Issuu on Google+

Motor'1s4

• PPG Paint Site Mixing on • Auto Glass t Replacemen ranty • 100% War es • Free Estimat airs • Frame Rep onwide s • Free Nati Used Auto Part ting Service irs Loca s Repa Part ks Autobody Cars & Truc Services Always Buying (Free Towing) Mechanical els Makes & Mod for Pricing Call Servicing All rity & Integ 67 With Honesty 8-642-31

MER SPRING/SUM

HESTER ENT TO MANC A SUPPLEM

Tips on cutting your auto s insurance cost

51

3039

Fax: (518) 642-

h

.

right vehicle

FreePress CURTIS LUMBER

r teen y about thei e as they worr nts can take to e for heartach s pare it can be a caus ing up, there are step for parents license, but kids from grow details. their driver's way to keep the ing no is all gett e for to ther 11 While forward page All teens look road all by themselves. driver a little easier. See sed hitting the open sition to a fully licen 's tran make a teen

CE, pg. 4

See INSURAN

AP P

SCR THESE MONEY ITE -S ON SAVING SCRAP METAL OVAL G & REM DISMANTLIN INSERTS E! IVE-ON SCAL DR INSIDE! Vehicle t.

ALL YS V • COPPER POULTNBREAS INUM

We have lots of exciting job opportunities in our classifieds!

DE!

IDE!

GS INS N I V A S F O K O O OUPON B

83

We've got 83 adorable pets inside looking for a home

. 30 South

Maple Mania!

ALUM STEEL BATTERIES •

36 2-3 4E, INC.0 orOR6AG 063 ST

518-642-3

NY 12832 2 Granville, rday 8-1 lb Road, 112 Deka -Friday 8-5, Satu Monday

Byron's Village Market

A long, cold winter that refuses to leave might have pushed the maple sugar season back, but the sap is beginning to flow just in time for New York’s Maple Open House Weekends, taking place in several locations around Washington County. Area residents are invited to tour local sugarhouses and see how maple syrup is made on March 22 and 23 and March 29 and 30. “We’re inviting area families to come and experience firsthand the sights, smells and sounds of maple sugar-making,” said David Campbell, a Salem producer and president of the Upper Hudson Maple Producers

Association. After two years of early maple seasons, this year’s extreme cold has pushed the season into midMarch, which could mean a shorter season. “The later it starts, the less chance you’ll have for a good season,” said Matt Rathbun of Rathbun’s Maple. Once the trees bud, sap is no longer collected because it changes flavor and becomes bitter. The flow of sap is triggered by the springtime thawing and freezing process. Mild days and below freezing temperatures at night are needed to get the sap flowing. With temperatures starting to

Merck celebrating Maple Weekend / 6

Cambridge Village Market

CVS pharmacy

"LUCK

pg. 3

399 TED VT ANRte UNW Poultney, & 34 ES52 HICL7VE228 ETAL 80 M P SCRA EY

by weigh

YES!

ER INSI Y L F E L A S " H S I R OF THE I

ARE C W D R A H N O H C U AUEBUP! RICES AR See CARE,

credit.

Postal Customer

Friday, March 21, 2014

e say about yo

icular select a part le others sage it utility, whi of the mes k because idealize drivers will t vehicles car oreys.truc Very often human holiday when mos conv the ing them is judged t lend be r e , Wha cles neve 12 s should as if they wer their vehi als n? See page Though book very often individu naming them ers will seek are reported stole qualities or rs, own wear, ed States Sometimes by their cove clothes they in the Unit a friend. rs by the even the car drivers are licensed ers choose judge othe pg. 2 live in and these driv Y, they ALIT and e ons. ada, the hom of reas See PERSON t and Can a variety their examine wha vehicles for they drive. because of resting to on their se vehicles It can be inte says about the pers Some choo ar car million a particul e than 200 wheel. Mor behind the

the n Choose drive goes a long you the cost The vehicle determining way toward insurance. of your auto m, minito Insure.co nglehold According had a stra vans had long the least expenof l the atop the list to insure unti sive vehicles crossovers 2013, when model year cles took utility vehi and sport 2013 Ford the list. The nsive control of expe t the leas Edge SE was re at just over insu svehicle to other cros year, while $1,100 per manufacSUVs from and s over Jeep, Subaru

PRSRT STD ECRWSS U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO. 65 GRANVILLE, NY

We’ve got 16 pages filled with money-saving automotive values inside plus helpful articles on all aspects of car care. And check out the car care coupons!

2, 3,ur5pers,on1al0ity?

le, NY 22, GranvilRout e 22 7311 St. Rt. on of Granville

6 miles sout

S NEWSPAPER ng Money-Savi Coupons on pages...

vehicl What does your

cle is not motor vehi Owning a purchase tion to the cheap. In addi cle, owners must vehi price of the maintenance ine rout the vehialso pay for . Insuring fuel as p as well ’t come chea cle likely won y for those drivers ciall ing hiseither, espe perfect driv with less than tories. ers with poor driv even But the wheel rds behind reco k the cost trac s to reduce . The can find way their vehicles avoid to of insuring a few ways e. following are auto insuranc on ding overspen

n Fix your

Motors Edition Inside

ER GS NEWSPAP OTIVE SAVIN

MER AUTOM

NG/SUM YOUR SPRI

Local sugar houses will open their doors again this weekend as part of the annual Maple Weekend celebration. You can enjoy tours, samples and even pancakes - like those prepared at Mapleland Farms in Salem.

See MAPLE, pg. 5

Salem's own movie star uncovered

Chili Chow Down

Salem historian Al Cormier will give a talk on "The Search for Jane Gail: Salem's Silent Film Star" this Thursday at the Salem Courthouse Community Center. See details inside.

ALSO INSIDE THIS WEEK n Raptor Fest planned / 7 n Blues and Brews /7 n Greenwich musical / 7

SEPTEMBER GIVEAWAY MARCH GIVEAWAY

not all circulars are inserted in all areas covered by the FreePress

Chili lovers will want to head to Greenwich this Wednesday to enjoy the third annual Chili Chow Down Challenge. Attendees can taste delicious chili and also vote for the favorite. See details inside.

H ome Improvement Giveaway THE GREAT

The Great Home Improvement Giveaway c/o Wiley Bros. Inc 1854 Rte. 40; PO Box 59 Schaghticoke, NY 12154

A $1,500 Value!

Spring is right around the corner...and what better time than now to win a $1,500 Spring Home Improvement Giveaway! That's what one lucky person will enjoy if they are the winner of our giant March giveaway. This great giveaway includes $500 shopping sprees at Wiley Brothers in Schaghticoke, Greenwich Floor Covering in Greenwich and Clear Water Pools in Greenwich. Don't delay. Fill out your oicial entry form and mail it in - or drop it of - today! Good luck!

See pages 9 - 12 for details.

Name Address Phone email (optional)

Tera Bolduc of Clearwater Pools in Greenwich says be sure to enter the home improvement giveaway!!1

EAGLE BRIDGE

Please note all entries must be on this oficial form and must be handwritten. All others are invalid. All entries must be received by 3/31/14. Any winner in the past 24 months is not eligible. Mail or Drop off only at the address above. We will announce the winner in our 4/11/14 edition. Winner required to have photo taken with sponsor for printing in paper. Must be 18 years of age to enter.

2 OFFICES TO SERVE YOU BETTER!

 ANTIQUE CENTER 

(518) 692-2886

Route 67 & Route 22 Eagle Bridge, NY (518) 686-4238 • 10am - 5pm Daily

LOW RATES • EASY PAYMENTS

NORTH COUNTRY INSURANCE AGENCY 101 Main Street, Greenwich, NY

MH

stoves • fireplaces • inserts

gas • wood • pellet • corn • coal Cash-N-Carry or Complete Installation

the stovery 518-638-8950 • www.thestovery.com

Heating Oil • Kero • Diesel Budget • COD • Quantity • Will Call Auto

518-792-2220

M ark harwooD Construction & Mechanical

518-692-9601

www.greenwichnyinsurance.com

SCHUYLERVILLE INSURANCE AGENCY

144 Broad Street, Schuylerville, NY

Design • New Homes • Additions 692-9390 Renovations • Remodeling • Painting 859-9979

518-695-4665 • 518-677-2110

www.markharwoodconstruction.com

www.schuylervilleinsurance.com


2 • The FREEPRESS • Friday, March 21, 2014

TheSCOOP by Lee Tugas

calendars@manchesternewspapers.com

HOOSICK FALLS Today, Friday, March 21 is the last day to register for the Hoosick Falls Soccer Club. The season runs from May 3 to June 7. To sign up, visit https://hoosickfallssoccer.sportssignup.com// login, call 944-4971 or email peasag17@aol.com.

ists are invited to decorate a birdhouse for an upcoming auction at the Greenwich Public Library. Plain wooden birdhouses are available at the library. Decorated birdhouses should be returned to the library by Saturday, April 5. On Monday, April 7, silent bidding will begin on the completed houses. All proceeds will benefit the Greenwich Public Library. Information: 518-6927157.

u

u

Friday21 Soccer Registration

Why Corsets

Birdhouse Art

STILLWATER

GREENWICH Aspiring art-

Ten

days

remain to find out why women wore stays and corsets during the Revolutionary War period, as the “Women’s History Month Display and Presentation” closes with the end of March at Stillwater’s Saratoga National Historical Park. All month, the park has offered a free-of-charge display of 18th century women’s garments. The park is located between Route 4 and Route 32 in Stillwater. For details, please call 518-670-2985, or visit www.nps.gov/sara or on Facebook at www.facebook. com/saratoganhp.

u

Fish Fry CAMBRIDGE A Lenten Fish Fry will be held at Cambridge’s St. Patrick’s Church from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Fridays during Lent. Cost is $9.50. Eat in or take-outs are available. For details, call 518-854-3692.

u Leon H. Barkley Licensed Real Estate Broker Cambridge Office: 518-677-3806 FREE CONSULTATIONS Mobile: 518-441-9910 www.barkleyrealestate.com

FULL TIME

+

PROFESSIONAL

+

THOROUGH

Penny M. Spiezio Associate Broker FREE CONSULTATIONS Mobile: 518-321-9767 penny.spiezio@gmail.com www.barkleyrealestate.com

FULL TIME

CP

+

PROFESSIONAL

+

Wizard of Oz GRANVILLE The Granville Junior-Senior High Drama Club will present the Tim Kelly version of “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” at 7 p.m. on Friday, March 21 and Saturday, March 429 Riddle Road, Greenwich, NY 12823

$239,000

THOROUGH

22. The school presents the play by special arrangement with Pioneer Drama Service, Inc. For details, contact Granville Junior-Senior High School at 518-642-1051.

u

King Lear CAMBRIDGE The final performances of the Theatre Company at Hubbard Hall’s production of King Lear will take place at 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, March 21 and 22, and at 2 p.m. on Sunday, March 23 at Hubbard Hall, 25 East Main St., Cambridge. Tickets are $25 general public, $22 for Hubbard Hall members and $15 for students and children. To purchase, go to www.hubbardhall.org or call 518-677-2495.

