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CORPORATE PLAN 2011-2014


Welcome to our Corporate Plan for 2011-14 and thank you for feeding back your thoughts during the consultation period

Welcome and foreword We published our draft Corporate Plan in October 2010 and embarked upon an extensive process of public consultation. Details of the process itself and the full feedback may be found on our website. Within that draft plan we acknowledged the state of flux and uncertainty we are in and we set out the many challenges we face; with our proposals to address those challenges. At the time, we were predicting a very significant financial challenge, and we also illustrated how the continuing risk of terrorism and how the growing implications of changes in climate could affect us. We explained how these global issues now not only touch all our lives as citizens, but have direct consequences on those with responsibility

for delivering public services. We also identified many other factors that presented a growing concern for us. Our proposals to address each of these issues were set out in the draft plan and sought to put in place the building blocks for change including: 

A new approach to risk assessment;

A new Risk Model;

A new Business Model;

A new set of Emergency Response Standards; and

A range of measures that would provide the basis for more detailed plans

Whilst we attempted to present these proposals in as clear and concise a way as possible, they are quite

complex and the feedback did highlight the fact that some people struggled a little with that complexity. Nevertheless, the vast majority of respondents recognised the implications of our proposals and in particular, the consequences in relation to the way we deal with emergencies; the number of firefighters we send to incidents, how quickly we propose to get to different incidents in future, the type of fire appliances we intend to send and so on. But, the world does not stand still, and an enormous amount has happened in just the few months since we embarked on our consultation. These changes do affect the proposals we made in our draft plan, though, to a very large degree, they have reinforced the relevance of our proposals. We believe therefore, it is worth saying a little more about what has happened, in order to put a proper context around the final plan. In relation to finance, we have now had our grant settlement from the Government 1, and it is both different and significantly worse than our (pessimistic) predictions. It’s different in the sense that, instead of the four year

settlement we were told we would be given, we have been given just a two year settlement, and we will not know the settlement for the third and fourth years until late in 2012. Notwithstanding this continued uncertainty about the medium term situation, what is already certain is that we do face very substantial reductions in grant. We have a 12.5% reduction in the next two years and, almost certainly, a bigger cut in the following two years. So our best estimate of the overall effect is for a cut of between 25% over the next four years to nearer 40%. These figures translate to reductions of between £18 million a year up to £25 million a year. We have already set our budget for 2011/12, and started to tackle the issue of a £7 million cut in budget, and this has already involved tough decisions. But the entire cut, so far, has come from our back office/management/support costs, where we face losing around 200 people as well as cutting budgets. It is selfevident, though, that much more will be required. Turning to the other challenges, and how these have changed. In relation to terrorism, we have continued to see attempts/attacks around

1 70% of our budget is funded by Government grant; the rest comes from Council Tax.

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GREATER MANCHESTER FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICE CORPORATE PLAN 2011-2014

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the world, and we have seen arrests that have thwarted attacks in the UK. We have also witnessed world events with enormous political and social change in other countries that will inevitably impinge on this issue, notably, Egypt, Libya and parts of the Middle East. Therefore, if anything, the terrorist risk is increasing – certainly it has not, and will not go away. This affects the way we must think about our approach to addressing our rescue role for the future. In relation to global warming, climate change and other natural disasters, we have had the coldest and longest winter on record, illustrating, once again, the massive impact the environment has on our lives, and the dramatic consequences of extremes of weather. More recently, the terrible domino effect of events in Japan in March 2011, where we deployed our firefighters in rescue operations, provide the most compelling and tragic example of the importance of being prepared to deal with the force of nature and its changes.

events/tragedies that disrupt and damage people’s lives and the economy. But they still happen.

the next few years.

a sense of focus, drive and determination from the professional and political leadership of the organisation to maintain the momentum and pace of change required.

This Corporate Plan, therefore, sets out the approach we intend to take to address these many and significant issues. It does not spell out in detail all of our specific actions – these form the basis of our operating plans, managed through the day to day business of the Service and the Fire and Rescue Authority. Rather, the Plan identifies the principles we will follow, the approach we will take and frameworks and standards in place, as well as the ‘big steps’ necessary to transform our organisation and to address the issues in front of us over

It will mean less firefighters overall, and we will need to change the way we roster and deploy our personnel in order to ensure minimal impact on the community. It will also mean different responses to different types of incident and rigorous assessment of real risks, and it will involve tough decisions about how we use our resources. Essentially, we must do more with less.

We remain passionate about our goal of making Greater Manchester a safer place and we believe that, despite the challenges, we can still achieve this goal and continue to improve our safety record.

But, it will also mean continuing, even increasing our investment in prevention and partnership work. It will mean investment in new technology, facilities and equipment to enable change, but also, to protect our personnel doing a hazardous job. It will require

Above all, we remain committed to delivering the expectations of our communities, that when they face an emergency, dial 999 and ask for the Fire and Rescue Service, they get a swift response and a quality of service that is second to none.

Steve McGuirk

Paul Shannon

John Bell

And, of course, fires! In Greater Manchester, we have continued our safety and prevention work and consequently continued to see a fall in the day to day

www.manchesterfire.gov.uk

CBE, MA, BA (Hons), FRSA, FIFireE

Chairman

Vice -Chairman

Chief Executive/ County Fire Officer

Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Authority

Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Authority

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Contents

Welcome and foreword Section 1

Section 2

Section 3

Section 4

2

Your Fire and Rescue Service Your Fire and Rescue Service

6

Our purpose and aims

8

Our values and behaviours

9

Prioritising our resources Financial resources

12

Comprehensive spending review

12

Where we are reducing our costs

14

Our approach to risk

16

What we plan to do What the public said during consultation

26

Our aims 2011 to 2014

30

Measuring and reporting our progress Our development goals 2011/14

34

Our delivery goals 2011/14

38

Our targets 2011/14

42

Appendix one - Our business model

46

Appendix two - Our outcome targets

47

Appendix three - How to contact us

48

Appendix four - Other languages

49

Appendices

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Section 1

Your Fire and Rescue Service

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Your Fire and Rescue Service Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Authority The Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Authority is a publicly accountable body. Thirty councillors are appointed annually by the 10 Metropolitan Borough Councils in Greater Manchester to govern the Service. We are also part of a group of bodies, which collectively make up, the Association of Greater Manchester Authorities (AGMA). The primary duties of the Fire and Rescue Authority are contained in The Fire and Rescue Services Act 2004, and require the provision, training and equipping of the Service to undertake: 

Fire fighting

Protection of people and property from fire

Fire safety promotion

Road traffic collision rescues

Other emergency responses to civil emergencies

We also play a major role in civil protection, so to ensure a more integrated approach to handling larger civil emergencies, the Civil Contingencies Act 2004 defines the roles and responsibilities of the Fire and Rescue Authority, alongside other regional public bodies, including: Police, Ambulance, Local Authorities and some private sector organisations including utility companies. The Authority is also responsible for: 

Ensuring that buildings remain safe from fire by enforcing the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005

The safe operation of petrol stations through the Petroleum (Consolidation) Act 1928

Licensing the storage of explosives (including fireworks) through the Manufacture and Storage of Explosives Regulations 2005

proper running of the Fire and Rescue Service, to ensure it meets both the statutory requirements as well as the needs of the communities of Greater Manchester. At the time of writing this plan, these committees are being reviewed to ensure the Authority remains fit for purpose to address its changing role. Authority meetings are open to the public and held at Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service Headquarters in Swinton. If you would like to know more about The Authority committees and view agendas, meeting minutes and future meeting dates see the Authority’s website. Alternative methods for contacting us can be found at the end of this document.

