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Annual Report 2011/12


Introduction

The services and projects that we deliver continue to help us to meet the aims and objectives detailed in our strategic plan:

Welcome to the first Manchester Mind Annual Review. In November 2011 HARP officially announced the organisation’s affiliation to Mind – the national mental health charity. The decision to affiliate was taken in order to help strengthen and support the work of the organisation by enabling us to link with the national network of Local Mind Associations as well as take on a brand that was well known and recognisable in terms of promoting positive mental health and challenging stigma and discrimination.

Vision

The affiliation has not affected the services that we run or the fact that we remain a local charity committed to delivering services to people with mental health issues living in Manchester.

Our Services:

Manchester Mind’s vision is of a society that promotes and protects good mental health for all, and that treats people with experience of mental distress fairly, positively, and with respect.

Mission Manchester Mind promotes the wellbeing and recovery of people and families who have been affected by mental distress through working with them in a meaningful way and on a range of issues

Strategic Aims To address the effects of poverty, insecurity and poor physical health on people’s mental health. To enable people to manage their own lives and to make positive choices with skill and confidence. ● To promote and create opportunities for people to contribute to their communities. ● ●

Advice provision on issues relating to welfare benefits, debts and housing to adults and young people. YASP: providing counseling, advice, volunteering, mentoring and befriending to 15 -25 year olds. Bite: providing opportunities in partnership with Manchester Mental Health and Social Care Trust in catering and

As part of this process we have developed a new strategic plan which includes a new mission statement, aims and strategic objectives.

growing.

If you would like to see a copy of this plan in full please contact us info@manchestermind.org or see the published plan @www.issuu.com

Big Manchester: Family intervention work in partnership with Barnardos, Lifeline Eclypse and Manchester Women’s Aid.

Manchester Mind Café and Good Mood Food: providing volunteer placements in catering and mentoring. Manchester Assertive Outreach: providing a service in partnership with Manchester Mental Health and Social Care Trust to people with mental health problems who have had difficulty engaging with services.

Inclusion and Development: providing opportunities for people to get involved in Manchester Mind. Training: delivering Mental Health First Aid Training to increase awareness and challenge the stigma and discrimination surrounding mental health problems.

This year’s annual review provides an opportunity to read more about these services and their achievements over the past year.


Chairs report for annual report 2011/12 I take great pride and pleasure in introducing to you our Annual report, our first as Manchester Mind. This report reflects the organisation’s achievements and challenges from April 2011 to March 2012. This period was a tough one for the charity sector. As the recession continued to bite, both nationally and here in Manchester, opportunities for continuing the funding of our projects or gaining funding for new ones shrank just as the need to provide services for some of the most vulnerable Mancunians spiralled. To ensure Manchester Mind can continue to deliver services, staff and board worked together to develop a Strategic and Business Plan to take us through until 2015. We are confident that these plans will enable us to survive and thrive, particularly through our staff and volunteers working in our projects: Manchester Assertive Outreach, YASP; the CafÊ and Good Mood Food; BITE partnership and the Zion Advice team. Our Central Management Team provide these staff with the background support and leadership to ensure project leads can focus on service delivery. The CEO, Elaine Pitt and her staff will tell you about their achievements, as well as some of the challenges ahead. It is a reflection of the calibre of these staff that they have continued to give 100% commitment to service delivery in such difficult times. Thanks especially to all our funders, supporters and partners who by their resources or other actions have made sure that Manchester Mind can continue to deliver high quality services to people with mental health problems living in Manchester.

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Opportunities for continuing the funding of our projects or gaining funding for new ones shrank just as the need to provide services for some of the most vulnerable Mancunians spiralled.

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I’d like to show my appreciation for all our volunteers who freely offer their time, knowledge and skills whether it is within the projects or on our Board of Trustees. Thanks especially to Ben Crouch our previous Chair, Karen Hall, Catherine Grayson, Brian Holmes, Marion Girling, Kathryn Bruderer, Kate Clarke and Maureen Banner, who have all served as trustees during the year. Finally all of us at Manchester Mind want to pay tribute to Malcolm Hardman. He worked as a volunteer in the finance section of our Central management team as well as on the Board for many years. He sadly died after a short illness in 2011 He is sadly missed both on the Board and in the Central Management team.


Chief Executive’s report for 11/12 Another busy year for Manchester Mind; In 2011, we celebrated our successful affiliation to national Mind and passed the first level of the Mind quality mark. It has been a year of immense challenges with increasing difficulties in delivering crucial services when the anticipated funding cuts began to bite. There is more demand for our services, increasing numbers of people experiencing mental ill health related to the recession, changes in welfare reform, debt and social isolation - the forgotten victims of the recession. I would like to give a huge thank you to all our staff, volunteers and trustees who have helped us through another challenging year but one that has brought us fantastic achievements!

