTEXT | THE INTERSECTION OF HEALTH AND ECOLOGY

69

green roofs capture water on all nonoccupiable roofs

37 m3 of rainwater captured, treated, reused, and recycled annually

HEALTHY OFFICE

captured water from green roof maintains vegetative dual facade and drops to reflecting pool below

air flushing system maintains healthy indoor air

interior garden atrium

MENTAL HEALTH CLINICS WELLNESS CLINICS

RADIANT HEATING GREYWATER INPUT CISTERN OUTPUT

PIPE FROM CISTERN FEEDS WATER FEATURES


535M TRANSIT RIDES PER YEAR

ADV BRO

EN

QUE

ERN EAST

IE W

proposed subway relief line proposed stop existing streetcar line proposed streetcar line proposed stop GOTransit commuter rail

RE HO proposed stop

S KE

LA

existing bike paths proposed bike connections ramp removals

MOBILITY |

EXISTING AND PROPOSED NETWORK

WELL recognizes and celebrates the inseparable link between human health and wellness, and the ecological health of our urban environments

individual and community gardens

recreation: Splah Pad

FLOODWATER OVERFLOW CISTERN

recreation: School includes rooftop field and playspace

view of Don River Naturalization maintains connection to surrounding ecology

PIPE FROM CISTERN FEEDS WATER FEATURES

GREYWATER INPUT CISTERN OUTPUT

70


dry condition

low-flow condition

71

REGULATORY FLOOD LEVEL

DON RIVER

SWALE

DRAIN

SWALE

CONVEYANCE + FILTRATION

CAPTURE + INFILTRATION

CONVEYANCE + FILTRATION

INITIAL SWELL

PERFORATED PIPE

SECONDARY SWELL GROUNDWATER RECHARGE

FLOOD MITIGATION + WATER CAPTURE | RIVER + DON VALLEY PARKWAY SECTION

overflow mechanism closes pipe when cistern full


72

building captures and uses rainwater

excess harvested rainwater stored in cistern frozen condition EXISTING SITE GRADE

BUILDING RADIANT INFLOOR HEATING CISTERN

cistern supplies nonpotable building uses cistern supplies water features on site

flooded condition


73


74

Challenge city-building practices in favor of restoring our relationships to the environment, to one other, and within ourselves.


XINJIN ZHI MUSEUM Year: 2015 | Spring Course: Construction III Professor: Guy Naeve Partner: Marriene Ondo

Partial Elevation 320 MM

75

390 MM

450 MM

Partial Plan

How can traditional materials be used with contemporary construction techniques to create a condition that is of the past and present? An investigation of building envelopes conducted on Kengo Kuma’s Xinjin Zhi Museum in Youxian, China. The use of terracotta tile in construction is a common feature of the surrounding region. Seen on the roofs of residential neighbourhoods, the tiles used in this screen act as a boundary between the inside and the outside. The clay tiles are locally produced and suspended by stainless-steel wires through drilled holes. A screen lightweight in appearance

is produced. Transforming itself from face-to-face, the particulate screen responds to the museum’s environment and contexts, merging inner and exterior space. Drawings produced by team. Model was constructed out of 3-ply bristol, acrylic, wood as well as fishing and music wire.

Effectively filtering the exterior landscape from the museum space within, the faÇade is modern in construction yet traditional in materiality and concept.


1 2 3 4

5

6 7

8

9

10

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11

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roof: aluminum-zinc alloy-coated steel sheet bituminous membrane waterproofing wooden fibre cement board steel rafter insulation screen supporter steel wiring support Chinese clay tile rivets SUS wire glazing exterior wall: granite interior wall: wooden fibre cement board floor: granite beam: H-700x500 zincing


COLLECTIVE PLACE Year: 2018 | Spring Course: Spatial Stories / Architectural Photography Professor: Nichole Wiedemann / David Heymann How may photography represent the qualitative and temporal character of a space? What is technology's role in enhancing spatial representation? An on-going photography project exploring the multiplicity of perspectives that contributes to a memory of place and the technological scope of photography. Each series pair organizes the same photographs in different manners and orientations: the two-dimensional plan orientation, the implied three-dimensionality of the tiny planet, and the final three-dimensional nature of the immersive virtual reality spatial experience. In the plan orientation, images are depicted spatially relative to the room and what its inhabitants see when

within the space. What is shown lies mostly in the horizontal visual plane. With the implied three-dimensionality of the tiny planet, the photos have been arranged with the additional consideration of vertical positions. Concentrations of views in the vertical planes may be better noted. The virtual reality spatial experience is the unwrapped version of the tiny planet. This viewing allows for awareness of both the horizontal and vertical visual planes and their respective concentrations. The resulting snapshots capture a moment in time and space, to be shared in the collective memory of place.

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Digital technology allows us now to recall and immerse within our collective memory of place through compilations of perspectives which inhabited the space.