The Authority has a number of committees which meet regularly to scrutinise the

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Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service covers an area of approximately 500 square miles and serves around 2.6 million residents, as well as those who work in, or visit the city region. We currently employ 1,872 uniformed staff and 511 non-uniformed staff across 44 locations and, each year, we answer around 66,000 emergency calls and attend around 40,000 emergencies including 800 serious road traffic collisions. Whilst providing the capacity to respond to foreseeable fire and

of respondents felt this was appropriate and that we should continue to focus on preventing fires from occurring.

emergency incidents across our region is a statutory requirement, and to many, the core purpose of a Fire and Rescue Service, our role is much broader than simply putting out fires.

In reflection of this and other feedback we have decided to now adopt the core purpose proposed in the draft plan which was;

Responding to emergencies is reactive, and whilst we must be able to provide this response extremely well, we also endeavour to do everything within our span of control to prioritise and target our resources and prevent the need for a response in the first instance.

“to protect and improve the quality of life of the people in Greater Manchester”. We will use this as the bedrock of our future planning.

During consultation on the draft of this plan over 95%

E38 RAMSBOTTOM

E31 LITTLEBOROUGH

E30 ROCHDALE

Wigan Borough Bolton Borough Bury Borough Rochdale Borough Oldham Borough

W51 BOLTON NORTH

W52 HORWICH

Manchester Borough Trafford Borough Salford Borough

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E32 HEYWOOD

W50 BOLTON CENTRAL

W53 FARNWORTH

W54 WIGAN W55 HINDLEY

W56 ATHERTON

W57 LEIGH

Tameside Borough Stockport Borough

E36 BURY

W62 IRLAM

E35 CHADDERTON

E37 WHITEFIELD

E33 OLDHAM S17 BLACKLEY

FSHQ HEADQUARTERS W59 BROUGHTON W60 AGECROFT S16 MCR CENTRAL W61 ECCLES S18 PHILIPS PARK W58 SALFORD S19 GORTON S13 MOSS SIDE S10 STRETFORD S11 SALE

E34 HOLLINS E41 MOSSLEY E39 ASHTON E40 STALYBRIDGE

E42 HYDE

S14 WITHINGTON S20 WHITEHILL S21 STOCKPORT

S12 ALTRINCHAM S15 WYTHENSHAWE S22 CHEADLE

S24 MARPLE

S23 OFFERTON

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Our purpose and aims Following the consultation on the draft plan, we have also finalised six key aims which support the achievement of our core purpose. We are committed to achieving these aims and a range of development activities and measures are contained within section four of this plan to outline in more detail how we will do so.

Our Purpose Our purpose is to protect and improve the quality of life of the people in Greater Manchester

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Prevention

Protection

Response

We aim to:

We aim to:

We aim to:

Engage with Greater Manchester’s communities to inform and educate people in how to reduce the risk of fires and other emergencies and do all we can to prevent crime and disorder

Influence and regulate the built environment to protect people, property and the environment from harm

Plan and prepare for emergencies that may happen and make a high quality, effective and resilient response to them

People

Public Value

Principles

We aim to:

We aim to:

We aim to:

Work with people with the right skills and attitude to deliver high quality, value for money services in a positive environment for everyone

Manage risk through using resources flexibly, efficiently and effectively, continuously improving our use of public money in ways the public value

Operate in accordance with the law and our values, and ensure that safety, sustainability, partnership and inclusivity run through all we do

GREATER MANCHESTER FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICE CORPORATE PLAN 2011-2014

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Our values and behaviours We believe that the way in which we work together towards our core aims is as important as their achievement. Our values reflect what we stand for, and, with our supporting behaviours, define how we will work to achieve our purpose. Our values haven’t been designed by a corporate committee or our management team working in isolation. Instead, they have been developed by staff across the organisation, and reflect what we truly believe in and commit to. These values don’t just ‘sit in’ this Corporate Plan, but have been ‘integrated’ into our day to day business, ensuring this is always reflected in the service the public receives.

Respect

Support, involve and listen to others, showing dignity, consideration and empathy.

Honesty

Commit to create and maintain an open and truthful environment, which is fair and consistent.

Inclusive

Remove barriers to participation and promote a truly representative service, using diversity to benefit all.

Excellence

Strive to develop, constantly improving our contributions to make our Fire and Rescue Service the best it can be.

Professionalism in our role

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Demonstrate a positive attitude and commitment, to deliver a high quality service and always take pride in our role.

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10


Section 2

Prioritising our resources

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Financial resources Revenue Support Grant (RSG)

Each year the Fire and Rescue Authority reviews its Medium Term Financial Strategy and its annual operating budget, to ensure that the aims and activities set out in our Corporate Plan can be delivered and afforded.

This is a Government Grant paid to the Authority from national taxation to provide funding to local services.

Our Funding comes from 3 key sources:

National Non -Domestic Rates (NNDR) Business rates set by, and paid to the Government, and then redistributed based on population.

15% Revenue Support Grant

Precepts

47% National Non Domestic Rates

This is local funding, paid to us by each Metropolitan District Authority of Greater Manchester and collected by them as part of council tax.

38% Precept Income

Comprehensive spending review In October 2010, as part of the National Deficit Reduction Plan, the Coalition Government announced the results of their Comprehensive Spending Review. The October announcement provided Fire and Rescue Authorities with details of the next two years of central government funding, though it had previously been stated and anticipated that a four year settlement would be announced.

the Emergency Budget in June 2010 and included very significant reductions in central government funding for public bodies, with average reductions of up to 25% of Government grant over the next four years being proposed.

The Comprehensive Spending Review followed

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GREATER MANCHESTER FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICE CORPORATE PLAN 2011-2014

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Implications to the Fire and Rescue Service Over the next two years the overall Government grant cuts to Fire and Rescue Services across the UK are around 6.5%. However, the allocation of that funding is very uneven, with some Fire and Rescue Authorities even seeing a small increase in grant. Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Authority on the other hand, has received the largest cuts in the sector, with a 12.35% reduction in our Government grant over the next two years.

back loading is that the bigger cut is yet to come and therefore indicates that our settlement for years three and four will be even worse.

some sort of perspective, a 25% reduction in our grant equates to a total reduction over the four years of £18 million, with 40% equating to £25 million..