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Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope and confidence. Helen Keller

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The Annual Report will give you a flavour of our achievements, successes and what that has meant to our service users. Our strategic plan was developed in 2011 and involved consulting with our partners, stakeholders and service users. It sets us a challenge for the next three years. Our vision is ambitious: we want to grow, develop and make the most of future opportunities and be the best in what we do. We want to become even more effective and efficient in what we do and be able to show how our work makes a difference to the lives of socially excluded and marginalised people in Manchester. It’s not going to be easy particularly in the demanding funding world we are living in and the fast pace of change both to local and national mental health policies and new commissioning and contracting arrangements.

In developing this plan we have looked at what is happening now in terms of changes in the welfare benefits system and changes in health and social care. Locally this year will bring a reorganisation of NHS community mental health services which will place recovery at the heart of services. We have also anticipated other changes which may occur over the next few years. We at Manchester Mind need to respond positively to all these challenges and new opportunities whilst keeping our services accessible and inclusive to all who use them. We were very proud in 2011 of our successful funding application to the Big Lottery “Reaching Communities Programme” which will fund our valuable young persons project YASP for the next three years. This funding will allow the project to continue and flourish following the end of statutory funding. Many people can and do want to get back to work with the right support. In response to this, this year we expanded opportunities for volunteering including a new mentoring programme. The aim is to support people who may have been away from the workplace for some time to build skills, increase confidence and improve mental health, with a view to supporting people back into employment, education or further volunteering.


Contents Introduction Chairs Report CEO Report YASP Advice Work Catering and Volunteering Service User Involvement Mental Health First Aid Partnerships: Converge, Health and Wellbeing Consortium Bite Assertive Outreach Big Manchester Treasurer’s Report And Finally

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Mind is a unique service. Being treated with respect and professionally supported at Mind gave me the stability to begin tackling a wide range of problems in my life.

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What have I learnt?

YASP

Awareness of issues & problems for young people About disability and mental health awareness Understanding of diversity, How to fill in forms How to deal with panic attacks


YASP YASP delivered impressive outcomes for young people and in 2011/12: YASP worked with 24 volunteers 12 had outcomes linked to work or other volunteering 9 moved on to other volunteering opportunities and 3 entered employment 3 gained a qualification outside of YASP 23 received training in food handling procedures

YASP has undergone a shake-up of services and a cosmetic make-over in the 2011/12 period. The shop front has been redesigned with some valuable contributions from service users’. This make-over has continued on-line with twitter, an expanded facebook profile and increased use of social media. Some of the best achievements on 2011-2012 were in the amount of input young people have made into YASP services. Volunteer roles have increased and young people now play a major part in welcoming people to YASP. Young people are in the YASP café to greet new comers with a smile and an hello. We have a new training course so that young people can train as mentors and befrienders. This allowed us to get our services out to more parts of Manchester. A young person’s Steering Group has been formed to guide all this new work and has been meeting every three months. These developments have been possible thanks to Big Lottery funding and the involvement of our fantastic volunteers. In Sept 2011 the contract with Rotherham Doncaster and South Humber to provide social welfare law advice within Manchester Early Intervention Team came to an end. This had been a productive and valuable partnership in providing access to advice for young people.

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Volunteer roles have increased and young people now play a major part in welcoming people to YASP.

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YASP Befriending case study

Imran was a 20 year old man from Pakistan. He referred himself to the befriending service as he came to the end of his time volunteering in the YASP Café. He was keen to pursue his interest in cooking but wasn’t sure how to do this. He had enjoyed his time volunteering but lacked the confidence to take the next step. Imran was matched up with a befriender who met him to help him plan his future. The befriender helped Imran identify a course at a local college. She then went with him to check out the college as he didn’t feel confident to go by himself. This was a breakthrough for Imran. He really liked the college and was pleased to find out about the extra support that could be offered there. Having the befriender with him gave him the confidence to ask about the course and to meet with the relevant staff there. Imran started his course in September and has flourished. He has taken advantage of the opportunities available and has now applied to begin another course in IT. Imran appreciated the support the befriender provided as being able to walk through the door that first day seemed unimaginable. Once through that door he has taken hold of every opportunity offered to him and is optimistic about his future.

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The befriender helped Imran identify a course at a local college. She then went with him to check out the college as he didn’t feel confident to go by himself. This was a breakthrough for Imran.

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YASP Advice at YASP The Advice Drop-in continues to be a much needed source of help. YASP still provides more in-depth casework to 15-18 year olds. This is a perfect complement to the advice delivered by the Advice Team for 18+. However, the open-access drop-in at YASP is still the main way that 15-25 year olds get in touch with us for practical support. The Casework service dealt with 1193 enquiries across a range of issues including, benefits, debts, housing, mental health. This vital work also led to £218,660 of financial gain to our service users.

