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Mammoet World

As the world market for heavy lifting and heavy transport continues to grow, the loads to A b be lifted are getting heavier and heavier. To meet this growth opportunity, we have d developed a New Generation of PTC Super Heavy Lift cranes, with a combination of high lilifting capacity and flexibility to set it apart from the rest of the market.

Petrochemical page 6

Mining page 12

Power page 14

Offshore page 24

Civil page 32

Marine page 40

Worldwide specialists in heavy lifting and transport

A long drive in South Africa. Read more about it on page 7.


Ready for the future

Introduction “Thoroughly familiar with our international operations”

In 2011 Mammoet celebrated its 45th anniversary. We will look back on 2011 as a dynamic year. It was a year of many developments which helped to place our business in an even better position to meet new challenges and provide our customers with a comprehensive range of engineered heavy lifting and transport services.

Halfway during the year a new Board of Management was appointed. In the interview you can learn more about Jan Kleijn, our CEO. He leads a new team of people who have all long been working for Mammoet and who are thoroughly familiar with our international operations. Mammoet’s new Safety, Health & Incident Management System is the first in our industry. SHE-Q Director Koos van Tol explains how this system benefits operational safety and the quality of our services. Mammoet Salvage has only been in business for six years but is already a major international player due to its unique solutions. “Mammoet’s united experience pays off” so explains Managing Director Fokko Ringersma with reference to the recent success stories relating to our rapidly expanding salvage division. Another good example of our inventiveness is given in the report on “AQIS, a very big cleaning job” which features a “floating” PTC. Our new web site www.mammoet.com is another innovation, it is clearer and more userfriendly and provides you all the information you might need. The news items also cover the awards Mammoet has received this year. For example, we are number one in the IC50 and IC T50 indexes and also received two ESTA Awards. Our business has also been expanded with new divisions. We have now fully acquired KR Wind (formerly 50% Mammoet-owned) which will now operate as Mammoet Wind and offer state-of-the-art solutions to the wind power industry. In Kazakhstan we have set up a new joint venture, Mammoet Kasmashal. The wide range of projects in this issue of Mammoet World clearly illustrates the innovative solutions our engineers develop. Finally, Mammoet World now includes a Mining section describing our specialized work in this industry. We hope that you will enjoy these and other items in this eleventh issue of Mammoet World.

Mammoet celebrated its 45th anniversary Two models of the New Generation PTCs were presented and demonstrated in June 2011 to customers, press and employees at Mammoet’s dedicated site in Zeeland, the Netherlands.

Conversion factors 1 meter = 3.28 feet 1 metric ton = 0.984 long tons (UK ton) 1 metric ton = 1.102 short tons (US ton) 1 metric ton = 2205 pounds 1 foot = 0.305 meters 1 long ton = 1.016 metric tons = 2240 pounds 1 short ton = 0.907 metric tons = 2000 pounds

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Colophon This magazine is a publication of Mammoet Holding B.V., Corporate Communication Department, Postbus 570, 3100 AN Schiedam, The Netherlands. E-mail: info@mammoet.com Editor in chief: Melvin Schaap Editors: Johan Pastoor, Peggy Croes-del Prado, Janet Martin, Kimberley Robichaud, Ashten Postell, Jude Castillo, Magdalene Lau Text & Photography: Mammoet Employees, Jorrit Lousberg, Bob Hersbach, Ads&Strats, TechTrans, Andrew Walkinshaw en Haut! Photographie Layout & printing: Badoux BV, Houten - The Netherlands Copyright: Text and photos may only be reproduced with permission from the Corporate Communication Department of Mammoet Holding B.V.

www.mammoet.com

© 2011


New Generation PTC Super Heavy Lift cranes

“World record among jib cranes and sheerlegs”

PTC 140 DS PTC 200 DS We have successfully tested one of our new PTC Super Heavy Lift cranes with a test load of 3,520 tons at 33 meters radius. The crane, designed in-house by Mammoet, was rigged with a 83 meter main boom and 36 meter jib. The maximum design load on the jib is 2,900 tons which sets a world record among jib cranes and sheerlegs. Visit our website for more detailed information. www.mammoet.com

Fully containerized

First project

Like all PTCs, the New Generation cranes break down into components the size of a standard 20 or 40 foot shipping container. Consequently they can be shipped worldwide without the need for special equipment at ports or in transit. This is a major advantage when working on remote sites in areas with a poor infrastructure.

The first new PTC 200 DS crane has been shipped for its first project. In the current setup the crane consists of 24 x 20 foot and 198 x 40 foot containers, with a total weight of 6,125 tons. The crane was loaded on two barges from the Mammoet Terminal in Westdorpe (The Netherlands) and was first shipped to Antwerp. From there the containers were transshipped on board of the MSC Antares which left Antwerp early in the morning of 29 November. The first job will be in Rio Grande, Brazil where it arrived by the end of December.

Contents Segments

Related

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30

Petrochemical

SHE-Q

Close up

4

Message from the board

Mining Power

News

Advertisements

Offshore

22

22 29 39

Civil Marine

Newsflash

Mammoet Rallysport Mammoet Workwear Mammoet Store

Mammoet Solutions carefully analyzed the requirements of future projects in different markets before designing the new cranes. The design was then fully reviewed by Lloyds’ Register so that our customers are assured of the safety of the equipment. The cranes are EN 13000 certified which is equivalent to ASME B30.5 and OSHA 1926.1433. Finally, the crane components were produced by a range of specialized manufacturers.


“It’s the people who make the difference, not the equipment”

Message from

The Board 2011 was a challenging year. A challenging economic situation, some great projects, the commissioning of the next generation of Super Heavy Lift cranes, designed and built by us, and finally the appointment of the new Board of Directors. Mammoet’s new CEO Jan Kleijn (formerly Managing Director of Mammoet USA) and the new Board were appointed in July.

“The great thing about the new Board is that all new members have been working for the company for some time. And their former positions have now been taken by other people from within the company. That proves the success of our concept of investing in people,” explained Jan Kleijn in his office. He likes to avoid hierarchy and work as equals with his people and his vision is fully focused on the future. The new Board is busy developing plans for the future, but it is too early to be specific. However, the broad outlines will be little different from the issues he has promoted throughout his career. Kleijn’s career at Mammoet started 15 years ago and he gradually discovered that he enjoyed being a people manager more than being a mechanical engineer.

the equipment is used and if we are able to generate added value.” The term “added value” was a recurring theme in this interview and will also be a key component of the long-term strategy currently being developed. “I’m more concerned about results than revenues. You can be very busy and have operations and equipment throughout the world, but there’s little point if it doesn’t bring in profits. That would be a waste of the invested resources and energy. It would be better to do that in countries and markets where you can make a difference,” he explained. “If you are looking for good financial results then you have to make choices as a business and focus on the activities where you provide added value.”

A versatile and closely-knit team

Customer focus

Because of his management skills and the way he supported the people he worked with he became head of the European Projects department at a young age. And now he is the youngest member of the management team he is leading. The other 3 members of the Board are Erik Rave (CIO), Herman Smit (COO) and Siem Kranenburg (CFO). Neil Birkbeck has been appointed as general advisor of the Board. They are all people who, like Kleijn, have long been working in the business, are intimately familiar with Mammoet and our customers, and have a lot of inter national experience. Kleijn commented: “The whole world and different cultures are represented on the Board, which reflects the worldwide operations of our company.” He also mused if Mammoet is a Dutch company with international branches, or an international company headquartered in the Netherlands. “I tend to think it’s the latter.”

Kleijn continued “That means you have to be focused. And flexible. In this dynamic ord rd to be inflexible. world you cannot afford e and continuously We have to be flexible g world to maintain adapt to the changing to do that because our position. We have to irr requirements and our customers and their h anging. That is expectations are changing. sss. We shouldn’t be inherent to our business. ve e to keep moving afraid of that. We have forward, otherwise we would go p phasizes downhill.” Kleijn emphasizes that our u customers. “We ur focus should be on our o provide the best have to be flexible to c possible service to ourr customers. That is o than in the past ore our objective. Much more we are going to putt ourselves in our customers’ shoes, consider their e their needs, and expectations, analyze m. If we can do that, how we can serve them. atting customers in the right way, by treating k king with respect, making their ha allenges, challenges our challenges, ce erns, and addressing their concerns, en we will providing solutions, then ho ort, we gain their trust. In short, u ustomer should focus on the customer n offer and see how we can them added value.”

Added value Time to return to “people”, one of Kleijn’s favorite subjects. “The success of our company is based on the fact that people are at the centre of it. And it’s going to continue that way. It’s the people who make the difference, not the equipment. The quality of our people determines how

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Corporate social a al responsibility Kleijn goes beyond

that and is already looking further ahead. “It may be premature, but I also want to see how we can provide this added value to our customers in a way which ties in with our corporate social responsibility. That is, in a way which also provides added value to society. If we can manage that, then the return will automatically follow. Because that also benefits our company and our shareholders. That social added value is my ultimate objective. And we are certainly moving in that direction. We can already see that among our customers. In another ten years or so, issues such as sustainability, corporate social responsibility and involvement with the local community will be an ordinary part of doing business. I’m convinced of that. Not just because we can


Jan Kleijn – President and CEO

benefit from it as a business, but because I really believe that is important.”

Mammoet Solutions Mammoet has already taken steps to create added value for its customers. The innumerable innovative solutions Mammoet has developed are the best example of that. Take SPMTs, our push up system and the countless innovative project solutions which customers are still benefiting from today. The Super Heavy Lift PTC ring cranes which we added to our fleet this year are more evolutionary than revolutionary. Even so, this successful development project undertaken in-house inspired us to set up a new, independent engineering department: Mammoet Solutions. “We have divided the c u r re n t Mammoet E u ro p e Engineering Department into a section which will remain part of Mammoet Europe and undertake routine engineering work for this region, and a section which will operate independently under the name Mammoet Solutions and will also serve external customers. That

Erik Rave – CIO

Herman Smit – COO

section will include a Project Engineering department for complex jobs, an Innovation department to develop new concepts, and a Fabrication department to develop and build new hardware.” This will bring the expertise and ingenuity of Mammoet’s engineers closer to our customers. And there are also other initiatives to help develop innovative solutions to benefit our customers and society. The creation of Mammoet Wind is another example. Apart from routine wind turbine installation services this division could also help to develop smarter logistics solutions to reduce the cost of wind energy. Kleijn emphasized that it is impossible to overestimate the value of innovation. It is also essential to stay ahead of the changing markets and circumstances. “We have to rely on our own strengths. So we have to keep our eyes open, but also invest time in ourselves to develop the business and its products, and so maintain our position in the industry.”

Delegating more responsibility Kleijn also wants to decentralize responsibility to get closer to customers and provide them with customized services which are better tailored to their

A year of many changes Jan Kleijn described 2011 as a challenging year. “A year of many changes, but also the foundation for many new opportunities. That’s because every change creates new opportunities. Looking back on 2011, it was a challenging year due to the economic changes and we are clearly starting to notice the impact of the recession. 2011 was a year of consolidation and 2012 will be challenging. However, we are confidently looking forward to 2012. We have enough work and our new PTCs will contribute to our revenues. We will have to focus on our strengths: our people, expertise, quality safety, service and added value. Those will enable us to deliver an excellent product, and the corresponding profits.”