If the proportion of savings required by Metropolitan Fire Authorities in years three and four mirrors the weightings placed upon us in years one and two, the grant reductions for this Service could equate to between 30% to 40%.

These cuts will inevitably have major impacts upon how we provide the Fire and Rescue Service. Nevertheless, we remain committed to changing the way we do things, to strive for greater efficiency rather than simply ‘cut’ services. We are taking this approach to ensure that the impact on the public services we provide is risk based.

This represents a budget reduction of £9 million over this period alone.

This is significantly higher than the 25% (average grant reduction) originally anticipated from the Comprehensive Spending Review.

It is very important to note that this settlement was worse than anticipated, but also that a back loading approach has been taken by the Government for grants to Fire and Rescue Authorities. The idea of

Disappointingly, the Government has not yet announced firm figures for 2013/14 and 2014/15, so it is hoped that the figures outlined, represent the worst case scenario. But to put these percentages into

Securing financial resilience focusing on whether the Authority is managing its financial risks to secure a stable financial position for the forseeable future; and

Challenging how the Authority secures economy, efficiency and effectiveness, focusing on prioritising resources within tighter budgets and improving productivity and efficiency.

To provide public assurance, the Audit Commission continues to have a role in assessing the effectiveness of the financial arrangements of the Authority and in particular will focus on arrangements for:

Overview of the predicted annual change in our income over the next four years 2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

Net Budget Requirement

120.72

114.27

112.30

112.92

114.60

Central Government Grants

75.34

69.24

67.08

58.23

49.38

Council Tax

42.21

42.56

44.01

45.77

47.60

Total

117.55

111.79

111.09

104.00

96.98

(£m)

(£m)

(£m)

(£m)

120

(£m)

Total income £’m

100 80 60 40 20

Gap to be met from efficiencies and reserves

www.manchesterfire.gov.uk

3.18

2.48

1.21

8.92

17.62

0

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

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Where we are reducing our costs To deliver this Corporate Plan we have now set our budget for 2011/12, and will deliver a £5.7 million cut in our budget this year. This has already involved some very difficult decisions, with virtually the entire cut coming from our back office, management and support costs, and with a loss of around 200 people.

2011/12

2011/12 (£m)

2012/13 (£m)

Borough management

-0.500

Service wide efficiency programmes

-2.522

-0.434

Catering staff

-0.525

-0.175

Control (999) staff

-0.208

-0.292

Station administration

-0.375

-0.375

Training and development staff

-0.525

End of temporary projects (HR and Payroll)

-1.009

Total

-5.664

-1.276

2012/13 Borough management Service wide efficiency programmes Catering staff Control (999) staff Station administration Training and development staff End of temporary projects

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Borough management Service wide efficiency programmes Catering staff Control (999) staff Station administration Training and development staff

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Looking ahead into 2012 and beyond Over the course of 2011/12 we will undertake further reviews considering our options to provide the service within the constraints of our predicted budget settlement for 2012 to 2015. This will involve further consideration of back office and management costs, but inevitably, must involve looking at our frontline services. Over the next few months we will use our detailed risk modelling for each area, to identify alternative crewing and rostering patterns, whilst still continuing to achieve our response and attendance standards, but at a lower cost. It is impossible to avoid the reality that whilst this will result in a range of options to re-balance our resources which will reflect local risk levels and demand, it will

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also mean fewer firefighters overall. The challenge for us is to ensure we have the right number of firefighters when we need them on a daily basis and to be able to scale up our resources quickly, to respond to major emergencies. As a trusted emergency service, public safety, and that of our staff, is a key priority, and all our reviews will consider the potential impact upon our core purpose to protect and improve the quality of life of people in Greater Manchester.

despite the challenges, we can still achieve this goal and continue to improve our safety record. Full details of our Financial Strategy 2011/12 and the impact of the Comprehensive Spending Review are available on our website.

But we must also take tough decisions and practical steps to deal with the significant reduction in our budget outlined above. We remain passionate about our goal of making Greater Manchester a safer place and we believe that,

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Our approach to risk Greater Manchester is a very diverse region, with a major airport, many large industrial sites, businesses, heritage sites, protected wildlife sites, major railway stations, homes and a well developed tourism sector and road network. Collectively, these features contribute to a broad potential range of incident types and possibilities which we need to be prepared for.

Understanding the risk of fires, incidents and other types of emergency is crucial to providing an efficient and cost effective Fire and Rescue Service. Accurate information on risk not only enables us to target our resources where they are most likely to be called upon in an emergency, but also helps us to prioritise proactive safety and prevention activity. It also assists us in prioritising our approach to controlling and regulating fire safety in the built environment.

We currently operate from 41 fire stations across Greater Manchester, with 66 fire engines and 29 other emergency vehicles. We continually analyse and

Overall life risk map (includes RTC, all fire and major incidents)

ROCHDALE BURY BOLTON OLDHAM

model the historic distribution of incidents, and use our findings to predict as far as possible, the likely demand for services. This ensures our vehicles and staff are in the best place to respond quickly when required. We used to say, “fires can happened anywhere”, and whilst that remains true, there are very clear patterns and trends around locations, times of day and seasons. The map shows the predominant risk levels of the areas within each of the ten metropolitan boroughs making up Greater Manchester. This provides an area overview, but this is not sufficiently detailed to enable us to target our resources effectively. Therefore, we utilise a number of more detailed information sources to breakdown our risk levels by incident type, and use these to provide appropriate response cover in any given area.

WIGAN

ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE

SALFORD LEIGH

Very High High

MANCHESTER IRLAM

STRETFORD

Medium

WITHINGTON

Low Very Low ALTRINCHAM

STOCKPORT

WYTHENSHAWE

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Household casualty risk map

ROCHDALE BURY BOLTON OLDHAM WIGAN

ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE

SALFORD LEIGH

Very High High

MANCHESTER IRLAM

STRETFORD

Medium

WITHINGTON

Low Very Low ALTRINCHAM

STOCKPORT

WYTHENSHAWE

The effects of fire in a home can be devastating, but most are preventable through good safety behaviour. For fire risk in homes and households we model previous incident data, along with predictive data and overlay other information about the vulnerability of different people and localities to build a ward by ward risk map. Of course, we can identify trends and patterns as mentioned already, but it is the nature of emergencies

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that we cannot predict exactly what will happen and when, or the scale of a major emergency. So, our planning must also take account of the probable risks across each locality, and help us to effectively target our prevention activity. Our primary tool to reduce domestic fire risk is the Home Fire Risk Assessment (HFRA). This involves a home visit providing advice and guidance on avoiding

fires, fitting free smoke alarms where needed, and making an escape plan to use should a fire still occur. Proactive prevention works!  Over the last five years we have reduced accidental dwelling fires across Greater Manchester by over 35%; a track record we are immensely proud of.