Jane is 16. Her mother, with whom she does not get on, threw her out of the family home. She made an income support claim as a result of estrangement, but the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) refused income support, as estrangement was not accepted. Jane was assisted to appeal this decision. The process took some time and Jane had no money from the DWP apart from 2 initial crisis loans. Her mental health deteriorated. The YASP caseworker contacted “Manchester Relief In Need” on her behalf, which awarded a £50 clothing voucher and £25 for food. YASP has also supplied £25 from emergency funds, so that Jane can attend her “Works for You” course. Jane was unable to return home as her mum did not want her there. There had been long term problems and the relationship had broken down. Jane was living in insecure accommodation, where she was at risk of witnessing domestic abuse. YASP supported an application to a supported housing project for young people but she was unable to be interviewed until the outcome of her Income Support appeal was known. YASP also referred Jane’s case to her local MP who intervened on her behalf. The YASP Caseworker was involved in multi-agency meetings with Connexions and her training provider to ensure that Jane’s needs could be fully catered for. The result of this work was that the DWP overturned the decision and Income Support was awarded meaning that Jane had the necessary weekly income through benefit and will also be able to apply for stable supported housing.

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YASP supported an application to a supported housing project for young people but she was unable to be interviewed until the outcome of her Income Support appeal was known.

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YASP Counselling Service at YASP YASP’s Counselling Service has gone from strength to strength. “Comic Relief” funding was secured and has allowed us to recruit two new Counsellors. We were able to start offering Tuesday evening appointments, making the service more accessible for students and people who are working. The Counselling service met with 47 young people in 2011/12

‘Jenny’ first came to YASP with her auntie for benefits advice when she was 16. The advice worker learnt that Jenny had suffered with depression for 2 years and informed Jenny about the counselling service. Jenny asked for a referral for counselling. During the counselling assessment, she said that she had been feeling so low that she was thinking of suicide and she was also self-harming as a way of coping with things that had happened to her in the past. At the start of the counselling process Jenny was self-harming between 3-5 times a week. As counselling progressed it became clear that Jenny had been bullied by other young people in her neighbourhood on account of her bi-sexuality. When people called her names, she would think about it a lot, get very upset and self-harm. Through the counselling sessions, Jenny started to learn more about when and why she self-harmed and she began to change the way she thought of the names that some people called her. She learnt to challenge them in her own mind, instead of accepting them as true comments about her. Instead of cutting herself, she wrote about what had happened and her feelings down on paper, then scribbled it out in red pen, and then destroyed the paper. The counsellor gave Jenny information about hate crime reporting and also told her about the support that the Albert Kennedy Trust provides for bi-sexual people experiencing hostility. Jenny wanted a referral to be made and she now has a mentor who meets with her and offers support. At the end of counselling Jenny’s self-harm had significantly reduced and Jenny felt confident to move on and build on the success she had had at addressing her problems.

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When people called her names, she would think about it a lot, get very upset and self-harm.

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Advice Team

The advice worker phoned the client’s GP who agreed to write a new sick note and arranged an appointment at the Job Centre for the client to hand in his sick notes.


Manchester Mind Advice Team Strategic objective: To address the effects of poverty, insecurity and poor physical and health on people’s mental health.

The Advice Team were able to contribute to this objective by opening 209 new cases and generating £1.6 million in terms of reduced debt and increased income “Mind is a unique service. Being treated with respect and professionally supported at Mind gave me the stability to begin tackling a wide range of problems in my life” There was consistent demand for our services throughout the year especially with reductions in city wide advice services and anxiety created through the continued transfer to and impact of Employment Support Allowance and other impending benefit changes which will be implemented throughout 2012/13. To enable people to access their legal rights and entitlements, the Advice Team can see people at The Zion Centre, hospital, at home or at other places where people might feel comfortable. Advisers provided patients within the Central Manchester inpatient unit access to advice work at a crucial time ensuring that benefits, debts and housing issues can be dealt with before discharge. A unique flavour to the Advice service is the awareness of the barriers that having mental health problems can create when people try to access their rights and entitlements as the case studies over the page show.

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The Advice Team can see people at The Zion Centre, hospital, and at home.


Manchester Mind Advice Team Advice at Manchester MIND In 2012 Manchester Mind Advice Team were successful in gaining funding from the “Office of Civil Society” Advice services Fund which provided us with 12 months funding to provide the service with dedicated management and development work plus an extension to our drop-in service.