Neil Birkbeck – Advisor

needs. “I have a strong belief in our teams and giving more responsibility to departments and regions. They have people who are much smarter than me and know much more about their region or specialty. They really know what’s the best option given the circumstances. So I want to challenge them more to develop their own plans, and make the arrangements they consider best. Of course, I’ll want to give my opinion about those, but I’m not going to tell them in detail what to do.” Hence he also really believes in empowering people. “They have the responsibility and the knowledge and they are paid in return. So, why would I have to do all the thinking? That’s their responsibility. This approach will also create more opportunities for growth. Otherwise it all depends on a few people at the top. Because we all have our limitations that might impede the development of our company. It’s better to do it the other way round. That also increases the motivation of our people. If it’s their own plan they will believe in it and they want to make it a success, so they’ll really go for it. Hence, you get much more energy from them than when you tell them: this is how you should do it.”

Siem Kranenburg – CFO

Jan Kleijn has always been aware of the value of positive energy. He draws strength from his work and from the drive to excel. “I’m very grateful that I enjoy going to work every day. That’s great and makes life easier. You can go on long trips and work long days when necessary, that’s fine. I enjoy doing that. It energizes me.”


Reactors and integrated logistics

Petrochemical

LOCATION: JAPAN, TRINIDAD AND VENEZUELA JOB: HEAVY TRANSPORT CHALLENGE: SHORT PREPARATION TIME, TRANSSHIPMENT

“One stop shop” On very short notice Mammoet was awarded a contract to transport 8 reactors from 2 fabricators in Japan to a refinery in Venezuela. The weight of the reactors ranged from 545 to 1,720 tons. Because the quay at Jose, Venezuela could not accommodate the heavy lift ship carrying the reactors, we used a transshipment site in Trinidad with deep water access and good facilities. The reactors were offloaded at Trinidad and placed in temporary storage. We then loaded the reactors onto a barge with our SPMTs, towed the barge to the project site in Venezuela, offloaded the reactors with the SPMTs and placed them in storage. The reactors were fitted with special supports, seafastening and load spreaders, around 1,000 tons of steel in total. It took 6 round trips by barge to transport all the units. This project is a good example of Mammoet’s integrated logistics concept, where we take responsibility for all transport operations and project management. Our experience with projects of this nature meant that the short time table for the preparation was never a problem. In addition to providing our own equipment we also arranged all the contracts and coordination for the heavy lift ship, sheerlegs in Japan, local subcontractors, etc. This meant that the client only had to deal with Mammoet, rather than with a number of contractors.

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Petrochemical

Hydrogen plant

Our client was building a new, highly efficient, hydrogen plant. We installed 93 units such as heat exchangers, columns, pipe racks and pumps. Although this was a new plant there were still some access problems. This meant that some pipe racks would have to be installed using a large 400 ton crane which needs some time to be fully rigged. To save the rigging time and to reduce the cost to the customer we decided to use a smaller crane but closer to the installation site. One of our expert drivers managed to get this 200 ton crane (so not actually that small) into position after extensive maneuvering. We then used a 70 ton crane to bring the counterweights to the 200 ton crane. After that, the installation of the pipe racks was straightforward. A large heat exchanger was supposed to be installed during the construction of the building housing it. Unfortunately the delivery of the unit was delayed, while the construction of the building proceeded. This called for a change of plan: we installed skid beams to bring the heat exchanger into the building and then positioned it using chain hoists. Other jobs on this project included the installation of 65 ton compressors, modules and other equipment. We also provided lifting services for the inspection and cleaning of several large pieces of rotating equipment.

A long drive “Equipment sourced internationally”

LOCATION: SOUTH AFRICA JOB: HEAVY TRANSPORT CHALLENGE: LONG DISTANCE

We transported a process plant reactor and quench tower 900 kilometers in South Africa, from the port to the plant site. The reactor was 34 meters long and had a diameter of 6.6 meters and weighed 349 tons. It was transported on 2 x 22 axle lines of conventional trailers. The quench tower had a length of 24 meters with a diameter of 7.4 meters and weight of 137 tons and was carried on 1 x 13 axle lines. The trip went well and was completed in 18 days. Mammoet South Africa’s equipment was supplemented by our operations in Dubai and Australia.

“Saving the customer time and money”

LOCATION: ROTTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS JOB: EQUIPMENT INSTALLATION CHALLENGE: CONGESTED SITE, SCHEDULE CHANGES


“Started with a site survey”

Petrochemical

Threading a needle This project started with a gentle trip by rail, carrying a 200 ton contactor for updating a gas plant. After 2 days traveling at a sedate 25 miles per hour we transferred the vessel from the railcar to our trailers using a jack and slide system. The next part was more difficult, as the plant was relatively old the site plans were not fully reliable so we had to start with a detailed site survey. To get the contactor vessel onto the site we had to remove a shack and fire hydrant, but there was still a large concrete barrier in the way at the site entrance. By pulling the trailers with 2 tractors and pushing with one our crew managed to negotiate the extremely tight turn, which was rather like threading a needle. LOCATION: CROSSFIELD, ALBERTA, CANADA JOB: HEAVY TRANSPORT AND LIFTING CHALLENGE: CONGESTED SITE

This area is normally very windy, but the weather conditions were in our favor which made the final installation of the vessel straightforward. We used a large main crane to lift it up, while the other end was guided by a tailing crane. Once the vessel was upright we disconnected the tailing crane, lifted the vessel over some cooling units and placed it on the 20 anchor bolts.

35 challenging kilometers LOCATION: PUERTO CABELLO AND PEQUIVEN, VENEZUELA JOB: HEAVY TRANSPORT CHALLENGE: DIFFICULT ROUTE

Our customer was building a new sulfuric acid plant and commissioned us to transport a process plant (up to 14 meters high and weighing 200 tons) from the port of Puerto Cabello to Pequiven, 35 kilometers away. However, obstructions along the direct route meant that it was unsuitable for the large loads. Instead we shipped these units by barge from the port to Planta Centro, about halfway to the final destination. We then used

conventional trailers to move the units to their final destination. As the route went through a town it was a real challenge to move the power lines, communications cables, road signs and lighting. Our subcontractor deployed around 100 personnel for this. We also had to reinforce a bridge to take the heavy loads. But in the end the convoy, which traveled only at night, reached the site of the new plant.

“We also had to reinforce a bridge to take the heavy loads”

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Petrochemical

It’s hot out there Mammoet was contracted to do 28 heavy lifts for the construction of this plant. Four of the lifts were done using one of our large gantry systems. The first job was to install an HP absorber with a weight of 1,750 tons and length of 55 meters. The main challenge on this project was the high temperature, around 50°C.

“Our large gantry systems”

LOCATION: ABU DHABI, UAE JOB: HEAVY LIFTS CHALLENGE: HIGH TEMPERATURE

Cat cracker turnaround Mammoet was contracted to provide one of our PTC ring cranes and a large crawler crane with SuperLift for a turnaround of a cat cracker. The site was very congested and it took a lot of coordination with the customer and the other contractors to fit our ring crane into the available space. We used the PTC for 8 heavy lifts with loads up to 632 tons and a maximum radius of 86 meters. The turnaround took 58 days during which we had Mammoet personnel working on site 7 days a week and 12 hours a day. The whole project went smoothly and was completed without incidents or injuries.

LOCATION: HOUSTON, USA JOB: HEAVY LIFTING CHALLENGE: COORDINATION WITH OTHER CONTRACTORS

“Fitting into the available space”

Another project in Taiwan “Hardly a featherweight”

LOCATION: LINYAN DISTRICT, KAOHSIUNG, TAIWAN ROC JOB: HEAVY LIFTING CHALLENGE: TIGHT SITE, COMMUNICATIONS

After the completion of a heavy lifting project for this customer we relocated our equipment 8 kilometers for the next job. We also brought in our custom-designed PTC-DS ring crane. We had to install 8 heavy units, 2 of which required the PTC. The largest unit, a column, had a length of almost 100 meters and weight of 1,175 tons which meant our PTC was operating at 99.8% of its rated capacity – and it did a great job. We then had to derig the PTC and re-assemble it at a different part of the site. This was quite a challenge as there was little space available and we had to support its boom and jib on a temporary bridge. The second column was slightly lighter, though with a length of 108 meters and weight of 850 tons it was hardly a featherweight. The other 6 vessels were installed with our heavy mobile cranes. Communications required special attention during this project.


“Extreme temperatures” LOCATION: SARNIA, ONTARIO, CANADA JOB: ROUTINE AND HEAVY LIFTS CHALLENGE: FITTING A LARGE CRANE INTO A SMALL AREA

Tight turnaround About 3 years before the start of this refinery turnaround project the customer asked us if we could provide a crane to meet some exacting requirements. They wanted to have the crane positioned outside the unit where the work was to be done, hence lifting 200 tons at 75 meters radius. However, the only location available for the crane was small and surrounded by obstructions. After several site visits our engineers proposed using one of the ring cranes designed in-house by Mammoet. The site restrictions meant that instead of assembling it in place, we would do that some distance away and then move the crane into position. Furthermore we had to modify the crane slightly to reduce its tail swing. The customer approved our proposal and we provided a PTC with 75 meter

main boom, 33 meter jib and 1,500 tons of counterweight. We undertook around 40 engineered heavy lifts with the PTC. The customer’s requirements changed several times and in the end the heaviest lift was 205 tons at 76 meters. This was well within the 90% capacity limit imposed by the customer. Mammoet also supplied a range of crawler cranes and telescopic cranes for the turnaround, as well as a lifting gantry, heavy trailers, etc. We encountered extreme temperatures, starting work on site in the cold Canadian winter, with temperatures down to -20°C with heavy snow and ending the project in unusually hot and humid weather.

Petrochemical

Tank transport in Italy “To enhance oil recovery”

Mammoet transported 6 large tanks (length 42.5 meters, width 7.5 meters, height 11 meters, weight 300 tons) from a fabrication yard on Sicily to a gas plant in Malta. In Sicily we transported the tanks to the quay and loaded them on the ship. It took the ship 2 trips to deliver all the tanks to Malta. We then offloaded the tanks and transported them on SPMTs from the port to the plant. The last part of the job was quite a challenge as the road had a steep gradient and in places there was only around 0.1 meters clearance around the load.

LOCATION: SICILY AND MALTA JOB: TRANSPORTING 6 LARGE TANKS CHALLENGE: LONG-TERM PROJECT

Major turnaround This olefins plant underwent a major turnaround in 39 days with up to 2,000 personnel working on site. Mammoet was contracted to provide all the lifting services, which we started preparing at an early stage. During the project we had up to 35 cranes, a range of other equipment and around 100 of the Men in Red on site. The customer’s turnaround manager commented that the long-term relationship with Mammoet and the integrated team were essential to the the success of the project.