Saturday22 Maple Tours VERMONT Bennington County Maple Weekend Open House will be held on Saturday and Sunday, March 22 and 23, with directions to, hours of, and activities at the nearly ten participating sugar houses to be found at www.benningtonmaple.org or call 802-394-2928. Admission is free and children are encouraged to get their parents out for a day of fun.

u

COUNTRY PROPERTIES REAL ESTATE

Judy Short, Broker/Owner

Matt Johnson,

Direct Line: 518-677-3396 Email: jshort12816@aol.com

Licensed Salesperson Phone: 518-677-3635

518-677-8588

www.countrypropertiesre.com

“If you are considering a move, please give me a call. I would love to assist you through the process. Call me for all your buying and selling needs.”

Christine Nemec

Rare Historic Year-Round House on Cossayuna Lake! This charmingly renovated home combines seasonal Lake Views with Timeless Antiquity. Enjoy the intimate rooms throughout and the cozy warmth of the Wood Stove and Fireplace. Streaming Sunlight enhances the wide-board Pine Floors and Granite Counters. Unusual Aviary/Barn offers unique opportunities. Appreciate the Beautiful Landscaping and Fish Pond from the attached Deck. New Furnace, Replacement Windows Throughout, Exterior Newly Painted.

Prudential Manor Homes, REALTORS Real Estate Salesperson

®

518-669-5310 cnemec@prudentialmanor.com

One Hill Street, Greenwich NY 12834

Valarie Batchelder (518) 669-8211 val@greenrootsrealestate.com 1240 State Route 29 Greenwich, NY “The paths we take and the roots we’re from, help define who we become.”

www.LReynoldsRealEstate.com

Maple Open House RUPERT As part of Bennington County’s Maple Weekend, Merck Forest and Farmland Center will hold its annual Maple Celebration and P a n c a k e Breakfast from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on March 22 and 23. All are welcome to join in the celebration of this community event. The breakfast honors the hard work that went into the year's sugaring operation, and it celebrates the outcome of sugaring – delicious maple syrup. “We start with a home-style cooked breakfast offering our farm-raised pork sausages, locally-grown eggs, and pancakes with our own Merck’s Vermont organic syrup,” Merck Forest Spokesperson Melissa Carll said. “After, we offer a variety of activities to participate in.” Staff will demonstrate how to tap a tree, showing what the sap looks like and how it tastes, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. on both days. Also there will be story time next to a bonfire where stories of old and new are told about the traditions of sugaring. On either Saturday or Sunday, take a wagon or sleigh ride up the Frank Hatch Sap House where the Merck staff will serve MFFC-raised pork breakfast sausages, locally-grown eggs, pancakes drizzled with Merck's Vermont-certified organic syrup, and coffee and juice. Everyone is encouraged to explore the workings of the sugaring operation and observe sap being boiled, step over to the sugar maple tapping demonstrations, discover the farm, participate in the children's activities, and check the barn for newborn lambs. As always, visitors are welcome to explore our 30 miles of trails during their visit and the sugarbush. Cost of the breakfast is $10 for adults, $5 for children ages 4 to 12, and free for under age 4. Merck Forest and Farmland CONTINUED

PETERSBURGH VILLAGE HOME

Manor Homes, REALTORS®

Easy maintenance in this 3BD, Full Bath home with large deck to enjoy all the seasons. Plant a garden and sitting area by the river. Easy access to all points, capital district, VT, MA. From the metal roof to the dry basement all the work has been done. $97,500 Kathren Jaeger

Phone: (518) 573-6763

Call Preble Realty LLC at 518-854-7888 www.PrebleRealtyLLC.com This is a remarkable opportunity to create a rural business or homesite right outside the Village of CAMBRIDGE. Formerly a portion of the Owlkill Farm, this 25 ACRE piece on TURNPIKE ROAD has mostly open fields bordered by the OWLKILL STREAM and includes 2 LARGE BARNS. Ag exemption is in place and ag tenant has the right to harvest current year’s crops. LIST PRICE @ $179,000. 6.55 ACRES ON FERGUSON ROAD, GREENWICH. Sweeping VIEWS across Carter’s Pond Wildlife Management Area from this roomy mostly open parcel that is close to Cossayuna Lake. Create a private homesite with sunset views, enjoy life on a quiet townmaintained gravel road. LIST PRICE @ $39,000.

Alan Brown Realty

28 Main Street Greenwich, NY 12834 (518) 692-2066

P.O. Box 417 Salem, NY 12865 (518) 854-7331

16 S. Main St. (Rt. 40) Schaghticoke, NY 12154 (518) 753-9800

www.alanbrownrealty.com


The FREEPRESS • Friday, March 21, 2014 • 3

SCOOP

Center is located at 3270 Route 315, Rupert, Vt., 05768. Visit www.merckforest.org for more information.

u

Horse Treatment FORT ANN As part of its “Ride into Spring” event, Walker’s Farm, Home and Tack will host a seminar on treating horses who have foundered or who have laminitis from 1 to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 22 at the store on Route 4. Esco Buff, PhD will explain how he shoes 90 to 150 such afflicted horses each year, achieving a 98 percent survival rate. For details, call 518-639-5223.

u

Benefit Dinner GREENWICH A benefit dinner/auction for Susan McCormick will be held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 22 at the Greenwich Elks Lodge on Route 40. Susan is currently undergoing treatment for breast cancer and is unable to work. To donate auction items call Kelly at 788-6546; for dinner information, cal Nichole at 321-4229.

u

Classical Music MANCHESTER Selections by Mozart and Brahms will be played by Joana Genova, violin, Edward Arron, cellist, Jeewon Park, pianist, and Ariel Rudiakov, musical director of the Manchester Music Festival at 3 p.m. on Saturday, March 22 in Southern Vermont Arts Center’s Yester House Galleries on West Road. One can purchase tickets or learn further details by visiting www.mmfvt. org or by calling 802-362-1956.

u

Chicken and Biscuits PITTSTOWN Pittstown United Methodist Church Hall on Route 7 in Pittstown will serve a chicken and biscuit supper, with all of the fixings, from 4 to 6 p.m. on Saturday, March 22. Cost is $10 for adults and $5 for children 5 to 12. Children under 5 are free. To make reservations, call 518-663-5607.

u

Chicken Dinner CAMBRIDGE St. Luke’s Church in Cambridge will serve a chicken barbecue, with seatings at 4, 5 and 6 p.m. on Saturday, March 22 in the church. Advance tickets are now on sale, so call 518-677-2632, ext. 2. Cost is $10 in advance and

$11 at the door. Children under 12, pay $5.

call Chelley Tifft at 802-867-5717, ext. 190.

u

u

Community Coffeehouse Benefit Barbecue GREENWICH A coffee house, sponsored by The Citizens’ Committee for Greenwich Youth and the Greenwich Youth Center, will be held from 6 to 9 on March 22 at Seventy Main in Greenwich. In development is a music scholarship program for local youths, which would provide lessons and instruments for in-need students. A meet and greet, performances by Bob Warren, Joy Mackenzie, Tim Patrick, Tom Keller and Rural Soul Studio, baked goods and refreshments will all be offered at this night of café music. Cost is $20. Tickets are available at www.seventymain.com, or at the door.

u

Long Trail Play

HARTFORD A “Rally for Rita” chicken barbecue and basket party for Rita Swezey of Harford, who faces medical challenges, will be held at 4 p.m. on Saturday, March 22, with the barbecue served at 5 p.m. and basket drawing at 7:30 p.m. Cost is $10 per adult and $5 per child. For full details on the event, call the following: Roxanne at 518642-9453; Chip at 632-5129; or Amy at 321-0565. Doors will open at 4 p.m. Please wear purple to support cancer awareness.

Saturday, March 22 at the Bacon Hill Reformed Church on Route 32N in Schuylerville. Cost is $7 for adults and $4 for children. Takeouts are available. Proceeds provide financial assistance for youths attending Camp Fowler in the summer. For general information, call 518-695-4325. The actual contact person is Peg Hall at 518-584-3290.

u CONTINUED

Top Cash Paid For All Unwanted, Broken & Damaged Jewelry, Gold & Silver Coins and Paper Money! EXTRA CA$H PAID WITH THIS COUPON!

u

Spaghetti Dinner SCHUYLERVILLE A “Camp Fowler Spaghetti Dinner” will be served from 4 to 6 p.m. on

DORSET The William Prenetta one-actor, “Silenced on Barbour Street,” will be performed by the Long Trail School’s drama troupe at 7:15 p.m. on Saturday, March 22 at the school, with a dinner preceding performance. Cost is $25 for dinner, entertainment, dessert and play, and $10 for play and dessert only. The play is for mature audiences. For details,

NATIONAL GOLD & SILVER

EXCHANGE FORMERLY

CSA

MON.-FRI. 10-4, SAT. 10-NOON CAMBRIDGE STOVE AND CHIMNEY First sweep $99.