Case Study A 38 year old Iraqi man came to the Zion centre in an agitated and distressed state and was seen by the Advice Service on the recommendation of his friend. An appeal had been lodged against the decision that he wasn’t entitled to Employment Support Allowance. He hadn’t had any money for 7 weeks. The Housing Association had sent threatening letters to take him to court for rent arrears. He had received a court date for non-payment of Council Tax. The advice worker contacted the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) who explained that the client’s sick notes had run out. The advice worker phoned the client’s GP who agreed to write a new sick note, and arranged an appointment at the Job Centre for the client to hand in his sick notes. The advice worker helped with a successful crisis loan application. (The client had tried to apply for a crisis loan himself, but the DWP hung up on him when he became confused and distressed by their questions) and contacted the clients landlord and then council tax unit to inform them of the situation. A few days later benefit was re-instated and backdated which wiped out the rent and council tax arrears. His financial situation is now stable and we are working with him to challenge the Employment Support Allowance decision and to apply for Disability Living Allowance.

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His financial situation is now stable and we are working with him to challenge the Employment Support Allowance decision and to apply for Disability Living Allowance.

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Thank you so much for providing me with the opportunity to volunteer with Manchester Mind; it has completely opened my eyes to the trials facing people with mental health problems.

Manchester Mind Catering & Volunteering


Manchester Mind Catering & Volunteering Manchester Mind Café, based at the Zion Community Centre, has continued to offer placements to people who want to return to work, training or education. The staff not only provide a café but also support people who have been affected by poor mental health to learn new skills in a catering environment, build confidence and meet new people. Volunteers are now offered a mentor for at least 6 months which gives people a chance to meet on a one to one basis, discuss their goals and the steps they need to take to reach these goals as well as receiving support along the way. We also developed kitchen” buddy” volunteer roles as well so that people on placement can benefit from one to one support whilst they are in the café as well. The café benefits greatly from the skills and experience people bring into the café when they take up their placements. Of 30 people who had taken up placements with us we found: That before coming into the café 30% said their mental health was fair; 56.7% said poor and 13.3% said very poor. After volunteering 66.7% said their mental health was good and 33.3% said poor. In answer to various other questions about their experience of the café placement; 86.7% of people said they strongly agreed or agreed that they now cooked more at home 93.1% said that they strongly agreed or agreed that they ate more healthily 100% said they were more active 76% said the experience had helped them to start looking for employment or other volunteering opportunities and 72.4% said they thought it had helped them to start looking to access training or college 100% of people said that the cafe placement had helped them meet new people. This demonstrates how the Cafe plays a positive role in people’s lives. With the development of volunteering roles such as mentors, kitchen buddies and admin support we are developing a new and improved service.


Manchester Mind Catering & Volunteering Volunteer mentor view

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Mentoring allows you to develop a good rapport with your mentee. Any role that gives you the time to listen to someone is rewarding for both parties.

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The café benefits greatly from the skills and experience people bring into the café when they take up their placements.

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Mentoring has been a personally and professionally rewarding experience. The training is a really good introduction to issues surrounding mental health and to working on a 1:1 basis with someone, including active listening. The training was an enjoyable experience and involved developing some highly transferable skills. Mentoring allows you to develop a good rapport with your mentee. Any role that gives you the time to listen to someone is rewarding for both parties. It also gives you the chance to reflect on how lifestyle can impact mental health and wellbeing. Although mentoring involves a high level of responsibility, at no point are you expected to go without the support of more senior staff. There’s always somebody on hand to chat to about any concerns you may have. I’ve really enjoyed mentoring and would recommend it to anyone who’s thinking of volunteering.


Manchester Mind Catering & Volunteering View of the mentee

Dave’s Case study I have been volunteering for the Manchester Mind Café for 6 months. As part of the volunteering I was offered a mentor. I had no idea what to expect in all honesty but am so glad now that I said yes. Mentoring was explained as having someone to talk to, look at what I wanted to do and help take the steps to get there. It has been fantastic having someone to talk to and having someone to bounce ideas off and getting suggestions and feedback. I feel it is basically whatever you want it to be – personally I have found it a fantastic and invaluable help and would recommend it to anyone. My aim has been to get back to work. Through the mentoring I have looked at lifestyle changes and have found different ways of looking at things. I have become a bit more confident in job hunting and have now got a part-time job and have had other interviews. It’s been really helpful to have the extra support of someone who understands.

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It has been fantastic having someone to talk to and having someone to bounce ideas off...


Manchester Mind Catering & Volunteering Good Mood Food is a separately constituted social enterprise delivering good quality and reasonably priced buffets to events, conferences and meetings all over Manchester. Set up in 2005 GMF runs alongside the Manchester Mind CafĂŠ and offers extended volunteering opportunities to people with mental health issues who may wish to develop their catering experience within this busy social enterprise. 2011/12 was a busy year for the business and the emphasis has been on ensuring that the business remain successful in what is a challenging financial environment for us all. The staff and volunteers have worked hard to ensure that GMF has maintained its reputation as a good quality provider. The team were involved in preparing and delivering buffets to a varied range of events during the year. Good Mood Food provides a range of hot and cold buffets for all types of events, both large and small. To find out more about our business visit www.goodmoodfood.org or email goodmoodfood@manchestermind.org .