LOCATION: GELEEN, THE NETHERLANDS JOB: WIDE RANGE OF LIFTING SERVICES CHALLENGE: INTENSE ACTIVITIES

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“Long-term relationship essential”


Petrochemical

Colombia’s tallest vessel “The first milestone of the upgrade project”

Mammoet transported a column and installed it at a refinery. This unit had a height of over 81 meters and weight of 535 tons, making it not only the largest vessel at the plant but also the tallest vessel in Columbia. The installation of the column marked the first milestone of the refinery upgrade project.

Oilfield redevelopment This 3-year project involved the upgrade of all the facilities of an onshore oilfield. The key change was the construction of a CHP plant. This plant supplies the steam used to heat the heavy crude at a depth of 800 meters to enhance oil recovery. Mammoet undertook a range of heavy lifts for this projects, sometimes using 4 cranes simultaneously. We installed the boiler and heat-recovery steam generator, steam drums (64 and 135 tons), stacks and various other components. Mammoet also provided SPMTs for on-site transport.

“To enhance oil recovery” LOCATION: SCHOONEBEEK, THE NETHERLANDS JOB: HEAVY LIFTING AND TRANSPORT CHALLENGE: SIZE, WEIGHT, SMALL CLEARANCE

LOCATION: CARTAGENA, COLUMBIA JOB: TRANSPORT AND INSTALLATION OF A VESSEL CHALLENGE: VESSEL SIZE


Spectacle on wheels “The first time modules had been transported in Australia at this scale”

Mining

The processing facilities at an iron ore mine were being expanded by installing 38 modules delivered by ship to Port Hedland. The modules, delivered in 4 shipments, were an impressive sight with lengths up to 40 meters, widths up to 13.6 meters and heights up to 12 meters. Their weights ranged from 120 to 325 tons. At the ports we received the modules on our SPMTs and then transferred them to conventional trailers for transport to our staging area 25 kilometers from the port. We set up a temporary base at the staging area, with offices and a maintenance workshop. LOCATION: PORT HEDLAND, AUSTRALIA JOB: OUTSIZE TRANSPORT CHALLENGE: SIZE, WEIGHT AND NUMBER OF THE LOADS

The modules were then transported to the mine in 19 trips, using conventional trailers and heavy prime movers. Because of bridges on the route and the need for special traffic management, each 380 kilometer trip took 2 days. Once at the mine we used SPMTs to take the modules to their locations in the plant and installed them with one of our heavy lifting cranes. This was the first time modules had been transported in Australia on this scale. Modular construction is increasingly used in the mining industry as it avoids the need to bring large numbers of personnel in to the often remote sites.

Mining plant A mining project in Canada required the transport of 3 large plant units, weighing 400 to 2,600 tons, from the fabrication area to the mine. The units were a roof assembly, crusher and surge facility. We started well in advance, by surveying the site and engineering the lifting solutions. The first job was to lift the 408 ton roof up with 8 climbing jacks, move it on SPMTs and then position it with 2 cranes. After that we jacked up the 2 parts of the 1,408 ton crusher plant using 12 climbing jacks, connected them together and transported them using 76 axle lines of SPMT and positioned them with millimeter-precision on the foundations. Finally we transported the 2,600 ton surge facility on SPMTs and then jacked it up 5 meters. The total weight of the transport, including all our plant and auxiliary materials, was over 3,300 tons. This was the second ore preparation line we relocated in the area and we are planning future projects of the same kind. LOCATION: NORTHERN ALBERTA, CANADA JOB: MOVING HEAVY MINING PLANT CHALLENGE: WEIGHT, NARROW WEATHER WINDOW

“Our second ore preparation line”

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Mining

Iron ore mine This iron ore mine was in the middle of a major expansion project. Mammoet was contracted to install 7 kilometers of conveyors to take the ore from the mine to a processing plant. First we had to transport the conveyor sections several kilometers from the assembly yard to the installation site. There were many challenges to be overcome: steep hills, heavy traffic and curfew schedules. We also had to deal with low temperatures, heavy rain, power lines, high winds and congested sites. Once we had transported a conveyor section to the site on an SPMT we lifted it up to 24 meters and held it in position while it was bolted in place. The schedule was often affected by poor weather or delays elsewhere on the site but the project has been a great team effort involving personnel from 4 Mammoet branches in Canada.

“Great team effort” LOCATION: LABRADOR, CANADA JOB: CONVEYOR INSTALLATION CHALLENGE: WEATHER, REMOTE SITE

Gold mine A new gold mine is being developed in Northern Ontario. The remote site includes Canada’s largest undeveloped gold reserve. Mammoet was on site for 9 months with a number of cranes to erect steel structures and a tank farm.

“Largest undeveloped gold reserve”

LOCATION: DETOUR LAKE, ONTARIO, CANADA JOB: HEAVY LIFTING CHALLENGE: REMOTE SITE

500 heavy loads The construction of a hydrometallurgical plant required the transport and installation of literally hundreds of modules and tanks. Our scope included the transport and installation of 160 modules and 110 tanks from several yards in the USA and Canada to Newfoundland, handling 120 modules built on site, and 120 tanks delivered by ship. Before loading any of the modules on the barges we weighed them to verify the weight and centre of gravity – essential information for the motion analysis, stability calculations, design of the sea fastenings and towing procedures. The project started by the blasting through the hills to construct a 2 kilometer road between the RoRo quay and the plant site. Even so, the road was still quite narrow and steep. Once a module or tank arrived the sea fastenings were removed, it was offloaded from the barge onto SPMTs and transported to the site. The loads were then installed using SPMTs, jacking or skidding. The project was very large and at times challenging – just what Mammoet specializes in as a company, and just what our people enjoy working on.

“What our people enjoy working on”

LOCATION: LONG HARBOUR, NEWFOUNDLAND, CANADA JOB: WEIGHING, EXTENSIVE HEAVY TRANSPORT AND LIFTING CHALLENGE: SCALE OF THE PROJECT


“We had to reconfigure the cranes” Power

A very tall structure LOCATION: LUENEN AND HAMM, GERMANY JOB: HIGH-LEVEL LIFTING CHALLENGE: HEIGHT

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We worked over a year on the construction of this power plant. Mammoet installed all the steelwork for the boiler house with a height of 110 meters. Once the main structure was finished we installed a range of units such as a 110 ton air preheater, flue gas ducts, etc. Because of the range of lifts we had to reconfigure our LR 1600 cranes in several configurations during this project. The whole project went well and was completed to the satisfaction of the customer.


Power

Just take the wall out “Custom-made strand jack gantries”

LOCATION: VAROBACKA, SWEDEN JOB: HEAVY LIFTING AND TRANSPORT CHALLENGE: NUCLEAR ENVIRONMENT, SMALL CLEARANCES

The 3 steam generators (length: 21 meters, diameter: 4.4 meters, weight: 320 tons) and a smaller pressurizer vessel of this nuclear power plant had to be replaced. As the building did not include suitable access options a large opening had to be made in the concrete wall with a thickness of 1.2 meters. Mammoet’s first job was to remove this slab of concrete (6.6 by 7.6 meters, weight: 115 tons) and take it to temporary storage. To lift the vessels we provided 2 custom-made strand jack gantries which were fitted to the existing polar crane inside the reactor building. The main unit was fitted with a 900 ton strand jack and the tailing unit with a 300 ton strand jack. We used this equipment to lift the vessels onto a skidding track which moved them outside the reactor building. They were then picked up by one of our mobile cranes and transported to a temporary storage building using a heavy duty trailer. Once the old vessels had been removed from the reactor building we could install the new ones using the same equipment. The nuclear environment and extremely limited clearances posed some challenges, but the 2 years of preparation paid off and the project was completed to the full satisfaction of the client.

Up and down every day Our customer was constructing a surge shaft for a large hydroelectric power station, 150 kilometers from the nearest highway. Because their excavator could not stay in place during rock blasting, we lifted it in and out of the shaft at the start and end of each shift. So, up and down every day.

“150 kilometers from the highway”

LOCATION: HAVRE-SAINT-PIERRE, QUEBEC, CANADA JOB: EXCAVATOR LIFTING CHALLENGE: REMOTE SITE


“8 vessels, 3 levels, 3 weeks�

Power

New power plant Mammoet installed 8 vessels, weighing 35 to 245 tons in this new coal and biomassfired power plant. We provided a skidding track inside building and our cranes first placed one end of a vessel on the track, and then as the vessel was pulled into the building, the other end. The vessels were skidded up to 90 meters and then jacked into position. The installation of the eight vessels on 3 different levels in the building took only 3 weeks. We also installed a generator stator (385 tons) and HP turbine (219 tons). The permissible loads in this section of the building were very limited hence we had to make special arrangements to spread the weight of the units. We used a combination of our skidding system and our containerized winch system which installed the units in only 3 days. Setting up and demobilizing our equipment took 3 weeks.

LOCATION: ROTTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS JOB: HEAVY LIFTING AND SKIDDING CHALLENGE: LOW PERMISSIBLE LOADS IN THE BUILDING

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Power

Up Monkey Run Hill

“The road got much softer”

LOCATION: MONTERREY, MEXICO AND ELIMIRA, NEW YORK, USA JOB: HEAVY TRANSPORT CHALLENGE: SUDDEN THAW

The planning of the delivery of this transformer started over 2 years ago when we undertook the initial route survey. We decided to transport the transformer (weight 180 tons) on conventional trailers drawn by 2 prime movers. The last 20 kilometers were the most challenging as many overhead lines had to be lifted out of the way and we had to build ramps across 8 structures, including a 100-year old timber bridge. It all went well until the weather suddenly got much warmer. We had expected the gravel road up Monkey Hill to be frozen and relatively hard. However, as it thawed the road got much softer and more difficult to climb. That called for a change of plan and the Mammoet crew hired 2 road construction trucks locally to help deliver the transformer to the substation. It has now been installed and has made the local power system more reliable at times of high demand.

Rotors delivered Mammoet was contracted to transport 2 large low-pressure steam turbine rotors from the US to the customer’s warehouse in Canada. The first part of the trip was by barge to a port near the warehouse. We used hydraulic gantries to transfer the rotors from the barge onto our SPMTs. The self-propelled transporters (15 axle lines) then carried the rotors the last 10 kilometers. Offloading the rotors in the warehouse was somewhat of a challenge due to the restricted headroom and numerous columns. We also put a lot of effort in coordinating the work of all the parties involved in this project.

“A lot of effort coordinating everybody”

LOCATION: BECANCOUR, QUEBEC, CANADA JOB: HEAVY TRANSPORT CHALLENGE: RESTRICTIONS INSIDE WAREHOUSE


Power

From factory to foundation in 7,000 kilometers A transformer in an underground hydroelectric power station had to be replaced and Mammoet was commissioned to undertake the full logistics chain: 7,000 kilometers. We first collected the new transformer (255 tons) from the factory in Austria, transported it by river to the port of Antwerp where we loaded it on a ship and shipped it to New Jersey. It was then transported by rail to Massachusetts where we picked it up by SPMT. The installation site was 215 meters below the surface and reached through a 760 meter long tunnel. As the clearances were extremely tight we first made a test run with a wooden mock-up of the transformer. To complete the project, we removed the old transformer and installed the new unit. The work was done by Mammoet USA and Mammoet Canada personnel and is an excellent example of our Factory-to-Foundation concept. All 4 modes of transport (river barge, seagoing vessel, rail, road) were handled by Mammoet.