QR to active website: https://collectiveplace.weebly.com/


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Tiny Planet Battle Hall Library, Goldsmith Courtyard, Union Courtyard


Plan Battle Hall Library

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Spatial Immersion Battle Hall Library

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Plan Goldsmith Courtyard

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Spatial Immersion Goldsmith Courtyard

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Plan Union Courtyard

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Spatial Immersion Union Courtyard

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MONET IMPRESSIONS Year: 2018 | Spring Course: Advanced Drawing Professor: John Blood

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Claude Monet. Water Lilies. c. 1920.

How may we learn from the master painters of all time? How may 'spirituality' be conveyed in a drawing? Clarity of a drawing's intention or role in the overall story is essential to effective visual communication. Analysis of color and drawing techniques were central to this advanced drawing course. The Monet Impressions drew inspiration from color palettes of Monet's paintings. The emotional tone of this set echoed the program design and experience of The Memory Sequence - clear yet unknown.


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Claude Monet. 'Water-Lilies'. after 1916.

The nuances of color and technique are essential to the visual communication of an idea or concept.


ASHLEY CHUNG EDUCATION University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture Bachelor of Architecture, May 2018 GPA: 3.78 / 4.0

WORK EXPERIENCE 2018 SOM Women's Initiative Shadowing Program, Intern Jan [Washington, D.C.] Selected participant of the firm's nationwide Women's Initiative. Introduced to office projects and SOM roles and responsibilities. Shadowed professionals in the architecture, interior design, urban planning, management, and marketing departments. 2017 Weiss / Manfredi, Intern Jan - Aug [New York, New York] Contributed to various projects from the Schematic Design to Construction Administration phases. Involved with firm marketing and client interview or meeting preparations by generating visual and presentation documents and models. Additionally, FF&E and signage packages were finalized for the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine project. Participated on a proposal which won a short-listed competition.

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2016 Steve Zagorski Architect, Intern Jun - Aug [Austin, Texas] Assisted various local and residential projects in the Project Planning, Design, Development, and Documentation phases using Revit. Presentation documents of renderings and videos were produced for clients with Photoshop, Premiere, and SketchUp. 2015 OTA+, Project Assistant Oct - Nov [Field Constructs Design Competition, Austin, Texas] Aided the CNC-lathing process and assembly of Hybroot, an interpretation of nature by technology in a digital and symbolic manner that raises societal awareness of Austin’s natural and cultural contexts. Project winner and week-long installation of the international competition. 2014 / LWK & Partners Limited, Intern 2013 [Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong] Jun - Aug Provided technical and programmatic assistance to the design team in preparing design schemes, precedent studies, and files for schematic and detailed design stages.

SKILL PROFICIENCY Digital Modeling

Hands-On

Rhinoceros Revit AutoCAD Grasshopper SketchUp Laser Machine CNC Router 3D Printing Model Making Sketching / Painting Wood Shop Tools

Digital Graphics

Photoshop Illustrator Maxwell Render InDesign Lightroom Premiere

Languages English (Fluent) Cantonese (Fluent) Mandarin Spanish


9006 Tweed Berwick Drive, Austin, Texas 78750 [512] 656 - 6433 ashleychung@utexas.edu issuu.com/mandyashleychung

DISTINCTIONS 2018 Oglesby Traveling Fellowship Nominee University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture's faculty-nominated applicant based on merit in architectural design. Proposed examination of border architecture as exhibited in two case studies of Italy/Vatican City and Italy/Slovenia 2017 AIA Large Firm Round Table and Dean's Forum School nominated representative; one of 11 students who participated in discussion about the architecture field with their respective university deans and principals of 56 firms representing 30,000 employees and $70 billion in annual construction value 2015 / 2016 College Scholar for the School of Architecture Annual university-wide recognition for academic excellence; top 20% of class 2012 The U.S. Congressional Award [Bronze Medal; Gold, Silver, Bronze certificate] Congress honor for proactive goal setting in the areas of service, initiative, and growth 2012 The President’s Volunteer Service Award [Gold Medalist] Honored for 250+ hours of service within a 12-month time period 2010 5 Who Care, 5 Kids Who Care Community Service Award [KVUE News Broadcast of Austin] Founder of music volunteering group which performed at senior assisted living centers

LEADERSHIP 2017 Border Without a Wall Publication Book Designer and Editor 2016 - Present Tau Sigma Delta Honours Society Architecture and Allied Arts- President 2015 - Present American Institute of Architecture Students [AIAS] 2013 - Present Austin Social Dance Teacher’s Assistant 2011 - 2012 Violin Teacher / Wedding Musician Austin, Texas

COMPETITIONS 2018 ULI Hines Student Competition, Submitted University of Texas at Austin, Team 182182 2017 Shortlist Competition, Winner Weiss / Manfredi Proposal

TRAVEL

INTERESTS Songwriting, Violin, Guitar, Photography, Social Dance, Climbing

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2018

Ashley Chung | Portfolio  

The University of Texas at Austin | B.Arch 2018 | Selected Works

Ashley Chung | Portfolio  

The University of Texas at Austin | B.Arch 2018 | Selected Works

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