(FirstÊsweepÊincludesÊinspection) www.cambridgestoveandchimney.com info@cambridgestoveandchimney.com

Lacy Bailey Chimney Sweep

518 677 7082

Fresh Dough Daily! 2 South Park St Cambridge, NY

677-2000

AUTO BROKERS

518-747-5917 3067 State Rte 4, Hudson Falls, NY 12839

EAGLE BRIDGE  ANTIQUE CENTER  Route 67 & Route 22, Eagle Bridge, NY (518) 686-4238 • Open 10am - 5pm Daily

STORE CLOSING SALE! All Item In Store

Come Early for Be

SALE ON NOW!

WE ACCEPT

Dominic Centurioni, President & CEO

Over 35 years of experience buying and appraising jewelry, coins and antiques. We buy all gold & silver jewelry, coins, flatware, vintage & antique. March 22nd, 11AM-4PM Weekly.

Restaurant & Tavern

Final Markdown! Last day of business 3/31/14

ion t a d i u q i L Total THING EVERY GO MUST

Centurioni Coin, Jewelry, & Antique Co.

Route 67 Eagle Bridge, NY

518-686-3500

SATURDAY MARCH 22ND Music with

Music with

TAPESTRY

DON KAHN

7:00 P.M.

7:00 P.M.

NEW WINTER HOURS: Thursday - Saturday Opening at 4 P.M. Closed Sunday - Wednesday

di on 4/1/14 and 4/2/14.

Yankee One Dollar Greenwich Plaza, Greenwich, NY

CHECK OUT OUR DAILY SPECIALS!

“AMISH BUILT SHEDS AND MORE”

We are

t

SATURDAY MARCH 29TH

Our products feature high quality craftsmanship and materials that can withstand the elements for many years... all at lower prices.

518-639-3055 6854 State Route 4 Fort Ann, NY 12827 NEW LOCATION!


4 • The FREEPRESS • Friday, March 21, 2014


80+ Adorable Pets Inside Needing A Home!

HealthyLiving

12 page pullout supplement

Week of March 17, 2014

No gluten, please! When Shelley Fairbanks started losing a lot of weight and experiencing severe stomach pains her junior year of high school, her doctors were perplexed.

Less sugar, please! Many people have a love-hate relationship with sugar. They may love how it tastes, but they also may hate the effects sugar can have on their bodies. As a result, many men and women would love to reduce their sugar consumption. The American Heart Association reports that the average adult in the United States consumes 22 teaspoons of added sugar every day, which equals 150 pounds per year. Teenagers consume even more, averaging 34 teaspoons every day. According to Statistics Canada, Canadians consume an average of 110 grams, or 26 teaspoons, of sugar daily. These numbers are

See SUGAR, pg. 2

Less severe than Celiac disease but also very It took them a year to finally diagnose her with damaging is gluten allergy or intolerance, which Celiac disease, which is an immune reaction to is becoming more prevalent. In fact, recent studgluten. It causes the body to essentially attack ies estimate that 5 to 10 percent itself, according to resident Amy Explaining the gluten free of all people may suffer from Rota-Poulin, an affiliate for the intolerance, according National Foundation for Celiac diet in 834 words / Pg. 2 gluten to statisticbrain.com. Awareness. Despite increasing awareGluten is a protein in wheat, ness about the health problem and a prolific rye and barley, which shows up in bread and increase in products claiming to be “gluten-free,” pasta, but may also hide in many other foods, medical science is still somewhat in the dark on such as cold cuts, salad dressings, beer and even the matter. licorice, according to webmd.com. Fairbanks said she’s been to three local gastroOnce Fairbanks, of North Granville, was diagenterologists, all of whom have different opinions nosed, she removed all forms of gluten and crossand beliefs about her health. contaminated products from her diet and person“Basically what I’ve learned: The whole gluten al care and gained back weight. Her condition thing is really still a mystery to even doctors improved for a couple of years, until she became claiming they are an ‘expert’ in the matter,” she very sick two years into college and was found to said. have severe Crohn’s disease and had to take a Gluten intolerance can be an unseen ailment, break. However, despite her not showing up on genetic tests to have Celiac, doctors said she still has it. See GLUTEN, pg. 2

CALL 800-354-4232 TO HAVE YOUR BUSINESS INCLUDED IN OUR NEXT HEALTHY LIVING


2 • Manchester Newspapers’ Healthy Living – Week of March 17, 2014

Gluten Continued from front page unlike more acute allergies, such as peanuts. Rota-Poulin, who also has a glutenfree cookbook and cooking show, said other than minor or major stomach pain or problems, symptoms can include light brain fog, bloating and heavy fatigue. She said the causes of the intolerance or Celiac disease aren’t certain, but she adheres to popular belief that a prevalence of refined, processed foods might be to blame. A recent study pub-

lished in the Journal of Interdisciplinary Toxicology by Dr. Anthony Samsel and Dr. Stephanie Seneff showed a correlation between the increased prevalence of Celiac disease and gluten intolerance and the use of glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, a popular herbicide. “There’s a lot of changes and modifications to our foods. Is it just because we eat too much refined flower, refined processes, bleaching processes? Artificial colors and flavors and preservatives?” she asked. Fairbanks said she has heard a theory about wheat being so genetically altered nowadays that humans’ gut bacteria can’t handle it.

The good news is in most cases, gluten intolerance or even Celiac disease can be treated by removing gluten from one’s diet. However, Rota-Poulin pointed out that gluten is often hidden in unlikely foods or items—from medication to turkey to shampoo. Even products labeled gluten-free often contain derivatives or were processed in a facility that could lead to heavy cross-contamination. “It’s overwhelming at first, but once you know you can fly through it,” she said of dealing with intolerance. Both she and Fairbanks offered tips for those who think or know they have a gluten allergy. “If anyone thinks they have an intol-

erance, make sure you get all the tests— blood, endoscopy and genetic, because I had Crohn’s that went diagnosed for a long time,” Fairbanks said. Rota-Poulin had several suggestions as well. n Make sure you have a great doctor that listens to you, and know your body. n If you know you have a gluten intolerance or Celiac disease, “don’t dim the lights”—take it on. Don’t cheat or you’ll cause yourself pain and damage. n Never assume something is glutenfree, even if it should be. Contact a manufacturer to make sure a product is certified. n Join a group; it’s free and it’s great

What does a gluten free diet mean? Dietary fads come and go, but the gluten-free movement is one nutritional trend that seems to have staying power. The gluten-free diet was once largely exclusive to sufferers of Celiac disease, a condition that damages the lining of the small intestine, preventing it from absorbing parts of food the body needs to stay healthy. That damage is the byproduct of the body’s reaction to gluten, a term used to describe proteins found in specific grains. But while the gluten-free diet remains a necessity for those who cannot tolerate gluten, nowadays even nonsufferers are embracing the gluten-free diet for a variety of reasons. One such reason is non-Celiac gluten sensitivity, or NCGS. Though NCGS is not as severe as Celiac disease, research has suggested that a gluten-free diet can relieve NCGS symptoms, which include abdominal pain and headaches. Allergies are another reason some people may opt for a gluten-free diet. Unlike Celiac disease or NCGS, both of which are digestive system responses to gluten, wheat allergy is an immune-system response and, like other allergies, can be outgrown. But until a wheat allergy is outgrown, it’s best to avoid foods, including those with gluten, that might trigger an allergic reaction. While a gluten-free diet is a necessity for people with Celiac disease, NCGS or wheat allergies, according to Michell Nacouzi, MD, a primary care physician at Duke Primary Care Brier Creek, it may provide little health benefit to those without such conditions. But that doesn’t mean the popularity of the gluten-free diet is about to wane. Those without a preexisting medical condition who are considering a gluten-free diet anyway should know a few things about this diet before making such a drastic change. n Gluten-free is not easy. Unlike eliminating sugary soft drinks or cutting back on fried foods,

going cold turkey on gluten can be very difficult. Many people who adopt a gluten-free diet find it extremely challenging, as gluten proteins can be found in additives, making something as seemingly simple as reading labels a lot trickier than it looks. Though labels may not list gluten among a product’s ingredients, men and women must be aware of all additives that contain gluten proteins in order to avoid gluten entirely. And while supermarkets are stocking more gluten-free products, shopping for groceries while on a gluten-free diet can be tedious. n Certain foods and drinks must be avoided. Though people considering a gluten-free diet are aware that such a diet requires some sacrifices, they may not know which foods and beverages they will need to avoid until they have instituted the diet. For example, a gluten-free diet excludes any beverages that contain barley, meaning beer cannot be part of a gluten-free diet. Though many gluten-free beers are now on the market, beer afficionados may find such alternatives cannot compare to the real thing. Rye and wheat products also must be avoided, and these include products whose labels list bulgur, durum flour, farina, graham flour, kamut, semolina, and spelt among their ingredients. Though there are now many gluten-free foods on the market, unless labels say gluten-free, the following are a handful of products that should be avoided: n Breads n Cakes and pies n Cereals n Croutons

~ Prenatal Visits ~ Newborn Care ~ Breast Feeding ~ Lending Library ~ Well Visits ~ Adolescent Care ~ Comprehensive Care to Children with Special Needs ~ Consultations With Parents (about wide range of needs) ~ Accepting Most Insurances, Including Medicaid

Main Street Pediatrics 33 Gilbert Street (Route 313) Cambridge, NY 12816 Seema Chaudhari M.D. George Ruta M.D.

518-677-8575

n French fries n Pastas n Salad dressings n Soy sauce n Soups Many doctors also recommend men and women on a gluten-free diet avoid oats, as they can easily be contaminated with wheat during the growing and processing stages of production. n Be mindful of the dangers of cross-contamination. Cross-contamination can occur during the manufacturing process when gluten-free foods come into contain with foods that contain gluten. Manufacturers typically include the phrase “may contain” on labels as a warning to consumers looking to avoid gluten and other ingredients. When labels include this phrase, there’s a strong chance that cross-contamination has occurred, and such products should be avoided by men and women on gluten-free diets. Cross-contamination also can occur when gluten-free foods are prepared on the same surfaces as foods containing gluten. For example, toasting gluten-free bread in the same toaster as regular bread can easily lead to contamination. Preventing crosscontamination can be a difficult task, and that difficulty merits consideration by people who want to adopt a gluten-free diet. n A gluten-free diet may lead to a vitamin and nutrient deficiency. Grains are often rich in vitamins, and avoiding grains as part of a glutenfree diet can deprive men and women of these vitamins, weakening their bodies as a result. When adopting a gluten-free diet, speak with a dietitian to ensure your diet has enough iron, calcium, fiber, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and folate. If the diet is lacking, you will need to make adjustments.