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GMF runs alongside the Manchester Mind CafĂŠ and offers extended volunteering opportunities to people with mental health issues

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Manchester Mind Catering & Volunteering Dave - Good Mood Food Driver I’ve volunteered for other places, but none like GMF at Manchester Mind. The volunteering here is great, it gives me a real purpose to get up and do something in the day. What separates it from other catering services is that all the proceeds go back into the charity to benefit the people who use the services. The food is great and I feel really proud to be part of GMF. I really enjoy doing the buffet deliveries, the people we deliver to are brilliant, and I often have a friendly chat with them. Volunteering with GMF and going out meeting new people has helped me be more sociable and built up my confidence, it’s really given me a boost. There’s nothing worse than sitting round the house all day watching rubbish TV, volunteering with GMF has given me a purpose in life, I love to help and just be able to give something back to the organisation that has helped me so much. I’d recommend volunteering with Manchester Mind to anyone. It’s been great.

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I’d recommend volunteering with Manchester Mind to anyone. It’s been great.


Service Users

Since volunteering at Manchester Mind my confidence has improved greatly. I have completed a training course which has been fantastic, it’s one of the first qualifactions I have received.


Manchester Mind Service User Involvement For those who use our services and want to get more involved with the organisation, we offer training around chairing meetings, recruitment and selection and ongoing supervision and support.

Service User Involvement is very important to Manchester Mind. We engage with people in lots of different ways to develop and improve our services. Service user involvement is about ensuring that there are clear pathways for people to express their views about the Manchester Mind services they have used or the gaps in provision of our services. By asking people about the service they receive from us, the organisation can ensure that we deliver the right services to meet people’s needs. It also measures the quality of our existing services, and it gives us evidence for funders when setting up new services which people want and ask for, not what we think they need. They are the experts on living and dealing with mental health problems. We have begun looking more closely capturing the views of service users on all levels of our services. For example, how they were treated, how information was given to them and the environment in which the services are delivered. In 2011 we replaced the bi-monthly service user meetings – Raising our Voice! with open door sessions. It was felt that this would give people a confidential space to talk about the views and ideas about Manchester Mind.


Manchester Mind Service User Involvement Youth Fund

Volunteering

In August 2011 Manchester Mind was awarded a grant via the City Council to deliver training to young people in the Manchester area. We have been busy marketing and adapting our current materials on confidence and self esteem, assertiveness and dealing with difficult situations, recruitment and selection and mental health awareness for the young adult age group of 13 to 19 year olds.

Since becoming Manchester Mind in Nov 2011 the number of volunteer enquires has risen by 50%. We have increased our volunteering opportunities which now also include, mentoring and kitchen buddies at the Zion Café, admin for the Café and Finance, Befriending at YASP, Bites veg bag scheme and allotments. As requests for volunteering increase, Manchester Mind wants to encourage people from the community as well as people who have used our services to become involved in the organisation. We want to involve a broad range of people to help deliver and contribute to the development of our services and projects which includes a wide demographic from the community; people currently facing mental health difficulties, people who have experienced mental health problems in the past, people who have family members or friends struggling with their mental health and people who want to help break down the stigma and discrimination 1 in 4 of us face on a daily basis. So for Manchester Mind, service user involvement is for us all – it‘s everyone‘s business.

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Volunteer roles have increased and young people now play a major part in welcoming people to YASP.

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Manchester Mind wants to encourage people from the community as well as people who have used our services to become involved in the organisation.

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MHFA

The MHFA course has given me improved knowledge of mental illness and I now feel much more confident in being able to support people. I will certainly be using what I have learnt in my work.


Mental Health First Aid In 2011/12 we delivered training to: 45 people

Manchester Mind continued its commitment this year to delivering mental health first aid training in order to increase awareness and challenge stigma and discrimination – an area of work that we feel is important. One of our volunteers who has experience of mental health problems completed the instructor training this year to ensure we had a cohort of four Mental Health First Aid England accredited trainers available. MHFA is itself a community interest company and in 2007 was involved in anglicising this Australian developed training programme. It is a 12 hour training course delivered over 2 days or 4 half days and gives participants a framework in which people can be more confident in working with and supporting people with poor mental health.

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...a framework in which people can be more confident in working with and supporting people with poor mental health.

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Partnerships

Manchester Mind is involved in a number of partnerships both in terms of delivering existing projects and services and also in developing potential new services.


Partnerships Manchester Mind recognises that by working in partnership we can often deliver services more effectively in terms of benefits to our service users. It enables us to learn from others, share resources and reach a greater number of people whilst also contributing our own values and expertise to others. Manchester Mind is involved in a number of partnerships both in terms of delivering existing projects and services and also in developing potential new services.