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The risk to life from fire in public and commercial buildings

ROCHDALE BURY BOLTON OLDHAM WIGAN

ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE

SALFORD LEIGH

Very High High

MANCHESTER IRLAM

STRETFORD

Medium

WITHINGTON

Low Very Low ALTRINCHAM

STOCKPORT

WYTHENSHAWE

The risk to life from fires in public and commercial buildings depends on a number of factors including:

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What a building is being used for and the number of people who occupy it

The fire safety awareness of the people and their ability to make their own escape from a fire

The provision and standard of safety features including fire alarms and sprinkler systems

How effectively a building is managed

Information relating to these factors is collected by our fire safety enforcement officers during inspections, and used to determine how frequently we will continue to inspect them. Where we are concerned about the standard of fire safety, we issue enforcement notices. In the most serious cases, we will prohibit the use of buildings until measures are taken to improve the fire safety and prosecute those responsible.

have been heavily involved in ensuring the new properties and developments meet the required fire safety standards.

Over the last 15 years the City Region has undergone significant regeneration and redevelopment, and our fire safety enforcement teams

GREATER MANCHESTER FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICE CORPORATE PLAN 2011-2014

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Case Study Media City

At over £500 million in value, the new Media City in Salford is one of the UK’s largest building projects outside London.

Our fire engineering section has supported this development to ensure designers met their functional requirements, but

also other requirements in relation to fire safety, with new and very innovative designs for the safety systems used.

Major incidents and business continuity Major incidents occur infrequently, with some areas and boroughs having less than one per year. These cannot be predicted accurately using risk models, so, as well as using historic incident data and a variety of other information sources to model possibilities and scenarios, we must also ensure we maintain the overall capacity across Greater Manchester

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to respond effectively to major emergencies when and wherever they occur. Major incidents include the effects from extremes in weather, such as, flooding and wild fires, but they also include train derailments, major spillages, fires and chemical incidents and even flu pandemics.

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Major incident risk map

Major RTC Flooding (1 in 10 yrs) Flooding (1 in 100 yrs) Aircraft Terrorist incident

Since the 9/11 attack in New York, and more recently, the 7/7 London tube and bus bombings, we also have to be prepared for potential terrorist attacks. We work extensively with other partners through the Greater Manchester Resilience Forum so we can provide a coordinated and effective response in the event of any major incident. Finally, we have also developed our own business continuity plans, which are regularly tested to ensure that we continue to

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provide an effective service during significant disruption to our operations. The recent tragedy in Japan illustrates the domino effect of an earthquake and tsunami and the major fires, flooding and rescue operations that follow. It serves as a stark reminder that planning for, and being able to respond to major and unpredictable events, is a truly difficult and complex issue.

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Previous response standards for life threatening incidents When we produced our first Integrated Risk Management Plan (IRMP) in 2004, we introduced simple and universal time targets for responding to all life threatening incidents. This was created by averaging the response times already achieved from the existing stations and appliances; an approach based on a previous national perspective aiming to provide blanket fire cover. Over the last six years we have been monitoring and observing the emergency response standards used in other Fire and Rescue Services, and we have had the opportunity to use our own experience and knowledge to develop our own comprehensive risk calculator, to determine the relative risk levels across Greater Manchester. This risk calculator uses previous incident data which includes fires, deaths, injuries, major incident information, road traffic collision data and other

www.manchesterfire.gov.uk

building risk data to determine overall risk levels by ward. This is then used to determine the overall risk levels associated with the geographic areas served by each of our stations. During consultation on this approach, many people reflected that categorising areas by risk ratings was understandable and appropriate. Using the risk calculator we have also been able to assess the impact of different response times for each locality. A full copy of the assessments which show the relative risk levels in each ward across Greater Manchester for varying response times can be found on our website. In addition to determining the most risk appropriate response standards, our risk calculator also identifies levels of prevention activity required in each area, to further reduce risk levels.

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New emergency response categories for life threatening incidents The response categories below reflect the targeted attendance times for the first fire appliance we send, from the moment it is mobilised, to its arrival at the scene. During consultation people also told us that a proposed category 5 response time of between 17 and 23 minutes was too slow to respond to a life threatening emergency.

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We have subsequently removed this category. As we have identified in our draft corporate plan, these response times are for the first appliance to a life threatening incident, but we will continue to commit to responding with an overall crewing level or response commensurate with the type of incident we can reasonably foresee or be called to. Furthermore, we

will continue to monitor and measure attendance times of further resources beyond the first appliance to ensure we understand the effect of the new response categories and our overall performance.

Category 1 Response

We will respond to a life threatening emergency and aim to arrive in less than 5 minutes on 95% of occasions

Category 2 Response

We will respond to a life threatening emergency and aim to arrive between 5 and 7 minutes on 95% of occasions

Category 3 Response

We will respond to a life threatening emergency and aim to arrive between 7 and 12 minutes on 95% of occasions

Category 4 Response

We will respond to a life threatening emergency and aim to arrive between 12 and 17 minutes on 95% of occasions with sufficient resources to mount an attack/intervention

Attendance to Road Traffic Collisions

To be developed

Non emergencies

When we respond to a non emergency incident we aim to arrive as soon as practicable whilst still observing normal road speed /driving conditions

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Turnout standards Turnout standards are used to measure the time it takes us to pick up the phone when we receive a 999 call and mobilise our emergency

Answering ‘999’ calls

response. Of course, we aim to turnout as quickly as possible, regardless of category of response but these standards provide a

benchmark against which we can measure the impact of any changes we propose.

‘999 emergency’ calls will be answered within 6 seconds on 98% of occasions The time from picking up the call to sending a turnout message to stations or engines is as follows:

Processing ‘999’ calls

75% of all calls handled in less than 45 seconds 85% of all calls handled in less than 60 seconds 90% of all calls handled in less than 90 seconds 98% of all calls handled in less than 120 seconds The target for turning out appliances at wholetime stations is less than 60 seconds from the time the call has been passed to the station

Turnout of appliances

The target for turning out appliances on retained stations is less than 5 minutes The target for stations with other types of crewing is an average of 180 seconds

Crewing fire appliances to meet varying levels of risk and demand For a number of years we have used our information on risk levels during different times of the day to match our resources to where they are most needed. This has resulted in appliances across Greater Manchester being brought into and out of service at different times of the day and night.

begin introducing alternative crewing and rostering patterns across a number of our stations.