“Your friends and neighbors in health care.”

• Prescriptions • Prescription transfers • Walkers • Wheelchairs • Lift chairs • Accept most major insurances, including Medicare/Medicaid 275 Route 30 North, Bomoseen, VT Tel: 802.468.5800 Fax: 802.468.5811 jason.smith2793@gmail.com

Community Tour by Appointment 5 General Wing Road, Rutland VT

$373


Manchester Newspapers’ Healthy Living – Week of March 17, 2014 • 3

Health center has provided quality care since 1996 Mettowee Valley Family Health Center is a family practice medical office located on Route 149 in West Pawlet, Vt., just over the border from Granville, N.Y. The health center has been providing care to patients throughout the region since 1996. Currently, the center is staffed by two physicians, Carl Beckler, MD, and Brian Kilpatrick, MD of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, and three mid-level providers, Michael Dashnaw, RPA, Jacki Becker, NP, and Jean Morgan, NP, office manager Colleen Bates said. All providers are Family Practice Medicine for Adults and Children. Janine Small, LICSW, has also joined the staff on a part time basis to help with patients who have behavioral health needs, she added. Center staff members are school phy-

sicians for the Granville Central School System and are on staff at the Orchard Nursing Centre, Bates said. They also provide care for work-related injuries for several area businesses. Mettowee Valley Family Health Center, affiliated with Community Health Centers of the Rutland Region, offers extended office hours in the evening on most days for the convenience of its patients. They also are open at 7 a.m. on most mornings to offer early appointments to their patients who would like to receive their medical care before they go to work or school. Its sister office in Castleton, Vt., is open on Saturdays and Sundays for patients who need urgent medical care on the weekends. The MVFHC providers see patients on the weekends at the Castleton office on a rotating basis.

There is on-call service available after regular office hours if their patients have an emergency or need to speak with a doctor. Mettowee Valley Family Health Center has been recognized by the American Diabetes Association as part of the CHCRR Diabetes Education Center. Jacki Becker, NP, and Colleen Bates, MA, are the diabetes educators at Mettowee Valley. Their program consists of one-on-one sessions with Jacki, while Colleen provides group education classes. Currently, the program is open to diabetic patients who are patients of one of the MVFHC providers. For more information, call the office at 802-6450580 and ask for Colleen. Mettowee Valley Family Health Center offers sliding-fee scales to their patients who do not have medical insur-

ance. There is an application process and the sliding-fee scale is based on income and family size. Please call the office to inquire about the sliding-fee scales or to make an appointment with Kathie to find out if you qualify. Visit our web site at www.chcrr.org. As a patient of MVFHC or any Community Health Centers of the Rutland Region office, you will receive an invitation to sign up for our patient portal after we have entered your email address into our computer system. With an active patient portal account, you may request a prescription refill online, request an appointment on-line or pay your bill on-line. To call Mettowee Valley Family Health Center, dial 802-645-0580 or if you have to call long distance you may call 1-800-730-2559.

Here's some healthy ways to banish belly fat Belly fat is often considered more of a cosmetic issue than a health issue. But few outside of the medical or fitness communities may know that belly fat is not only unsightly but unhealthy as well. Excessive belly fat can increase a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, and even certain cancers, including breast cancer and colon cancer. So while many people may want to reduce their belly fat for cosmetic purposes, they can also use improving their overall health as a motivating factor when attempting to trim their waistlines. The following are a few healthy ways to reduce belly fat.

n Adopt a healthy diet. Belly fat is often the first victim when men and women adopt a healthy diet and begin to lose weight. Researcher Kristen Hairston, MD, an assistant professor of endocrinology and metabolism at Wake Forest School of Medicine, found that people who ate 10 grams of soluble fiber per day but made no other changes to their diet built up less fat over time than others. In addition to fiber, you should include fruits, vegetables and lean proteins in your diet. These foods will help you feel more full, which will curb your hunger and, as a result, reduce your caloric intake.

YOUR GLUTEN-FREE BAKERY!

LifeSource Chiropractic

BOMOSEEN

Dr. Brian E. Sweeney

BREAD BASKET Come see us at the Winter Market on Saturdays from 10am-2pm at 251 West Street in Rutland or Call Mon-Fri 8-6

802-683-0677 ORDER 1 DAY AHEAD Castleton, VT bomoseenbreadbasket@comcast.net GLUTEN-FREE BAKED GOODS!

WELCOMES Continuing the care provided by Dr. Dean Harrison who is retiring.

NEW HOURS Monday - Thursday: 9am to 5pm Friday: 8am to 1pm Saturday: 9am to 11am

2 Riverside Drive Middle Granville, NY (across from Post Office)

518-642-2022

SPRING – A TIME FOR NEW BEGINNINGS! Put your people skills to work where it matters! For over 50 years our staff has supported the needs, hopes and dreams of individuals with an intellectual or developmental disability in Warren Washington & Albany Counties. Advancement potential! A workplace with stability! Great Benefits! Extensive Paid Training! Work/Life Balance! Greater Glens Falls area, including Warrensburg, Granville, Ft. Ann and Argyle.

Entry Level Positions – Full-time/Part-time $10.60 per hour – without experience Preferred qualifications: HS or GED, insurable driver’s license for at least 2 years and must have the ability to complete our required training. Visit our website: www.wwaarc.org Apply Mon.-Fri. 8am-4pm or send cover letter and resume to:

Warren Washington & Albany ARC 436 Quaker Road Queensbury, NY 12804 Equal Opportunity employer, females, minorities, disabled, veterans.

n Get some rest. A good night's sleep, which is at least seven hours of sleep each night, has been shown to reduce fat over an extended period of time. Though the exact relationship between sleep and belly fat is unknown, a lack of sleep can force men and women to look to sugary beverages or snacks to provide a boost during the day. Such drinks and snacks can cause weight gain, especially among those people who routinely fail to get a good night's sleep. n Get off the couch and exercise. Exercise is another effective way to reduce belly fat. Numerous studies have shown the positive effect that daily, vigorous exercise can have on overall

health. For example, a study conducted by researchers at Duke University found that 30 minutes of vigorous aerobic exercise, which includes jogging or working out on a cardiovascular machine, such as an elliptical or a treadmill, four times per week can reduce fat and slow down the buildup of fat over time. Those who want to reduce belly fat will likely need to emphasize vigorous exercise. While those hoping to prevent the buildup of belly fat should know that studies have shown, when coupled with a healthy diet, moderate activity, which includes anything that raises your heart rate, three times per week may be enough to slow down fat buildup.


4 • Manchester Newspapers’ Healthy Living – Week of March 17, 2014

Do you know the early warning signs of Alzheimer's? Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. It is a progressive, degenerative disorder that attacks neurons and essentially robs people of their memory and language skills. Although there is no cure for Alzheimer’s, there are therapies that can slow its neurological impact. Recognizing the early warning signs of Alzheimer’s can encourage people to begin treatments that can stave off some of the more debilitating symptoms of this disease. Though it’s most common among the elderly, Alzheimer’s is not a normal part of aging. The Mayo Clinic says that the reasons behind the inception and progression of Alzheimer’s disease are

METTOWEE VALLEY

SPEECH THERAPY SERVICES, PLLC 88 Mettowee Street Granville, NY 12832 Specializing in Speech and Language Therapy for Children, Adolescents and Adults Accepting Fidelis Care, CDPHP, GHI, Empire Blue Cross/Blue Shield and Medicare

Call 518-642-3942 for an appointment

largely unknown. It is believed damage starts a decade or more before problems become evident. Abnormal deposits of proteins begin to form the amyloid plaques and tau tangles throughout the brain, and these formations are the hallmarks of the disease. Once-healthy neurons gradually begin to lose their efficiency and ability to function and communicate with one another. As more neurons die, entire areas of the brain shrink. The hippocampus, which is the area of the brain essential in forming memories, may soon become compromised. Millions of people in North America are estimated to have Alzheimer’s disease and many others will be diagnosed.

ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS You must be at least 62 years of age to apply. Lufkin Commons, Argyle, Moss Street Square, Hudson Falls Westfield Heights, Fort Ann

1 Bedroom From $406 - $500 2 Bedrooms From $460 - $600 Household Income Must Be Less Than:

1 Person $22,050 - $26,460 2 Person $25,200 - $30,240

Affordable rent includes heat & hot water, garbage pick-up, lawn care & snow removal.

HomeFront Development Corporation 518-747-8250, press #5.

The following are the most common early signs and symptoms of the disease. n Memory loss: According to the Alzheimer’s Organization, early memory loss can include forgetting important dates or repeatedly asking for the same information. Forgetting recently learned information and having to rely increasingly on memory aids is another potential indicator of Alzheimer’s.

n Misplacing items: Everyone loses something at a point in time, but those with Alzheimer’s may put items in unusual places. They may sometimes accuse others of stealing when they cannot retrace their steps and find items. n Decreased judgment: Decision-making abilities may be compromised. A person with Alzheimer’s may take unnecessary risks or give away sums of money.

n Declining cognition: Impaired reasoning or judgment, trouble finding the right words and visual and spatial issues also may be early indicators of Alzheimer’s. n Difficulty completing familiar tasks: Those with Alzheimer’s sometimes have trouble driving to a familiar location or remembering the rules to a favorite game. People who were once good with numbers may now have difficulty balancing their checkbooks, while those who love to cook may have trouble following recipes. n Time confusion: Another indicator of Alzheimer’s disease is losing track of time. One may have trouble understanding something that isn’t happening in the present. Alzheimer’s sufferers often forget where they are and how they got there.

n Mood changes: People with Alzheimer’s may suffer from confusion, suspicious feelings, depression and anxiety. A person may upset easily or become anxious outside of his or her comfort zones. Age and family history of Alzheimer’s disease are the biggest risk factors. The liklihood of developing Alzheimer’s doubles about every five years after age 65, says the Alzheimer’s Organization. In addition, those with a parent, child or sibling who have developed Alzheimer’s are more likely to develop the disease than people with no such family history. A physical and neurological exam, which may include blood tests and brain imaging, will be used to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease. Individuals can learn more by making appointments with their doctors.