In 2011/12 Manchester Mind had a key role in the Converge, Health and Wellbeing Consortium Manchester Mind became a full member of the consortium in 2010 following a thorough assessment process. The consortium now has fifty members who provide a range of health and wellbeing services including mental health, physical disabilities, learning disabilities and older age and is managed by GMCVO. Converge provides a way for voluntary sector organisations like ours to enter the contracts market. It does this by providing a central ‘hub’ function which takes a lot of the work needed around bidding for contracts away from voluntary sector organisations and managing those contracts when acquired. It also provides the opportunity to expand our partnership working by having an established consortium with valued partners who are ready to apply for tenders as soon as they come out. Converge is a social enterprise with a board of directors which are derived from its member organisations. Manchester Mind holds a director position on the Converge Board.

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Converge provides a way for voluntary sector organisations like ours to enter the contracts market.

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Partnerships We have also maintained our involvement in a number of networks across the City, for example the Voluntary Sector Mental Health Forum, North West Mental Health Advisers Group, Greater Manchester Welfare Rights Advisers Meetings and Food Futures.

Bite

Two of our major partnerships are with Manchester Mental Health and Social Care Trust to deliver Bite and Assertive Outreach:

Growing Communities – an organisation in Hackney had set up their own scheme to develop inner-city patchwork growing in Hackney were now offering mentorship to other organisations. Bite was accepted onto the mentorship programme early in January 2011. In June 2012 a veg bag was born!

The launch of the Bite Veg Bag represented a significant move for the successful Bite partnership. For some time we had felt that Bite needed a stronger vehicle at service delivery level that was recognisable as being Bite and distinctive from existing services. This opportunity arose in the prospect of setting up a Bite Veg Bag scheme.

The Growing Communities model was very specific and created out of their learning. The Bite Veg Bag mirrored this model as it had proved to be successful. It is a drop-off scheme rather than delivery. People sign up to monthly standing orders – so the only produce that is ordered is produce that will be used. Produce is organic as this is a more sustainable method of vegetable production. Manchester Mind provides a development worker and volunteer time. The Trust provides valuable in kind benefits – such as a van and the site at North Manchester and staff time. Here, service users that had moved on from a traditional day services model, work in the poly tunnels preparing and bagging veg. With this in place the capital outlay and risk were minimal. We had identified a wholesale organic provider and grew some produce ourselves from our own local growing sites. The Veg Bag started with 16 customers over 2 drop off points and ended this year with a 40 bags (Fruit Bags were added to the produce list later on in the year) sold over 4 drop-off points.

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Bite was accepted onto the mentorship programme early in January 2011. In June 2012 a veg bag was born!


Partnerships The gaps in our expertise were the capacity and knowledge to co-ordinate and expand growing. In December the “North West Social Value Innovation Board� were looking to fund projects where NHS organisations were working with Voluntary Sector agencies in order to improve services and seek innovative solutions to service delivery. Bite was successful in applying to this fund and after a presentation and interview we were awarded funding for a part-time growing co-ordinator who would be able to work across Bite to develop coordination of growing to enable more inner city veg to be grown and contribute to the Veg Bags. The Growing Co-ordinator will start in April 2012. People who use mental health services are benefiting from the partnership working. Service users are involved in the whole of the veg bagging process from picking up produce, weighing, bagging, quality control and delivery and growing food for the bags. There will be challenges for Bite in the coming year as existing funding runs out but Bite has continued to be influential in a number of City wide networks including Food Futures.

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One of my key workers suggested I come along to the allotment and I thought I would give it a try and see what happens.

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Partnerships The service provides a flexible and creative client-centred approach to reaching those most disengaged from services and ensures that care and support for individuals is maintained to a high standard, working to re-engage service users with the community.

Assertive Outreach Service Manchester’s Assertive Outreach Service (AOS) is a unique partnership between Manchester Mind and Manchester Mental Health and Social Care Trust. We have been involved in the delivery of assertive outreach for eleven years now working seven days a week, every week of the year. During the last year, we have worked with over 300 service users, their families and carers. The Service works specifically with people who have been involved with mental health services and who, for various reasons may find it difficult to engage. AOS provides a flexible and creative client-centred approach to reaching those who are most disengaged from society and services. The service also provides time limited intensive support to service users between 18 years and 65 years old to meet their complex health and social care needs and wishes. The aim of the service is to sustain community living and enable users to take up active roles as citizens.

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The Service works specifically with people who have been involved with mental health services and who, for various reasons may find it difficult to engage.