LOCATION: WEIZ, AUSTRIA AND NORTHFIELD MOUNTAIN, MASSACHUSETTS, USA JOB: HEAVY TRANSPORT OF A TRANSFORMER CHALLENGE: WOODEN MOCK-UP FOR A TEST

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“All transport and lifting services”


Power

Aluminum smelter transformer “Waiting for low tide”

LOCATION: DESCHAMBAULT, QUEBEC, CANADA JOB: HEAVY LIFTING AND TRANSPORT CHALLENGE: LOW PERMISSIBLE GROUND PRESSURE

A transformer at an aluminum smelter had to be replaced. The new unit, weighing 392 tons, was transported from Germany to Canada on a heavy-lift ship which offloaded it onto our SPMTs on a barge. The barge was then towed to a port near the smelter where we waited for the low tide to ground it. Due to the load restrictions on the quay we carefully engineered the positioning of the RoRo ramps and the barge. This allowed our SPMTs to drive off the barge and make a 90 degree turn onto the road without exceeding the permissible ground pressure. After a 13 kilometer trip by road we placed the transformer on a storage pad by jacking and skidding. The transformer was then fitted with other equipment, increasing its weight to 500 tons. To complete the project we removed the old transformer and installed the new one on its permanent foundations.

Working inside the tower

“Cranes inside the tower” This project involved installing 2 gas pipes, one on the outside and one on the inside of the cooling tower. Each pipe had a length of 50 meters, diameter of 9 meters and weight of 100 tons. Using 2 of our mobile cranes we first installed the pipe inside the cooling tower. We then relocated the cranes to the outside of the tower and lifted the second pipe. Setting up our cranes inside the tower, where there was limited space available was quite a challenge.

LOCATION: HAMM, GERMANY JOB: HEAVY LIFTING CHALLENGE: RESTRICTED SPACE


Largest crane in Iceland “From the Netherlands to Iceland”

Power

LOCATION: REYDARFJORDUR, ICELAND JOB: HEAVY LIFTING AND TRANSPORT CHALLENGE: POOR WEATHER

We revisited an aluminum plant we had helped build a few years ago, to replace a failed transformer. This time we needed a larger crane to install the transformer: an LR 1750, by no means Mammoet’s largest, but apparently the largest crane ever on Iceland. Apart from the crane we also shipped 2 x 10 axle lines of SPMT and a large number of timber and steel mats from our base at Schiedam, the Netherlands to Iceland. The weather was very poor when we arrived, with high winds and snow, which delayed the assembly of the crane. Once the weather improved we unloaded the transformer and other items from the ship. The heaviest load weighed 252 tons. We then transported the transformer to the site on the SPMTs and installed it by jacking. The last part of the job was to return the failed transformer to the port and load it onto a ship. After that we just had to pack up all our equipment and transport it back to the Netherlands.

Offshore wind turbines

“Onshore handling for offshore turbines”

LOCATION: THE NETHERLANDS AND THE UK JOB: HEAVY LIFTING AND HANDLING CHALLENGE: SIZE OF THE COMPONENTS

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Mammoet did the onshore handling of components for 3 wind turbine parks off the coast of the UK: London Array, Sheringham Shoal and LINCS. Depending on the project, the work included: receiving and ballasting pontoons, removing seafastenings, unloading the pontoons, moving the wind turbine components on SPMTs to temporary storage at the terminal, taking the components back to the quayside when required and loading them onto pontoons or a special cradle. These components were mostly monopiles and transition pieces. We also handled a large mast for an offshore meteorology station. Other services included the provision of cranes for use on offshore pontoons or onshore wind turbine installation projects.


Power

Deaerator up in the air Our customer in the Netherlands built a deaerator (length: 43 meters, weight: 200 tons) for a power station in Germany. We were commissioned to transport the vessel to the site and install it. This proved to be a complex job, calling for a wide range of our skills and resources. We first moved the vessel from the fabrication yard in Hengelo along a very tight route through the town. However, all went well and we covered the 2 kilometers in only one hour and the SPMTs and their load arrived at the quay much earlier than expected. Two of our cranes then loaded the deaerator onto the ship taking it to Mannheim. In the meantime, we sent 4 trucks with jacking and skidding equipment to the site of the new power plant. There we installed the skid tracks inside the building, spanning 70 meters. By that time the deaerator vessel had arrived at the local quayside and we loaded it onto our SPMTs which transported it to the site. The installation of the vessel was complex as we had to lift it 40 meters and then pass it through an opening in the side of the building, place it on the skid track and finally move it inside the building. The site imposed numerous restrictions. The permissible ground pressure was very low so we had to use many mats to spread the load of the cranes and the vessel. There was also very little space to operate in, calling for some typical Mammoet choreography. As we were working at the edge of the site we had to swing the deaerator across a public road, which had to be closed. Finally we lifted the vessel to the 40 meter level with 2 cranes, introduced it into the building, and placed its first saddle on the skidding track. This was followed by complex load transfers between the 2 cranes and the skidding equipment until the vessel was largely inside the building and the cranes could be unhooked. The vessel was then skidded another 35 meters inside the building and jacked up so that the skid track could be removed. From start to finish this part of the operation took around 4 hours, as planned. LOCATION: HENGELO, THE NETHERLANDS AND MANNHEIM, GERMANY JOB: HEAVY LIFTING AND SKIDDING CHALLENGE: SITE RESTRICTIONS

“Complex load transfers”

Comber turbines Mammoet was contracted to install 26 wind turbines using a large LG-1550 mobile crane and a smaller tailing crane, working together with 2 cranes provided by the customer. The key challenge was to coordinate the work on the different sites and the customer’s schedule and dealing with the impact of changing weather conditions.

“Coordination was key” LOCATION: COMBER, ONTARIO, CANADA JOB: WIND TURBINE INSTALLATION CHALLENGE: SCHEDULE, WEATHER CONDITIONS


Newsflash

Newsflash is a section with short Mammoet messages and announcements

AQIS, a very big cleaning job Mammoet will be working on a new 1.7 kilometer long jetty for LNG tankers in Australia. The loads and the limited water depth called for a special lifting solution. Our Engineering Department analyzed the project and decided to install one of our custom-made PTC ring cranes on a 100 x 30 meter barge. The unit can operate in slewing mode (the crane can revolve a full circle) and in sheerlegs mode (with the jib across the bow). It can make heavy lifts without ballasting the barge and is perfect for operations in shallow water.

LOCATION: BATAM, MALAYSIA JOB: CRANE MODIFICATION AND CLEANING CHALLENGE: STRICT AUSTRALIAN QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

Our Marine engineers designed the modifications to be made to the barge, such as fitting grillages and deck eyes. The slew drive of the PTC was also upgraded to cope with the inclination of the barge. The crane and barge can operate at wind speeds up to 12.7 meters per second and a wave height of 3 meters. The Engineering Department drew up load charts for 2 operating modes: • Slewing mode with a capacity of 310 tons at 20 meters radius to 53 tons at 60 meters. • Sheerlegs mode with the jib across the bow resulting in a capacity of 1,000 tons at 20 meters radius to 316 tons at 70 meters. Mammoet is thoroughly familiar with the AQIS (Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service) requirements for cleaning. Both the crane and the barge had to be thoroughly cleaned. We set up a base at a yard on Batam and it took 40 of our people 9 weeks to undertake the cleaning. We also had to set up a program to separate clean and dirty materials, etc.

Mammoet wins 2 ESTA Awards! ESTA is the European umbrella association representing the individual associations in the EU-countries in the field of heavy and specialized transport and crane companies. Mammoet received one ESTA Award in the category SPMT for moving a 14,000 ton integrated production and hotel facility platform from the fabrication hall to an outside yard using 418 axle lines of SPMT. It was the largest deck ever built in the Netherlands. Mammoet also received one ESTA Award in the category Innovation  end user for developing the JS500 jacking system. The system includes a base frame with 4 jacks with a combined capacity of 500 tons, 0.5 meter steel sections to be inserted from the base and an external hydraulic power pack. 

KR Wind 100% Mammoet

New Joint Venture Mammoet and Kasmashal have established a joint venture company in Kazakhstan to serve our customers even better in the region.

Visit our new website!

From January 2011, KR Wind has been fully owned by the Mammoet Group.   Mammoet has played an important role in KR Wind from the very beginning. Back in 2002, KR Wind was established as a joint venture between the Mammoet Group and the Danish Enggaard Group. Since then and until 10 January 2011, Mammoet owned 50% of the shares of KR Wind.

Mammoet stands out from the competition and we are proud to be innovative. That’s why we are proud to introduce to you our new website which now incorporates our Used Equipment website. Visit the websites and find out for yourself. Enjoy surfing on the sites! www.mammoet.com

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Newsflash

Polo Men + Kids

Hooded Sweater Men + Kids

Fleece Sweater Men

Bodywarmer Men

Cap Basic c Men

Cap Luxe Men + Kids

ORDER AND MORE INFORMATION VIA WWW.MAMMOETSTORE.COM

Mammoet USA receives the Houston Business Roundtable’s safety award

5 IRCA stars for Mammoet Southern Africa Mammoet Southern Africa has achieved a 5 star IRCA grading for Health and Safety. IRCA is an international recognized auditing body which specializes in the field of Occupational Health, Safety, Environment and Quality. Mammoet received an average score of 98%. It is very rare that a company is awarded a 5 star IRCA rating!

Safety Records Mammoet USA is a winner of the 2011 Crane & Rigging Group Safety Award. These awards are given each year at the Annual Conference to SC&RA members with exceptional safety records.

Number one in the IC50 & ICT50 index Mammoet took first place in the 2011 IC50 ranking of the world’s largest crane-owning companies and also took first place in the ICT50 ranking of the world’s largest heavy and specialized transport owning companies in the world. The ranking was carried out by International Cranes and Specialized Transport magazine.

1,500,000 Safe Man-Hours without lost time injuries Mammoet Middle East received the HSE Achievement Appreciation Award for providing the engineered lifting of heavy items in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.


“23,179 tons and a total height of 26.485 meters”

Offshore

Push-up record “To withstand winds up to 30 m/s”

LOCATION: ULSAN, SOUTH KOREA JOB: OFFSHORE DECK PUSH-UP CHALLENGE: RECORD LOAD AND HEIGHT

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Mammoet was awarded the contract to push-up a newly built offshore deck at the production site in Ulsan, South Korea. The Mammoet push-up system is designed to withstand winds up to 20 meters per second. However, the customer asked us to modify it to withstand 30 meters per second, as the actual push-up date was close to the end of the typhoon season. We mobilized 15 of our 16 push-up towers and produced additional jacking cans and bracing pipes. A total of 153 containers of equipment were brought in from all around the world. In a combined effort by Mammoet and the customer the deck was picked-up from the temporary construction supports, weighed with the push-up system and brought to a new record height of 26.485 meters. This only took us 7 days. In the following 2 days, the client positioned the load-out frame underneath the deck and Mammoet lowered the deck onto the frame. This project set 2 push-up records: for a total weight of 23,179 tons and a total height of 26.485 meters.