Home of the

Choose a Place Where Excellence is the Standard Moreau (518) 792-1000 Wilton (518) 580-0702 Saratoga (518) 584-3317 Malta (518) 581-2800

• 24-hour care, RN on site • Customized care plans for each resident • Private suites, daily activities, transportation • Meals, housekeeping and laundry services • A continuum of care which allows residents to “age in place”

www.homeofthegoodshepherd.com

The New York State Department of Health Radon Program reminds you of the U.S. Surgeon General’s warning:

Radon Causes Lung Cancer. You Should Test Your Home. Radon is an invisible radioactive gas that seeps into your home from underground. The only way to tell if your home has dangerous levels of radon is to test for it. Once detected, homes with high levels of radon can be easily fixed. For more information or to order a test kit, call:

518-746-2560

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Washington County Linda S. Law-Saunders, FCS Educator

Dental Office

We want to make you

NEW PATIENTS WELCOME!

All Commercial Ins - preferred providers of NE Delta, CBA Blue and Metlife, Vermont Medicaid. Available sliding fee scale, self-pay 35% discount.

HOURS: Monday-Friday 7:30AM - 5:00PM

Community Dental Community Health Centers of the Rutland Region

802-774-5050 69 ALLEN STREET, SUITE 10, RUTLAND, VT


Manchester Newspapers’ Healthy Living – Week of March 17, 2014 • 5

How to reduce your risk for Alzheimer's disease Alzheimer’s disease affects millions of people across the globe. In the United States alone, the Alzheimer’s Association estimates one in eight older men and women has the disease, which is the sixth-leading cause of death in the country. Few families have not been affected by Alzheimer’s disease, and many relatives of those with the disease fully understand the role family history can play. Research into the disease is ongoing, and it’s already yielded valuable information that may help reduce the prevalence of this devastating disease in the years to come. One byproduct of researchers’ efforts is the discovery that it may be possible to prevent or delay the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease through the implementation of a combination of healthy lifestyle choices. The following are a few healthy habits that may help men and women reduce their risk for Alzheimer’s. n Exercise regularly. A study conducted by Scottish researchers and published in the journal Neurology in 2012 touted exercise as the most effective way for adults to protect their brains from Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers examined roughly 700 70-year-old participants, all of whom were born in 1936, who were asked to report their levels of physical activity. Each participant then received an MRI at age 73. Those tests revealed that the participants who were more physically active showed less brain shrinkage and fewer white matter lesions, both of which are indicators of Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, the Alzheimer’s Research & Prevention Foundation reports that physical exercise reduces a person’s

risk of developing Alzheimer’s by 50 percent and can even slow further deterioration in those who have already begun to develop the cognitive problems associated with Alzheimer’s. Researchers continue to study the relationship between physical activity and the development ofAlzheimer’s diseases, but the evidence is mounting that regular exercise, regardless of a person’s age, is a great way to reduce risk for Alzheimer’s. n Eat healthy. What you put into your body may also reduce your risk for Alzheimer’s disease. The brain operates at its best when it is fueled with a healthy diet that includes fresh fruit and vegetables, healthy fats and lean protein. A heart-healthy diet is also brain-healthy, and researchers have found a potential link between heart disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Researcher Larry Sparks of the Sun Health Research Institute in Arizona and formerly of the Kentucky medical examiner’s office studied brain tissues with a goal of finding early signs of Alzheimer’s disease. He discovered that those who had the telltale plaques of Alzheimer’s disease also had heart disease, suggesting heart disease may be a forerunner of brain diseases like Alzheimer’s. The Alzheimer’s Association feels this link between the two will only grow stronger in the years to come, suggesting that a hearthealthy diet that reduces a person’s risk of heart disease may also reduce the risk forAlzheimer’s down the road. More information on a heart-healthy diet is available at www.heart.org.

n Remain socially active. Staying socially active into older adulthood is important for a variety of reasons, not

Providing the Comfort, Quality & Service you deserve! Let us help you choose a mattress that’s right for you at a price you can afford.

TRUCKLOAD SALE CASH & CARRY SPECIALS

TWIN SETS starting at $129 Don’t be fooled by the price, these are quality mattresses!

Memory Foam SERTA Mattress King Matts QUEEN

$499

Get 2 FREE Memory Foam Pillows w/Purchases

$299

FUTONS, HEADBOARDS & FOOTBOARDS

FREE Frame Plus Delivery & Setup (Excludes Cash & Carry Specials)

See our Website for Specials!

dreamsleepmattress.com

LOW COST CAT SPAY & NEUTER CLINICS Cost: Female Cat $60 1st and 3rd Wednesday of every month. Male Cat $25 Second Wednesday.

Current Rabies Vaccine Required Please call for details and an appointment

Granville Small Animal Hospital 9928 State Route 22, P.O. Box 203 Middle Granville, NY 12849

granvillesmallanimalhospital.com

Come see our full line of

SPECIAL NEEDS

MIDWIFERY, LLP

FURNITURE

140 Hospital Drive ��� Suite 205 Bennington, VT 05201 (802) 447-2677 or (888) 448-VIEW

Michael P. Finnegan PT, ATC

the least of which is that research has indicated the brain functions better when men and women are not isolated from others. Memory and cognition are stronger when people remain socially active and engaged in their society, so retirees should look for ways to revive their social lives as a means to protecting their brains from the onset of Alzheimer’s or dementia. Alzheimer’s disease remains an enigma in many ways. But ongoing research continues to show that men and women can take measures to actively prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease and improve their quality of life as a result.

(518) 642-1283

n Stimulate yourself mentally. Mental stimulation can help the brain

WOMEN‛S VIEW

GYNECOLOGICAL & OBSTETRICAL CARE

218 B R. 4A West Castleton, VT 05735 Tel 802-468-5555 Fax 802-468-5557

M. B. Kilmer Funeral Home

www.kilmerfuneralhome.com Fort Edward 747-9266

Argyle 638-8216

Call Toll-Free 1-800-598-5784 Or email mbkilmer@kilmerfuneralhome.com

©2008 Copyrighted Material

• Pap Smears • Breast Exams • Birth Control • Mammograms • Menopause • Well Visits • GYN Problems Kim Griffin, CNM Amy Kranick, CNM

Kelley Odorisio, PT

South Glens Falls 745-8116

stay sharp, and men and women who find ways to stay mentally stimulated can reduce their risk of developing Alzheimer’s. Embrace activities that require communication and interaction with others, and find time for additional tasks that can stimulate your brain. These may include studying a foreign language, reading, trying your hand at mentally stimulating puzzles such as crosswords or Sudoku, and other activities that emphasize organization. Such activities are essentially workouts for your brain that can help it stay sharp as you age.

Quality Manor

Furniture & Mattress

www.livingstonsfurn.com GLENS FALLS • Corner Dix Ave & Quaker Rd • 793-2888


6 • Manchester Newspapers’ Healthy Living – Week of March 17, 2014

"There's Trouble" in Washington County What do you get for a $550 adoption fee at Double L Stable Equine Rescue and Sanctuary? You might get lucky and find ‘There’s Trouble’ in Washington County like Jackie did nearly a decade ago. With the deep freeze weather clutching most of the country these days it put Shannon Hahn, co-founder of Double L, in mind of the very first thoroughbred that came to the rescue directly off the racetrack. It was late in the year and the ground was frozen hard and covered with snow. Early in the evening the phone rang and it was a contact asking if the rescue had room for a racehorse. The rescue had handled plenty of thoroughbreds but this would be the first coming right off the track. Double L received the beautiful welltraveled mare the next day after her four-hour trailer ride from the Fingerlakes racetrack. She had raced at Aqueduct, Belmont Park, Tampa Bay, and then finally, The Fingerlakes. The lovely chestnut named ‘Threes Trouble’ was polite and kind and very agreeable. She boasted a shiny red coat and beautiful snow white stocking and blaze. Her ears were alert as she took in her new surroundings and assessed the horses around her. The bright thoroughbred mare wondered at Pearl the mule when she brayed her hello. Pearl, now at 50 years old, has been living in the sanctuary for a number of years and continues to sing her hellos to the new arrivals. Theres Trouble was quickly given the name ‘Chrissy’ in light of the impending Christmas holiday. It seemed to fit. Her personality was illuminating like holiday lights and her movement reminded everyone of tinsel floating off

the branches of the tree. It did not take long for her to get adopted by a wonderful woman named Kelly Davis. Chrissy spent a month with a local trainer to learn how to become a pleasure horse but the match was not to be and so she was put back up for adoption. The connection Chrissy helped forge between Kelly and Double L was amazing and Kelly went on to adopt three more horses over the years giving them all fabuChrissy with Ayla. lous lives. Chrissy can take the credit for those rescues. It was luck that a woman named Jackie was in the market for a new horse. Chrissy was just what Jackie was looking for. On a cool early spring morning Double L’s trailer pulled into a newly built paddock to bring Chrissy to her new home. The run in sheds were going up quickly, the grass was starting to just peek out and Chrissy was home. She has proven to be a wonderful addition to Jackie’s family since 2005 when her racing career ended. Over the past decade the horse, born in 1998, foaled out of Top Of The Charts by Islefaxyou, has learned to ride English and Western. She has carried riders in all types of situations and is currently learning to do a drill routine with three