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Partnerships A culturally sensitive multi-disciplinary assessment is used to develop and deliver a comprehensive care plan involving the users and carers. The assessment focuses on identifying the service user’s strengths, goals and aspirations. Carers and family members are involved in all assessments to help identify how they can contribute to meeting the service users identified needs in line with the “Care Programme Approach”. The team also identify clients’ physical health needs and give advice and support with nutritional and dental needs, helping them to access local health services. Care plans help users to make sense of their distress within their life experience and support the development of coping strategies to improve quality of life. Within the assertive outreach teams as well as providing practical, vocational and social work support, we provide Housing and Welfare Rights Advice. This is an essential part of the service as many AOS service users present with issues which can cause or be compounded by low income, inadequate housing, homelessness and debt. Offering good quality advice and representation on these issues is also a key way of getting people to engage with the service. Manchester Mind staff work alongside Trust staff; community psychiatric nurses, occupational therapists and psychologists-with service users benefiting from this multi skilled approach.

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The assessment focuses on identifying the service user’s strengths, goals and aspirations.


Partnerships Assertive Outreach

Case Study Rebecca has a diagnosis of schizophrenia. She had become disengaged from services, she had isolated herself in her flat and was barely meeting her basic care needs and activities of daily living. Rebecca’s mental health had not fully recovered when she was referred to the team and the aim was to try and engage and support her to re-establish her activities of daily living and to develop a care plan that was recovery focussed. When the team first started work with Rebecca, she was very reluctant to engage and we had numerous non access visits. On the visits she did open to the door she was very verbally hostile and abusive to any attempts to engage with her and we were frequently told to go away and to leave her alone as she did not want anything to do with services. On the one occasion she let us into her flat it was in a very chaotic state and after a few minutes she was very abusive and threatening and told us to leave.

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Rebecca was able to meet with GMP and have her views listened to at a time when a lot of things in her life had felt out of her control.

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Rebecca was again admitted to hospital. The team had a better chance of developing a more trusting therapeutic relationship during this admission. One of the main engagement tools was assisting her to write an advanced statement on her care plan and supporting her to write a letter of complaint to Greater Manchester Police (GMP) and the Manchester Mental Health and Social Care Trust as she had been very unhappy with how her transfer to Hospital had happened and her treatment at Accident and Emergency. Rebecca was able to meet with GMP and have her views listened to at a time when a lot of things in her life had felt out of her control. Rebecca became more trusting of services as she was supported to take control once more of all activities of daily living. Initially Rebecca found basic communication very difficult but over time her confidence and ability to function socially have improved. Her flat and finances were in a chaotic state and she was supported by her family and care team to manage them.


Partnerships Once Rebecca was more independent in resuming all the basic care needs she felt ready to develop her skills base and activity level and was introduced a Support Time and Recovery worker with whom she developed a very positive therapeutic relationship with. Rebecca had lost all friendships as a result of the several years of poor mental health. The referral to other agencies had a dual purpose of offering her the opportunities to develop other meaningful relationships and to reduce the sense of loneliness and the need to get her social and emotional needs met needs through services. It took time to build trust and respect with her but by being consistent, structured, honest and boundaried this helped to build a good, effective, professional working relationship. Together areas of interest to her were identified and information researched and discussed.

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It took time to build trust and respect with her...this helped to build a good, effective, professional working relationship.

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We began by first looking at her sleeping patterns as she found it difficult to get up and could still be in bed at 1pm in the afternoon, and this could pose problems with any future activities and appointments. We worked on healthy eating and exercise until eventually she was ready for a referral to SMILE, an exercise scheme. Since then she has gone from strength to strength. In July 2010 she was accepted into START and is still there building up her repertoire of skills. She has moved house, got a bank account and sorted out her benefits. She now contacts the team for reassurance and support. She has started the process to become a volunteer at Christies hospital and has spent some time talking about the amazing progress she has made, as she didn’t think anything had changed much. She is also looking at college courses for the future. It has been a long but progressive journey and the person we work with now is a very different person to the one we saw when we started working with her and it has been rewarding and a privilege to see the transformation.


Partnerships In 2011, Manchester Mind was invited to be a partner in an exciting new service, Big Manchester.

Big Manchester The project is lead by Barnardo’s, in partnership with Lifeline Eclypse, Manchester Women’s Aid and Manchester Mind. It is an ambitious child-focussed family service funded for three years through the lottery ‘Improving Futures’ programme. BIG Manchester will work in North Manchester with families affected by alcohol and substance misuse, domestic abuse and poor mental health and who have children where the eldest is between 5 and 11 years old. It has been a fantastic opportunity for Manchester Mind to be involved in Big Manchester and with supporting families who have young children affected by poor mental health. It was planned that each organisation would employ a worker who would bring their and the organisations expertise to the service. The ethos is on strong and committed partnership working and in delivering a unique and innovative intervention within the complex families’ work that is developing across Manchester. The Service will begin in July 2012 with all the workers in place and will be reported on further in the next Annual Review. So far the experience of this partnership and the work planned has been extremely positive for Manchester Mind.