Offshore

Helideck installation We installed a helideck, weighing approximately 160 tons, on an offshore structure in a dry dock. The deck was first placed in the dock by sheerlegs, moved into position on SPMTs and then lifted by 2 of our cranes, a 700 ton and a 1,200 ton rig. The 700 ton crane is regularly lowered into dry docks, but this was the first time we lifted the 1,200 ton crane, using a third crane. LOCATION: ROTTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS JOB: TRANSPORT AND HEAVY LIFTING CHALLENGE: LOWERING THE CRANES FIRST

“First time we lifted the 1,200 ton crane”

BIG platform legs

LOCATION: STAVANGER, NORWAY JOB: INSTALLING PLATFORM LEGS CHALLENGE: SIZE OF THE LOADS

“We used one of our MSG ring cranes, fitted with a 115 meter main boom and 26 meter jib”

For this project we fitted an offshore platform with 3 legs, a flare and lifeboat davits. The legs were of an impressive size, 102 meters long and 3.5 meters in diameter, and weighed 800 tons each. We used one of our MSG ring cranes, fitted with a 115 meter main boom and 26 meter jib. The MSG was assisted by 4 large mobile cranes and the legs were transported on site by 32 axle lines of SPMT. It took 2 days to install each leg. The leg was first upended, then lifted up another 30 meters, slewed through 120 degrees and then lowered 50 meters to install it in the platform. We used a special remotely controlled hydraulic pin release system to disconnect the crane from the leg. The release system was designed in-house by Mammoet and is solar powered.


“Overdesigned rigging” LOCATION: FOSS SUR MER, FRANCE JOB: HEAVY LIFTING, WEIGHING, ETC. CHALLENGE: STRICT SAFETY REQUIREMENTS

Platform assembly Our customer had built an offshore installation. We first used 2 x 32 axle lines of SPMT to move the 600 ton main deck and 215 ton upper deck from the construction building to the yard and weighed the structures. We then lifted the upper deck up 29 meters to install it on the main deck. This job was done with an LR 1750 crawler crane equipped with 360 ton Superlift and 70 meter main boom. We used overdesigned rigging to meet the client’s strict safety requirements. We will return to the site later for a load-out of the entire structure using 72 axle lines of SPMT.

Offshore

Offshore module

“Driving at night”

Our customer had built a 125 ton module for an offshore installation. This module uses advanced technology for eliminating both dissolved and dispersed hydrocarbons from water, to protect the marine environment. Mammoet was commissioned to load the module onto the vessel transporting it to the installation site in Norway. We started at the fabrication site by jacking the module up 1.2 meters and placing it on timber supports. The jacks were then removed and we could drive 2 x 12 axle lines of SPMT under it. Because the size of the load required road closures we had to drive it to the port at night, which only took 2 hours. Our cranes then picked the module up and placed it on the ship. This tandem lift required special rigging, but only took half an hour.

LOCATION: FARMSUM, THE NETHERLANDS JOB: JACKING, TRANSPORT, LIFTING CHALLENGE: SPECIAL RIGGING

Lifting in Angola One of Mammoet’s LR 1600 crawler cranes is spending a year and a half in Angola. It is used for assembling offshore structures, site moves and load-outs. As always safety has priority and all Mammoet safety standards are strictly followed.

LOCATION: ANGOLA JOB: ASSEMBLY, LOAD-OUTS CHALLENGE: ENSURING SAFE OPERATIONS

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“Assembling offshore structures”


Offshore

From start to finish Our customer had built a large deck for an offshore installation. Mammoet used a push-up system with 12 jacking towers with a capacity of 2,400 tons each. After picking the load up with the jacks we used the calibrated pressure transducers to weigh the deck: 18,903 tons. After removing the temporary supports we jacked the deck up to 15.5 meters. Our SPMTs (2 x 42 axle lines) then placed 2 deck support frames (860 tons each) under the structure. We also provided other weighing, site move and load-out services for this project, handling structures from 200 to 8,000 tons. We have done a number of projects at this yard and are now very familiar with the site. We returned to the site a few months later to load the 20,700 ton deck onto the customer’s barge. We used 4 strand jacks, each with a capacity of 900 tons. These were supported by 4 pushing jacks, 450 tons each, to help start the deck moving. It took only 17 hours to shift the deck the required 225 meters and we finished the job well ahead of schedule.

capacity of 1,000 m3/hr. 16 of the pumps were used to offset the tidal movement and the other 26 to pump ballast from the barge as the deck slid onto it. We used our proprietary ballast control system for this part of the job. We left 20 of the pumps and the control system on the barge to support the barge’s own ballasting system during the float-over of the deck. The barge then sailed to the Gulf of Thailand where it was positioned between the legs of the jacket. It was slowly ballasted using its own pumps, until the required clearance between the jacket and the deck was obtained. Our high-capacity ballasting system was then engaged to lower the deck onto the jacket. Finally the barge was withdrawn from the structure and deballasted. Mammoet’s personnel really enjoyed being involved from the start through to the finish of this project.

Mammoet also provided the ballasting system for the barge, with 42 ballast pumps, each with a

“Well ahead of schedule”

LOCATION: BATAM, INDONESIA JOB: JACKING, LOAD-OUT AND FLOAT-OVER CHALLENGE: SIZE OF THE LOAD

Deck installation Mammoet was called on short notice to engineer the installation of a 170 ton deck on an offshore structure. Our engineering team decided that it would be best to use 3 mobile cranes for this project and developed the lift plan. The lift was undertaken a week later to the full satisfaction of the customer.

“Called in on short notice”

LOCATION: NEWCASTLE, UK JOB: HEAVY LIFTING CHALLENGE: TRIPLE LIFT


Jacket load-out Mammoet was contracted to undertake the load-out of a 13,058 ton jacket from a yard onto a barge. We used strand jacks and our skidding system to handle this load, so far the largest jacket loaded out in Oman. This project had some interesting aspects, such as the barge-quay interface and special ballasting arrangements on the barge.

Offshore

“Largest jacket in Oman ”

LOCATION: SOHAR, OMAN JOB: LOAD-OUT CHALLENGE: BARGE-QUAY INTERFACE, BALLASTING

Skidding in 2 directions Our customer upgraded an offshore installation by adding a number of modules to it. There were 2 modules which required repositioning after the crane on their barge had placed them on the platform. Hence they contracted Mammoet to skid the modules into place. The modules first had to be moved lengthways and then sideways, which required 2 sets of skid tracks. At the start of the project the customer’s crane lifted the modules onto our skidding system and they were then skidded in one direction. To transfer the modules to the other set of skid tracks we jacked them up, exchanged the skid shoes and then skidded the modules in the other direction. Once the modules had reached their final positions we jacked them up and removed the skid shoes and tracks. This was actually the most difficult part of the job as the working space was very restricted. Finally we jacked the modules down and aligned them. LOCATION: THAILAND JOB: SKIDDING AND JACKING CHALLENGE: RESTRICTED WORKING SPACE

“Transferring to the other skid tracks”

Load-out close to home After numerous load-outs throughout the world we were commissioned to undertake one not far upstream from the Mammoet office in Schiedam. The yard in the historic city of Gorinchem was building an offshore platform for installation in the North Sea. This was a fast-track project, to be completed within 8 months. The yard contracted Mammoet to undertake all the heavy lifting, weighing, site move, loadout and barge operations.

LOCATION: GORINCHEM, THE NETHERLANDS JOB: HEAVY LIFTING AND LOAD-OUT CHALLENGE: LOW WATER LEVEL

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Our work started with heavy lifts such as installing several decks, living quarters and a crane on the platform using mobile cranes with capacities from 160 to 400 tons. We also transported a number of heavy components from a subcontractor to the yard by river. Once the topsides were

completed we weighed them and relocated them on site. Finally we used 64 axle lines of SPMT to move the 1,250 tons topsides onto the barge provided by the customer. The ballasting of the barge and towing it to the Port of Rotterdam were also handled by Mammoet. The water level in the river was unusually low during this period and there was only a clearance of 30 centimeters under the keel. On the way to Rotterdam there was sometimes only a 15 centimeter gap between the barge and the bridges. However, Mammoet’s experienced personnel dealt with all these challenges. We enjoyed undertaking such a multifaceted lifting and transport job so close to our European head office.

“Multifaceted lifting and transport job”


WORKWEAR BOOSTING YOUR SAFETY EVERYWHERE

EN-ISO-11612

EN-ISO-11611

EN-1149

IEC 61482-2

EN-471

EN-13034

C L O T H I N G F O R S P E C I F I C M A R K E T S E G M E N T S C O M P L I E S W I T H R E L E V A N T A D D I T I O N A L S TA N D A R D S

DESCRIPTION

FOOTWEAR

THE ULTIMATE S3 WORKSHOERESISTANT HORN S3 GTX M A M M O E T K N O W S H O W P E O P L E N E E D T O P R O T E C T T H E M S E LV E S

EDGE S3 GTX

TRIBE S3 GTX

W W W. M A M M O E T W O R K W E A R . C O M


Koos van Tol, Corporate SHE-Q Director:

“More emphasis on personal responsibility” Mammoet is setting a trend in the industry with the successful introduction of our new Safety Health & Incident Management System (SHIMS). The new logging system provides the best possible information about the causes and impact of incidents. Additionally, anyone in the company can use the system to submit proposals for improvement. Consequently, it benefits both the safety of our operational processes and the quality of the services we provide. Finally the system promotes the involvement and sense of responsibility of our employees and therefore encourages them to contribute actively to our corporate policies.

KEEP THINKING!

The SHIMS information system is used throughout Mammoet and any employee can use it to report incidents and unsafe situations using an intranet form. It was developed primarily as a tool to report and record unsafe situations, near misses and accidents using a straightforward, quick, uniform and more informative process. The system also provides a modern channel for communicating issues related to quality and policies such as action points further to workplace inspections, complaints, ideas, improvement proposals and general proposals relating to corporate policies. These could aim to improve safety or our environmental performance and other aspects of corporate social responsibility. All information within SHIMS is available in digital format at every level. This ensures that everyone is fully informed of all relevant issues and can take effective action. Thus, SHIMS ensures both directly and indirectly that: • we develop a better understanding of the causes and effects of incidents • preventive and corrective actions become more effective • the safety of our own people and third parties is improved • our own people become more involved and feel more responsible

• •

the operating processes are improved we provide a better service to our customers.

Quicker and easier “The primary objective of this system is that the causes and effects of incidents are identified more quickly and more effectively, so we can take action more quickly and effectively to deal with unsafe situations and prevent accidents” so Van Tol explained. All notifications are now received digitally, in a uniform format which makes it easer and quicker to record and analyze the information. The option to report unsafe situations and near misses is a new development. “The more of these situations we record, the better we can identify the hazards, and the more targeted the prevention measures we take. SHIMS is a perfect tool for proactive intervention. If you only write reports about what has gone wrong, your are too late, by definition.”