other horses. Although she learned her part just fine, her riding companions have been retired and so her debut as a drill team horse will have to wait. Her health has been wonderful through out all of her adventures and she has required very few visits from the vet outside of the normal yearly check up and shots. She is not a stressful horse and lets everything just roll along agreeably. She gets along fine with other horses and doesn’t make trouble, giving her name an ironic twist. Jackie’s granddaughter Ayla is learning to ride on Chrissy now. Earlier in the year a horse was acquired for the little girl but it turned out it needed more work and time to be child safe and trustworthy for the young rider. Once again Chrissy took on a new role. The safety of this young girl has been placed in Chrissy’s care and she has come though with grace as usual. The chestnut mare, which had a total of 64 starts in her career, is now starting a little girl on her way to years of equine enjoyment. Chrissy is such a good-tempered mature steed and at the age of 16 is ready to start her next chapter of fun and will be learning trail course riding

this year. Is there anything this girl can’t do? It does not look like it. With a total career earning of just over $81,000 she has proved herself dozens of times over and shown how the love and dedication a willing, smart off-track thoroughbred can freely give is priceless. Jackie is looking forward to many more years of riding and love with her dear friend and Double L is proud to say they helped make this match turning this exracer into a cherished family member. Double L Stable Equine Rescue and Sanctuary has gotten many calls over the past few years from people who have become victims of the hard economy. So many individuals are unable to keep their horses due to the rising cost of everything. The heartbreaking stories are coming in faster then the horses can find homes. Chissy has known the love and security of her family for so long and is giving back in her own equine way, now working with the next generation of the family’s riders. Double L will continue to help in any way they can and with each horse placed in safety smile just for a moment. ‘Theres Trouble’ may have been the very first ex-runner ever placed by Double L but she will not be the last. Double L Stable Equine Rescue and Sanctuary also continues to work with at risk youth and high-function handicapped folks as well as people doing community service through the local county drug court. Your support is very much appreciated. If you are looking to adopt check out the horses Double L Equine Rescue and Sanctuary has listed at www.doublelstableequine.petfinder.org We are located on 9 Tilford Rd. in Argyle, N.Y.

Caring Compassionate Committed Rehabilitation Services & Long Term Care

Now offering Outpatient Therapy Services for patients of all ages.

10421 State Route 40 • Granville, NY 12832 Phone (518) 642-2346 • Fax (518) 642-3870 www.clrchealth.com

• Recipient of the 2009 Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award for performance excellence. • 2008 New York State Health Facility Association Award for Innovative Practice in Nutritional Services. • Physical, Occupational & Speech Therapy • Onsite Physician, Podiatry, Dental & Ophthalmology • Locally Owned and Operated • Activities Programs & Concerts • Religious Services


Manchester Newspapers’ Healthy Living – Week of March 17, 2014 • 7

Mettowee Valley Speech Therapy offers services to meet individual needs neurologic impairment and swallowing. Claudia H. Ellis is a licensed speech language pathologist who has operated Mettowee Valley Speech Therapy Services, PLLC in the Granville area since 1996. The office has been serving children, adolescents and adults at the Mettowee St. office since February of 2002. Services are provided through private insurance, private pay, schools and programs for children ages 3-5 with speech and language delays. The office accepts Fideliscare, Empire Plan, Empire Blue Cross/Blue Shield, CDPHP, GHI/ Emblem Health and Medicare.

How we speak and how we learn is directly related to our ability to understand and communicate our wants, needs, feelings and ideas. Speech disorders were first identified and discussed in the late 1800’s but it wasn’t until the 1940’s and 50’s that the profession began to develop and work with people of all ages with a variety of communication disorders. Over the past 70 years, speech language pathologists have worked to improve the lives of children and adults with disorders related to delayed development, speech impairment, learning disabilities, physical anomalies, stuttering, voice,

Mettowee Valley Speech Therapy Services specializes in working with children and adolescents with delayed development, speech impairment, learning disabilities and autism spectrum disorders. Therapy is individualized to meet the individual’s specific needs after a thorough assessment has been completed. Frequency of therapy is dependent upon the need of the patient. Questions related to specific concerns can be addressed by calling the office at 518-642-3942 or sending an e-mail to cellisslp@gmail.com. Also visit our Facebook page at Mettowee Valley Speech Therapy Services, PLLC.

Did you know?

Cambridge

People frequently take human hair for granted, especially if they have it in abundance. While hair can help keep your head warm, there's more to hair than what meets the eye. For a healthy individual with no hair diseases, hair is very strong with enormous tensile strength. In fact, human hair is about as strong as copper wire of the same diameter. That means one strand of hair can support up to 100 grams in weight. Considering the average head of hair contains about 100,000 to 150,000 strands of hair in all, the combined strength of human hair could feasibly support up to 12 tons, or the equivalent of two African elephants.

Food Co-op

518•677•5731

Local & Organic Produce Bulk Teas & Spices Locally Roasted Coffee Kombucha on Tap Local & Artisan Cheeses

Apartments Available The Gables at East Mountain, Rutland County’s only full-service retirement community, has several openings for new residents. Call Randi Cohn or Jay Grimes at 770-5263 to learn how worry-free living can be within your reach. Dining services

Housekeeping

Transportation

All are Welcome! Working and Supporting Memberships Available Now!

Affordable monthly fees

80% return on entry fee

HOURS: Mon-Sat 10 to 6 • Thurs 10 to 8 Sun 11 to 2:30

Rutland, VT

1 West Main Street, Cambridge, NY www.cambridgefoodcoop.com

The Gables Retirement Community

(802) 770-5263

www.thegablesvt.com

We Accept New York and Vermont Medicare & Medicaid Programs.

A Tradition of Friendly Family Care Providers Since 1967 Since way back when, generations of families have brought their health care concerns to the friendly, knowledgeable healthcare professionals at Castleton Family Health Center

OUR HOURS ARE: 7:30AM-7PM MON, TUES, THURS & FRI 9AM-5PM WED • 8AM-4PM SAT 9AM-3PM SUN

Services include: • • • • • • • • • •

On-site lab and x-ray services On-site full service retail pharmacy Same day appointments available Acute Care Service Pediatrics Geriatrics Women’s Health Care Behavioral Health Services Evening & Weekend Hours Sliding Fee Scale

Erica Tamblini, LICSW

Jeffrey Stall, MD

J. Andrew Gorton, PA-C

Colleen Mitchell, MSN-FNP

Judith M. Ellwood, MSN-FPN

Stephen Kornbluth, MD

Jill Read, PNP

Stephen D. Rosmus, MD

Bradley Berryhill, MD

Luis Bauzo, MD

Photos not available: H. Peter Diercksen, MD • James Jordan, MD • Megan Greenleaf, MD • Julie Foster, MD • Shana Berger, MD • Deborah Boston, LIC W

CASTLETON FAMILY HEALTH CENTER

COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTERS OF THE RUTLAND REGION

A personal companion program from Rutland Area Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice... the agency you have known and trusted for more than 60 years.

OUR OTHER SITES: Brandon • Mettowee • Rutland • Shorewell • CHCRR Dental

Visit our Website: chcrr.org

802.468.5641

275 Route 30 North Bomoseen, Vermont 05732


8 • Manchester Newspapers’ Healthy Living – Week of March 17, 2014

METTOWEE VALLEY

FAMILY HEALTH CENTER Community Health Centers of the Rutland Region Preventative Health Care Women’s Health Care Well-Baby Care Management of Serious or Chronic Illness We See Patients from Vermont & New York

Carl Beckler, MD Brian Kilpatrick, MD of Internal Medicine & Pediatrics Jacki Becker, FNP, Michael Dashnaw, DHSc, MPAS, PA-C Jean Morgan, NP FAMILY PRACTICE MEDICINE FOR ADULTS AND CHILDREN

278 VT Route 149 • West Pawlet, VT 05775

802-645-0580

Convenient Hours: Monday-Thursday 7am-8pm • Friday 8am-7pm Weekend Appointments are available at our sister office in Castleton. Please call 802-468-5641 Lab Hours: Monday-Friday 7am-11am

www.chcrr.org


Manchester Newspapers’ Healthy Living – Week of March 17, 2014 • 9

Adult male grey tabby

We bring you these wonderful pets courtesy of: Saratoga Animal Shelter, Ballston Spa NY • Double L Stable Equine Rescue & Sanctuary, Argyle, NY Rutland County Humane Society, Pittsford, VT Second Chance Animal Center, Shaftsbury VT

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

Adult female Tortoiseshell

Adult male gray and white DSH Adult male, American Staffordshire

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

Adult male black DSH

Adult female Tortoiseshell

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

1 year old spayed female

Contact: Double L Stable Equine Rescue and Sanctuary 9 Tilford Rd. Argyle, NY 12809 518-638-6929

Isaac (before)

Adult female DSH Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

5 year old spayed female

Contact: Double L Stable Equine Rescue and Sanctuary 9 Tilford Rd. Argyle, NY 12809 518-638-6929

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

10 year old neutered male Older adult spayed female

6 year old spayed female

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

7 year old declawed, neutered brothers Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Contact: Double L Stable Equine Rescue and Sanctuary 9 Tilford Rd. Argyle, NY 12809 518-638-6929

2 year old neutered male 7 year old spayed female

16 month old spayed female Adult spayed female

Adult female, Boxer & American Staffordshire Terrier Mix

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter


10 • Manchester Newspapers’ Healthy Living – Week of March 17, 2014

We bring you these wonderful pets courtesy of: Saratoga Animal Shelter, Ballston Spa NY • Double L Stable Equine Rescue & Sanctuary, Argyle, NY Rutland County Humane Society, Pittsford, VT Second Chance Animal Center, Shaftsbury VT

Adult male Chihuahua

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

9 year old spayed female 6 year old spayed female

6 year old neutered bob tail

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Adult male American Staffordshire Terrier

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

4 year old spayed Shepherd mix

5 year old spayed female 3 year old spayed Catahoula Leopard mix Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Contact: Double L Stable Equine Rescue and Sanctuary 9 Tilford Rd. Argyle, NY 12809 518-638-6929