During 2011/12, using our new risk model and response standards, we will

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Task analysis To ensure we continue to provide safe and sufficient crewing levels, we have also undertaken a detailed task analysis for the emergency scenarios we respond to. This analysis determines the number and type of staff required for safe working, for each category of emergency incident, and also provides an indication of the best level of supervision, and the type of equipment needed for each incident scenario. Of course this isn’t an exact science, and it is in the nature of being an emergency service that we must deal with unpredictable and fast

24

moving events. We must continue to be honest that we cannot offer total protection, and fire and rescue remains a hazardous business. We must acknowledge the need for our personnel to be able to use their own initiative and judgement. Full details of the task analysis and optimum crewing level studies can be found on our website.


Section 3

What we plan to do

25


What the public said during consultation Why did we want to talk to people? We know that our budget settlement is very challenging and will require a number of important changes to the delivery of our service. As an organisation, we serve the needs of local people and want to be open and transparent in how we shape our activities to best meet our statutory obligations, as well as local needs. This plan needs to reflect a shared vision for Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service and make sure people’s thoughts and opinions count. We wanted people who may use the service, or work with it, to have a meaningful voice in the way in which we design the future.

How did we gather feedback? Our staff represent our greatest asset and are also some of the best people to ask in terms of what needs to improve and how to make those improvements. In 2009 we undertook our largest ever staff consultation exercise in what were entitled “Blueprint” discussions. This led to the production of our Strategic Intent document in September 2010, which outlined our view of how we could respond to the challenges we face. The Strategic Intent document can be found on our website.

In November 2010, we launched a 12 week public consultation on our draft Corporate Plan, and proposed priorities and activities for 2011 to 2014. The consultation involved workshops and events in every borough, on line surveys, focused mail-outs and targeted telephone calls. A wide spectrum of people and agencies were involved in this engagement including other emergency services, our staff, the general public and other partners across Greater Manchester and beyond. We also shared our plans with Government. This open and extensive consultation, along with the confirmation of our budget position for the next two years during December 2010, has been reflected in the final version of this Corporate Plan to make this our shared plan for 2011/14. In total, during the consultation period, we:

26

Had direct contact with 406 people. 199 of these attended at least a two hour workshop

Generated 967 individual comments

Received 1,200 items of data from people who had used our services

Produced 1,452 items of data from the survey available online

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What did people tell us? The summary below draws together some of the common themes from feedback and how we have responded. We believe it is our responsibility, when people have given their time to comment on the plan, to respond to that comment, and demonstrate how we plan to improve in the future. A full list of all of the comments and our responses during consultation on this plan can be found on our website. Risk Ratings People said that they wanted more specific information on areas which are categorised as high risk and what this will mean to the service that they might receive in an emergency.

We have published all of the 225 ward based risk ratings. Each ward covers on average 5,000 households. This information is available on our website. People said that they wanted to be sure that we would take into consideration local knowledge and intelligence when allocating risk ratings, as opposed to relying on historical data alone.

We made a commitment to review the risk ratings on a yearly basis and ensure they remain relevant to the communities we serve. The potential to include other intelligence and professional judgements has been integrated into the risk model. In delivering our prevention, protection and response service, local knowledge will be equally important to target our resources. Response standards People told us that category 5 response time of between 17 and 23 minutes was too slow to respond to a life threatening emergency.

We make sure that no area across Greater Manchester receives less than a category 4 response. Most areas in Greater Manchester will receive a category 3 or faster. A full list of the category breakdowns can be found on our website. We have now removed category five response.

www.manchesterfire.gov.uk

Rostering and crewing levels Staff told us that they need to be consulted and kept informed of the proposed changes. Partners and the public need to be confident and able to trust the Service and that the level of service will be maintained.

We will continue to consult with our staff over proposed changes and will build on the partnerships that we already have within many communities, to make sure that people remain confident in the quality and public value of our service. People said that they were open and accepting to new ways of working, but that we had to make sure that it was right for the area.

We made a commitment to make no changes to service delivery without appropriate consultation and evidence of good practice from other organisations or other Fire and Rescue Services. Any proposals that are implemented will undergo stringent reviews to make sure that we are making the right changes for the communities that we serve.

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Budget People told us about ways in which we might be able to generate income in the future, to make up for some of the budget deficit caused by the Comprehensive Spending Review.

We have taken the ideas on board and will look at developing ways to bring some of these ideas to fruition over the next year, in line with our aim on Public Value.

Partnership working Partners said that they wanted more collaborative working between ourselves and other organisations, sharing the delivery of some services in partnership with one another.

Together we have already delivered a range of successful preventative work in partnerships across Greater Manchester. We are keen to continue this, and do more, and welcome your ongoing ideas and collaboration. We have recently made recommendations to a national review of fire policy and reflect the potential to work in a more integrated manner with other agencies including the NW Ambulance Service, and will consult on further developments in our future plans.

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GREATER MANCHESTER FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICE CORPORATE PLAN 2011-2014

www.manchesterfire.gov.uk


We will update our plan each year and provide further opportunities for you to consult on our future plans. If anyone requires any further information or have any other questions or wish to make any other comment on our plan they can : 

Email at: consultation@manchesterfire.gov.uk

Write to: GMFRS Consultation GMFRS Planning and Performance Directorate Headquarters 146 Bolton Road Manchester M27 8US

Call:

For information on alternative formats or languages, please see page 49 of this plan

0161 608 4169

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Our aims 2011 to 2014

Aim 1 Prevention

Aim 3 Response

We aim to:

We aim to:

We aim to:

Engage with Greater Manchester’s communities to inform and educate people in how to reduce the risk of fires and other emergencies and do all we can to prevent crime and disorder.

Influence and regulate the built environment to protect people, property and the environment from harm.

Plan and prepare for emergencies that may happen and make a high quality, effective and resilient response to them.

The sustainability and resilience of the City Region and its economy is critical to us all. We will continue to support businesses to improve their resilience to accidental fire, crime, climate change and major incidents. Fire safety in the workplace is a legitimate and critical business overhead, not only to protect people and buildings, but also to sustain long term economic growth.

We recognise that we cannot prevent every fire and major incident but we will provide effective emergency cover to rescue people from harm, preserve buildings and our heritage and minimise damage to the environment.

We would like a City Region where no-one suffers injury or death from fires and where the quality of life is better for all. We will use our resources effectively and efficiently to target our prevention activities to where they will support the greatest reduction in fires, suffering and fire related crime.

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Aim 2 Protection

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Aim 4 Public Value

Aim 5 People

Aim 6 Principles

We aim to:

We aim to:

We aim to:

Manage risk through using resources flexibly, efficiently and effectively to continuously improve the way we use public money.

Work with people with the right skills and attitude to deliver high quality, value for money services in a positive environment for everyone.

Operate in accordance with the laws and our values, and ensure that safety, sustainability, partnership and inclusivity run through all that we do.

We will continue to monitor our performance in both delivering efficiencies and what we hope will be exceptional services with high levels of public satisfaction.

We know that staff and volunteers represent our greatest asset and we want to support a well informed, high performing workforce with high levels of enthusiasm and satisfaction to help us to ensure Greater Manchester is a safer place to live in, work in and visit.