Koos van Tol

“Both front line personnel and managers are very positive about it and can see the advantages. The new system is user-friendly with a clear structure, and it is reliable and comprehensive. Everything is now combined into one database. All the information is stored with a clear structure and continues to be available. It takes just one press of the button to search for something and make associations. The system allows us to sort by division, country, region, customer, equipment type and even individual employees. As I checked it this morning, I know that right now, hand, finger and arm incidents account for 38% of all injuries. The system helps us to identify trends and analyze their backgrounds in greater detail. That provides yet another stimulus to address the causes of those situations effectively.”

Acceptance SHIMS went live on 1 January 2011. The initial skepticism, everyone was thinking “Even more paperwork?���, soon changed into happy acceptance of the convenience and speed of this method of reporting issues. According to Van Tol:

Effective management tool SHIMS provides all the quantitative and qualitative information about incidents and other matters which managers might need. In its first year it has proven itself as an

LOOK OUT!

Mammoet Runs crosses the finish line!

WE CARE!

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Roparun team 174, better known under the name “Mammoet Runs”, took part in the Roparun for the third time in 2011. The Roparun is the world’s longest relay run, covering a distance of 522 kilometers from Paris to Rotterdam, where people in teams, give an athletic performance to raise funds for people who suffer cancer. Thanks to our sponsors and other supporters, we were able to contribute € 25,000 to the Roparun Foundation. www.mammoetruns.com


SHE-Q Mammoet Cycles In the initiative Ven2-4Cancer cyclists unite to gather funds in support of cancer recovery. The struggle to conquer the Mont Ventoux four times in a single day symbolizes the sheer impossible task that cancer patients undertake every day to live life in spite of a disease. Our team with 34 members made a total of 77 ascents of the mountain. Mammoet Cycles collected € 63,000. Many thanks to all our sponsors! www.mammoetcycles.com

The Hunger Project (THP) is a global, non-profit, strategic organization committed to the sustainable end of world hunger. THP develops effective bottom-up strategies to end hunger and poverty. Ending hunger requires a true break with the status quo. To resolve humanity’s oldest problem requires Transformative Leadership. Mammoet has been supporting The Hunger Project since 2005. www. thp.org / www.thehungerproject.nl

extremely useful program. Not just to Van Tol and the senior management, but also for the next level down: the regional directors and SHE-Q officers. For the latter, SHIMS is an effective management tool for proactive measures. “This fits in with the policy of decentralizing responsibilities within Mammoet. We no longer dictate from the top what the regions should do - they are much more aware of what is the best option for their own region. Within the framework of the corporate policies the regions are responsible for their own safety and quality policy and the roll-out of the system.” SHIMS essentially serves as the eyes and ears of the regional management and provides them with all the information they need for proactive management. Van Tol watches what happens within SHIMS and how the regions respond to the reports. “I’m right on top of that. You have to make sure that the regions deal effectively with their greater responsibility, and are accountable for their actions. And if their performance is below standard then Jan Kleijn and I will challenge those

concerned about their own responsibility. Sometimes that extra encouragement is needed.”

a significant improvement compared with last year. It’s not the end of the year yet, but right now we are very close to the target.”

More measuring instruments SHIMS is currently being enhanced so that the follow-up of an incident or other report and the associated evidence can be recorded. “That completes the cycle and then you can close the case. We will make random checks to see if the followup is effective.” Despite the delegation of responsibility to the regions, Van Tol keeps a close watch on how they deal with their responsibilities, especially in the key area of safety. The weekly calculation and communication of the Total Recordable Case Frequency (TRCF) is also part of that approach. This method is widely used in the industry and is used to measure four types of incidents: lost time, medical treatment, restricted work and fatal incidents. Dividing these by the number of person-hours produces a safety score. The lower the TRCF, the better the safety performance. “We are now communicating the TRCF every week. That has been a real eye-opener. Our managers now know exactly where they stand and if their score is rising or falling. We have set ourselves a very ambitious target this year and we aim for

Changes in behavior Van Tol mentioned that you often have to keep reminding people about something to convince them of the effectiveness and necessity of safety measures and to change behavior. “The focus is often the same. So you have to repeat things over and over again, and then once more. The last stage in reaching the ultimate in safety performance is to change human behavior. And that means you have to persevere,” so explained Van Tol. He mentioned past changes which are now commonly accepted, such as wearing safety helmets. “You can do everything to create favorable circumstances, from training personnel through to providing the most modern equipment, but the one factor which is difficult to change is human behavior. The incidents confirm that. As many as 95% are due to behavior: ignoring instructions, not thinking, being overconfident, being afraid to intervene, or not saying anything if you see something that’s not right.” It is difficult to change behavior like that. To improve this area Mammoet has engaged

a major consultancy to study the culture and attitude to safety within the business. This study, based on Behavioral Science Technology (BST) includes a questionnaire and group discussions. The results of the study so far will be published in 2012. “We have taken this initiative assuming that behavior is the missing link. It should tell us more about the mechanisms associated with that behavior and how we can improve our performance. In this way we try to keep making progress, one step at a time.”

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Mammoet Rides the Big Bike for Heart & Stroke Mammoet Canada Eastern has participated in the Heart & Stroke Big Bike event for 2011. Our team, made up of 29 riders, rode through the streets of Cambridge, Ontario on a huge bicycle. Thank you to everyone who participated and sponsored the cause, donating a total of $5,000.00 for heart disease and stroke research.

Take the Mammoet Minute, daily!


“Special steel to withstand -40°C”

Civil

First project in Antarctica At Mammoet we have always been slightly unhappy that our operations have so far been limited to 6 of the world’s 7 continents. However we have now done a job in Antarctica.

LOCATION: AMUNDSEN-SCOTT SOUTH POLE STATION, ANTARCTICA JOB: BEARING REPLACEMENT CHALLENGE: REMOTE SITE, EXTREME COLD

The South Pole Telescope is a 10 meter radio telescope used to study the cosmic microwave background radiation and is operated by a consortium of American universities. It is located at 2.8 kilometers altitude on the South Pole to minimize interference by water vapor in the atmosphere.

The design of the building meant that we had to provide a customized structure (made from special steel to withstand -40°C) to take the load. We also winterized our jacking system of four 200 ton climbing jacks with special powerpacks and control software. Finally we could jack the telescope up, skid the old bearing out and then install the new bearing which had to be aligned to within 0.1 millimeter. The job only took 5 days on site and the customer was fully satisfied. Our team of 5 really enjoyed this project at this most unusual site, making company history at the same time.

Unfortunately the main bearing supporting the 230 ton upper part of the telescope was deteriorating and had to be replaced.

Aircraft carrier A shipyard contracted Mammoet to place the upper section onto an aircraft carrier under construction. Given the size and weight of the load we used 2 large mobile cranes for a tandem lift.

“An aircraft carrier under construction” LOCATION: ROSYTH, UK JOB: LIFTING A SHIP SECTION CHALLENGE: TANDEM LIFT

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Civil

Dutch flyover The city of Haarlem decided to build a major flyover (overpass) to improve access to an industrial estate and reduce heavy traffic through a residential area. Mammoet was commissioned to transport and install the 100 concrete beams required for this project, with weights ranging from 150 to 190 tons. The time window available for this work was very tight. We started by collecting the heaviest beams from the factory using our pontoons and tugs and transporting them to Haarlem by canal. Once we arrived there the challenging part of the job began: transporting them through the city, which meant removing traffic lights and street furniture to create enough space. The installation of the heavy beams went very well, apart from some delays due to bad weather. For a later part of the project we transported a batch of smaller beams from the factory to the job site by road. The use of these precast beams allowed the city of Haarlem to improve the traffic flow without a long construction period or extended road closures.

“No extended road closures”

LOCATION: HAARLEM, THE NETHERLANDS JOB: INSTALLING CONCRETE BEAMS CHALLENGE: TIME WINDOW

Replacing a bridge … in one night A bridge in Ottawa needed replacement and as it was on one of the country’s busiest highways the job had to be done in one night. The new bridge sections were built adjacent to the existing bridge, which took a year. In one night Mammoet then removed the 2 old bridge sections and replaced them by the new ones, all using SPMTs. The heaviest load weighed 635 tons. The ballet performed by the SPMTs was watched by many local residents, the media and civil engineering students and was also presented as a webcast. The job was completed 3 hours ahead of schedule, to the satisfaction of our customer and the highway authorities.

“SPMT ballet”

LOCATION: OTTAWA, CANADA JOB: HEAVY TRANSPORT CHALLENGE: TIGHT SCHEDULE


Heavy lifts inside a tunnel

Civil

“Within the small clearance of the tunnel”

LOCATION: MODANE, FRANCE JOB: ASSEMBLING A TBM CHALLENGE: WORKING INSIDE A TUNNEL

The main contractor is drilling an 18 kilometer tunnel between France and Italy. We were contracted to provide a gantry lifting system for handling the twenty heaviest components of the tunnel-boring machine (TBM), weighing 50 to 250 tons. As all the work had to be carried out inside another tunnel there were severe space constraints. We built a gantry with 4 independent lifting points, with telescopic legs on electric bogies and 4 strand jacks. This system was a perfect match for the site conditions and weight of the TBM components. The four-point lift system proved to be very versatile and could turn components into the vertical position within the small clearance of the tunnel. We also used an SPMT to bring an 8-meter TBM shield into the tunnel. The whole project went very smoothly thanks to the efforts of our engineers and the team on site.

Beer tank convoy A brewery had ordered 6 huge new beer tanks. Mammoet transported them 108 kilometers from a port to the site. The route was quite a challenge as it led through busy urban areas and we could only travel at night. Consequently, the trip took nine days. The heavy transport vehicles were accompanied by 40 other vehicles including many trucks from the utility companies, escort trucks, police, etc. As the total height of the tanks on the trailers was 10 meters no fewer than 1,600 overhead lines had to be removed temporarily. Once on site Mammoet used a mobile crane to install the tanks. The whole project required extensive planning and coordination with the authorities and other operators. The preparations paid off as the project went very smoothly and the tanks now hold over 8 million bottles of beer.

“The whole project required extensive planning and coordination with the authorities and other operators” LOCATION: TORONTO, CANADA JOB: HEAVY TRANSPORT CHALLENGE: 1,600 OVERHEAD LINES

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Civil

1,100 ton railroad bridge As the old railroad bridge across the Illinois river had a clear span of less than 39 meters it was frequently hit by barges passing under it. Mammoet installed a new bridge with a total length of 106 meters to provide a much larger clear span. The new bridge was built on a trestle on one bank, to avoid interfering with barge traffic on the canal. Once it was finished the old bridge was removed, which took less than 24 hours. The new bridge was then launched across the river by skidding, until it landed on a second trestle on the opposite bank. It was then skidded sideways about 13 meters to align with the existing railroad tracks. We used 12 of our 600 ton hydraulic skid shoes and a range of hydraulic equipment. The skidding operation was completed within 24 hours, to an accuracy of around 6 millimeters.