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

8 year old Hound mix Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Contact: Double L Stable Equine Rescue and Sanctuary 9 Tilford Rd. Argyle, NY 12809 518-638-6929

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

6 year old black DSH 7 year old neutered Catahoula mix

4-5 year old spayed female

12 year old DSH 3 year old DSH Calico Tabby

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org

Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org

Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org

3 1/2 year old Calico DSH Adult female spayed DSH

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

4 month old black DSH

Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org

4 year old Calico DSH Male American Staffordshire Terrier mix

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org

Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org


Manchester Newspapers’ Healthy Living – Week of March 17, 2014 • 11

6 year old grey Calico DSH

We bring you these wonderful pets courtesy of: Saratoga Animal Shelter, Ballston Spa NY • Double L Stable Equine Rescue & Sanctuary, Argyle, NY Rutland County Humane Society, Pittsford, VT Second Chance Animal Center, Shaftsbury VT

Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org

9 year old DLH

3 year old black & white DSH

Adult male gray and white DSH

7 year old grey DSH

Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org

Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org

Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

2 1/2 year old black & white DSH Barn Cat Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org

1 year old buff & white DLH 12 year old DLH

Contact: Double L Stable Equine Rescue and Sanctuary 9 Tilford Rd. Argyle, NY 12809 518-638-6929

Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org

2 year old black & white DLH Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org

Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org

10+ year old DSH

Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org

6 year old black & white DSH 8 year old male American Shelter Dog Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org

Adult female Labrador Retriever Mix Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org

Adult female cat Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

Adult female black & white short hair

Adult male Beagle

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

Adult small male Chihuahua Mix

Contact: Double L Stable Equine Rescue and Sanctuary 9 Tilford Rd. Argyle, NY 12809 518-638-6929

Contact: Double L Stable Equine Rescue and Sanctuary 9 Tilford Rd. Argyle, NY 12809 518-638-6929

Male American Staffordshire Terrier Mix

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com


12 • Manchester Newspapers’ Healthy Living – Week of March 17, 2014

We bring you these wonderful pets courtesy of: Saratoga Animal Shelter, Ballston Spa NY • Double L Stable Equine Rescue & Sanctuary, Argyle, NY Rutland County Humane Society, Pittsford, VT Second Chance Animal Center, Shaftsbury VT

1 year old brindle male American Shelter Dog Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org

Adult neutered male DSH

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

1 year old neutered Labrador mix Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

3 year old male American Shelter Dog

Contact: Second Chance Animal Center P.O. Box 620, Shaftsbury, VT 05262 802-375-2898 www.secondchanceanimals.org

4 year old neutered Labrador mix

4 year old neutered male

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

9 month old Beagle mix

Contact: Double L Stable Equine Rescue and Sanctuary 9 Tilford Rd. Argyle, NY 12809 518-638-6929

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Adult male orange DLH

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

Adult spayed female DSH Two adult spayed females, mother & daughter, DLH Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

2 year old male Husky mix Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

10 month old male American Bulldog/ Lab mix Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Senior female tiger Adult spayed female DSH Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

Adult male DSH Adult spayed female DSH

Contact: Saratoga Animal Shelter featured at Clifton Park Annex 6010 County Farm Rd Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-2570 www.saratogacountyny.gov/shelter

Adult female tiger

Adult male tabby

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com

Adult male tabby

Contact: Rutland County Humane Society 765 Stevens Rd, Pittsford, VT 802-483-6700 www.rchsvt.com


The FREEPRESS • Friday, March 21, 2014 • 5

SCOOP

Sportsmen’s Dinner HOOSICK FALLS A Sportsmen’s banquet will be held at 6 p.m. at Hoosick Falls Community Alliance Church at 484 Hill Road, a free event in which all are invited to enjoy side dishes, desserts, beverages and the game dishes sportsmen are asked to bring as a game dish to share. For details, call 518-686-3269.

u

Religious Talk MANCHESTER Bestselling author and spiritual advisor Thomas Moore, a former monk, will present his newest book, “In a Religion of One’s Own,” in a lecture at 7 p.m. on Saturday, March 22 in Manchester’s Northshire Bookstore. Moore will delineate the “myriad possibilities of creating a personal spiritual style, either inside or outside formal religion.” For details, call 1-802-362-2200 or visit www.northshire.com.

u

Rock and Roll GRANVILLE Granville Hook and Ladder and Fire and Rescue will sponsor a “Rock and Roll 60’s Show” at 7 p.m. on Saturday, March 22, with music provided by Skeeter Morse and his Northern Band, and featuring Little Red Riding Hood and The Surfin’ Bird. Other entertainments include a limbo contest, old time refreshments and ice cream, a 50/50 raffle, and all for $7 per person, $12 per couple, kids 8 to 15, $5 and under 8, free. All proceeds benefit Granville Hook and Ladder. For details, call 518-642-2401.

u

Church Opening HOOSICK FALLS The Gnostic Church of L.V.X. will hold a Grand Opening Gala and Church Consecration at 8 p.m. on Saturday, March 22 at the church at 8 Factory Hill Rd., Hoosick Falls. Two bands will perform. On Sunday, March 23 at noon, there will be a church consecration ceremony and its first public service. Information: 518-205-5031.

Sunday23 Spaghetti Dinner GANSEVOORT The Rosary Altar Society of St. Therese Chapel in Gansevoort will serve a spaghetti dinner from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. in the church’s parish hall. St. Therese’s is located at the junction of Routes 32 and

Maple Continued from front page moderate this week, the maple producers have finally been able to work. Open House Weekend comes at the perfect time to see the maple sugaring process and taste freshly-produced syrup. The popular event has been expanded to two weekends. Signs will be placed along roadsides to direct motorists to the sugarhouses, which will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Most sugarhouses will offer samples and demonstrations.

the Wilton Gansevoort Road. Cost is adults, $7 and children, 10 and under, $4. Take-out is available. For details, call 518792-2276.

u

Symphony and Solos GLENS FALLS Glens Falls Symphony will perform at 4 p.m. on Sunday, March 23 in Glens Falls High School, playing pieces by Haydn, Bartok and Gerald Finzi. Cost is $25 for adults and $10 for students.

u

Job Network SALEM Salem United Methodist Church’s “Job Networking Ministry” will begin again at 6 p.m. on Monday, March 24 at the church on West Broadway. After registering for the program, a participant will review hundreds of new job chances at each session of the ministry. A complimentary dinner will be held at 6:30 at this meeting, and the speaker is Elijah Braemer. For further details, call Chuck and Donna Alexander at 518-854-3517 or Rev. Debbie Earthrowl at 518854-3203.

Wizard of Oz,” at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, March 25, a reschedule from February. Free and open to the public, refreshments will be served at the event. For details, call 802-362-2607. The library is located at 48 West Road in Manchester.

Wednesday26 Story Time VALLEY FALLS The Valley Falls Library will hold a children’s story and craft time at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, March 26 in the library at 42 State Street. For details, call Sandi Goodwin, library director, at the library at 518-753-4230.

and Museum will present “Mammals around the World” from 4 to 5 p.m. on Wednesday, March 26. A free after-school discovery program offering discussion, hands-on animal artifacts, a museum search and a

live short-tailed opossum named Peter. For details, call Bernie, museum educator, at 518-642-1515.

SALES & SERVICE

Jct. Rtes. 22 & 149, Granville, NY

518-642-1720

Civil War Talk CAMBRIDGE Civil War Historian Michael Russert will present a two-part talk on “The Battlefield at Gettysburg” at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, March 25 in Cambridge Public Library. Part one explores the history of the park. Part two explains how to get the most out of a visit to the park. For details, call 518-6775091. Cambridge Public Library is at 21 West Main Street in Cambridge.

u

Making Oz MANCHESTER Manchester’s Mark Skinner Library will screen a documentary on the making of the 1939 classic, “The Some will serve pancake breakfasts as well. In Washington County, maple aficionados can visit Dry Brook Sugar House on Chambers Road in Salem, Grottoli’s Maple on Ritchie Road in Middle Granville, Highland Maple Farm on Coach Road in Argyle, Mapleland Farms on Bunker Hill Road in Salem, Rathbun’s Sugar House on Hatch Hill Road in Whitehall, Sugar Mill Farm on State Route 29 in Greenwich, and Wild Hill Maple on Carney Cassidy Road in Salem. For more information, call 518-854-7386 or visit www. upperhudsonmaple.com.

KIOTI

Tractor

www.moorescorners.com

u

World Mammals GRANVILLE Pember Library

www.catherineburklyforjudge.com

Cemetery Talk

Tuesday25

CONTINUED

TRACTORS • EQUIPMENT

u

GRANVILLE Genealogist and Cemetery Transcriber Peggy Jenks will give a talk and slide show called “Grandparents and Gravestones” at 7 p.m. on Monday, March 24 in the Pember Library at 33 West Main Street in Granville. The talk is part of the monthly meeting of the Granville Historical Society. Jenks will demonstrate how to use cemetery stones as part of one’s genealogical research. Jenks has authored award-winning books that list cemetery inscriptions of 27 towns in the Granville-Rutland area. For details, call 518-642-2525.

u

Beecroft’s, LLC Schaghticoke, NY 518-753-4402


6 • The FREEPRESS • Friday, March 21, 2014


The FREEPRESS • Friday, March 21, 2014 • 7

SCOOP

Chili Chow Down

GREENWICH Who’s got the best chili in Greenwich? Vote for your favorite at the third annual Chili Chow Down Challenge, taking place from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 26 at the Greenwich Elks Lodge on Route 40. The event is presented by the Greater Greenwich Chamber of Commerce. For just a $1 entrance fee and a cost of $1 per sample, the public is invited to taste delicious chili prepared by local restaurants and caterers. Attendees can also bring a non-perishable food item to serve as admission. Awards to be voted on include “Best Chili” and “Best Booth Design.” This year there will be a third category entitled “Judges Choice,” to determine the holder of the coveted “Chili Bowl,” which will be held for one year by the winner. Last year’s event raised $1,200 for the Greenwich Food Pantry. This year’s contest will also benefit that organization. For more information, or if you are a local restaurant that wants to participate, call the chamber at 692-7979 or email info@greenwichchamber.org.