We want this service to be delivered through successful partnerships and an equitable workforce, reflecting the diversity of the communities across Greater Manchester. We will continue to do everything we can to protect the safety of staff and reduce our impact upon the environment as we deliver the service.

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32


Section 4

Measuring and reporting our progress

33


Our development goals 2011/14 This action plan sets out a clear picture of our development goals over the next three years to achieve our strategic aims. Our development goals will result in a change in the way we do things and represent major pieces of work which underpin how we will deliver our service in the future.

Some goals will relate to more than one aim and will take more than one year to achieve, and each goal has an owner from our Corporate Leadership Team, who will be ultimately responsible for its delivery.

departmental and staff action plans which we monitor through our planning and performance reporting process.

More detailed activities for achieving these goals are incorporated into our

These do not reflect all the work we will be doing, and inevitably new risks and priorities will arise that we will need to deal with. The development goals have been derived from a combination of analysis of our reduced budget, corporate risks, future planning and extensive consultation. Against each goal there is a reference to which of our strategic aims it is intended to address.

Corporate Aims Key Prevention

34

Public Value

Protection

People

Response

Principles

For example:

GREATER MANCHESTER FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICE CORPORATE PLAN 2011-2014

represents that the goal is intended to address the Strategic Aims of; Prevention, Protection and Public Value.

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#

Strategic Aim

Development goal

Timeframe for delivery

DV 1

Produce, agree and implement a range of strategies to inform and educate people in how to reduce their risk from fires and other emergencies and to improve quality of life outcomes for our communities.

Year 1 to 3

DV 2

Produce, agree and implement a range of strategies to regulate the built environment so as to protect people, reduce property damage and economic loss and preserve our heritage.

Year 1 to 3

DV 3

Complete the restructure of Prevention and Protection services commenced in 2011 to create efficiencies and improve service delivery.

DV 4

Implement our new partnership strategy to ensure we work effectively with partners and deliver public value.

DV 5

Deploy a new comprehensive risk model to determine risk levels and proportionate response times for each of our fire stations.

DV 6

Scope the introduction of special rescue stations to focus our expertise and pursue excellence in service delivery, then make recommendations and implement as required.

Year 1 to 3

DV 7

Review the current arrangements for urban search and rescue and their relationship with international search and rescue capabilities, recommend improvements and implement as required.

Year 1 to 3

DV 8

Review the fleet of special appliances, make recommendations for improvements and implement as required.

Year 1 to 3

DV 9

Revise the current Rostering for Duty arrangements to reduce the numbers of staff needed to operate the system and create significant efficiencies.

Year 1 to 2

Year 1

Year 1 to 2

Year 1

continued overleaf

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#

36

Development goal

Strategic Aim

Timeframe for delivery

DV10

Introduce pumping appliances more suited to dealing with smaller fires.

Year 1 to 3

DV11

Vary crewing arrangements on fire stations to ensure they are fit for purpose and meet the risk and demand levels identified in each area.

Year 1 to 3

DV12

Review our arrangements for incident command, make recommendations and implement as required.

Year 1 to 3

DV13

Refurbish or build fire stations in accordance with the Fire and Rescue Authority’s Asset Management Plan to meet the needs of our Risk Model and effective service delivery.

Year 1 to 3

DV14

Implement our people and organisational development strategy to ensure we work with people with the right skills and attitude to deliver high quality, value for money services in a positive environment for everyone.

Year 1 to 3

DV15

Provide a new technical solution for the delivery of our control (999) service prioritising opportunities for regional collaboration in the interests of public value.

Year 1 to 3

DV16

Implement the changes from the management and back office reviews as part of reducing costs for 2011/12 and beyond.

Year 1

DV17

Conduct further reviews into back office functions in order to create further efficiencies and preserve front line services.

Year 1 to 2

DV18

Identify opportunities for commissioning and / or sharing services with other public (in particular the Association of Greater Manchester Authorities (AGMA)), private and third sector organisations, make recommendations and implement as required.

Year 1 to 2

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Strategic Aim

Development goal

Timeframe for delivery

DV 19

Continue to implement our Sustainability Strategy, investing in green technology and behaviour change programmes to reduce our direct and indirect impact upon the environment.

Year 1 to 3

DV 20

Provide new training facilities to improve real fire training for our firefighters.

Year 1 to 2

DV 21

Complete a further review of the senior management of the organisation, make recommendations and implement as required.

Year 1

DV 22

Develop and implement a Corporate Communications Strategy to support our aims and maximise opportunities for income generation.

Year 1

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Our delivery goals 2011/14 Within our business model (see page 46) we have six strategic aims to deliver our core purpose, ‘to protect and improve the quality of life of the people in Greater Manchester’. Our delivery goals are simply the outcomes that we expect to see from achieving these aims.

To ensure we are accountable in achieving these goals and meeting our aims we use a variety of performance measures and where appropriate we use targets to help us to identify where we need to do more.

We use our delivery goals to test that there is a ‘golden thread’ between our overall strategic aims and any actions and activities we undertake, whether these are corporate, departmental, or even actions in individual staff plans.

Corporate Aims Key Prevention

38

Public Value

Protection

People

Response

Principles

For example:

GREATER MANCHESTER FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICE CORPORATE PLAN 2011-2014

represents that the goal is intended to address the Strategic Aims of; Prevention, Protection and Public Value.

www.manchesterfire.gov.uk


Strategic Aim

Delivery goal

How will we measure this?

DL 1

Reduce the number of emergency calls

Using our emergency call data and information on mobilisations.

DL 2

Reduce deaths and injuries from fires and other emergencies

From our incident records, prevention and protection activities and the levels of risk in our communities.

DL 3

Reduce crime and disorder

Through the overall numbers of deliberate fires, hoax calls and crimes against our staff or property.

Reduce property damage, economic loss and damage to the environment

The number and extent of property fires and the number of fires where smoke alarms or fire suppression systems are fitted. The use of spill materials, foams and the data on economic cost of fires and associated carbon footprint from all fires we attend.

DL 5

Preserve our heritage from fire damage

By monitoring the number of fires in grade I and II listed buildings and the quality of protection assessed through the protection inspection programme.

DL 6

Ensure the public are highly satisfied with our services

In house and independent public satisfaction surveys of our activities, and public consultation on major planned changes to our service.

DL 7

Support business resilience and economic growth

Monitoring the number and quality of fire safety enforcement inspections and the number of fires affecting businesses.

#

DL 4

continued overleaf

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40

Strategic Aim

Delivery goal

How will we measure this?

DL 8

Maintain a high state of preparedness for emergencies, effective emergency cover and a high quality response

By monitoring the number and quality of incident pre-plans, the range and quality of training events, the availability of our appliances and staff, the achievement of the response standards and staff performance and training records.