“The old bridge was frequently hit by barges” LOCATION: MORRIS, ILLINOIS, USA JOB: LAUNCHING THE BRIDGE BY SKIDDING CHALLENGE: SHORT TIME WINDOW

Cycle bridge across the junction To separate cyclists and motor vehicles at a busy junction it was decided to build a cycle bridge across the junction. Mammoet installed all 14 elements, each weighing 100 tons, in one day. We started early in the morning to ensure that we finished the work by the evening, as the road had to be opened again for the heavy traffic to a local soccer stadium. This job called for 3 mobile cranes, with capacities from 200 to 400 tons. Generally, 2 cranes positioned a bridge element while the third crane was repositioned, ready for the next element.

“This job called for 3 mobile cranes”

LOCATION: ENSCHEDE, THE NETHERLANDS JOB: CONCRETE BRIDGE INSTALLATION CHALLENGE: TIME PRESSURE


Waldschlösschenbrücke “Warming up 1,800 timbers”

The new Waldschlösschenbrücke crosses the river Elbe and connects the north of Dresden and the areas to the east. It is a large structure: length 140 meters, width 28 meters, weight 1,800 tons. This project is an excellent example of Mammoet’s versatility as we had to use a gantry, skidding and jacking equipment, SPMTs, barges and cranes. We started by erecting four 35 meter gantry towers with 900 ton strand jacks. These were used to place the bridge on the skidding system. The skids and SPMTs were then used to move the bridge 120 meters and load its front end onto a 5 meter high support structure on 2 linked barges. The bridge was then moved across the river. The combined use of winches to move the barges at the front end and the SPMTs at the tail end allowed us to position the bridge accurately despite the strong current. Finally the bridge was picked up with climbing jacks and installed in its final position. The weather posed a real challenge: it was freezing all the time, sometimes even down to -15˚C. This meant that we had to warm up no fewer than 1,800 jacking timbers to thaw and dry them. Despite the cold, the project attracted over 30,000 people who watched our work.

Civil

LOCATION: DRESDEN, GERMANY JOB: INSTALLING A BRIDGE CHALLENGE: COLD WEATHER, SIZE OF THE STRUCTURE

Rotterdam Central Station

LOCATION: ROTTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS JOB: HEAVY LIFTING CHALLENGE: CITY CENTRE LOCATION

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Rotterdam Central Station is being extended into one of the busiest railway and underground stations in Europe. A project like this called for an equally large crane, so Mammoet provided an LR 1750 fitted with a 63 meter main boom and 91 meter jib – quite a sight in a busy city centre location. The crane operated at a maximum radius of 125 meters. Many lifts were made across the busy square in front of the station so we mostly worked at night. As the crane was sited next to the underground station a special foundation had to be built for it, with 68 piles going down 28 meters into the ground. For the occasion the crane was named after Lee Towers, a well-known Dutch singer with a long career – who was previously a crane driver. Mammoet also provided several other mobile cranes for this project.


Civil

High level building The design for the entrance to these horticultural exhibition grounds included an imposing entrance building. The 4 towers and 2 bridges were built and finished (including all the tiling, installation of sanitary fittings, etc.) at ground level and Mammoet was contracted to lift them in place. Because of the site layout this meant that we had to hand the towers over from one crane to the other. We also had to pick one end of the bridges up by crane while the other end was moved closer to the installation site by SPMTs. Once the site move was completed we could lift the bridges in place on the towers. Thanks to the effective preparation the whole job went smoothly and took less than 3 days.

“Hand over the towers”

Parisian bridge We installed a pedestrian bridge in Compiègne, just to the north of Paris. The bridge had been assembled on the quayside. We used one of our barges fitted with an MPC 1200 crane. The first bridge section could be lifted straight into place. The second section had been assembled further away and first had to be relocated with the assistance of a mobile crane. The third section had to be turned round, using an auxiliary barge, before it could be installed. The whole project went smoothly and according to schedule.

LOCATION: COMPIÈGNE, FRANCE JOB: INSTALLING A BRIDGE CHALLENGE: RESTRICTED SPACE

LOCATION: VENLO, THE NETHERLANDS JOB: BUILDING ASSEMBLY CHALLENGE: SIZE OF THE LOADS

“Turned round with a barge”


Network Rail in the UK are working on a key project to double the number of tracks at London Bridge Station to remove a major bottleneck in the network. This project requires extensive construction works in a very busy part of London with major roads and a large market in a historic building (a listed monument). Other complications included underground rail tunnels, cables and pipes. This meant that the construction of a the new bridge across the road junction was particularly difficult. The main contractor decided to build the bridge on top of a recently constructed viaduct and then move it into place. The new bridge had a weight of 1,080 tons, a length of 70 meters and a height of 6 meters. It was built in 3 sections on top of the viaduct. Once a section was finished it was skidded out of the way by Mammoet. The complete bridge was then skidded to the end of the viaduct. Launching the bridge and moving it across the site took a combination of SPMTs, heavy duty jacks, skids and our new JS500 jacking tower system. The front of the bridge was picked up by jacking towers on top of SPMTs while the rear still rested on the skidding system. This way the bridge was moved 70 meters to span across the junction. During this operating it also had to be shifted sideways on a dedicated transverse skidding system to stay clear of the surrounding buildings.

Civil

Finally the tail end of the bridge was supported by another set of JS500 towers and the structure was installed on its bearings. We completed the work 5 hours ahead of schedule. It was a real challenge to undertake this project in a congested, historic area which is visited by many tourists. Furthermore, the job had to be done within 60 hours. Our work attracted crowds watching the progress of the bridge across the junction.

Borough market bridge “To be done within 60 hours” LOCATION: LONDON, UK JOB: BRIDGE INSTALLATION CHALLENGE: CONGESTED SITE, TIME

Crane on the roof “Lift a crane in place with a larger crane”

LOCATION: ROTTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS JOB: DISMANTLING A LIFTING SHED CHALLENGE: UNUSUAL CRANE LOCATION

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The renowned Erasmus Medical Centre in Rotterdam was recently extended by another tower. The structure was built from precast units which were lifted in place from a lifting shed at the top of the tower, which moved up as construction proceeded. Once the tower was finished, the shed was around 80 meters above ground level and had to be dismantled. So, how do you go about that? Mammoet’s answer was easy: just put a crane on the roof! As this project required numerous lifts over a 5-week period we decided to place a 55 ton mobile crane on top of the structure. This crane was lifted in place by one of our large LR 1600-2 crawler cranes fitted with a 96 meter main boom and 78 meter luffing jib.


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Fokko Ringersma, Managing Director Mammoet Salvage:

“United experience pays off” When we started up, six years ago, Mammoet Salvage was fully occupied by a single job. In the past year we’ve been working on four projects in different parts of the world simultaneously. This clearly proves that Mammoet’s salvage division has developed into a key player operating at the top of the worldwide salvage market. A large part of this success is due to the added value of ‘united experience, smart solutions’ which our salvage business can offer, as a Mammoet subsidiary. This approach has again proven to be highly effective this year, when working on a range of projects. During the course of the year Arjan Herrebout was appointed as a director of Mammoet Salvage. Fokko Ringersma

Marine

Successful company looking for salvage specialists   Because of its rapid growth Mammoet Salvage is looking for experienced personnel such as salvors and naval architects to join the company. People with the right qualities and experience who are flexible and prepared to work abroad when required. Because the world is our arena. Visit our website for job opportunities and for more information. www.mammoetsalvage.com

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Fokko Ringersma, Managing Director Mammoet Salvage, reminds us: “When we set up Mammoet Salvage our idea was not to follow the rest of the market chasing routine jobs but to distinguish ourselves through engineered salvage operations. Using the united experience and smart solutions we can offer as a subsidiary of Mammoet, a much larger company. This year that has paid off in Chili, Canada and the Gulf of Mexico, with challenging projects which have come our way because of this added value, often despite us not being the lowest bidder. Customers are prepared to pay more for a smarter solution which provides more certainty. That’s the reputation we’ve built up.”

Capacity and versatility Ringersma explained that the united experience which has helped Mammoet Salvage be so successful relates to a number of advantages. “Our network, with three fully equipped bases at Mammoet facilities in Singapore, Schiedam and Houston provides worldwide 24/7 immediate emergency response services and the rapid deployment of a large and versatile range of equipment and specialist personnel. We can also draw on dozens of other Mammoet branches throughout the world and the numerous engineers within

the company.” He also mentioned the managerial decisiveness and financial resources of Mammoet which allow for rapid changes in direction where necessary. This enables Mammoet Salvage to offer smart solutions which set it apart from competitors. Competitors who usually offer traditional solutions and cannot always mobilize the required resources quickly. “We now have a presence in the market which simply cannot be ignored. Consequently, we are invited to bid on all the major tender.” In tenders, Mammoet Salvage is often among the select group of bidders considered in the final round. Ringersma: “Our bids are occasionally rejected for the reason: ‘Your solution is superior, but exceeds our budget.’ We accept that. But we have never been rejected on technical grounds. That would be a real slap in the face.”

Distinguishing services Mammoet Salvage is expanding its field work capacity and has 60 salvage personnel on the regular payroll, who are divided between the three bases. At the busiest period of 2011, when they worked on four projects at once, they had 120 people working for them. One of the projects is clearing a huge ships’ graveyard in Mauritania, which will take over a year.

Environmental protection is the key to this job. The issue is not so much the scrap metal, but the asbestos, oil and chemicals still on board the ships. To clear the wrecks efficiently, with a minimum environmental impact, Mammoet Salvage is providing a full service package, from recovering the ships and taking them to shore through to disassembly, separation and disposal of wastes at a dedicated waste separation facility built on shore. “Our bid emphasized recycling and processing waste streams rather than the physical removal of the wrecks.” As Ringersma put it: “Anyone can salvage those boats, but nobody equaled our comprehensive plan for processing and recycling the waste streams. When we lift a ship up, we place a containment around with a special edge to prevent the pollution escaping. It is then taken to the scrap facility on shore where we disassemble the wreck, remove fishing nets, polyurethane foam and oil-contaminated wastes, separate the oil and remove the asbestos using all necessary precautions. We have set up a complete asbestos

24/7 Emergency...


Smart solutions, united experience

laboratory on site. There are also bins to separate the wastes, and a weighbridge and we provide security. We do all the work in accordance with strict European environmental standards. In addition to that we have set up a hospital, we are employing local personnel and training them, and informing local residents about environmental awareness. In short, we provide a comprehensive package which sets us apart from the competition.”