u

Organic Dinner GREENWICH A community potluck dinner, stressing healthy, organic foods, will be served from 6 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, March 26 at Plow103 Main Street in Greenwich. For details, call 518-531-4004. The event is free and open to all.

student Anthony Van Dyk is in Ecuador, and his counterpart, Valentina Saldivia, is visiting here from Chile. The Salem Rotary provides a monetary allowance for each student who comes to Salem and provides them with local transportation and fees for special events. The club welcomes everyone to attend the dinner and support this program. For more information, call 518-854-9339.

u

History Lecture SALEM Learn about Salem’s early movie star on Thursday, March 27 at 7:30 p.m., when the Salem Courthouse Community Center presents the final talk in its 2014 History Lecture Series with Salem Historian William “Al” Cormier presenting “The Search for Jane Gail: Salem’s Silent Film Star.” Born Ethel S. Magee on Aug. 6, 1890 in Salem, Jane Gail was an early American silent film star who appeared in 79 films. Her most famous movie was “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,” in which she appeared as Dr. Jekyll’s imperiled fiancé. The movie will be shown at the talk. As chair of the village of Salem Historical Preservation Commission and Salem Historian, All Cormier has documented and archived much of local history. His newest book, “Along the Battenkill,” is a pictorial essay featuring old photographs of the area between the Batten Kill and the Adirondacks. It will be released on Aug. 4, 2014. There is no charge for the lecture, but donations are appreciated. To reserve a place, call the CCC at 518-854-7053. The CCC is located at 58 East Broadway in Salem.

Thursday27

Friday28

License Class

Fun Night

HOOSICK FALLS A five-hour pre-licensing class, sponsored by Northeast New York Safety and Health Council, will be held at 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 27 in the Center for Nursing Rehabilitation of the Hoosick Falls Health Center. A $40 prepaid fee, or a $50 payment at the door is required. Successful completion of the class, including passing the test, provides one with necessary paperwork to take the state driver’s test. It is valid for one year. You must pre-register at 518-686-4854.

GRANVILLE Mary J. Tanner Elementary School on Granville’s Route 22 will host a Family Fun Night from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday, March 28, offering dancing, games, face painting, refreshments and more. The event is sponsored the Mary J. Tanner PBIS Team, the initials standing for Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports. The program promotes “Bee-ing Safe, Kind and Responsible.” For details, call the school at 518-642-9460.

u

u

Two-Day Cook H E B RO N Cooking Instructress Sally Brillon extends an invitation to her home, The 1786 Wilson Homestead in Hebron, for two days of “open hearth cooking” lessons from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 29 and Saturday, April 5. No more than

7 pupils will employ tin reflector ovens, a Dutch oven, iron pots and kettles to cook roasted meat, homemade bread, vegetables and apple pie. Cost is $45 per person and gift certificates are available. Separate classes of 6 to 7 may also be arranged, but be sure to call 518-854-3134 or 854-1117.

u

Bottle Drive WEST PAWLET The Rupert Mettawee Valley 4-H Club will hold a bottle drive to help support its upcoming show season. The drive will be held from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday, March 29 in the West Pawlet Fire House. For details, call 802-3420991.

u

Turkey Dinner HARTFORD Hartford’s United Methodist Church will serve a turkey dinner from 4 to 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 29 in the church on 47 County Route 23. Cost is $9 for adults; $4 for children 5 to 12; and free for children 4 and under. A food and craft sale will also be held. For details, call 518-632-5387.

u

Pizza and Wings VICTORY MILLS Pizza and Wing Night will be held from 4 to 8 p.m. on March 29 at the Victory Mills Fire Department, but orders can be placed at 6956623 after 2 p.m. Open to 8 p.m., the last call is 7. Full particulars on pizza toppings and choice of sauce for wings can be learned by again calling 6956623.

u

Blues and Brews CAMBRIDGE Beat the winter blues on Saturday, March 29 at 7 p.m., at Blues & Brews, a smokin’ hot fundraiser for Hubbard Hall in Cambridge. Everyone is invited to dance to the hot sounds of the Roadside Blues Band, enjoy some warming jambalaya, chili, corn bread and desserts. There will also be a cash beer and wine bar. Admission charge of $25 includes all food, music and soft drinks. This is a 21 and over event. Purchase tickets in advance at www.hubbardhall.org or call 518-677-2495. Tickets will also be available at the door. Hubbard Hall is located at 24 East Main St. in Cambridge.

u

Appraisal Fair BENNINGTON Bennington Museum will offer an “Appraisal Fair” from 1 to 4 p.m. on Saturday, March 29. A panel of art experts and antiques appraisers will evaluate family heirlooms or any other odd, quirky piece. For more information, call 802-447-1571.

u

South Pacific GREENWICH The Greenwich Central School Senior High Drama Club will present the much-loved musical “South Pacific” by Rodgers and Hammerstein at 7 p.m. on CONTINUED

KUBOTA MODEL L3200HST 4WD 32HP Diesel Tractor with 3 ranges, and a hydrostatic transmission. R4 industrial tires. Kubota LA524 loader with 66” quick attach bucket and Loaded rear tires.

Payments of $315.00 per month on new Kubota L3200HST based on sales price of $19,900.00 at $1,000 down, 0% APR for 60 months. Financing available from Kubota Credit Corporation, U.S.A., 3401 DelAmo Blvd., Torrance, CA 90503; subject to credit approval. Payments do not include implements, set up, delivery, or local taxes where applicable. Some exceptions apply. Offer expires 3/31/2014. See dealership for details and other low-rate finance options.

KUBOTA MODEL BX25D 4WD tractor loader backhoe 23hp Diesel with hydrostatic transmission. Optional Mid mounted 60” mower additional $25 month or Front mounted 50” snow blower additional $45 month.

u

Workshop International Dinner Piano CAMBRIDGE Hubbard Hall

SALEM The Salem Rotary Club will host its annual International Dinner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 27 at the First Presbyterian Church in Salem. The dinner supports the club’s Student F o r e i g n Exchange Program. Recipes from around the world will be prepared by Rotarians and others who support the program. The cost for adults is $10, while children ages 6 to 10 are $5 and children 5 and under are free of charge. This is the Salem Rotary’s 45th year of sending and receiving high school age foreign exchange students for one-year experiences. This year, Salem

place on Saturday, March 29 and Sunday, March 30 at Gallup Ridge Farm on Blackhouse Road in Fort Edward. Presented by the Friends of the I B A , the Raptor Fest features live flight demonstrations by hawks and owls, a guided snowshoe walk, and a shorteared owl watch. The event also includes various kids’ activities, horsedrawn sleigh rides, and food vendors. Some of the groups presenting during the weekend include Adirondack Raptors with freeflight demos, Adirondack Wildlife Refuge & Rehab Center, the Vermont Institute of Natural Science, and the New York State Wildlife Rehab Council. New this year is a “For the Birds” Gift Shop and a Raptor Photo Booth, where visitors can get their photo taken with a live bird of prey. In addition, Dr. Gordon Ellmers will be on hand from noon to 2 both days to sign prints of his photos. Admission to the festival is $10 for adults and $5 for kids 12 and under. For a complete schedule, go to www.winterraptorfest.com/schedule-of-events.

will offer a one-day piano workshop, “Introduction to American Piano” with instructor Paul Joseph Rovelli from 6:30 to 8 p.m. on Friday, March 28. Participants will learn to read music and to use three foundational chords to create simple improvisational melodies. Recommended for ages 10 and up. Cost is $15 for the general public, $12 for members and $10 for youth ages 10 to 18. To register, visit www.hubbardhall.org or call 518-677-2495.

Saturday29 Raptor Fest FORT EDWARD Get up close and personal with live birds of prey at the Fourth Annual Winter Raptor Fest, taking

Payments of $285.00 per month on new Kubota BX25D based on sales price of $18,000.00 at $1000 down, 0% APR for 60 months. Financing available from Kubota Credit Corporation, U.S.A., 3401 DelAmo Blvd., Torrance, CA 90503; subject to credit approval. Payments do not include implements, set up, delivery, or local taxes where applicable. Some exceptions apply. Offer expires 3/31/2014. See dealership for details and other low-rate finance options.

KUBOTA RTV MODEL RTV400CIR UTILITY VEHICLE 4WD 16 HP gas, fuel-injected and CVT transmission. ATV traction tires, with camouflage paint.

Payments of $180.00 per month on new Kubota RTV400 based on sales price of $8,600.00 at zero down, 0% APR for 48 months. Financing available from Kubota Credit Corporation, U.S.A., 3401 DelAmo Blvd., Torrance, CA 90503; subject to credit approval. Payments do not include implements, set up, delivery, or local taxes where applicable. Some exceptions apply. Offer expires 3/31/2014. See dealership for details and other low-rate finance options.

5109 NY Rt 22 Salem, NY 12865 1-800-999-3276


8 • The FREEPRESS • Friday, March 21, 2014

SCOOP

Friday and S a t u r d a y, March 28 and 29, and at 3 p.m. on Sunday, March 30 in the high school auditorium. Set on an island paradise in World War II, “South Pacific” centers on two parallel love stories threatened by the dangers of prejudice and war. Alison Beck stars as spunky nurse Nellie Forbush, Chandler Hansen plays the French planter Emile, and James BrownKinsella portrays Lt. Joe Cable. The musical is directed by Mr. Richard Cherry with the assistance of Mrs. Sarah Moses. This is a wonderful showcase for the incredible student talent at Greenwich Central School. Tickets for this family-friendly event are $6 for adults and $4 for students and senior citizens. Tickets can be purchased at the door or in advance at the high school main office or reserve by calling 692-9542 ext. 6300.

Sunday30 Bakers needed GREENWICH Bakers are needed at Greenwich Youth Center to prepare cakes served with ice cream for children’s birthdays celebrated from 3 to 4 p.m. on Sunday, March 30, and on the last Sunday of each succeeding month. For details, call 518-522-8335 or email greenwichyouth12834@gmail.com


Freepress 3 21 14 pdf web