DL 9

Rescue people from harm and maintain resilience during peak activity levels and business disruption

From our incident data, attendance and response standards and regular testing of our business continuity plans.

DL 10

Continually improve our service, providing value for money and a balanced budget

Our financial records, internal and external audits and cost benchmarking against other Fire and Rescue Services.

DL 11

Place fire stations at the heart of communities, valued and used by local people, organisations and partners

The use levels of fire station facilities by local communities and partnerships.

DL 12

Provide improved quality of life outcomes for communities

Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the impact of our work on quality of life outcomes for communities.

DL 13

Volunteers adding further value to our service

Volunteer records, numbers and satisfaction levels.

DL 14

Develop and sustain a high quality, performing, effective, well informed and well trained workforce

Our staff performance and appraisal records, awareness surveys, communications and training records, external audit and feedback from other partners.

#

GREATER MANCHESTER FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICE CORPORATE PLAN 2011-2014

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Delivery goal

How will we measure this?

DL15

Develop and maintain a committed, enthusiastic and healthy workforce including volunteers with high levels of satisfaction

Staff satisfaction surveys, consultations and reward and recognition processes.

DL16

Develop and maintain confident, capable leaders and managers, with low levels of absenteeism, staff turnover and ill discipline

Attendance records, staff performance and appraisal data and staff surveys.

DL17

Reduce our carbon footprint, use of natural resources and deliver our services in a sustainable way

Resource use data, carbon emission calculations, staff behaviour and measures on our supply chain and indirect environmental impact. Progress against our Sustainability Strategy.

DL18

Develop and maintain a safe workforce with low rates of accidents and injuries to our people

Sickness, absence, accident and injury records.

DL19

Provide for better community outcomes through equitable service delivery by a workforce that is representative of our collective diversity

Ethnic, gender, age and disability profiles of our staff and volunteers and the success of our prevention and protection strategies.

#

www.manchesterfire.gov.uk

Strategic Aim

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Our targets 2011/14 Strategic monitoring against our corporate targets is undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Authority, with more detailed departmental and directorate targets being scrutinised through our internal performance and planning process.

Our outcome targets (for example, number of accidental dwelling fires) for the next three years can be found in Appendix Two.

A summary of our corporate performance and the highlights of our activities in each borough are published quarterly in the Chief Officer’s Activity Report (available on our website) and in the meeting minutes of our Authority Committees (available on the Authority’s website). We also produce an annual performance report which provides some more detailed analysis and benchmarking of our performance alongside similar Fire and Rescue Services. The headline targets that follow reflect some of the key output measures we will use to monitor the delivery of this plan over the next three years (2011/14).

42

GREATER MANCHESTER FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICE CORPORATE PLAN 2011-2014

www.manchesterfire.gov.uk


Prevention We will deliver 180,000 Home Fire Risk Assessments and target the areas we know to be at higher risk of accidental dwelling fires.

Protection To support business resilience and fire safety we will deliver 21,000 fire safety enforcement inspections.

Response We will aim to arrive at emergencies and life threatening emergencies within our category response times on 95% of occasions Category 1: Category 2: Category 3: Category 4:

less than 5 minutes between 5 and 7 minutes between 7 and 12 minutes between 12 and 17 minutes

We aim to answer all 999 emergency calls within 6 seconds on 98% of occasions and meet our call processing times of: 75% of all calls within 45 seconds 85% of all calls within 60 seconds  90% of all calls within 90 seconds  98% of all calls within 120 seconds  

We will also aim to turn out fire appliances from whole time stations within 60 seconds and from retained stations within 5 minutes.

Public Value We will deliver a 12.35% (£9 million) reduction in the cost of the Service over 2011 to 2013 and prepare for further grant reductions in 2014 and 15.

People We will target fewer than 6 days / shifts lost to short and long term sickness in our workforce. We will recruit and maintain at least 200 volunteers to provide 100,000 volunteer hours of support in outreach and fire prevention work across the City Region.

Principles We will continue to reduce our impact upon the environment and reduce our overall carbon footprint and use of natural resources by 25% versus our 2008/09 baseline. We aim to reduce working days lost to ill heath and injuries by 30% over the next 10 years.

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44


Appendices

45


What we aim to do

How we aim to achieve this (the means)

46

GREATER MANCHESTER FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICE CORPORATE PLAN 2011-2014

The outcomes of our aims

Fewer emergency calls Fewer deaths and injuries from fires and other emergencies Less crime and disorder Less property damage and economic loss Less damage to the environment Citizens recovering effectively from incidents High public satisfaction with our services

Targeted marketing, advice and education to change behaviour Helping communities to help themselves Investigating the causes of fires and helping to detect crimes Understanding the nature of our diverse communities Learning from incidents Monitoring, evaluating and improving our effectiveness Being influential locally, regionally, nationally and internationally to benefit Greater Manchester

Engage with Greater Manchester’s communities to inform and educate people in how to reduce the risk of fires and other emergencies and do all we can to prevent crime and disorder

Prevention

Modelling the risk of emergencies Determining what emergencies we respond to A risk based incident planning programme that focuses on life safety and protects Greater Manchester’s critical assets and heritage Effective business continuity arrangements Valid response standards Mutual support arrangements, regionally and nationally Limiting economic and environmental damage by the way we deal with incidents Learning from incidents Monitoring, evaluating and improving our effectiveness Being influential locally, regionally, nationally and internationally to benefit Greater Manchester

Plan and prepare for emergencies that may happen and make a high quality, effective and resilient response to them

Response

Effective research Effective risk management, planning and performance management Utilising our brand, expertise and resources beyond our statutory duties Maximising the use of our resources Attracting additional funding, where necessary, to support the delivery of our aims Using technology to improve services and efficiency Supporting economic growth Involving our communities in designing, evaluating and delivering our services Promoting the nature, purpose and value to the public of our organisation Being influential locally, regionally, nationally and internationally to benefit Greater Manchester

Manage risk through using resources flexibly, efficiently and effectively, continuously improving our use of public money in ways the public value

Public Value

Best practice approaches to recruiting people An integrated approach to workforce planning, succession planning and career development Effective learning and development programmes and facilities Maintaining competence and continued professional development Employing people who take appropriate responsibility for their development and maintenance of competence Providing consistent assessment and appraisal systems Recognising and rewarding good performance and dealing fairly and consistently with poor performance Informing, consulting and involving our people in issues that affect them Recruiting and developing confident and capable leaders and managers

Work with people with the right skills and attitude to deliver high quality, value for money services in a positive environment for everyone

People

Fewer emergency calls Fewer deaths and injuries from fires and other emergencies Less crime and disorder Less property damage and economic loss Less damage to the environment More business resilience and economic growth Our heritage preserved High public satisfaction with our services

High state of preparedness for emergencies Effective emergency cover and high quality response to emergencies Resilience during peak activity levels and business disruption People rescued from harm Fewer deaths and injuries from fires and other emergencies Less property damage and economic loss Less damage to the environment More business resilience and economic growth Our heritage preserved High public satisfaction with our services ■