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...a fantastic opportunity for Manchester Mind to be involved in Big Manchester and with supporting families who have young children affected by poor mental health.

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Treasurer’s Report

The financial story


Looking back - edited highlights of 2011/12 Where our money comes from

We had some great news in October 2011 – we were awarded £486,000 of funding from the Big Lottery’s Reaching Communities Fund for our young people’s project, YASP over the next three years. This was fantastic as it had been a challenging start to the year as the main funding source for the project, Working Neighbourhoods Funding, had been withdrawn, so we had set aside money to bridge the gap. Securing this new funding sustains this vital and valued service. Income received in the year totalled £1.436m a reduction of 10% on 2010/11. The reduction was mainly due to the loss of Working Neighbourhoods Funding for YASP. Most of our funding still comes from public sector contracts and grants but we are increasingly looking at ways to diversify our income. Generating income from enterprise activities is one of our areas of focus. Income from our social enterprise Good Mood Food increased slightly during the year although trading has been challenging. We started the Veg Bag scheme during the year and although sales are still low – they have risen since the launch.

78% Public Sector 13% Charitable Trusts 9% Earned Income - food sales etc

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Income received in the year totalled £1.436m a reduction of 10% on 2010/11.

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Treasurer’s Report Expenditure for the year totaled £1.463m a reduction of 8% on 2010/11. As a service delivery organisation, salaries remain our single largest cost with 74% of our expenditure on salary costs, a similar level to 2010/11. Expenditure has reduced across all areas of existing activities as we look to deliver all services within available budgets whilst ensuring that we deliver the services that are needed and valued by our service users.

How we spend it

What that all means in practice is that by the end of the year our general funds increased by £32K even though some projects were underfunded. We spent £45K from our designated reserves to plug the gap in YASP’s funding but were able to transfer £8K into the reserve from other YASP activity areas so we now have £35K set aside for YASP. Overall the charity’s unrestricted reserves, which are made up of general funds and designated funds, only fell by £4,761 – which is fantastic given the decision to fund the gap in YASP funding. We have £46K in restricted reserves made up of grants from charitable trusts linked to specific project activities. Overall a positive position to end what started as a challenging year. If anyone wants to read the whole story you can ring the office and we will send you a full set of accounts or you can download them from the charity commission website.

54% Assertive Outreach 21% YASP 13% Café & GMF Catering

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8% Casework & Advice 3% Bite & Growing Partnerships 1% Governance, Central Management & Support

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Overall a positive position to end what started as a challenging year.


Looking forward Looking forward we know that it is going to get more difficult to fund projects as there are further reductions in public sector budgets and increased competition for other sources of funding. We need to rise to this challenge so that we can ensure the long term financial sustainability of Manchester MIND.

thank you to…. NHS Manchester Mental Health Joint Commissioning Team The Joint Health Unit, Manchester City Council

We will do this by: Diversifying our income by attracting new funders and securing contracts for service delivery on our own or in partnership with other organisations

Manchester City Council Food Futures and Youth Fund Manchester Health and Social Care Trust Comic Relief

Making sure that all projects are properly funded and delivered as efficiently and effectively as possible so that they can have the most impact Increasing income and profits generated by all of our trading activities – our cafes, our social enterprise, Good Mood Food and the Veg Bag scheme

Children in Need Big Lottery North West Target Wellbeing Fund Rotherham, Doncaster and South Humber NHS Trust Big Lottery Reaching Communities

Integrating service delivery and financial planning so that we have the funds available when we need them most and that they are used in the most effective way for the benefit of the current and future service users

NHS North West Social Value Fund Office of Civil Society

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We need to rise to this challenge so that we can ensure the long term financial sustainability of Manchester MIND

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…the story continues


and finally Although it’s been said before there needs to be a special mention and thanks to all our staff and volunteers. Times aren’t easy and there is a lot of uncertainty for everyone and so its even more important to pay tribute to a staff team that has maintained its focus and commitment, started to make changes and improvements to the work they do and also to the volunteers who have this year played a greater part than ever in supporting the organisation to carry on its valuable work.

Annual Report 2011/12

We also need also to thank again individuals who have donated to Manchester Mind – we acknowledge the time and work that has gone into fundraising for us and it is appreciated. This year donations coming into Manchester Mind has been set aside so it can be directly used for activities that benefits our volunteers and service users.


Zion Community Centre 339 Stretford Road Hulme Manchester M15 4ZY telephone: 0161 226 9907 email: info@manchestermind.org website: www.manchestermind.org Registered in England & Wales. Company No: 4738057 Charity No: 1102058


Manchester Mind annual review 2011/12  

Review of the year 11/12 for Manchester Mind - a mental health charity.

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