Smart environmental solutions The project in Mauritania illustrates the growing interest in the environment and solutions which respect it. Mammoet Salvage wants to maintain its lead in this area, not only by being green and operating accordingly, but by taking the next step and offering additional services to customers. “Mauritania is a good example. We take the environment seriously, and that includes our own operation. We are one of the few operators to use powerpacks which meet all emission requirements. Others are often still using noisy, smoky units.” Ringersma has noticed that the market appreciates

the smart environmental solutions. “The Canadian coast guard commissioned us to remove the oil from the Miner, a laker which was beached in Nova Scotia. One of the reasons we got this emergency response job is that the customer was impressed by our earlier work, when two years ago we recovered a tanker truck from a water depth of 350 meters in a nature reserve in West Canada, using an innovative method, without any harm to the environment.”

based on Mammoet’s huge resources. We were given that job specifically because of the guaranteed contingency plans. That’s because our people at good at analyzing what-if scenarios. For us it is actually fairly straightforward. If the required pull is not enough we can simply deploy another 5,000 tons. And if that’s not enough we can easily go up to 10,000 tons additional pull. That’s where the others give up. We don’t suffer from that, with the almost unlimited equipment resources of Mammoet.”

Unlimited resources The job in Nova Scotia again demonstrated the strength of the united experience. “Without the network of Mammoet Canada-East we would never have been informed and been able to get the job arranged so quickly.” This advantage applied even more to an emergency response job Mammoet Salvage undertook in the Gulf of Mexico. Out at sea, a flotel (floating hotel) had capsized and hit an other rig. Mammoet Salvage was able to respond quickly and effectively, working with Mammoet USA. “This job included all hazards associated with salvage operations. And to top it all, everything was happening over a live oil pipeline,” explained Ringersma. “Together with Mammoet USA we developed an effective plan which fully covered all contingencies,

call +31 (0)10 204 24 45

Another high point Ringersma likes to refer to is the recovery of a costly research vessel in Chile. The brand new ship, which cost tens of millions to build, was thrown on land by the tsunami following a heavy earthquake. This happened only a few hours before the scheduled launching ceremony. Amazingly, the ship suffered little damage. Again, the united experience, smart solutions approached paid off. “The combination of Mammoet engineering and their SPMTs and our years of salvage expertise allowed us to develop a unique concept. The customer was prepared to pay more for this and get a guarantee that we would return the costly vessel to the dry dock without damage. It all started with these tremendous jobs, which nobody else can do, using the inventiveness, versatility,

Marine

resources and global network of Mammoet. This has proven to be a formula for success and allowed Mammoet Salvage to become one of the world’s leading salvage companies.”

“We take the environment seriously, and that includes our own operation”

Arjan Herrebout - Director Mammoet Salvage


“Safely recovered the MS Waldhof”

Marine

Sulfuric acid tanker

LOCATION: RIVER RHINE, GERMANY JOB: SHIP SALVAGE CHALLENGE: HAZARDOUS CARGO, EXPLOSION HAZARD

A tanker carrying 2,400 tons of concentrated sulfuric acid capsized and sank in the Rhine, Western Europe’s major waterway. The wreck restricted shipping on the river for weeks, at times leading to a backlog of 400 vessels. The accident led to the loss of 2 lives.

posed an explosion hazard. Consequently we first had to inert the tanks with nitrogen. Tests then showed that there was dilute acid floating on top of the concentrated acid so we lowered submersible pumps into the tanks to obtain a uniform concentration.

Mammoet deployed 2 sheerlegs (AMSTERDAM, GRIZZLY), a crane pontoon (ATLAS) and a range of other salvage equipment and resources for dealing with the extremely hazardous acid. We started by pulling wire ropes under the vessel and supported it with 2 sheerlegs. This allowed us to investigate the situation by drilling holes through the hull and checking the tank contents. We discovered that chemical reactions had produced hydrogen which

We managed to pump around 550 tons of the acid from the tanker into a second tanker. However, the distortion of the hull was so severe that in consultation with the authorities it was decided it would be safer to gradually discharge the acid into the river. A monitoring vessel nearby confirmed that this did not have a significant impact on the environment. Finally we refloated the vessel and moved it to a mooring.

Fuel tanker

“Other jetties in use”

An inland waterway tanker was being loaded with fuel at a refinery when it caught fire, exploded and sank. We deployed our ATLAS crane pontoon for the salvage operation. As many parts of the tanker contained fuel or a flammable mixture the project had to be carried out with the greatest care and the vessel had to be inerted. We could then offload the cargo, remove protruding parts from the tanker and remove it from the site. During the salvage operation other jetties at the refinery remained in use which required additional safety precautions.

LOCATION: LINGEN, GERMANY JOB: SALVAGE CHALLENGE: FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD

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Loading bridge Mammoet installed a loading bridge (length 54 meters, width 6 meters, height 6 meters, weight 200 tons) at a bulk terminal in Amsterdam. We used 2 sheerlegs, 2 tugs and a range of rigging.

LOCATION: AMSTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS JOB: HEAVY LIFTING CHALLENGE: FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD


Transport, heavy lift and salvage services

Marine

2nd Coentunnel LOCATION: AMSTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS JOB: PLACING IMMERSED TUNNEL SEGMENTS CHALLENGE: SIZE OF THE TUNNEL SECTIONS

The Amsterdam ring road has a serious bottleneck where the Coentunnel carries it under a major waterway on the west side of the city. The second tunnel will improve the traffic flow. The immersed tunnel was built in sections in a construction dock and fitted with bulkheads. Each section had a length of 180 meters, width of 30 meters, height of 9 meters and weight of 48,000 tons. The sections were floated and then towed 130 kilometers along waterways and the North Sea to the construction site by Mammoet Maritime. We used our multipurpose pontoon SCHELDE, a pusher tug and several conventional tugs. Once at the site of the tunnel we removed the towing provisions and prepared the sections for immersion. The sections were then immersed with the assistance of our AMSTERDAM sheerlegs and other vessels.

“Immersing 48,000 ton sections”

First frigate launched

LOCATION: LORIENT, FRANCE JOB: FLOAT-OFF CHALLENGE: LARGE TIDAL RANGE

“Special keel blocks and saddles”

Our customer had built their first frigate in a building on shore. The vessel was built on special keel blocks and special saddles to accommodate our SPMTs. We moved the vessel from the building on 2 x 36 axle lines of SPMT and then loaded it onto our SCHELDE multipurpose pontoon. Because of the 5 meter tidal range, the pontoon’s own ballasting pumps were supplemented by eight auxiliary pumps. The SPMTs were then driven off the pontoon and the pontoon was towed to a dry dock where the frigate was floated off. The schedule was quite tight due to the tides, but everything went smoothly as a result of the good cooperation between Mammoet, the customer and local subcontractors.

Bicycle bridge Mammoet transported a set of concrete units for a bicycle bridge across a canal near Brielle, a historic town in the west of the Netherlands. We started in Vlissingen where we used a RoRo system and 2 mobile cranes to load the units onto our pontoon. The largest unit had a length of 118 meters and weighed 505 tons. Once we reached the site in Brielle we installed the bridge units using 3 sheerlegs. The bridge includes a bascule section which can open to allow larger vessels to use the canal.

“Using 3 sheerlegs”

LOCATION: VLISSINGEN AND BRIELLE, THE NETHERLANDS JOB: BRIDGE TRANSPORT AND INSTALLATION CHALLENGE: WEIGHT AND SIZE OF THE COMPONENTS


The heavy lifting and transport specialist Mammoet is the world’s leading tailor-made heavy lifting and multimodal transport solutions specialist. Our core business is the transport, shipping, installation (including horizontal and vertical positioning) and removal of heavy or large objects, to and from any location, onshore and offshore. Maintenance lifting services and plant shutdowns and the worldwide trade in new and used equipment are also one of Mammoet’s core activities. Mammoet’s activities are focused on the petrochemical and mining industries, civil engineering projects, the power generation sector, offshore and marine projects. The engineering skills, experience, thousands of highly skilled professionals and a vast fleet of state-ofthe-art equipment, combined with high quality and safety standards, have made Mammoet a market leader, setting trends and records around the world.

“Mammoet’s objective: to be the best full-service provider of engineered heavy-lifting and multimodal transport in the global market – for the benefit of our customers, shareholders and employees.”

Petrochemical

Mining

Mammoet’s operations in the petrochemical and chemical industries largely relate to maintenance work, the replacement of plant modules, complete overhauls and the expansion or construction of production sites.

Mammoet’s services to the opencast and deep mining industry include transporting and installing large modular plants at remote mine sites, general lifting services and supporting maintenance operations.

Power

Mammoet has established a formidable reputation for itself in all parts of the power industry, from fossil fuel and nuclear plants to facilities using renewable energy sources.

Offshore

Mammoet’s activities in the offshore industry include the accurate and safe implementation of transport solutions by land and by water, load-ins and loadouts, and the assembly of extremely large and heavy items.

Civil

Marine

Experience of multimodal transport by road, rail and water, together with equipment for lifting, skidding and jacking heavy loads ensure Mammoet’s position as a full-service provider in the market for civil projects and infrastructure works.

Mammoet offers specialist heavy lifting and transport services at sea, in coastal waters and on inland waterways. With the division, Mammoet Salvage, and the subsidiary, Mammoet Maritime, Mammoet has proven its ability throughout the world.

Global service, local presence Mammoet has clients and projects in all parts of the world. To keep the lines of communication short and to stay abreast of the local markets, Mammoet has operating companies throughout Europe, the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Australia. Global or complicated projects and global logistics are handled centrally from our home base in Schiedam, the Netherlands. As much as possible everything else is handled locally. This structure enables us to act swiftly, effectively and cost-efficiently in your local market, while offering the benefit of a central knowledge and experience center for more demanding aspects and projects.

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Mammoet Europe was awarded the contract for the transportation of four heavy components to a power station. A complete generating line consisting of a gas turbine Mammoet was awarded the contract for the transportation the installation of two (310 tons), steamand turbine (200 tons) and generator (342 tons) was transported from the HDS Reactors at a refinery in Lithuania. Both reactors, Heavy with a length of 32 meters and a Mammoet Lift Terminal to the station’s machinery hall. In addition to this, Mammoet provided the transport and placement on the foundations of a transweight of 515 tons, had to be transported over a routealso of 155 kilometers from the port former (236 tons). of Klaipeda to the site.

Petrochemical

Petrochemical

Petrochemical

page 6

page 6

page 6

Power

Power

Power

page 16

page 14

page 14

Offshore

Offshore

Offshore

page 26

page 22

page 24

Civil

Civil

Civil

page 32

page 30

page 32 Worldwide specialists

Marine page 36

Worldwide specialists

of an Absorber Stripper by Mammoet Canada. The transport configuration Multimodal transportation of a reactor (520 Transport tons) by Mammoet Venezuela. in heavy lifting and transport was in heavy lifting and transport the Tobolsk Polymer project in Siberia, Russian 6.5 meters wide by 108 meters long and 8.5Heavy meterslifting high and with transportation a gross vehiclefor weight of Marine Marine Federation. Read more about it on page 10. 730 tons. The total distance travelled was 1,200 kilometers. page 40 page 34

Worldwide specialists in heavy lifting and transport

Mammoet World Missing? You can order available back issues by sending an e-mail to corporate.communication@mammoet.com, stating which issue you wish to receive, together with your name and the address to which the Mammoet World(s) should be sent.

Please visit our website for Mammoet job opportunities and for more information and addresses all over the world. In this magazine you’ll find a card with telephone numbers of all our offices.

www.mammoet.com

Worldwide specialists in heavy lifting and transport


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