A balanced budget Better designed, high value for money services Improved quality of life outcomes for communities More economic growth Fire stations at the heart of communities Volunteers adding further value to our service offer High public satisfaction with our services

High quality, well trained workforce High performing workforce Effective workforce cover Committed and enthusiastic staff working in a positive environment A well informed workforce Low levels of ill discipline, absenteeism and staff turn over High levels of staff and volunteer satisfaction Have confident and capable leaders and managers

Performance measures tracking progress towards our service delivery and service development goals

Targeted marketing, advice and education to change behaviour Helping businesses to help themselves and treat fire safety as a legitimate business overhead A risk based audit and inspection programme that focuses on life safety and protects Greater Manchester’s critical assets and heritage Responding to concerns over fire safety Enforcing fire safety law in the public interest Supporting economic growth Learning from incidents Monitoring, evaluating and improving our effectiveness Being influential locally, regionally, nationally and internationally to benefit Greater Manchester

Influence and regulate the built environment to protect people, property and the environment from harm

Protection

Our purpose is to protect and improve the quality of life of the people in Greater Manchester

Better outcomes for our communities using the same resources but through partnerships A healthy workforce Low rates of accidents and injuries to our people Equitable service delivery by a workforce that is representative of the communities it serves Less impact on the environment from our services High levels of staff and volunteer satisfaction High public satisfaction with our services

Effective internal and external communication An internal management system audit framework Setting clear standards and accountabilities In accordance with our values, holding each other to account Seeking to work in partnership to achieve better outcomes than could be achieved alone Providing ‘safe persons’ and a healthy and safe working environment so far as is practicable in an emergency service Providing our services in a sustainable way Providing services tailored to meet the needs of our diverse communities Being an employer of choice for all our communities

Operate in accordance with the law and our values, and ensure that safety, sustainability, partnership and inclusivity run through all we do

Principles

Appendix one - Our business model

www.manchesterfire.gov.uk


www.manchesterfire.gov.uk

36.73%

Percentage of dwelling fires attended where no smoke alarm was fitted

126 835

Number of incidents involving hostilities towards firefighters

Total number of calls to road traffic collisions

820

106

2,157

101

43

Number of people rescued from fires

4,927

94%

95%

Percentage of accidental dwelling fires confined to room of origin

Number of people in accidental dwelling fires who escaped unharmed without Fire and Rescue Service assistance

2,427

7,354

2,460

11,582

723

31.24%

20.49%

48.27%

9,959

3,285

13,244

372

16

7,179

2009/10

Actual

Number of accidental dwelling fires

Response targets

Number of unwanted fire signals caused by automatic fire detection apparatus

920

16.82%

Percentage of dwelling fires attended where a smoke alarm was fitted but did not activate

Number of calls to malicious false alarms attended

46.45%

Percentage of dwelling fires attended where a smoke alarm activated

Prevention targets

10,716

3,738

Number of deliberate primary fires

Number of deliberate secondary fires

14,454

655

Number of casualties resulting from primary fires

Total number of deliberate fires

22

7,689

2008/09

Number of fatalities resulting from primary fires

Total number of primary fires

Incident targets

Description of measure

781

72

2,699

200

93%

2,306

6,400

660

27.49%

21.72%

50.79%

9,839

2,527

12,366

540

15

6,330

2010/11

24.20%

≥ 95%

2,089

4,081

442

21.30%

≥ 95%

1,988

3,259

362

18.70%

monitored for information

≥ 95%

2,195

5,111

540

6,972

1,498

1,783 7,820

8,410

386

4,503

2013/14

9,564

430

Aspiring to zero

5,044

2012/13

monitored for information

8,772

2,123

10,875

482

5,651

2011/12

Target

Appendix two - Our outcome targets

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Appendix three - How to contact us Alternatively, you can contact your local Borough Command: Bolton Borough Tel 01204 905126/7 Fax 01204 905109 Bury Borough Tel 0161 909 0326/7 Fax 0161 909 0309

You can contact us verbally or in writing at Headquarters using the address below: Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service Headquarters 146 Bolton Road Swinton Manchester M27 8US Telephone Number 0161 736 5866 Fax Number 0161 743 1777 e-mail consultation@manchesterfire.gov.uk You can also use the ‘contact us’ links on our website at www.manchesterfire.gov.uk Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. See the links on our website.

48

Manchester Borough Tel 0161 608 5326/7 Fax 0161 608 5309

Contacting us in an emergency Dial 999 and ask for the fire service. If you are inside a building when a fire starts, remember: Get out, stay out, call us out. Never try to put a fire out unless you have received sufficient training.

Oldham Borough Tel 0161 909 8626/7 Fax 0161 909 8609 Rochdale Borough Tel 01706 900126/7 Fax 01706 900109 Salford Borough Tel 0161 609 0226/7 Fax 0161 609 0209 Stockport Borough Tel 0161 608 5426/7 Fax 0161 608 5409 Tameside Borough Tel 0161 609 1626/7 Fax 0161 609 1609 Trafford Borough Tel 0161 608 9226 Fax 0161 608 9209 Wigan Borough Tel 01942 650126/7 Fax 01942 650109

GREATER MANCHESTER FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICE CORPORATE PLAN 2011-2014

www.manchesterfire.gov.uk


Appendix four - Other languages This document contains information about your Fire Service. If you or anybody you know would like this information in another language or format including large print, Braille and audiotape, please phone 0161 608 4387 or 4386.

Arabic

Bangla

Chinese

Farsi

French

Ce document contient des informations en ce qui concerne le service des pompiers. Si vous, ou une personne que vous connaissez, voudriez ces informations dans une autre langue, format y compris en Braille ou sur bande sonore, prière de contacter le numéro de téléphone 0161 608 4387 ou 4386.

Gujarati

Hindi

Polish

Ten dokument zawiera informacje o serwisie przeciw po_arowym. Je_li ty lub kto_ kogo znasz chcia_by te informacje w innym j_zyku lub formacie, wliczaj_c wielkim drukiem, Braillem oraz na kasecie audio, prosz_ zadzwoni_ na numer 0161 608 4387 lub 4386.

Punjabi

Somali

Dokumentigan waxaa ku jira warbixin ku saabsan Adeegaaga Dabka. Haddii adiga ama qofkasta aad garanaysid warbixintan u baahnaan lahaa iyadoo luqada kale ah ama hab kale uu ku jiro daabac balaaran, Qoraalka dadka indhaha la’a iyo cajalada maqalka, fadlan dir telefoon lambar 0161 608 4387 ama 4386.

Urdu

www.manchesterfire.gov.uk

CORPORATE PLAN 2011-2014 GREATER MANCHESTER FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICE

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Printed on 80% recycled paper using vegetable based inks

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